4,105 results match your criteria Behavioral neuroscience[Journal]


Hippocampal injection of the exercise-induced myokine irisin suppresses acute stress-induced neurobehavioral impairment in a sex-dependent manner.

Behav Neurosci 2020 Jun;134(3):233-247

Department of Biological Sciences.

Stress disrupts a variety of neural processes, including reducing levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the hippocampus. In contrast, exercise increases BDNF and is beneficial for health and cognition. Irisin is a myokine that is released into circulation during exercise. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/bne0000367DOI Listing

Context-dependent odor learning requires the anterior olfactory nucleus.

Behav Neurosci 2020 May 7. Epub 2020 May 7.

Department of Neurobiology and Behavior.

Learning to associate the context in which a stimulus occurs is an important aspect of animal learning. We propose that the association of an olfactory stimulus with its multisensory context is mediated by projections from ventral hippocampus (vHC) networks to the anterior olfactory nucleus (AON). Using a contextually cued olfactory discrimination task, rats were trained to associate 2 olfactory stimuli with different responses depending on visuospatial context. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/bne0000371DOI Listing

A role for neurogenesis in probabilistic reward learning.

Behav Neurosci 2020 May 7. Epub 2020 May 7.

Department of Psychology.

Rewards are often unreliable and optimal choice requires behavioral flexibility and learning about the probabilistic nature of uncertain rewards. Probabilistic learning occurs over multiple trials, often without conscious knowledge, and is traditionally associated with striatal function. While the hippocampus is classically recognized for its role in memory for individual experiences, recent work indicates that it is also involved in probabilistic forms of learning but little is known about the features that support such learning. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/bne0000370DOI Listing

An investigation into the nonlinear coupling between CA1 layers and the dentate gyrus.

Behav Neurosci 2020 Apr 16. Epub 2020 Apr 16.

Engineering School of Sustainable Infrastructure and Environment.

Although the activity from the dentate gyrus is known to have strong connections with other hippocampal layers, the functionality of these connections, that is, the degree to which it drives activity in the downstream regions of the hippocampus, is not well understood. This question is particularly relevant for mesoscale localfield potential (LFP) rhythms such as gamma oscillations. Following the hypothesis that fundamental features of the LFP are consistent with turbulent dynamics, we investigate the crosslayer relationship between the CA1 layers and the dentate gyrus as a function of running speed. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/bne0000366DOI Listing

Early life nutritional stress affects song learning but not underlying neural circuitry in zebra finches.

Behav Neurosci 2020 Jun 30;134(3):222-232. Epub 2020 Mar 30.

Department of Psychology, Program in Neuroscience, Lafayette College.

Early life stress negatively impacts behavior and underlying neural circuitry across species. The present study investigated the effects of nutritional stress (NS), which increases parental foraging, on song quality in males, song preferences in females, and the size and number of cells in song and auditory regions of the zebra finch brain. We hypothesized that NS would decrease song quality in males and decrease preference for high quality song in females. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/bne0000362DOI Listing

Sex difference in depression: Which animal models mimic it.

Behav Neurosci 2020 Jun 30;134(3):248-266. Epub 2020 Mar 30.

Key Laboratory of the Ministry of Education for Medicinal Resources and Natural Pharmaceutical Chemistry, National Engineering Laboratory for Resource Development of Endangered Chinese Crude Drugs in Northwest China, College of Life Sciences, Shaanxi Normal University.

Depression affects both women and men, but women are 2 times more susceptible to the incidence of depression. Although a number of studies report sex differences in stress responses, it remains unclear which animal models of depression can better mimic the sex difference in human depression. The majority of stress models used male rodents whereas fewer studies included females. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/bne0000369DOI Listing

Gestational exposure to a ketogenic diet increases sociability in CD-1 mice.

Behav Neurosci 2020 Mar 30. Epub 2020 Mar 30.

Neuroscience Program, Trinity College.

Postnatal administration of high-fat, low-carbohydrate ketogenic diets (KDs) is an established and effective treatment option for refractory epilepsy, with more recently identified therapeutic potential across a wide range of preclinical models of neurological and psychiatric disorders. However, the impact of gestational exposure to a KD (GKD) on offspring development remains unclear. Previous work has found that GKD exposure reduces depression- and anxiety-like behaviors in CD-1 mice, whereas postnatal KD improves sociability in several different rodent models of autism. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/bne0000368DOI Listing

Emotional responses in monkeys differ depending on the stimulus type, sex, and neonatal amygdala lesion status.

Behav Neurosci 2020 Apr;134(2):153-165

Yerkes National Primate Research Center, Emory University.

The amygdala plays an essential role in evaluating social information, threat detection, and learning fear associations. Yet, most of that knowledge comes from studies in adult humans and animals with a fully developed amygdala. Given the considerable protracted postnatal development of the amygdala, it is important to understand how early damage to this structure may impact the long-term development of behavior. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/bne0000360DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7100995PMC

Dissociating the effects of dopamine D2 receptors on effort-based versus value-based decision making using a novel behavioral approach.

Behav Neurosci 2020 Apr;134(2):101-118

Department of Psychiatry, Columbia University.

Cost-benefit decision making is essential for organisms to adapt to their ever-changing environment. Most studies of cost-benefit decision making involve choice conditions in which effort and value are varied simultaneously. This prevents identification of the aspects of cost-benefit decision making that are affected by experimental manipulations. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/bne0000361DOI Listing

Timing impairments in early Alzheimer's disease: Evidence from a mouse model.

Behav Neurosci 2020 Apr;134(2):82-100

School of Psychology, University of Nottingham.

A key characteristic of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is loss of episodic memory-memory for what happened, where and when; this final aspect--is the focus of the present article. Although timing deficits have been reported in AD patients, few parallel studies have been performed in animals, compromising the translational potential of these findings. We looked for timing impairments in the APPswe/PS1dE9 mouse model of AD at 4-5 months of age, before significant plaques have developed. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/bne0000359DOI Listing

Middle age, a key time point for changes in birdsong and human voice.

Behav Neurosci 2020 Jun 12;134(3):208-221. Epub 2020 Mar 12.

Department of Neuroscience and Speech.

Voice changes caused by natural aging and neurodegenerative diseases are prevalent in the aging population and diminish quality of life. Most treatments involve behavioral interventions that target the larynx because of a limited understanding of central brain mechanisms. The songbird offers a unique entry point into studying age-related changes in vocalizations because of a well-characterized neural circuitry for song that shares homology to human vocal control areas. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/bne0000363DOI Listing

Retrosplenial cortex damage impairs unimodal sensory preconditioning.

Behav Neurosci 2020 Jun 9;134(3):198-207. Epub 2020 Mar 9.

Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences.

The retrosplenial cortex (RSC) is positioned at the interface between cortical sensory regions and the structures that compose the medial temporal lobe memory system. It has recently been suggested that 1 functional role of the RSC involves the formation of associations between cues in the environment (stimulus-stimulus [S-S] learning; Bucci & Robinson, 2014). This suggestion is based, in part, on the finding that lesions or temporary inactivation of the RSC impair sensory preconditioning. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/bne0000365DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7244381PMC

Binge eating for sucrose is time of day dependent and independent of food restriction: Effects on mesolimbic structures.

Behav Neurosci 2020 Jun 9;134(3):267-281. Epub 2020 Mar 9.

Department of Anatomy.

Binge eating behavior (BEB) is the most common condition among eating disorders. In animal models, binge eating behavior is defined as overconsumption in a brief time interval and it develops as a progressive increase in food intake along time. It is triggered by restricting food access to regular chow or to palatable food and is associated with dopamine release from the ventral tegmental area to the nucleus accumbens. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/bne0000364DOI Listing
June 2020
2.728 Impact Factor

Involvement of the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis in initial conditioning and rapid reconditioning following extinction of contextual fear.

Behav Neurosci 2020 Jun 5;134(3):177-186. Epub 2020 Mar 5.

Department of Behavioral Neuroscience.

Although a great deal is known about neurobiological mechanisms of initial conditioning and extinction, relatively little is known about mechanisms involved in the return of behavior following extinction. In this article, we examine the effects of temporarily inactivating the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) on initial conditioning and postextinction reconditioning. We investigate effects in unsignaled contextual fear conditioning, in which animals initially receive strong contextual conditioning, followed by three sessions of nonreinforced context exposure (extinction), and then receive a single context-shock reconditioning trial. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/bne0000358DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7244369PMC

Medial prefrontal lesions impair performance in an operant delayed nonmatch to sample working memory task.

Behav Neurosci 2020 Jun 5;134(3):187-197. Epub 2020 Mar 5.

Department of Psychiatry, Columbia University.

Cognitive functions, such as working memory, are disrupted in most psychiatric disorders. Many of these processes are believed to depend on the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). Traditionally, maze-based behavioral tasks, which have a strong exploratory component, have been used to study the role of the mPFC in working memory in mice. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/bne0000357DOI Listing

Interaction of spatial source separation, fundamental frequency, and vowel pairing in a sequential informational masking paradigm in Mongolian gerbils.

Behav Neurosci 2020 Apr 23;134(2):119-132. Epub 2020 Jan 23.

Cluster of Excellence Hearing4all and Division for Animal Physiology and Behavior, Department of Neuroscience, School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Carl von Ossietzky University Oldenburg.

Informational masking (IM) defines the compromised ability to perceive and analyze signals from a single source in a clutter of other sounds even if there is no interference between these signals' excitation patterns in the inner ear. IM is affected by the similarity between target and masker and the variation of stimulus features from trial to trial, that is, stimulus uncertainty, both modulating discrimination thresholds. We applied a sequential IM paradigm measuring Mongolian gerbils' sensitivity to detect level increments between constant-level standard (reference) and deviant (target) vowels with a level increase in a background of level-varying distracting (masker) vowels. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/bne0000356DOI Listing

Early stress and waiting to respond versus waiting to receive.

Behav Neurosci 2020 Apr 23;134(2):166-176. Epub 2020 Jan 23.

Department of Psychology.

Chronic social stress in early puberty results in enhanced impulsive action-in particular, decreased action inhibition. We address possible effects of early stress on the capacity to wait to respond, the other form of impulsive action. Male golden hamsters were exposed daily to aggressive adults from postnatal Day 28 to Day 42. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/bne0000355DOI Listing

Addiction vulnerability and the processing of significant cues: Sign-, but not goal-, tracker perceptual sensitivity relies on cue salience.

Behav Neurosci 2020 Apr 9;134(2):133-143. Epub 2020 Jan 9.

Department of Psychology.

The identification of broadly defined psychological traits that bestow vulnerability for the manifestation of addiction-like behaviors can guide the discovery of the neuronal mechanisms underlying the propensity for drug taking. Sign-tracking behavior in rats (STs) signifies the presence of a trait that predicts a relatively greater behavioral control of Pavlovian drug and reward cues than in rats that exhibit goal-tracking behavior (GTs). We previously demonstrated that relatively poor cholinergic-attentional control in STs is an essential component of the trait indexed by sign-tracking and that this trait aspect contributes to the relatively greater power of drug cues to control the behavior of STs. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/bne0000353DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7078022PMC

Perirhinal cortex inactivation produces retrieval deficits in fear extinction to a discontinuous visual stimulus.

Behav Neurosci 2020 Apr 9;134(2):144-152. Epub 2020 Jan 9.

Department of Psychology.

Several studies suggest that the perirhinal cortex (PER) may function to unitize stimulus components across time or modalities. While the PER has been shown to be critical for fear acquisition to discontinuous stimuli, the role of the PER in fear extinction memory has not been evaluated. The current study assessed the involvement of the PER during fear extinction training to a continuous or discontinuous conditioned stimulus (CS). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/bne0000351DOI Listing

Phasic modulation of hippocampal synaptic plasticity by theta rhythm.

Behav Neurosci 2020 Jan 9. Epub 2020 Jan 9.

Department of Physiology and Pharmacology.

Theta rhythm and long-term potentiation (LTP) are 2 remarkable discoveries. The theta rhythm is an oscillatory neural activity of 3-10 Hz in the hippocampus. LTP is implicated as a cellular basis of memory, but the function of theta oscillation in memory is not clear. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/bne0000354DOI Listing
January 2020

Social and olfactory experiences modify neuronal morphology of orbital frontal cortex.

Behav Neurosci 2020 Feb;134(1):59-68

Department of Neuroscience, University of Lethbridge.

Structural modifications in the dendritic morphology of neurons occur following many forms of experience, including exposure to drugs, complex housing, and training in specific behavioral tasks. The present study examined morphological changes in orbitofrontal (OFC) and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) neurons of female rats following experience with a variety of social partners or nonsocial olfactory stimuli. We reasoned that experience with various social partners or olfactory stimuli, and the associated behavioral adaptations, would drive structural modifications in prefrontal cortex neurons engaged by these stimuli. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/bne0000350DOI Listing
February 2020

Altered face scanning and arousal after orbitofrontal cortex lesion in adult rhesus monkeys.

Behav Neurosci 2020 Feb;134(1):45-58

Department of Neurobiology and Anatomy, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston.

To further assess orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) contribution to the processing of socioemotional signals, spontaneous scanning patterns and pupil diameter variations were measured while adult rhesus macaques with either bilateral lesions of OFC areas 11 and 13 (Group O-asp) or sham-operations (Group C) freely viewed pictures of neutral and expressive faces of conspecifics, of other nonhuman primates and humans, and of objects with and without facial features. As compared to Group C, Group O-asp displayed (a) increased overall spontaneous visual exploration and increased scanning of primate neutral faces regardless of species and face orientation (upright/inverted), (b) longer gazes at the eyes of faces and of objects with facial features, and (c) intact ability to discriminate emotional from neutral faces, but (d) altered scanning patterns at emotional macaque faces coupled with (e) increased pupil dilation for conspecific faces according to face emotion and orientation (profile/stare). Thus, the primate OFC appears essential in the attention to and processing of faces, especially attention to the eyes and arousal self-regulation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/bne0000342DOI Listing
February 2020

Sex differences in age-related impairments vary across cognitive and physical assessments in rats.

Behav Neurosci 2020 Apr 30;134(2):69-81. Epub 2019 Dec 30.

Department of Neuroscience and Institute on Aging.

Inclusion of female subjects in preclinical biomedical research is imperative for understanding mechanisms of age-related cognitive decline, as more than half of individuals older than 65 are female. In rodents, however, few behavioral and physical assessments have been conducted in both sexes within the same study. The current article documents data obtained from young and aged rats of both sexes that performed a battery of cognitive and physical assessments to examine for potential interactions between sex and age. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/bne0000352DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7078049PMC

Functional dissociations between subregions of the medial prefrontal cortex on the rodent touchscreen continuous performance test (rCPT) of attention.

Behav Neurosci 2020 Feb 12;134(1):1-14. Epub 2019 Dec 12.

Department of Psychology.

Converging evidence in humans, monkeys, and rodents suggests a functional dissociation of cognitive function along the dorso-ventral axis of the prefrontal cortex (PFC). Previous studies of attention suggest that the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) plays a role in target detection, whereas the prelimbic (PL) cortex is important for tests requiring the combined detection and discrimination of signals. We investigated the effect of discrete, quinolinic acid-induced lesions of subregions of the rat medial PFC (mPFC)-ACC, PL cortex, and infralimbic (IL) cortex-on attentional performance on the recently developed rodent touchscreen continuous performance test (rCPT). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/bne0000338DOI Listing
February 2020

The basolateral amygdala-medial prefrontal cortex circuitry regulates behavioral flexibility during appetitive reversal learning.

Behav Neurosci 2020 Feb 12;134(1):34-44. Epub 2019 Dec 12.

Department of Psychology.

Environmental cues can become predictors of food availability through Pavlovian conditioning. Two forebrain regions important in this associative learning are the basolateral amygdala (BLA) and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). Recent work showed the BLA-mPFC pathway is activated when a cue reliably signals food, suggesting the BLA informs the mPFC of the cue's value. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/bne0000349DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6944768PMC
February 2020

The medial prefrontal cortex is needed for resolving interference even when there are no changes in task rules and strategies.

Behav Neurosci 2020 Feb 2;134(1):15-20. Epub 2019 Dec 2.

Department of Psychology.

The prefrontal cortex (PFC) plays a key role in behavioral flexibility, and the ability to resolve conflict from shifting strategies, task rules or attentional demands seems to be a hallmark of PFC function. Conflict also occurs in the domain of memory and the PFC plays an important role in the ability to cope with interference between competing retrieval targets. Previous studies often involved both interference and changes in task demands, which makes it difficult to determine the degree to which mnemonic interference per se engages PFC processing. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/bne0000347DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6944745PMC
February 2020

Differential consequences of habitual responding in a mouse model of repetitive behavior.

Behav Neurosci 2020 Feb 14;134(1):21-33. Epub 2019 Nov 14.

Department of Psychiatry.

Restricted, repetitive behavior (RRB) is diagnostic for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and characteristic of a number of neurodevelopmental, psychiatric, and neurological disorders. RRB seen in ASD includes repetitive motor behavior and behaviors reflecting resistance to change and insistence on sameness. C58 mice provide a robust model of repetitive motor behavior and have shown resistance to change in a reversal learning task. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/bne0000348DOI Listing
February 2020
4 Reads

Lesions to the lateral mammillary nuclei disrupt spatial learning in rats.

Behav Neurosci 2019 Dec 24;133(6):624-633. Epub 2019 Oct 24.

Department of Psychology.

The head direction (HD) signal is thought to originate in the reciprocal connections between the dorsal tegmental nuclei (DTN) and the lateral mammillary nuclei (LMN) and lesions to these structures disrupt the HD signal in downstream structures. Lesions to the DTN also disrupt performance on spatial tasks where directional heading is thought to be important. In Experiment 1, rats with bilateral electrolytic lesions of the LMN and sham controls were trained on 2 tasks previously shown to be sensitive to DTN damage. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/bne0000344DOI Listing
December 2019
4 Reads

Mapping the estrous cycle to context-specific extinction memory.

Behav Neurosci 2019 Dec 10;133(6):614-623. Epub 2019 Oct 10.

Department of Psychology.

In Pavlovian renewal paradigms, intact female rats have previously failed to exhibit renewal of appetitive behavior after extinction. However, when treated with exogenous estradiol, female rats exhibit robust renewal behavior. The current study aims to investigate whether the estrous cycle can influence renewal of appetitive behaviors and activity in brain areas known to support the renewal effect. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/bne0000343DOI Listing
December 2019

Lesions of the head direction cell system impair direction discrimination.

Behav Neurosci 2019 Dec 3;133(6):602-613. Epub 2019 Oct 3.

Centre for Discovery Brain Sciences, University of Edinburgh.

Previous results suggest that directional information from the head direction cell circuit may inform hippocampal place cell firing when an animal is confronted with visually identical environments. To investigate whether such information might also be essential for spatial behavior, we tested adult, male Lister Hooded rats that had received either bilateral lateral mammillary nuclei (LMN) lesions or sham lesions on a four-way, conditional odor-location discrimination in compartments arranged at 60° to one another. We found that significantly fewer rats in the LMN lesion group were able to learn the task compared to the Sham group. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/bne0000341DOI Listing
December 2019

Delay activity in pigeon nidopallium caudolaterale during a variable-delay memory task.

Behav Neurosci 2019 Dec 29;133(6):563-568. Epub 2019 Aug 29.

Department of Psychology.

Neurons in the pigeon nidopallium caudolaterale (NCL) are important for the maintenance of information across delays as long as 3 s. In the current study, we recorded neural activity from the avian NCL of 3 birds trained on a working memory task with three different delay lengths intermixed within a session. We found that when the birds are unable to predict the upcoming delay length there is no evidence that NCL cells engage in temporal coding. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/bne0000339DOI Listing
December 2019
2.728 Impact Factor

Tadpole bioacoustics: Sound processing across metamorphosis.

Behav Neurosci 2019 Dec 26;133(6):586-601. Epub 2019 Aug 26.

Brown University.

Many species of anuran amphibians (frogs and toads) undergo metamorphosis, a developmental process during which external and internal body morphologies transform dramatically as the animal transitions to a new ecosystem (from aquatic to terrestrial) and develops new behavior patterns (from filter-feeding to active pursuit of moving prey; from mostly mute to highly vocal). All sensory systems transform to some extent during metamorphosis, even in those "primitive" anuran species that remain fully aquatic in adult life. In this article, I review what is known about the development of the auditory system in anuran tadpoles. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/bne0000340DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6856408PMC
December 2019

Mindfulness training reduces stress and amygdala reactivity to fearful faces in middle-school children.

Behav Neurosci 2019 Dec 26;133(6):569-585. Epub 2019 Aug 26.

Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

The impact of mindfulness training on stress and associated brain plasticity has been shown in adults, whereas the impact of such training in the developing brain remains unknown. To address this open question, 40 middle-school children were randomized to either mindfulness or coding training (active control) interventions during the school day for eight weeks. Outcome measures were ratings of self-perceived stress and right amygdala activation while viewing fearful, happy, and neutral facial expressions during functional MRI. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/bne0000337DOI Listing
December 2019
1 Read

Involvement of D1- and D2-like dopamine receptors within the rat nucleus accumbens in the maintenance of morphine rewarding properties in the rats.

Behav Neurosci 2019 Dec 19;133(6):556-562. Epub 2019 Aug 19.

Neuroscience Research Center.

Previous studies on drug abuse have shown that response to drug-associated cues exist during prolonged abstinence. In succession to previous investigations in our laboratory on morphine dependence and our research on acquisition and expression phases of morphine-conditioned place preference (CPP), in this study we attempt to determine the effects of intraaccumbal administration of SCH-23390, as a D1-like receptor antagonist, and sulpiride, as a D2-like receptor antagonist, in the maintenance of morphine-induced CPP in rats. Seventy-nine adult male Wistar rats weighing 200-280 g were bilaterally implanted with cannulas into the nucleus accumbens. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/bne0000336DOI Listing
December 2019

D1- and D2-like receptors in the dentate gyrus region of the hippocampus are involved in the reinstatement induced by a subthreshold dose of morphine and forced swim stress in extinguished morphine-CPP in rats.

Behav Neurosci 2019 Dec 15;133(6):545-555. Epub 2019 Aug 15.

Neuroscience Research Center, School of Medicine, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences.

Addiction to opioids is an important global problem. Published research has indicated the powerful rewarding effects of drug use, which in the case of opiates like morphine may lead to drug addiction and maladaptive decision making with negative social consequences. In-depth comprehension of the role of responsible mechanisms in addiction can lead us to better and more effective treatments for drug dependence. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/bne0000335DOI Listing
December 2019
1 Read

Histone deacetylase inhibition differentially attenuates cue-induced reinstatement: An interaction of environment and acH3K9 expression in the dorsal striatum.

Behav Neurosci 2019 Oct 25;133(5):478-488. Epub 2019 Jul 25.

Department of Psychological Sciences.

Substance use disorder is driven by complex gene-environment interactions. Epigenetic histone regulation is a significant contributor to several behavioral phenotypes of drug abuse. The primary epigenetic mechanisms that drive drug taking and drug seeking are still being investigated, and it is unclear how environmental conditions alter epigenetic histone acetylation to change behaviors geared toward drug reward. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/bne0000333DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6722001PMC
October 2019

NMDA receptors in the basolateral amygdala mediate acquisition and extinction of an amphetamine conditioned place preference.

Behav Neurosci 2019 Aug;133(4):428-436

Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences.

Previous work from our laboratory has indicated that temporary inactivation of the basolateral amygdala (BLA) with bupivacaine blocks acquisition, consolidation, and retrieval of an amphetamine conditioned place preference (CPP). The present study was designed to extend this line of investigation by examining whether N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors in the BLA mediate acquisition and extinction of an amphetamine CPP. Adult male Long-Evans rats received bilateral intra-BLA injections of the NMDA receptor antagonist 2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (AP5; 1. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/bne0000323DOI Listing
August 2019
1 Read

Spatial judgment in Parkinson's disease: Contributions of attentional and executive dysfunction.

Behav Neurosci 2019 Aug;133(4):350-360

Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Boston University.

Spatial judgment is impaired in Parkinson's disease (PD), with previous research suggesting that disruptions in attention and executive function are likely contributors. If judgment of center places demands on frontal systems, performance on tests of attention/executive function may correlate with extent of bias in PD, and attentional disturbance may predict inconsistency in spatial judgment. The relation of spatial judgment to attention/executive function may differ for those with left-side versus right-side motor onset (LPD, RPD), reflecting effects of attentional lateralization. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/bne0000329DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6629466PMC
August 2019
5 Reads

Aged rats with intact memory show distinctive recruitment in cortical regions relative to young adults in a cue mismatch task.

Behav Neurosci 2019 Oct 27;133(5):537-544. Epub 2019 Jun 27.

Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences.

Similar to elderly humans, aged Long-Evans rats exhibit individual differences in performance on tasks that critically depend on the medial temporal lobe memory system. Although reduced memory performance is common, close to half of aged rats in this outbred rodent population perform within the range of young subjects, exhibiting a stable behavioral phenotype that may signal a resilience to memory decline. Increasing evidence from research on aging in the Long-Evans study population supports the existence of adaptive neural change rather than avoidance of detrimental effects of aging on the brain, indicating a malleability of brain function over the life span that may preserve optimal function. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/bne0000332DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6722034PMC
October 2019
1 Read

Gonadal hormone fluctuations do not affect the expression or extinction of fear-potentiated startle in female rats.

Behav Neurosci 2019 Oct 27;133(5):517-526. Epub 2019 Jun 27.

Department of Psychology.

Prior studies suggest that levels of ovarian hormones may affect learning and memory in rats, including studies of fear conditioning and extinction. We previously showed that female rats show reduced retention of extinction compared to males when measuring fear-potentiated startle, but not when measuring freezing behavior. One commonly reported observation in studies of freezing behavior is that rats with increased levels of estradiol during extinction learning show better retention of extinction than rats given extinction training when levels of estradiol are low. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/bne0000324DOI Listing
October 2019
1 Read

Development of an "object category recognition" task for mice: Involvement of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors.

Behav Neurosci 2019 Oct 27;133(5):527-536. Epub 2019 Jun 27.

Department of Psychology.

Recent research suggests that rats are capable of object categorization-like processes. To study whether mice possess similar abilities, we developed a spontaneous one-trial object category recognition (OCR) task. Based on the spontaneous object recognition paradigm, mice discriminated between two otherwise equally novel objects, one from a novel category and one from a studied category. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/bne0000331DOI Listing
October 2019
4 Reads

"Introduction to the special issue on neuroethology": Correction to Simmons and Moss (2019).

Authors:

Behav Neurosci 2019 Jun 27. Epub 2019 Jun 27.

Reports an error in "Introduction to the special issue on neuroethology" by Cynthia F. Moss and Andrea M. Simmons (, 2019[Jun], Vol 133[3], 265-266). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/bne0000334DOI Listing
June 2019
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Human anxiety-specific "theta" occurs with selective stopping and localizes to right inferior frontal gyrus.

Behav Neurosci 2019 Jun 20. Epub 2019 Jun 20.

Department of Psychology.

Anxiety disorders have high prevalence and generate major disability. But they have poor treatment targeting because psychiatry lacks diagnostic biomarkers. Right frontal goal-conflict-specific-rhythmicity (GCSR) in the simple stop signal task appears homologous to hippocampal "theta" as an anxiety-process biomarker but is weak and transient. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/bne0000316DOI Listing
June 2019
10 Reads

Anxiety process "theta" biomarker in the stop signal task eliminated by a preceding relaxation test.

Behav Neurosci 2019 Jun 20. Epub 2019 Jun 20.

Department of Psychology.

Anxiety disorders are currently the most prevalent psychiatric diseases in Europe and the United States, the 6th highest cause of years of life lived with disability, and so a grave and ever-increasing burden on health care resources. Categorization of specific anxiety disorders is constantly evolving, but even the new (5th ed.; ) manual uses symptom lists, not objective biomarkers. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/bne0000328DOI Listing
June 2019
4 Reads

Timing is everything: Developmental differences in the effect of chronic corticosterone exposure on extinction retention.

Behav Neurosci 2019 Oct 17;133(5):467-477. Epub 2019 Jun 17.

School of Psychology.

Adolescence is noted as a time of "storm and stress." In this developmental stage both rodents and humans exhibit an impairment in the extinction of learned fear; however, this impairment can be alleviated, at least in rodents, by increasing the amount of extinction training given or by administering the partial NMDA receptor agonist D-Cycloserine. In the present study we explored whether the benefits of these treatments would be reduced by chronic exogenous corticosterone (a commonly studied stress-related hormone). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/bne0000326DOI Listing
October 2019
4 Reads

Operant conditioning prevents cell death in the adult rat dentate gyrus.

Behav Neurosci 2019 Oct 17;133(5):508-516. Epub 2019 Jun 17.

Department of Behavioral Sciences.

Thousands of new neurons are produced each day in the dentate gyrus of the adult mammalian hippocampus. However, the majority of those cells die within weeks of their birth. The most effective way to prevent this cell death is through effortful and successful learning. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/bne0000330DOI Listing
October 2019
29 Reads

The rat medial frontal cortex controls pace, but not breakpoint, in a progressive ratio licking task.

Behav Neurosci 2019 Aug 6;133(4):385-397. Epub 2019 Jun 6.

Department of Biology.

The medial frontal cortex (MFC) is crucial for selecting actions and evaluating their outcomes. Outcome monitoring may be triggered by rostral parts of the MFC, which contain neurons that are modulated by reward consumption and are necessary for the expression of relative reward value. Here, we examined if the MFC further has a role in the control of instrumental licking. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/bne0000322DOI Listing
August 2019
1 Read

Bilateral postsubiculum lesions impair visual and nonvisual homing performance in rats.

Behav Neurosci 2019 Oct 6;133(5):496-507. Epub 2019 Jun 6.

Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences.

Nearly all species rely on visual and nonvisual cues to guide navigation, and which ones they use depend on the environment and task demands. The postsubiculum (PoS) is a crucial brain region for the use of visual cues, but its role in the use of self-movement cues is less clear. We therefore evaluated rats' navigational performance on a food-carrying task in light and in darkness in rats that had bilateral neurotoxic lesions of the PoS. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/bne0000321DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6721993PMC
October 2019
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A neural marker of the start-gun in interval timing: Onset N1P2.

Authors:
Halil Duzcu

Behav Neurosci 2019 Aug 6;133(4):414-427. Epub 2019 Jun 6.

Department of Psychology.

Although the neural markers of interval timing have been widely studied, the events that determine the onset and offset of an interval have only recently started to gain attention. In the present study, I compare the predictions of the perceptual (preonset and start-gun) and decisional bias hypotheses with respect to onset N1P2 amplitude, the point of subjective equality (PSE) and delta/theta activity. The onsets of the comparison intervals (CIs) were manipulated to begin earlier, later, or on-time with regard to a standard interval (SI). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/bne0000325DOI Listing
August 2019
7 Reads

Introduction to the special issue on neuroethology.

Behav Neurosci 2019 Jun;133(3):265-266

Johns Hopkins University.

This special issue highlights some recent advances in neuroethology based on research presented at the 13th International Congress of Neuroethology and associated satellite symposia in Brisbane, Australia, on July 15-20, 2018. The discipline of neuroethology combines methods and concepts from ethology with those from neurobiology to develop a comparative analysis of the mechanisms of behavior that takes into account a species' ecology and evolutionary history. In his 1951 book , Nobel Prize winner Niko Tinbergen called on ethologists and neurophysiologists to join forces to search for mechanisms of motivated behaviors. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/bne0000327DOI Listing
June 2019
16 Reads