224 results match your criteria Behavioral Ecology And Sociobiology[Journal]


What constitutes "social complexity" and "social intelligence" in birds? Lessons from ravens.

Behav Ecol Sociobiol 2019 19;73(1):12. Epub 2019 Jan 19.

1Department of Cognitive Biology, University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.

In the last decades, the assumption that complex social life is cognitively challenging, and thus can drive mental evolution, has received much support from empirical studies in nonhuman primates. While extending the scope to other mammals and birds, different views have been adopted on what constitutes social complexity and which specific cognitive skills are selected for. Notably, many avian species form "open" groups as non-breeders (i. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00265-018-2607-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6404394PMC
January 2019

Complex patterns of collective escape in starling flocks under predation.

Behav Ecol Sociobiol 2019 19;73(1):10. Epub 2019 Jan 19.

1Theoretical Research in Evolutionary Life Sciences (TRÊS), Groningen Institute for Evolutionary Life Sciences (GELIFES), University of Groningen, Nijenborgh 7, 9747AG Groningen, The Netherlands.

Abstract: Collective behaviour of animals has been a main focus of recent research, yet few empirical studies deal with this issue in the context of predation, a major driver of social complexity in many animal species. When starling () flocks are under attack by a raptor, such as a peregrine falcon (), they show a great diversity of patterns of collective escape. The corresponding structural complexity concerns rapid variation in density and shape of the flock over time. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00265-018-2609-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6404399PMC
January 2019

Parental manipulation of offspring size in social groups: a test using paper wasps.

Behav Ecol Sociobiol 2019 25;73(3):36. Epub 2019 Feb 25.

Centre for Ecology & Conservation, University of Exeter, Penryn campus, Penryn, Cornwall, TR10 9FE UK.

Abstract: Maternal effects should be especially likely when mothers actively provision offspring with resources that influence offspring phenotype. In cooperatively breeding and eusocial taxa, there is potential for parents to strategically manipulate offspring phenotype in their own interests. Social insect queens are nearly always larger than their worker offspring, and queens could benefit by producing small daughter workers in several ways. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00265-019-2646-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6394940PMC
February 2019

Colony-level non-associative plasticity of alarm responses in the stingless honey bee, Tetragonisca angustula.

Behav Ecol Sociobiol 2018 Mar 15;72. Epub 2018 Mar 15.

School of Life Sciences, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona.

In ants, bees, and other social Hymenoptera alarm pheromones are widely employed to coordinate colony nest defense. In that context, alarm pheromones elicit innate species-specific defensive behaviors. Therefore, in terms of classical conditioning, an alarm pheromone could act as an unconditioned stimulus (US). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00265-018-2471-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6373452PMC

Olfactory cues and the value of information: voles interpret cues based on recent predator encounters.

Behav Ecol Sociobiol 2018 26;72(12):187. Epub 2018 Nov 26.

2Konnevesi Research Station, University of Jyväskylä, P.O. Box 35, 40014 Jyväskylä, Finland.

Abstract: Prey strategically respond to the risk of predation by varying their behavior while balancing the tradeoffs of food and safety. We present here an experiment that tests the way the same indirect cues of predation risk are interpreted by bank voles, , as the game changes through exposure to a caged weasel. Using optimal patch use, we asked wild-caught voles to rank the risk they perceived. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00265-018-2600-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6267667PMC
November 2018

The scent of infanticide risk? Behavioural allocation to current and future reproduction in response to mating opportunity and familiarity with intruder.

Behav Ecol Sociobiol 2018 18;72(11):175. Epub 2018 Oct 18.

1Animal Ecology, Institute of Biochemistry and Biology, University of Potsdam, Potsdam, Germany.

Abstract: The killing of young by unrelated males is widespread in the animal kingdom. In short-lived small rodents, females can mate immediately after delivery (post-partum oestrus) and invest in future reproduction, but infanticide may put the nestlings, their current reproductive investment, at risk. Here, we investigated the behavioural trade-offs between mating interest and nest protection in an arena experiment with bank voles (). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00265-018-2585-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6208815PMC
October 2018

Parasite infection and host personality: -infected three-spined sticklebacks are more social.

Behav Ecol Sociobiol 2018 6;72(11):173. Epub 2018 Oct 6.

1Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, IFM Biology, Linköping University, SE-581 83 Linköping, Sweden.

Abstract: The existence of animal personality is now well-documented, although the causes and consequences of this phenomenon are still largely unclear. Parasite infection can have pervasive effects on hosts, including altering host behaviour, and may thus contribute to differences in host personality. We investigated the relationship between the three-spined stickleback and its common parasite , with focus on differences in host personality. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s00265-018-2586-3
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00265-018-2586-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6182751PMC
October 2018
11 Reads

The relationship between learning speed and personality is age- and task-dependent in red junglefowl.

Behav Ecol Sociobiol 2018 26;72(10):168. Epub 2018 Sep 26.

1Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, IFM Biology, Linköping University, 58183 Linköping, Sweden.

Abstract: Cognition is fundamental to animals' lives and an important source of phenotypic variation. Nevertheless, research on individual variation in animal cognition is still limited. Further, although individual cognitive abilities have been suggested to be linked to personality (i. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s00265-018-2579-2
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00265-018-2579-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6182743PMC
September 2018
2 Reads

Sex differences in life history, behavior, and physiology along a slow-fast continuum: a meta-analysis.

Behav Ecol Sociobiol 2018 17;72(8):132. Epub 2018 Jul 17.

6Ecology and Evolution Research Centre, School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, The University of New South Wales, Sydney, 2052 Australia.

The pace-of-life syndrome (POLS) hypothesis predicts that behavior and physiology covary with life history. Evidence for such covariation is contradictory, possibly because systematic sources of variation (e.g. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00265-018-2534-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6060830PMC
July 2018
2 Reads

Circular data in biology: advice for effectively implementing statistical procedures.

Behav Ecol Sociobiol 2018 11;72(8):128. Epub 2018 Jul 11.

1Research Institute of Molecular Pathology (IMP), Vienna Biocenter (VBC), 1030 Vienna, Austria.

Circular data are common in biological studies. The most fundamental question that can be asked of a sample of circular data is whether it suggests that the underlying population is uniformly distributed around the circle, or whether it is concentrated around at least one preferred direction (e.g. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00265-018-2538-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6060829PMC

The role of complex cues in social and reproductive plasticity.

Behav Ecol Sociobiol 2018 7;72(8):124. Epub 2018 Jul 7.

1School of Biological Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich Research Park, Norwich, NR4 7TJ UK.

Phenotypic plasticity can be a key determinant of fitness. The degree to which the expression of plasticity is adaptive relies upon the accuracy with which information about the state of the environment is integrated. This step might be particularly beneficial when environments, e. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s00265-018-2539-x
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00265-018-2539-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6060796PMC
July 2018
2 Reads

High level of self-control ability in a small passerine bird.

Behav Ecol Sociobiol 2018 26;72(7):118. Epub 2018 Jun 26.

Department of Biology, Ecology Building, Lund University, S-223 62 Lund, Sweden.

Abstract: Cognitively advanced animals are usually assumed to possess better self-control, or ability to decline immediate rewards in favour of delayed ones, than less cognitively advanced animals. It has been claimed that the best predictor of high such ability is absolute brain volume meaning that large-brained animals should perform better than small-brained ones. We tested self-control ability in the great tit, a small passerine. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s00265-018-2529-z
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00265-018-2529-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6019425PMC
June 2018
4 Reads

A dynamic threshold model for terminal investment.

Behav Ecol Sociobiol 2017 Dec 3;71(12). Epub 2017 Dec 3.

Behavior, Ecology, Evolution & Systematics Section, School of Biological Sciences, Illinois State University, Normal, IL, USA.

Although reproductive strategies can be influenced by a variety of intrinsic and extrinsic factors, life history theory provides a rigorous framework for explaining variation in reproductive effort. The proposes that a decreased expectation of future reproduction (as might arise from a mortality threat) should precipitate increased investment in current reproduction. Terminal investment has been widely studied, and a variety of intrinsic and extrinsic cues that elicit such a response have been identified across an array of taxa. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00265-017-2416-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6039117PMC
December 2017
4 Reads

Distinguishing between apparent and actual randomness: a preliminary examination with Australian ants.

Behav Ecol Sociobiol 2018 20;72(7):113. Epub 2018 Jun 20.

1Department of Biological Sciences, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW 2109 Australia.

Abstract: The correlated random walk paradigm is the dominant conceptual framework for modeling animal movement patterns. Nonetheless, we do not know whether the randomness is apparent or actual. Apparent randomness could result from individuals reacting to environmental cues and their internal states in accordance with some set of behavioral rules. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00265-018-2527-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6010489PMC
June 2018
4 Reads

Predictors of nest growth: diminishing returns for subordinates in the paper wasp .

Behav Ecol Sociobiol 2018 11;72(6):88. Epub 2018 May 11.

1School of Life Sciences, University of Sussex, John Maynard Smith Building, Falmer, Brighton, BN1 9QG UK.

Abstract: In cooperative breeders, subordinates that have alternative reproductive options are expected to stay and help dominant breeders only as long as they contribute to group productivity, if their fitness is linked with colony success. Female paper wasps live as cooperative breeders in small groups of typically fewer than 10 females. Subordinates tend to have high-quality outside options, and so could choose alternative breeding tactics if their work efforts increased productivity negligibly. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00265-018-2502-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5945790PMC
May 2018
1 Read

The pervasive role of social learning in primate lifetime development.

Behav Ecol Sociobiol 2018 3;72(5):80. Epub 2018 May 3.

2Department of Ecology and Evolution, University of Lausanne, 1015 Lausanne, Switzerland.

In recent decades, an accelerating research effort has exploited a substantial diversity of methodologies to garner mounting evidence for social learning and culture in many species of primate. As in humans, the evidence suggests that the juvenile phases of non-human primates' lives represent a period of particular intensity in adaptive learning from others, yet the relevant research remains scattered in the literature. Accordingly, we here offer what we believe to be the first substantial collation and review of this body of work and its implications for the lifetime behavioral ecology of primates. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00265-018-2489-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5934467PMC

Chemical composition of axillary odorants reflects social and individual attributes in rhesus macaques.

Behav Ecol Sociobiol 2018 28;72(4):65. Epub 2018 Mar 28.

1Junior Research Group of Primate Kin Selection, Department of Primatology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Deutscher Platz 6, 04103 Leipzig, Germany.

Abstract: Scents play an important role in the life of most terrestrial mammals and may transmit valuable information about conspecifics. Olfaction was long considered of low importance in Old World monkeys due to their relative reduction of olfactory structures and low incidence of scent-marking behavior but has been increasingly recognized for mediating social relationships in recent years. Yet, studies investigating the composition of their chemical cues remain scarce. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00265-018-2479-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5871651PMC

Exposure to predators reduces collective foraging aggressiveness and eliminates its relationship with colony personality composition.

Behav Ecol Sociobiol 2017 Aug 25;71(8). Epub 2017 Jul 25.

Department of Ecology, Evolution and Marine Biology, University of California at Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA, USA.

Predation is a ubiquitous threat that often plays a central role in determining community dynamics. Predators can impact prey species by directly consuming them, or indirectly causing prey to modify their behavior. Direct consumption has classically been the focus of research on predator-prey interactions, but substantial evidence now demonstrates that the indirect effects of predators on prey populations are at least as strong as, if not stronger than, direct consumption. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00265-017-2356-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5871624PMC
August 2017
2 Reads

Evolution of sex-specific pace-of-life syndromes: genetic architecture and physiological mechanisms.

Behav Ecol Sociobiol 2018 16;72(3):60. Epub 2018 Mar 16.

4Center for Biodiversity Dynamics, Department of Biology, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Høgskoleringen 5, 7491 Trondheim, Norway.

Sex differences in life history, physiology, and behavior are nearly ubiquitous across taxa, owing to sex-specific selection that arises from different reproductive strategies of the sexes. The pace-of-life syndrome (POLS) hypothesis predicts that most variation in such traits among individuals, populations, and species falls along a slow-fast pace-of-life continuum. As a result of their different reproductive roles and environment, the sexes also commonly differ in pace-of-life, with important consequences for the evolution of POLS. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00265-018-2462-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5856903PMC
March 2018
1 Read

Limited social plasticity in the socially polymorphic sweat bee .

Authors:
P J Davison J Field

Behav Ecol Sociobiol 2018 10;72(3):56. Epub 2018 Mar 10.

1School of Life Sciences, University of Sussex, John Maynard Smith Building, Brighton, BN1 9QG UK.

Abstract: Eusociality is characterised by a reproductive division of labour, where some individuals forgo direct reproduction to instead help raise kin. Socially polymorphic sweat bees are ideal models for addressing the mechanisms underlying the transition from solitary living to eusociality, because different individuals in the same species can express either eusocial or solitary behaviour. A key question is whether alternative social phenotypes represent environmentally induced plasticity or predominantly genetic differentiation between populations. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00265-018-2475-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5845590PMC

What makes Alpine swift ascend at twilight? Novel geolocators reveal year-round flight behaviour.

Behav Ecol Sociobiol 2018 26;72(3):45. Epub 2018 Feb 26.

1Swiss Ornithological Institute, Seerose 1, 6204 Sempach, Switzerland.

Abstract: Studying individual flight behaviour throughout the year is indispensable to understand the ecology of a bird species. Recent development in technology allows now to track flight behaviour of small long-distance bird migrants throughout its annual cycle. The specific flight behaviour of twilight ascents in birds has been documented in a few studies, but only during a short period of the year, and never quantified on the individual level. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s00265-017-2438-6
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00265-017-2438-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5847200PMC
February 2018
5 Reads

Understanding immune function as a pace of life trait requires environmental context.

Authors:
B Irene Tieleman

Behav Ecol Sociobiol 2018 9;72(3):55. Epub 2018 Mar 9.

Groningen Institute for Evolutionary Life Sciences, University of Groningen, 9700 CC Groningen, The Netherlands.

This article provides a brief historical perspective on the integration of physiology into the concept of the pace of life of birds, evaluates the fit of immune function into this framework, and asks what it will take to fruitfully understand immune functioning of birds in pace of life studies in the future. In the late 1970s, physiology started to seriously enter avian life history ecology, with energy as the main currency of interest, inspired by David Lack's work in the preceding decades emphasizing how food availability explained life history variation. In an effort to understand the trade-off between survival and reproduction, and specifically the mortality costs associated with hard work, in the 1980s and 1990s, other physiological phenomena entered the realm of animal ecologists, including endocrinology, oxidative stress, and immunology. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00265-018-2464-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5843675PMC

Extra-pair parentage and personality in a cooperatively breeding bird.

Behav Ecol Sociobiol 2018 15;72(3):37. Epub 2018 Feb 15.

1Department of Animal and Plant Sciences, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, S10 2TN UK.

Abstract: Why so much variation in extra-pair parentage occurs within and among populations remains unclear. Often the fitness costs and benefits of extra-pair parentage are hypothesised to explain its occurrence; therefore, linking extra-pair parentage with traits such as personality (behavioural traits that can be heritable and affect reproductive behaviour) may help our understanding. Here, we investigate whether reproductive outcomes and success are associated with exploratory behaviour in a natural population of cooperatively breeding Seychelles warblers () on Cousin Island. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00265-018-2448-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5814466PMC
February 2018
3 Reads

Why and how the early-life environment affects development of coping behaviours.

Behav Ecol Sociobiol 2018 9;72(3):34. Epub 2018 Feb 9.

Behavioural Physiology and Ecology Group, Groningen Institute for Evolutionary Life Sciences, University of Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands.

Understanding the ways in which individuals cope with threats, respond to challenges, make use of opportunities and mediate the harmful effects of their surroundings is important for predicting their ability to function in a rapidly changing world. Perhaps one of the most essential drivers of coping behaviour of adults is the environment experienced during their early-life development. Although the study of coping, defined as behaviours displayed in response to environmental challenges, has a long and rich research history in biology, recent literature has repeatedly pointed out that the processes through which coping behaviours develop in individuals are still largely unknown. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00265-018-2452-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5805793PMC
February 2018
4 Reads

A review of thanatosis (death feigning) as an anti-predator behaviour.

Behav Ecol Sociobiol 2018 15;72(2):22. Epub 2018 Jan 15.

School of Biology, University of St Andrews, Dyer's Brae House, St Andrews, Fife, KY16 9TH UK.

Abstract: Thanatosis-also known as death-feigning and, we argue more appropriately, tonic immobility (TI)-is an under-reported but fascinating anti-predator strategy adopted by diverse prey late on in the predation sequence, and frequently following physical contact by the predator. TI is thought to inhibit further attack by predators and reduce the perceived need of the predator to subdue prey further. The behaviour is probably present in more taxa than is currently described, but even within well-studied groups the precise taxonomic distribution is unclear for a number of practical and ethical reasons. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00265-017-2436-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5769822PMC
January 2018

On the role of body size, brain size, and eye size in visual acuity.

Behav Ecol Sociobiol 2017 29;71(12):179. Epub 2017 Nov 29.

Department of Zoology/Ethology, Stockholm University, Svante Arrhenius väg 18B, SE-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.

Abstract: The visual system is highly variable across species, and such variability is a key factor influencing animal behavior. Variation in the visual system, for instance, can influence the outcome of learning tasks when visual stimuli are used. We illustrate this issue in guppies () artificially selected for large and small relative brain size with pronounced behavioral differences in learning experiments and mate choice tests. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00265-017-2408-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5705735PMC
November 2017
1 Read

Domestic violence shapes Colombian women's partner choices.

Behav Ecol Sociobiol 2017 19;71(12):175. Epub 2017 Nov 19.

Perception Lab, School of Psychology and Neuroscience, St Mary's Quad, University of St Andrews, St Andrews, Fife, Scotland KY16 9JP UK.

Abstract: Potential protection from violence has been suggested as an explanation for women's preferences for more masculine partners. Previous studies, however, have not considered that violence may be multi-modal, and hence come from different sources. Therefore, we tested the effect of different fears of violence (i. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00265-017-2405-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5694761PMC
November 2017
4 Reads

Does similarity in call structure or foraging ecology explain interspecific information transfer in wild bats?

Behav Ecol Sociobiol 2017 29;71(11):168. Epub 2017 Oct 29.

Sensory Ecology Group, Max Planck Institute for Ornithology, Seewiesen, Germany.

Abstract: Animals can gain important information by attending to the signals and cues of other animals in their environment, with acoustic information playing a major role in many taxa. Echolocation call sequences of bats contain information about the identity and behaviour of the sender which is perceptible to close-by receivers. Increasing evidence supports the communicative function of echolocation within species, yet data about its role for interspecific information transfer is scarce. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00265-017-2398-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5661007PMC
October 2017

The use of the nest for parental roosting and thermal consequences of the nest for nestlings and parents.

Behav Ecol Sociobiol 2017 7;71(12):171. Epub 2017 Nov 7.

Department of Biology, Section of Evolutionary Ecology, Lund University, Ecology Building, SE-223 62 Lund, Sweden.

Abstract: At temperate latitudes, altricial birds and their nestlings need to handle night temperatures well below thermoneutrality during the breeding season. Thus, energy costs of thermoregulation might constrain nestling growth, and low nocturnal temperatures might require resources that parents could otherwise have invested into nestlings during the day. To manipulate parental work rate, we performed brood size manipulations in breeding marsh tits (). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00265-017-2400-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5676808PMC
November 2017
2 Reads

Vocal foragers and silent crowds: context-dependent vocal variation in Northeast Atlantic long-finned pilot whales.

Behav Ecol Sociobiol 2017 6;71(12):170. Epub 2017 Nov 6.

Sea Mammal Research Unit, Scottish Oceans Institute, University of St Andrews, Scotland, UK.

Abstract: Vocalisations form a key component of the social interactions and foraging behaviour of toothed whales. We investigated changes in calling and echolocation behaviour of long-finned pilot whales between foraging and non-foraging periods, by combining acoustic recordings and diving depth data from tagged individuals with concurrent surface observations on social behaviour of their group. The pilot whales showed marked vocal variation, specific to foraging and social context. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00265-017-2397-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5674111PMC
November 2017
32 Reads

Consequences of grouped data for testing for departure from circular uniformity.

Behav Ecol Sociobiol 2017 28;71(11):167. Epub 2017 Oct 28.

School of Biology, University of St Andrews, Dyer's Brae House, St Andrews, KY16 9TH UK.

Limits to the precision of circular data often cause grouping of data points into discrete categories, but the effects of grouping on tests for circular uniformity have been little explored. The Rayleigh test is often applied to grouped circular data, despite it being designed for continuous data and the statistical literature recommending a suite of alternative tests specifically designed for grouped data. Here, we investigated the performance of the Rayleigh test relative to four alternatives for testing the null hypothesis of uniformity in grouped circular data. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00265-017-2393-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5660840PMC
October 2017

Plasticity of signaling and mate choice in a trilling species of the complex (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae).

Behav Ecol Sociobiol 2017 24;71(11):164. Epub 2017 Oct 24.

Institute of Zoology, University of Graz, Universitätsplatz 2, A-8010 Graz, Austria.

Abstract: Males of a trilling species in the complex produce conspicuous calling songs that consist of two motifs: an amplitude-modulated motif with alternating loud and soft segments (AM-motif) and a continuous, high-intensity trill. The function of these song motifs for female attraction and competition between males was investigated. We tested the hypothesis that males modify their signaling behavior depending on the social environment (presence/absence of females or rival males) when they compete for mates. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00265-017-2381-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5655568PMC
October 2017

Turn-taking in cooperative offspring care: by-product of individual provisioning behavior or active response rule?

Behav Ecol Sociobiol 2017 17;71(11):162. Epub 2017 Oct 17.

Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge, CB2 3EJ UK.

Abstract: For individuals collaborating to rear offspring, effective organization of resource delivery is difficult because each carer benefits when the others provide a greater share of the total investment required. When investment is provided in discrete events, one possible solution is to adopt a turn-taking strategy whereby each individual reduces its contribution rate after investing, only increasing its rate again once another carer contributes. To test whether turn-taking occurs in a natural cooperative care system, here we use a continuous time Markov model to deduce the provisioning behavior of the chestnut-crowned babbler (), a cooperatively breeding Australian bird with variable number of carers. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00265-017-2391-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5644705PMC
October 2017
4 Reads

Smell or vision? The use of different sensory modalities in predator discrimination.

Behav Ecol Sociobiol 2017 8;71(10):143. Epub 2017 Sep 8.

Behavioural Ecology, Institute of Ecology and Evolution, University of Bern, Wohlenstrasse 50a, 3032 Hinterkappelen, Switzerland.

Abstract: Theory predicts that animals should adjust their escape responses to the perceived predation risk. The information animals obtain about potential predation risk may differ qualitatively depending on the sensory modality by which a cue is perceived. For instance, olfactory cues may reveal better information about the presence or absence of threats, whereas visual information can reliably transmit the position and potential attack distance of a predator. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00265-017-2371-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5607904PMC
September 2017
6 Reads

Multinomial analysis of behavior: statistical methods.

Behav Ecol Sociobiol 2017 25;71(9):138. Epub 2017 Aug 25.

Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Deutscher Platz 6, 04103 Leipzig, Germany.

Behavioral ecologists frequently use observational methods, such as instantaneous scan sampling, to record the behavior of animals at discrete moments in time. We develop and apply multilevel, multinomial logistic regression models for analyzing such data. These statistical methods correspond to the multinomial character of the response variable while also accounting for the repeated observations of individuals that characterize behavioral datasets. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00265-017-2363-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5594044PMC
August 2017
3 Reads

Sparrowhawk movement, calling, and presence of dead conspecifics differentially impact blue tit () vocal and behavioral mobbing responses.

Behav Ecol Sociobiol 2017 13;71(9):133. Epub 2017 Aug 13.

School of Biology, University of St Andrews, Harold Mitchell Building, St Andrews, Fife, Scotland KY16 9TH UK.

Abstract: Many animals alter their anti-predator behavior in accordance to the threat level of a predator. While much research has examined variation in mobbing responses to different predators, few studies have investigated how anti-predator behavior is affected by changes in a predator's own state or behavior. We examined the effect of sparrowhawk () behavior on the mobbing response of wild blue tits () using robotic taxidermy sparrowhawks. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s00265-017-2361-x
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00265-017-2361-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5558234PMC
August 2017
2 Reads

Temporal and geographic patterns of kinship structure in common dolphins () suggest site fidelity and female-biased long-distance dispersal.

Behav Ecol Sociobiol 2017 21;71(8):123. Epub 2017 Jul 21.

School of Life Sciences, University of Lincoln, Lincoln, UK.

Abstract: Social structure plays a crucial role in determining a species' dispersal patterns and genetic structure. Cetaceans show a diversity of social and mating systems, but their effects on dispersal and genetic structure are not well known, in part because of technical difficulties in obtaining robust observational data. Here, we combine genetic profiling and GIS analysis to identify patterns of kin distribution over time and space, to infer mating structure and dispersal patterns in short-beaked common dolphins (). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00265-017-2351-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5522516PMC

Acoustic ranging in poison frogs-it is not about signal amplitude alone.

Behav Ecol Sociobiol 2017 12;71(8):114. Epub 2017 Jul 12.

Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of California Los Angeles, 621 Charles E. Young Drive South, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1606 USA.

Abstract: Acoustic ranging allows identifying the distance of a sound source and mediates inter-individual spacing and aggression in territorial species. Birds and mammals are known to use more complex cues than only sound pressure level (SPL), which can be influenced by the signaller and signal transmission in non-predictable ways and thus is not reliable by itself. For frogs, only SPL is currently known to mediate inter-individual distances, but we hypothesise that the strong territoriality of Dendrobatids could make the use of complex cues for ranging highly beneficial for this family. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00265-017-2340-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5506510PMC

Differences in social preference between the sexes during ontogeny drive segregation in a precocial species.

Behav Ecol Sociobiol 2017 20;71(7):103. Epub 2017 Jun 20.

Centre for Research in Animal Behaviour, Psychology, University of Exeter, Exeter, EX4 4QG UK.

Abstract: Hypotheses for why animals sexually segregate typically rely on adult traits, such as differences in sexual roles causing differential habitat preferences, or size dimorphism inducing differences in diet or behaviour. However, segregation can occur in juveniles before such roles or size dimorphism is well established. In young humans, leading hypotheses suggest that (1) sexes differ in their activity and the synchronisation of behaviour causes segregation and (2) sexes separate in order to learn and maximise future reproductive roles. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00265-017-2332-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5486806PMC
June 2017
2 Reads

Long-term exposure to elevated carbon dioxide does not alter activity levels of a coral reef fish in response to predator chemical cues.

Behav Ecol Sociobiol 2017 5;71(8):108. Epub 2017 Jul 5.

Australian Institute of Marine Science, Townsville, Queensland Australia.

Abstract: Levels of dissolved carbon dioxide (CO) projected to occur in the world's oceans in the near future have been reported to increase swimming activity and impair predator recognition in coral reef fishes. These behavioral alterations would be expected to have dramatic effects on survival and community dynamics in marine ecosystems in the future. To investigate the universality and replicability of these observations, we used juvenile spiny chromis damselfish () to examine the effects of long-term CO exposure on routine activity and the behavioral response to the chemical cues of a predator (). Read More

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s00265-017-2337-x
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00265-017-2337-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5498585PMC
July 2017
10 Reads

The influence of social relationship on food tolerance in wolves and dogs.

Behav Ecol Sociobiol 2017 30;71(7):107. Epub 2017 Jun 30.

Comparative Cognition, Messerli Research Institute, University of Veterinary Medicine, Medical University of Vienna, University of Vienna, 1 Veterinaerplatz, 1210 Vienna, Austria.

Abstract: Food sharing is relatively widespread across the animal kingdom, but research into the socio-ecological factors affecting this activity has predominantly focused on primates. These studies do suggest though that food tolerance is linked to the social relationship with potential partners. Therefore, the current study aimed to assess the social factors which influence food tolerance in two canids: wolves and dogs. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00265-017-2339-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5493712PMC
June 2017
5 Reads

Punish the thief-coevolution of defense and cautiousness stabilizes ownership.

Behav Ecol Sociobiol 2017 16;71(7):102. Epub 2017 Jun 16.

University of Groningen, GELIFES, Nijenborgh 7, 9747 AG Groningen, The Netherlands.

Abstract: Ownership of non-controllable resources usually has to be maintained by costly defense against competitors. Whether defense and thus ownership pays in terms of fitness depends on its effectiveness in preventing theft. We show that if the owners' willingness to defend varies in the population and information about it is available to potential thieves then the ability to react to this information and thus avoid being attacked by the owner is selected for. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00265-017-2330-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5486837PMC
June 2017
6 Reads

Conflict over non-partitioned resources may explain between-species differences in declines: the anthropogenic competition hypothesis.

Behav Ecol Sociobiol 2017 10;71(7):99. Epub 2017 Jun 10.

Centre for Research in Animal Behaviour, College of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Exeter, Exeter, EX4 4QG UK.

Abstract: Human alterations of habitats are causing declines in many species worldwide. The extent of declines varies greatly among closely related species, for often unknown reasons that must be understood in order to maintain biodiversity. An overlooked factor is that seasonally breeding species compete for nest sites, which are increasingly limited in many anthropogenically degraded environments. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00265-017-2327-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5486810PMC

Wild chimpanzees' use of single and combined vocal and gestural signals.

Behav Ecol Sociobiol 2017 27;71(6):96. Epub 2017 May 27.

School of Psychology and Neuroscience, University of St Andrews, St Marys College, South Street, St Andrews, KY16 9JP Scotland.

Abstract: We describe the individual and combined use of vocalizations and gestures in wild chimpanzees. The rate of gesturing peaked in infancy and, with the exception of the alpha male, decreased again in older age groups, while vocal signals showed the opposite pattern. Although gesture-vocal combinations were relatively rare, they were consistently found in all age groups, especially during affiliative and agonistic interactions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00265-017-2325-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5446553PMC
May 2017
1 Read

Adult bacterial exposure increases behavioral variation and drives higher repeatability in field crickets.

Behav Ecol Sociobiol 2016 11 9;70(11):1941-1947. Epub 2016 Sep 9.

Department of Environmental and Biological Sciences, University of Eastern Finland, Joensuu, Finland.

Among-individual differences in behavior are now a widely studied research-focus within the field of behavioral ecology. Furthermore, elements of an animal's internal state, such as energy or fat reserves, and infection status can have large impacts on behaviors. Despite this, we still know little regarding how state may affect behavioral variation. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s00265-016-2200-5
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00265-016-2200-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5456298PMC
November 2016
3 Reads

Sex in murky waters: algal-induced turbidity increases sexual selection in pipefish.

Behav Ecol Sociobiol 2017 5;71(5):78. Epub 2017 Apr 5.

Department of Ecology and Genetics/Animal Ecology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.

Abstract: Algal-induced turbidity has been shown to alter several important aspects of reproduction and sexual selection. However, while turbidity has been shown to negatively affect reproduction and sexually selected traits in some species, it may instead enhance reproductive success in others, implying that the impact of eutrophication is far more complex than originally believed. In this study, we aimed to provide more insight into these inconsistent findings. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00265-017-2310-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5391056PMC
April 2017
3 Reads

Silence is not golden: the hissing calls of tits affect the behaviour of a nest predator.

Behav Ecol Sociobiol 2017 7;71(5):79. Epub 2017 Apr 7.

Faculty of Natural Science, Department of Zoology, Siedlce University, Prusa 12, 08-110 Siedlce, Poland.

Abstract: Nest predation is one of the most important mortality factors of birds. Field observations showed that tits (Paridae) produce hissing calls and, usually, have lower breeding losses than nesting flycatchers, which do not make such calls. We hypothesise that differences in fledgling success can be directly attributed to the vocal reaction of tits. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00265-017-2313-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5383675PMC
April 2017
3 Reads

Long-term analysis on the variance of extra-group paternities in rhesus macaques.

Behav Ecol Sociobiol 2017 17;71(4):67. Epub 2017 Mar 17.

Junior Research Group of Primate Kin Selection, Department of Primatology, Max-Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Deutscher Platz 6, 04103 Leipzig, Germany.

Abstract: Extra-group paternity (EGP) has been described in various mammalian species; however, little is known about which factors contribute to the variation in EGP, as the majority of studies were restricted in time and the number of groups considered. Using longitudinal demographic and genetic data, we aim to investigate which factors predict rates of EGP in the free-ranging rhesus macaque population of Cayo Santiago, Puerto Rico (USA). Of the 1649 infants considered which were born into six social groups over 9 years, we identified an average of 16% of infants resulting from EGPs. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s00265-017-2291-7
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00265-017-2291-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5355504PMC
March 2017
6 Reads

Predatory interactions between prey affect patch selection by predators.

Behav Ecol Sociobiol 2017 16;71(4):66. Epub 2017 Mar 16.

Institute for Biodiversity and Ecosystem Dynamics, Department of Population Biology, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

Abstract: When predators can use several prey species as food sources, they are known to select prey according to foraging efficiency and food quality. However, interactions between the prey species may also affect prey choice, and this has received limited attention. The effect of one such interaction, intraguild predation between prey, on patch selection by predators was studied here. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00265-017-2288-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5352743PMC
March 2017
3 Reads

Evidence against observational spatial memory for cache locations of conspecifics in marsh tits .

Behav Ecol Sociobiol 2017 10;71(2):34. Epub 2017 Jan 10.

Department of Biology, Lund University, Ecology Building, S-223 62 Lund, Sweden.

Abstract: Many species in the family Paridae, such as marsh tits , are large-scale scatter hoarders of food that make cryptic caches and disperse these in large year-round territories. The perhaps most well-known species in the family, the great tit , does not store food itself but is skilled in stealing caches from the other species. We have previously demonstrated that great tits are able to memorise positions of caches they have observed marsh tits make and later return and steal the food. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00265-016-2264-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5225171PMC
January 2017
4 Reads