141 results match your criteria Behavioral Ecology[Journal]


The behavioral origins of novelty: did increased aggression lead to scale-eating in pupfishes?

Behav Ecol 2019 Mar-Apr;30(2):557-569. Epub 2019 Jan 14.

Department of Biology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, NC, USA.

Behavioral changes in a new environment are often assumed to precede the origins of evolutionary novelties. Here, we examined whether an increase in aggression is associated with a novel scale-eating trophic niche within a recent radiation of pupfishes endemic to San Salvador Island, Bahamas. We measured aggression using multiple behavioral assays and used transcriptomic analyses to identify differentially expressed genes in aggression and other behavioral pathways across 3 sympatric species in the San Salvador radiation (generalist, snail-eating specialist, and scale-eating specialist) and 2 generalist outgroups. Read More

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https://academic.oup.com/beheco/article/30/2/557/5289190
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/beheco/ary196DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6450202PMC
January 2019
2 Reads

Temporal plasticity in habitat selection criteria explains patterns of animal dispersal.

Behav Ecol 2019 Mar-Apr;30(2):528-540. Epub 2019 Jan 12.

Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, Rhinelander, WI, USA.

Patterns of dispersal behavior are often driven by the composition and configuration of suitable habitat in a matrix of unsuitable habitat. Interactions between animal behavior and landscapes can therefore influence population dynamics, population and species distributions, population genetic structure, and the evolution of behavior. Spatially explicit individual-based models (IBMs) are ideal tools for exploring the effects of landscape structure on dispersal. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/beheco/ary193DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6450207PMC
January 2019

Juvenile social experience generates differences in behavioral variation but not averages.

Behav Ecol 2019 Mar-Apr;30(2):455-464. Epub 2018 Dec 21.

Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, USA.

Developmental plasticity is known to influence the mean behavioral phenotype of a population. Yet, studies on how developmental plasticity shapes patterns of variation within populations are comparatively rare and often focus on a subset of developmental cues (e.g. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/beheco/ary185DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6450201PMC
December 2018

Multiple environmental cues impact habitat choice during nocturnal homing of specialized reef shrimp.

Behav Ecol 2019 Mar-Apr;30(2):348-355. Epub 2018 Dec 15.

School of Marine Science and Policy, University of Delaware, Lewes, USA.

Habitat selection is a critical process for animals throughout their life, and adult organisms that travel to forage or mate must reselect habitat frequently. On coral reefs, competition for space has led to a high proportion of habitat specialists. Habitat selection is especially vital for organisms that require specialized habitat; however, research has primarily focused on the initial habitat choice made during the larval/juvenile stage. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/beheco/ary171DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6450203PMC
December 2018

Individual variation and the source-sink group dynamics of extra-group paternity in a social mammal.

Behav Ecol 2019 Mar-Apr;30(2):301-312. Epub 2019 Jan 14.

Centre for Ecology and Conservation, University of Exeter, Penryn, Cornwall, UK.

Movement of individuals, or their genes, can influence eco-evolutionary processes in structured populations. We have limited understanding of the extent to which spatial behavior varies among groups and individuals within populations. Here, we use genetic pedigree reconstruction in a long-term study of European badgers () to characterize the extent of extra-group paternity, occurring as a consequence of breeding excursions, and to test hypothesized drivers of variation at multiple levels. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/beheco/ary164DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6450204PMC
January 2019

Extrapair mating and the strength of sexual selection: insights from a polymorphic species.

Behav Ecol 2019 Mar-Apr;30(2):278-290. Epub 2019 Feb 9.

Department of Biology, Indiana State University, Terre Haute, IN, USA.

Extrapair mating could drive sexual selection in socially monogamous species, but support for this hypothesis remains equivocal. We used lifetime fitness data and a unique model species, the dimorphic white-throated sparrow (), to examine how extrapair mating affects the potential for sexual selection. In this species, the morphs employ distinct reproductive strategies, with white males pursuing extrapair mating at higher rates than tan counterparts. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/beheco/ary160DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6450205PMC
February 2019

Gene expression shifts in yellow-bellied marmots prior to natal dispersal.

Behav Ecol 2019 Mar-Apr;30(2):267-277. Epub 2018 Dec 17.

Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USA.

The causes and consequences of vertebrate natal dispersal have been studied extensively, yet little is known about the molecular mechanisms involved. We used RNA-seq to quantify transcriptomic gene expression in blood of wild yellow-bellied marmots () prior to dispersing from or remaining philopatric to their natal colony. We tested 3 predictions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/beheco/ary175DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6450206PMC
December 2018

Counting crows: population structure and group size variation in an urban population of crows.

Behav Ecol 2019 Jan-Feb;30(1):57-67. Epub 2018 Dec 8.

Department of Cognitive Biology, University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.

Social complexity arises from the formation of social relationships like social bonds and dominance hierarchies. In turn, these aspects may be affected by the degree of fission-fusion dynamics, i.e. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/beheco/ary157DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6398430PMC
December 2018

Collective behavior and colony persistence of social spiders depends on their physical environment.

Behav Ecol 2019 Jan-Feb;30(1):39-47. Epub 2018 Dec 8.

Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Marine Biology, University of California Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA, USA.

The physical environment occupied by group-living animals can profoundly affect their cooperative social interactions and therefore their collective behavior and success. These effects can be especially apparent in human-modified habitats, which often harbor substantial variation in the physical environments available within them. For nest-building animal societies, this influence of the physical environment on collective behavior can be mediated by the construction of nests-nests could either buffer animal behavior from changes in the physical environment or facilitate shifts in behavior through changes in nest structure. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/beheco/ary158DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6398429PMC
December 2018

Past and present resource availability affect mating rate but not mate choice in .

Behav Ecol 2018 Nov-Dec;29(6):1409-1414. Epub 2018 Aug 11.

Department of Zoology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, B.C., Canada.

The choices of when, where, and with whom to mate represent some of the most important decisions an individual can make to increase their fitness. Several studies have shown that the resources available to an individual during development can dramatically alter their mating rate later in life, and even the choice of mate. However, an individual's surroundings and available resources can change rapidly, and it is not clear how quickly the redistribution of resources towards reproduction can change. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/beheco/ary114DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6293226PMC
August 2018
1 Read

Navigating infection risk during oviposition and cannibalistic foraging in a holometabolous insect.

Behav Ecol 2018 Nov-Dec;29(6):1426-1435. Epub 2018 Aug 9.

Institute of Evolutionary Biology, School of Biological Sciences, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK.

Deciding where to eat and raise offspring carries important fitness consequences for all animals, especially if foraging, feeding, and reproduction increase pathogen exposure. In insects with complete metamorphosis, foraging mainly occurs during the larval stage, while oviposition decisions are made by adult females. Selection for infection avoidance behaviors may therefore be developmentally uncoupled. Read More

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https://academic.oup.com/beheco/advance-article/doi/10.1093/
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/beheco/ary106DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6257210PMC
August 2018
15 Reads

Experimental cross-fostering of eggs reveals effects of territory quality on reproductive allocation.

Behav Ecol 2018 Sep-Oct;29(5):1190-1198. Epub 2018 Jul 16.

Behavior, Ecology, Evolution, and Systematics Section, School of Biological Sciences, Illinois State University, Normal, IL, USA.

Parental and territory quality are often correlated in territorial birds, and both factors influence the resources allocated to offspring. Surprisingly, the relative contribution of these two components of variation in parental investment remains obscure. We experimentally decoupled the normal covariation between parental quality and territory quality to test the hypothesis that territory quality influences female prenatal and postnatal reproductive allocation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/beheco/ary098DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6129948PMC
July 2018
1 Read

Genomic analysis of MHC-based mate choice in the monogamous California mouse.

Behav Ecol 2018 Sep-Oct;29(5):1167-1180. Epub 2018 Jul 12.

Department of Integrative Biology, University of California, Berkeley, CA.

Variation at Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) genes is thought to be an important mechanism underlying mate choice in vertebrates, with individuals typically predicted to prefer MHC-dissimilar reproductive partners. However, analyses based on individual MHC loci have generated contradictory results regarding the role of these genes in mate-choice decisions. To provide a more comprehensive assessment of relationships between MHC variation and mating behavior, we used an exome capture strategy to characterize variability at 13 MHC loci, 312 innate immune system genes, and 1044 nonimmune genes in 25 obligate monogamous pairs of California mice () from 2 free-living populations of this species in Monterey County, California. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/beheco/ary096DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6129947PMC
July 2018
4 Reads

Organization enhances collective vigilance in the hovering guards of bees.

Behav Ecol 2018 Sep-Oct;29(5):1105-1112. Epub 2018 Jun 12.

Laboratory of Apiculture and Social Insects (LASI), School of Life Sciences, University of Sussex, Brighton, UK.

One benefit of group living is vigilance against predators. Previous studies have investigated the group size effect, where individual vigilance decreases as group size increases without reducing the overall ability of the group to detect predators. However, there has been comparatively little research on whether the positioning of individuals can improve the collective vigilance of the group. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/beheco/ary086DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6129946PMC
June 2018
1 Read

Dynamic conflict among heterogeneous groups: a comment on Christensen and Radford.

Behav Ecol 2018 Sep-Oct;29(5):1016-1017. Epub 2018 Apr 27.

Centre for Ecology and Conservation, University of Exeter, Penryn Campus, Penryn, Cornwall, UK.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/beheco/ary044DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6129945PMC
April 2018
1 Read

Odor alters color preference in a foraging jumping spider.

Behav Ecol 2018 Jul-Aug;29(4):833-839. Epub 2018 May 23.

Entomology and Nematology Department, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA.

In many prey taxa with aposematic coloration, prey defenses also involve signals in other modalities (odors, sounds, etc.), yet the selective forces that have driven multimodality in warning displays are not well understood. One potential hypothesis that has recently received support in the avian literature (but has yet to be examined in invertebrates) is that different signal components may interact synergistically, such that one component of a signal (odor) may trigger a predator's aversion to another component of a signal (color). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/beheco/ary068DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6041943PMC
May 2018
4 Reads

Social interactions predict genetic diversification: an experimental manipulation in shorebirds.

Behav Ecol 2018 May-Jun;29(3):609-618. Epub 2018 Feb 14.

Milner Centre for Evolution, Department of Biology and Biochemistry, University of Bath, Claverton Down, Bath, UK.

Mating strategy and social behavior influence gene flow and hence affect levels of genetic differentiation and potentially speciation. Previous genetic analyses of closely related plovers spp. found strikingly different population genetic structure in Madagascar: Kittlitz's plovers are spatially homogenous whereas white-fronted plovers have well segregated and geographically distinct populations. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/beheco/ary012DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5946871PMC
February 2018
4 Reads

A marker of biological ageing predicts adult risk preference in European starlings, .

Behav Ecol 2018 May-Jun;29(3):589-597. Epub 2018 Feb 24.

Centre for Behaviour and Evolution, Institute of Neuroscience and Newcastle University Institute of Ageing, Henry Wellcome Building, Newcastle University, Framlington Place, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK.

Why are some individuals more prone to gamble than others? Animals often show preferences between 2 foraging options with the same mean reward but different degrees of variability in the reward, and such risk preferences vary between individuals. Previous attempts to explain variation in risk preference have focused on energy budgets, but with limited empirical support. Here, we consider whether biological ageing, which affects mortality and residual reproductive value, predicts risk preference. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/beheco/ary009DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5946890PMC
February 2018
3 Reads

Social and ecological drivers of reproductive seasonality in geladas.

Behav Ecol 2018 May-Jun;29(3):574-588. Epub 2018 Feb 17.

Department of Anthropology, University of Michigan, S. University Ave., West Hall, Ann Arbor, MI, USA.

Many nonseasonally breeding mammals demonstrate some degree of synchrony in births, which is generally associated with ecological factors that mediate fecundity. However, disruptive social events, such as alpha male replacements, also have the potential to affect the timing of female reproduction. Here, we examined reproductive seasonality in a wild population of geladas () living at high altitudes in an afro-alpine ecosystem in Ethiopia. Read More

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https://academic.oup.com/beheco/article/29/3/574/4868863
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/beheco/ary008DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5946938PMC
February 2018
5 Reads

Temporal migration patterns and mating tactics influence size-assortative mating in .

Behav Ecol 2018 Mar-Apr;29(2):418-428. Epub 2018 Jan 10.

Museum für Naturkunde, Leibniz Institute for Evolution and Biodiversity Science, Berlin, Germany.

Assortative mating is a common pattern in sexually reproducing species, but the mechanisms leading to assortment remain poorly understood. By using the European common frog () as a model, we aim to understand the mechanisms leading to size-assortative mating in amphibians. With data from natural populations collected over several years, we first show a consistent pattern of size-assortative mating across our 2 study populations. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/beheco/arx188DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5873255PMC
January 2018
7 Reads

Joint care can outweigh costs of nonkin competition in communal breeders.

Behav Ecol 2018 Jan-Feb;29(1):169-178. Epub 2017 Oct 20.

School of Biological Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich Research Park, Norwich, UK.

Competition between offspring can greatly influence offspring fitness and parental investment decisions, especially in communal breeders where unrelated competitors have less incentive to concede resources. Given the potential for escalated conflict, it remains unclear what mechanisms facilitate the evolution of communal breeding among unrelated females. Resolving this question requires simultaneous consideration of offspring in noncommunal and communal nurseries, but such comparisons are missing. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/beheco/arx137DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5873242PMC
October 2017
5 Reads

Parental investment in Tibetan populations does not reflect stated cultural norms.

Authors:
Juan Du Ruth Mace

Behav Ecol 2018 Jan-Feb;29(1):106-116. Epub 2017 Oct 20.

Life Sciences, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou, Gansu Province, PRC.

In this paper, we examined both stated norms of sex preference and actual sex-biases in parental investment in a Tibetan pastoralist society. We collected detailed demographic data on infant mortality, infant feeding, the length of interbirth intervals, and a decision when giving gifts, to examine sex-biased parental investment. Our results indicate a mismatch between self-reported son preference and measures of actual parental investment that favor daughters. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/beheco/arx134DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5873243PMC
October 2017
4 Reads

Selfish partners: resource partitioning in male coalitions of Asiatic lions.

Behav Ecol 2017 Nov-Dec;28(6):1532-1539. Epub 2017 Sep 25.

Department of Animal Ecology & Conservation Biology, Wildlife Institute of India, Chandrabani, Dehra Dun, Uttarakhand 248 001, India.

Behavioral plasticity within species is adaptive which directs survival traits to take multiple pathways under varying conditions. Male-male cooperation is an evolutionary strategy often exhibiting an array of alternatives between and within species. African male lions coalesce to safeguard territories and mate acquisition. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/beheco/arx118DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5873260PMC
September 2017
4 Reads

A case for considering individual variation in diel activity patterns.

Behav Ecol 2017 Nov-Dec;28(6):1524-1531. Epub 2017 Sep 11.

Faculty of Environmental Sciences and Natural Resource Management, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, NO-1430 Ås, Norway.

There is a growing recognition of the role of individual variation in patterns emerging at higher levels of biological organization. Despite the importance of the temporal configuration of ecological processes and patterns, intraspecific individual variation in diel activity patterns is almost never accounted for in behavioral studies at the population level. We used individual-based monitoring data from 98 GPS-collared brown bears in Scandinavia to estimate diel activity patterns before the fall hunting season. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/beheco/arx122DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5873257PMC
September 2017
5 Reads

Cognition, personality, and stress in budgerigars, .

Behav Ecol 2017 Nov-Dec;28(6):1504-1516. Epub 2017 Sep 25.

Department of Biology, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces MSC 3AF, 1200 Horseshoe Drive, NM 88003, USA.

To study the fitness effects of individual variation in cognitive traits, it is paramount to understand whether traits such as personality and physiological stress influence cognitive performance. We first tested whether budgerigars showed both consistent personalities and cognitive performance across time and tasks. We tested object and food neophobia, and exploratory behavior. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/beheco/arx116DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5872908PMC
September 2017
5 Reads

Is male rhesus macaque facial coloration under intrasexual selection?

Behav Ecol 2017 Nov-Dec;28(6):1472-1481. Epub 2017 Sep 11.

Department of Anthropology, New York University, 25 Waverly Pl, New York, NY 10003, USA.

Exaggerated male traits can evolve under intra- or intersexual selection, but it remains less clear how often both mechanisms act together on trait evolution. While the males of many anthropoid primate species exhibit colorful signals that appear to be badges of status under intrasexual selection, the red facial coloration of male rhesus macaques () appears to have evolved primarily under intersexual selection and female mate choice. Nonetheless, experiments show that red color is salient to males, raising the question of whether the signal may also be under intrasexual selection. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/beheco/arx110DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5872909PMC
September 2017
5 Reads

Marginal predation: do encounter or confusion effects explain the targeting of prey group edges?

Behav Ecol 2017 Sep-Oct;28(5):1283-1292. Epub 2017 Jul 27.

School of Biological Sciences, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TQ, UK.

Marginal predation, also known as the edge effect, occurs when aggregations of prey are preferentially targeted on their periphery by predators and has long been established in many taxa. Two main processes have been used to explain this phenomenon, the confusion effect and the encounter rate between predators and prey group edges. However, it is unknown at what size a prey group needs to be before marginal predation is detectable and to what extent each mechanism drives the effect. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/beheco/arx090DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5873256PMC
July 2017
4 Reads

Camouflaging moving objects: crypsis and masquerade.

Behav Ecol 2017 Sep-Oct;28(5):1248-1255. Epub 2017 Jun 17.

School of Biological Sciences, University of Bristol, Bristol Life Sciences Building, 24 Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TQ, UK, and.

Motion is generally assumed to "break" camouflage. However, although camouflage cannot conceal a group of moving animals, it may impair a predator's ability to single one out for attack, even if that discrimination is not based on a color difference. Here, we use a computer-based task in which humans had to detect the odd one out among moving objects, with "oddity" based on shape. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/beheco/arx085DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5873248PMC
June 2017
6 Reads

Allopreening in birds is associated with parental cooperation over offspring care and stable pair bonds across years.

Behav Ecol 2017 Jul-Aug;28(4):1142-1148. Epub 2017 Jun 9.

Department of Animal and Plant Sciences, Alfred Denny Building, University of Sheffield, Western Bank, Sheffield, S10 2TN, UK, and.

Individuals of many species form bonds with their breeding partners, yet the mechanisms maintaining these bonds are poorly understood. In birds, allopreening is a conspicuous feature of interactions between breeding partners and has been hypothesized to play a role in strengthening and maintaining pair bonds within and across breeding attempts. Many avian species, however, do not allopreen and the relationship between allopreening and pair bonding across species remains unexplored. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/beheco/arx078DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5873249PMC
June 2017
5 Reads

Cut your losses: self-amputation of injured limbs increases survival.

Behav Ecol 2017 Jul-Aug;28(4):1047-1054. Epub 2017 Apr 22.

Department of Biology, University of Florida, 876 Newell Drive Gainesville, FL 32611, USA.

Autotomy, self-induced limb loss, is an extreme trait observed throughout the animal kingdom; lizards drop their tails, crickets release their legs, and crabs drop their claws. These repeated evolutionary origins suggest that autotomy is adaptive. Yet, we do not have a firm understanding of the selective pressures that promote and maintain this extreme trait. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/beheco/arx063DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5873245PMC
April 2017
6 Reads

Mate choice in sticklebacks reveals that immunogenes can drive ecological speciation.

Behav Ecol 2017 Jul-Aug;28(4):953-961. Epub 2017 Jun 1.

Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Department of Evolutionary Ecology, August- Thienemann- Str. 2, D-24306, Ploen, Germany.

Adaptation to ecologically contrasting niches can lead to the formation of new species. Theoretically, this process of ecological speciation can be driven by pleiotropic "magic traits" that genetically link natural and sexual selection. To qualify as a true magic trait, the pleiotropic function of a gene must be reflected in biologically relevant mechanisms underlying both local adaptation and mate choice. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/beheco/arx074DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5873247PMC
June 2017
5 Reads

Avoiding the misuse of BLUP in behavioural ecology.

Behav Ecol 2017 Jul-Aug;28(4):948-952. Epub 2017 Mar 2.

Centre of Ecology and Conservation, College of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Exeter, Penryn Campus, Penryn, Conrwall, TR10 9FE, UK.

Having recognized that variation around the population-level "Golden Mean" of labile traits contains biologically meaningful information, behavioural ecologists have focused increasingly on exploring the causes and consequences of individual variation in behaviour. These are exciting new directions for the field, assisted in no small part by the adoption of mixed-effects modelling techniques that enable the partitioning of among- and within-individual behavioural variation. It has become commonplace to extract predictions of individual random effects from such models for use in subsequent analyses (for example, between a personality trait and other individual traits such as cognition, physiology, or fitness-related measures). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/beheco/arx023DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5873244PMC
March 2017
4 Reads

Specialists and generalists coexist within a population of spider-hunting mud dauber wasps.

Behav Ecol 2017 May-Jun;28(3):890-898. Epub 2017 Apr 1.

Entomology and Nematology Department, University of Florida, 1881 Natural Area Drive, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA.

Individual foraging specialization describes the phenomenon where conspecifics within a population of generalists exhibit differences in foraging behavior, each specializing on different prey types. Individual specialization is widespread in animals, yet is understudied in invertebrates, despite potential impacts to food web and population dynamics (Hymenoptera: Sphecidae) is an excellent system to examine individual specialization. Females of these mud dauber wasps capture and paralyze spiders which they store in mud nests to provision their offspring. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/beheco/arx050DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5873241PMC
April 2017
5 Reads

Repeatable and heritable behavioural variation in a wild cooperative breeder.

Behav Ecol 2017 May-Jun;28(3):668-676. Epub 2017 Feb 18.

Nature Seychelles, PO Box 1310, Roche Caiman, Mahé, Republic of Seychelles.

Quantifying consistent differences in behaviour among individuals is vital to understanding the ecological and evolutionary significance of animal personality. To quantify personality, the phenotypic variation of a behavioural trait is partitioned to assess how it varies among individuals, which is also known as repeatability. If pedigree data are available, the phenotypic variation can then be further partitioned to estimate the additive genetic variance and heritability. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/beheco/arx013DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5873258PMC
February 2017
5 Reads

Relative advantages of dichromatic and trichromatic color vision in camouflage breaking.

Behav Ecol 2017 Mar-Apr;28(2):556-564. Epub 2017 Feb 4.

University of Exeter, School of Biosciences, Penryn Campus, Penryn TR10 9FE, UK.

There is huge diversity in visual systems and color discrimination abilities, thought to stem from an animal's ecology and life history. Many primate species maintain a polymorphism in color vision, whereby most individuals are dichromats but some females are trichromats, implying that selection sometimes favors dichromatic vision. Detecting camouflaged prey is thought to be a task where dichromatic individuals could have an advantage. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/beheco/arw185DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5873837PMC
February 2017
4 Reads

Environmental heterogeneity and population differences in blue tits personality traits.

Behav Ecol 2017 Mar-Apr;28(2):448-459. Epub 2016 Dec 20.

Département des Sciences Biologiques, Université du Québec à Montréal, CP-8888 Succursale Centre-ville, Montréal, Québec, Canada and.

Environmental heterogeneity can result in spatial variation in selection pressures that can produce local adaptations. The pace-of-life syndrome hypothesis predicts that habitat-specific selective pressures will favor the coevolution of personality, physiological, and life-history phenotypes. Few studies so far have compared these traits simultaneously across different ecological conditions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/beheco/arw148DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5873839PMC
December 2016
6 Reads

Consequences of sibling rivalry vary across life in a passerine bird.

Behav Ecol 2017 Mar-Apr;28(2):407-418. Epub 2016 Dec 19.

School of Biological Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich Research Park, Norwich, NR4 7TJ, UK.

Many studies have assessed the costs of sibling rivalry in systems where offspring always have competitors, but conclusions about sibling rivalry in these species are restricted to interpreting the cost of changes in the relative level of competition and are often complicated by the expression of potentially costly rivalry related traits. Additionally, the majority of studies focus on early-life sibling rivalry, but the costs of competition can also affect later-life performance. We test a suite of hypothesized immediate (early-life body mass, telomere length, and survival) and delayed (adult reproductive potential and lifespan) costs of sibling rivalry for offspring of differing competitive ability in Seychelles warblers, where most offspring are raised singly and hence competitor success can be compared to a competition-free scenario. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/beheco/arw167DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5873840PMC
December 2016
5 Reads

Transparent and credible practices under the microscope: a response to comments on Ihle et al.

Behav Ecol 2017 Mar-Apr;28(2):360-361. Epub 2017 Apr 15.

Department of Animal and Plant Sciences, Alfred Denny Building, University of Sheffield, Western Bank, Sheffield S10 2TN, UK.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/beheco/arx026DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5873835PMC
April 2017
5 Reads

Striving for transparent and credible research: practical guidelines for behavioral ecologists.

Behav Ecol 2017 Mar-Apr;28(2):348-354. Epub 2017 Mar 14.

Department of Computer Science, Regent Court, University of Sheffield, 211 Portobello, Sheffield S1 4DP, UK.

Science is meant to be the systematic and objective study of the world but evidence suggests that scientific practices are sometimes falling short of this expectation. In this invited idea, we argue that any failure to conduct research according to a documented plan (lack of ) and/or any failure to ensure that reconducting the same project would provide the same finding (lack of ), will result in a low probability of independent studies reaching the same outcome (lack of ). After outlining the challenges facing behavioral ecology and science more broadly and incorporating advice from international organizations such as the Center for Open Science (COS), we present clear guidelines and tutorials on what we think open practices represent for behavioral ecologists. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/beheco/arx003DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5873838PMC
March 2017
5 Reads

Task switching is associated with temporal delays in ants.

Behav Ecol 2017 Jan-Feb;28(1):319-327. Epub 2016 Nov 29.

Department of Neurobiology and Behavior, Cornell University , Corson-Mudd Hall, 215 Tower Road, Ithaca, NY 14850 , USA and.

The major evolutionary transitions often result in reorganization of biological systems, and a component of such reorganization is that individuals within the system specialize on performing certain tasks, resulting in a division of labor. Although the traditional benefit of division of labor is thought to be a gain in work efficiency, one alternative benefit of specialization is avoiding temporal delays associated with switching tasks. While models have demonstrated that costs of task switching can drive the evolution of division of labor, little empirical support exists for this hypothesis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/beheco/arw162DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5255904PMC
November 2016
8 Reads

Evolution of elaborate parental care: phenotypic and genetic correlations between parent and offspring traits.

Behav Ecol 2017 Jan-Feb;28(1):39-48. Epub 2016 Aug 22.

Institute of Evolutionary Biology, School of Biological Sciences, University of Edinburgh , Charlotte Auerbach Road, Edinburgh EH9 3FL , UK.

The evolution of elaborate forms of parental care is an important topic in behavioral ecology, yet the factors shaping the evolution of complex suites of parental and offspring traits are poorly understood. Here, we use a multivariate quantitative genetic approach to study phenotypic and genetic correlations between parental and offspring traits in the burying beetle . To this end, we recorded 2 prenatal traits (clutch size and egg size), 2 postnatal parental behaviors (direct care directed toward larvae and indirect care directed toward resource maintenance), 1 offspring behavior (begging), and 2 measures of breeding success (larval dispersal mass and number of dispersing larvae). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/beheco/arw129DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5255903PMC
August 2016
11 Reads

Exploration is dependent on reproductive state, not social state, in a cooperatively breeding bird.

Behav Ecol 2016 Nov-Dec;27(6):1889-1896. Epub 2016 Aug 4.

Department of Animal and Plant Sciences, University of Sheffield , Sheffield S10 2TN , UK.

Personality is an intriguing phenomenon in populations because it constrains behavioral flexibility. One theory suggests that personality could be generated and maintained if dependent on asset protection. It is predicted that trade-offs with fitness expectations and survival probability encourage consistent behavioral differences among individuals (personality). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/beheco/arw119DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5181527PMC
August 2016
8 Reads

The benefits of being toxic to deter predators depends on prey body size.

Behav Ecol 2016 Nov-Dec;27(6):1650-1655. Epub 2016 Jun 21.

Centre for Behaviour and Evolution, Institute of Neuroscience, Newcastle University, Henry Wellcome Building, Framlington Place , Newcastle upon Tyne NE2 4HH , UK.

Many prey have evolved toxins as a defense against predation. Those species that advertise their toxicity to would-be predators with conspicuous warning signals are known as "aposematic." Investment in toxicity by aposematically signaling prey is thought to underpin how aversive prey are to predators; increasing toxicity means that predators learn to avoid prey faster and attack them at lower rates. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/beheco/arw086DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5181525PMC
June 2016
7 Reads

Adult helpers increase the recruitment of closely related offspring in the cooperatively breeding rifleman.

Behav Ecol 2016 Nov-Dec;27(6):1617-1626. Epub 2016 Jun 15.

Department of Animal and Plant Sciences, University of Sheffield , Western Bank, Sheffield S10 2TN , UK and.

Indirect fitness benefits gained through kin-selected helping are widely invoked to explain the evolution of cooperative breeding behavior in birds. However, the impact of helpers on productivity of helped broods can be difficult to determine if the effects are confounded by territory quality or if the benefit of helpers is apparent only in the long term. In riflemen , helping and group membership are effectively decoupled as adult helpers are individuals that have dispersed from their natal territory and live independently from breeders in "kin neighborhoods. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/beheco/arw087DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5181526PMC
June 2016
8 Reads

Dazzle camouflage, target tracking, and the confusion effect.

Behav Ecol 2016 Sep-Oct;27(5):1547-1551. Epub 2016 May 31.

Experimental Psychology, University of Bristol , 12a Priory Road, Bristol BS8 1TU , UK.

The influence of coloration on the ecology and evolution of moving animals in groups is poorly understood. Animals in groups benefit from the "confusion effect," where predator attack success is reduced with increasing group size or density. This is thought to be due to a sensory bottleneck: an increase in the difficulty of tracking one object among many. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/beheco/arw081DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5027625PMC
May 2016
9 Reads

Sexually selected sentinels? Evidence of a role for intrasexual competition in sentinel behavior.

Behav Ecol 2016 Sep-Oct;27(5):1461-1470. Epub 2016 Apr 24.

Centre for Ecology and Conservation, University of Exeter , Cornwall Campus, Treliever Road, Penryn, Cornwall TR10 9EZ , UK and.

Although the evolutionary mechanisms that favor investment in cooperative behaviors have long been a focus of research, comparatively few studies have considered the role that sexual selection may play. For example, evolutionary explanations for sentinel behavior (where 1 individual assumes an elevated position and scans the surroundings while other group members forage nearby) have traditionally focused on the inclusive fitness benefits arising from its effects on predation risk, while its potential role in defense against intrasexual competitors remains largely unexplored. Here, we provide experimental evidence of a role for sentinel behavior in intrasexual competition, in a cooperatively breeding songbird, the white-browed sparrow weaver (). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/beheco/arw064DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5027623PMC
April 2016
17 Reads

Not leaving home: grandmothers and male dispersal in a duolocal human society.

Behav Ecol 2016 Sep-Oct;27(5):1343-1352. Epub 2016 Apr 6.

Human Evolutionary Ecology Group, Department of Anthropology, UCL , Taviton Street, London WC1H 0BW , UK.

Models suggest that dispersal patterns will influence age- and sex-dependent helping behavior in social species. Duolocal social systems (where neither sex disperses and mating is outside the group) are predicted to be associated with mothers favoring sons over daughters (because the latter are in reproductive competition with each other). Other models predict daughter-biased investment when benefits of wealth to sons are less than daughters. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/beheco/arw053DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5027622PMC
April 2016
33 Reads

Imperfect past and present progressive: beak color reflects early-life and adult exposure to antigen.

Behav Ecol 2016 Sep-Oct;27(5):1320-1330. Epub 2016 Apr 6.

Department of Integrative Biology, Oklahoma State University , 501 Life Science West, Stillwater, OK 74078 , USA and.

Secondary sexual traits may convey information about individual condition. We assessed the capacity for immune challenge with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) during the prenatal and early postnatal stages to impact beak color development and expression in captive zebra finches. In addition, we tested whether adult immune challenge impacted beak color, and if early-life experience was influential. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/beheco/arw029DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5027621PMC
April 2016
8 Reads

Maternal age at maturation underpins contrasting behavior in offspring.

Behav Ecol 2016 Sep-Oct;27(5):1280-1287. Epub 2016 May 10.

Institute of Biodiversity, Animal Health and Comparative Medicine, MVLS, University of Glasgow , University Avenue, Glasgow G12 8QQ, Scotland UK.

In species where parental care occurs primarily via the provisioning of eggs, older females tend to produce larger offspring that have better fitness prospects. Remarkably however, a relationship between age of mother and fitness of offspring has also been reported independently of effects on offspring size suggesting that there may be other factors at play. Here, using experimental matings between wild Atlantic salmon that differed in their age at sexual maturation, we demonstrate distinct size-independent variation in the behavior of their offspring that was related to the maturation age of the mother (but not the father). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/beheco/arw073DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5027624PMC
May 2016
12 Reads

Wherever I may roam: social viscosity and kin affiliation in a wild population despite natal dispersal.

Behav Ecol 2016 Jul-Aug;27(4):1263-1268. Epub 2016 Apr 1.

Edward Grey Institute, Department of Zoology, University of Oxford , South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PS , UK.

Dispersal affects the social contexts individuals experience by redistributing individuals in space, and the nature of social interactions can have important fitness consequences. During the vagrancy stage of natal dispersal, after an individual has left its natal site and before it has settled to breed, social affiliations might be predicted by opportunities to associate (e.g. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/beheco/arw042DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4943112PMC
April 2016
6 Reads