167 results match your criteria Behavioral Ecology[Journal]


Defense against predators incurs high reproductive costs for the aposematic moth .

Behav Ecol 2020 May-Jun;31(3):844-850. Epub 2020 Apr 15.

Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland.

To understand how variation in warning displays evolves and is maintained, we need to understand not only how perceivers of these traits select color and toxicity but also the sources of the genetic and phenotypic variation exposed to selection by them. We studied these aspects in the wood tiger moth which has two locally co-occurring male color morphs in Europe: yellow and white. When threatened, both morphs produce defensive secretions from their abdomen and from thoracic glands. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/beheco/araa033DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7303824PMC

Risk exposure trade-offs in the ontogeny of sexual segregation in Antarctic fur seal pups.

Behav Ecol 2020 May-Jun;31(3):719-730. Epub 2020 Mar 17.

Ecosystems Team, British Antarctic Survey, High Cross, Madingley road, Cambridge, UK.

Sexual segregation has important ecological implications, but its initial development in early life stages is poorly understood. We investigated the roles of size dimorphism, social behavior, and predation risk on the ontogeny of sexual segregation in Antarctic fur seal, , pups at South Georgia. Beaches and water provide opportunities for pup social interaction and learning (through play and swimming) but increased risk of injury and death (from other seals, predatory birds, and harsh weather), whereas tussock grass provides shelter from these risks but less developmental opportunities. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/beheco/araa018DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7303822PMC

Physical and social cues shape nest-site preference and prey capture behavior in social spiders.

Behav Ecol 2020 May-Jun;31(3):627-632. Epub 2020 Feb 14.

Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of California, Los Angeles, CA, USA.

Animals often face conflicting demands when making movement decisions. To examine the decision process of social animals, we evaluated nest-site preferences of the social spider . Colonies engage in collective web building, constructing 3D nests and 2D capture webs on trees and fences. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/beheco/araa003DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7303816PMC
February 2020

Genetic monogamy despite frequent extrapair copulations in "strictly monogamous" wild jackdaws.

Behav Ecol 2020 Jan-Feb;31(1):247-260. Epub 2019 Nov 22.

Department of Behavioural Neurobiology, Max Planck Institute for Ornithology, Eberhard-Gwinner-Strasse, Seewiesen, Germany.

"Monogamy" refers to different components of pair exclusiveness: the social pair, sexual partners, and the genetic outcome of sexual encounters. Avian monogamy is usually defined socially or genetically, whereas quantifications of sexual behavior remain scarce. Jackdaws () are considered a rare example of strict monogamy in songbirds, with lifelong pair bonds and little genetic evidence for extrapair (EP) offspring. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/beheco/arz185DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7191249PMC
November 2019

Experience modulates an insect's response to anthropogenic noise.

Behav Ecol 2020 Jan-Feb;31(1):90-96. Epub 2019 Sep 27.

Department of Ecology and Genetics, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.

In response to anthropogenic noise, vertebrates express modified acoustic communication signals either through individual plasticity or local population adaptation. In contrast, how insects respond to this stressor is poorly studied. Field crickets use acoustic signals to attract and locate mates and are commonly found in noisy roadside environments, offering a powerful system to study the effects of anthropogenic noise on insect communication. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/beheco/arz159DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7191250PMC
September 2019

Male mate choice for large gravid spots in a livebearing fish.

Behav Ecol 2020 Jan-Feb;31(1):63-72. Epub 2019 Sep 27.

Department of Zoology: Ethology, Stockholm University, Svante Arrhenius väg, Stockholm, Sweden.

Male mate choice occurs in a wide range of species, and males can increase their reproductive success by distinguishing between females based on their fecundity (e.g., large body size) or their expected sperm competition risk (e. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/beheco/arz156DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7191251PMC
September 2019

Analysis of direct and indirect genetic effects in fighting sea anemones.

Behav Ecol 2020 Mar-Apr;31(2):540-547. Epub 2020 Jan 10.

School of Biological and Marine Sciences, Animal Behaviour Research Group, University of Plymouth, Plymouth, Devon, UK.

Theoretical models of animal contests such as the Hawk-Dove game predict that variation in fighting behavior will persist due to mixed evolutionarily stable strategies (ESS) under certain conditions. However, the genetic basis for this variation is poorly understood and a mixed ESS for fighting can be interpreted in more than one way. Specifically, we do not know whether variation in aggression within a population arises from among-individual differences in fixed strategy (determined by an individual's genotype-direct genetic effects [DGEs]), or from within-individual variation in strategy across contests. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/beheco/arz217DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7083097PMC
January 2020

Affiliation history and age similarity predict alliance formation in adult male bottlenose dolphins.

Behav Ecol 2020 Mar-Apr;31(2):361-370. Epub 2019 Nov 28.

Department of Anthropology, Evolutionary Genetics Group, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland.

Male alliances are an intriguing phenomenon in the context of reproduction since, in most taxa, males compete over an indivisible resource, female fertilization. Adult male bottlenose dolphins () in Shark Bay, Western Australia, form long-term, multilevel alliances to sequester estrus females. These alliances are therefore critical to male reproductive success. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/beheco/arz195DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7083095PMC
November 2019

Towards a comparative approach to the structure of animal personality variation.

Behav Ecol 2020 Mar-Apr;31(2):340-351. Epub 2019 Nov 26.

Centre for Ecology and Conservation, University of Exeter (Penryn Campus), Cornwall, UK.

Latent personality traits underpinning observed behavioral variation have been studied in a great many species. However, a lack of standardized behavioral assays, coupled to a common reliance on inferring personality from a single, observed, behavioral trait makes it difficult to determine if, when, and how conclusions can be directly compared across taxa. Here, we estimate the among-individual (co)variance structure () for a set of four behaviors expressed in an open field trial, putatively indicative of boldness, in seven species of small freshwater fish. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/beheco/arz198DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7083098PMC
November 2019

Hierarchically embedded interaction networks represent a missing link in the study of behavioral and community ecology.

Behav Ecol 2020 Mar-Apr;31(2):279-286. Epub 2019 Oct 11.

Department of Collective Behavior, Max Planck Institute of Animal Behavior, Universitätsstraße 10, Konstanz, Germany.

Because genes and phenotypes are embedded within individuals, and individuals within populations, interactions within one level of biological organization are inherently linked to interactors at others. Here, we expand the network paradigm to consider that nodes can be embedded within other nodes, and connections (edges) between nodes at one level of organization form "bridges" for connections between nodes embedded within them. Such hierarchically embedded networks highlight two central properties of biological systems: 1) processes occurring across multiple levels of organization shape connections among biological units at any given level of organization and 2) ecological effects occurring at a given level of organization can propagate up or down to additional levels. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/beheco/arz168DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7083094PMC
October 2019

The costs and benefits of decentralization and centralization of ant colonies.

Behav Ecol 2019 Nov-Dec;30(6):1700-1706. Epub 2019 Aug 14.

Department of Biology, Wentworth Way, University of York, York, UK.

A challenge faced by individuals and groups of many species is determining how resources and activities should be spatially distributed: centralized or decentralized. This distribution problem is hard to understand due to the many costs and benefits of each strategy in different settings. Ant colonies are faced by this problem and demonstrate two solutions: 1) centralizing resources in a single nest (monodomy) and 2) decentralizing by spreading resources across many nests (polydomy). Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/beheco/arz138DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6838651PMC

Sources of intraspecific variation in the collective tempo and synchrony of ant societies.

Behav Ecol 2019 Nov-Dec;30(6):1682-1690. Epub 2019 Aug 11.

Department of Psychology, Neuroscience & Behaviour, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.

Populations of independently oscillating agents can sometimes synchronize. In the context of animal societies, conspicuous synchronization of activity is known in some social insects. However, the causes of variation in synchrony within and between species have received little attention. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/beheco/arz135DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6838655PMC

Marriage stability in a pastoralist society.

Authors:
Juan Du Ruth Mace

Behav Ecol 2019 Nov-Dec;30(6):1567-1574. Epub 2019 Jul 8.

State Key Laboratory of Grassland and Agro-ecosystems, School of Life Sciences, Lanzhou University, Tianshui Nan Lu, Lanzhou, Gansu Province, PRC.

We examined how individual investment was associated with the duration of marriage partnerships in a pastoralist society of Amdo Tibetans in China. We collected demographic and socioeconomic data from 420 women and 369 men over five villages to assess which factors predicted partnership length. We found that the payment of dowry and bridewealth from both sides of the family predicted marriage stability. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/beheco/arz115DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6838654PMC

Causes and consequences of intraspecific variation in animal responses to anthropogenic noise.

Behav Ecol 2019 Nov-Dec;30(6):1501-1511. Epub 2019 Jul 1.

School of Biological Sciences, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK.

Anthropogenic noise is a recognized global pollutant, affecting a wide range of nonhuman animals. However, most research considers only whether noise pollution has an impact, ignoring that individuals within a species or population exhibit substantial variation in responses to stress. Here, we first outline how intrinsic characteristics (e. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/beheco/arz114DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6838653PMC

Pipefish embryo oxygenation, survival, and development: egg size, male size, and temperature effects.

Behav Ecol 2019 Sep-Oct;30(5):1451-1460. Epub 2019 Jun 29.

School of Biological Sciences/Life Sciences, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK.

In animals with uniparental care, the quality of care provided by one sex can deeply impact the reproductive success of both sexes. Studying variation in parental care quality within a species and which factors may affect it can, therefore, shed important light on patterns of mate choice and other reproductive decisions observed in nature. Using , a pipefish species with extensive uniparental male care, with embryos developing inside a brood pouch during a lengthy pregnancy, we assessed how egg size (which correlates positively with female size), male size, and water temperature affect brooding traits that relate to male care quality, all measured on day 18, approximately 1/3, of the brooding period. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/beheco/arz101DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6776002PMC

Perceived threat to paternity reduces likelihood of paternal provisioning in house wrens.

Behav Ecol 2019 Sep-Oct;30(5):1336-1343. Epub 2019 Jun 5.

Behavior, Ecology, Evolution, and Systematics, School of Biological Sciences, Illinois State University, Normal, IL, USA.

Biparental care is a critical and, occasionally, unequally shared obligation that ensures that young survive to maturity. Such care may be complicated in systems in which one parent, typically the male, is unsure of his genetic relatedness to the young. Males may reduce paternal provisioning when full paternity is not assured, as occurs in mating systems in which females engage in extrapair copulations. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/beheco/arz082DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6765381PMC

Generalization of learned preferences covaries with behavioral flexibility in red junglefowl chicks.

Behav Ecol 2019 Sep-Oct;30(5):1375-1381. Epub 2019 Jul 13.

Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, IFM Biology, Linköping University, Campus Valla, inköping, Sweden.

The relationship between animal cognition and consistent among-individual behavioral differences (i.e., behavioral types, animal personality, or coping styles), has recently received increased research attention. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/beheco/arz088DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6765379PMC

Socio-ecological conditions and female infidelity in the Seychelles warbler.

Behav Ecol 2019 Sep-Oct;30(5):1254-1264. Epub 2019 May 30.

Centre for Ecology, Evolution and Conservation, School of Biological Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich Research Park, Norwich, UK.

Within socially monogamous breeding systems, levels of extra-pair paternity can vary not only between species, populations, and individuals, but also across time. Uncovering how different extrinsic conditions (ecological, demographic, and social) influence this behavior will help shed light on the factors driving its evolution. Here, we simultaneously address multiple socio-ecological conditions potentially influencing female infidelity in a natural population of the cooperatively breeding Seychelles warbler, . Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/beheco/arz072DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6765383PMC
May 2019
4 Reads

Experimental field evidence that out-group threats influence within-group behavior.

Behav Ecol 2019 Sep-Oct;30(5):1425-1435. Epub 2019 Jun 20.

School of Biological Sciences, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK.

In social species, conspecific outsiders present various threats to groups and their members. These out-group threats are predicted to affect subsequent within-group interactions (e.g. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/beheco/arz095DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6765380PMC
June 2019
1 Read

Effects of manipulated levels of predation threat on parental provisioning and nestling begging.

Behav Ecol 2019 Jul-Aug;30(4):1123-1135. Epub 2019 Apr 24.

Research Group Evolutionary Ecology of Variation, Max Planck Institute for Ornithology, Seewiesen, Germany.

Parental provisioning behavior is a major determinant of offspring growth and survival, but high provisioning rates might come at the cost of increased predation threat. Parents should thus adjust provisioning activity according to current predation threat levels. Moreover, life-history theory predicts that response to predation threat should be correlated with investment in current reproduction. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/beheco/arz060DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6606999PMC

Experimentally induced antipredator responses are mediated by social and environmental factors.

Behav Ecol 2019 Jul-Aug;30(4):986-992. Epub 2019 Apr 12.

Behavioural Physiology and Ecology, Groningen Institute for Evolutionary Life Sciences, Faculty of Science and Engineering, University of Groningen, CC Groningen, the Netherlands.

Nest predation is a common cause of reproductive failure for many bird species, and various antipredator defense behaviors have evolved to reduce the risk of nest predation. However, trade-offs between current reproductive duties and future reproduction often limit the parent's ability to respond to nest predation risk. Individual responses to experimentally increased nest predation risk can give insights into these trade-offs. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/beheco/arz039DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6606998PMC
April 2019
8 Reads

Natal habitat and sex-specific survival rates result in a male-biased adult sex ratio.

Behav Ecol 2019 May-Jun;30(3):843-851. Epub 2019 Feb 22.

Conservation Ecology Group, Groningen Institute for Evolutionary Life Sciences (GELIFES), University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands.

The adult sex ratio (ASR) is a crucial component of the ecological and evolutionary forces shaping the dynamics of a population. Although in many declining populations ASRs have been reported to be skewed, empirical studies exploring the demographic factors shaping ASRs are still rare. In this study of the socially monogamous and sexually dimorphic Black-tailed Godwit (), we aim to evaluate the sex ratio of chicks at hatch and the subsequent sex-specific survival differences occurring over 3 subsequent life stages. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/beheco/arz021DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6562303PMC
February 2019
7 Reads

Behavioral responses by an apex predator to urbanization.

Behav Ecol 2019 May-Jun;30(3):821-829. Epub 2019 Mar 2.

School of Environment and Natural Resources, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA.

Wildlife can respond to urbanization positively (synanthropic) or negatively (misanthropic), and for some species, this is a nonlinear process, whereby low levels of urbanization elicit a positive response, but this response becomes negative at high levels of urbanization. We applied concepts from foraging theory to predict positive and negative behavioral responses of coyotes () along an urbanization gradient in the Chicago metropolitan area, USA. We estimated home range size and complexity, and metrics of 3 movement behaviors (encamped, foraging, and traveling) using Hidden Markov movement models. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/beheco/arz019DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6562302PMC
March 2019
1 Read

Collective responses to heterospecifics emerge from individual differences in aggression.

Behav Ecol 2019 May-Jun;30(3):801-808. Epub 2019 Feb 22.

Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USA.

Variation in individual behavior among group members impacts collective outcomes. The ability of both individuals and groups to outcompete others can determine access to resources. The invasive Argentine ant, , dominates resources and displaces native species. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/beheco/arz017DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6562301PMC
February 2019
2 Reads

Breeding success but not mate choice is phenotype- and context-dependent in a color polymorphic raptor.

Behav Ecol 2019 May-Jun;30(3):763-769. Epub 2019 Feb 9.

Department of Wetland Ecology, Estación Biológica de Doñana, CSIC, Sevilla, Spain.

Morph-specific mate choice has been proposed as one of the evolutionary mechanisms that contribute to the maintenance of variation in color polymorphic systems. Coloration usually covaries with other phenotypic traits affecting life history and thus is often used as a criterion for mate choice. Here, we assess whether mating patterns, natal dispersal, and breeding output are phenotype-dependent in the color polymorphic Eleonora's falcon. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/beheco/arz013DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6562304PMC
February 2019
1 Read

Cleaner personality and client identity have joint consequences on cleaning interaction dynamics.

Behav Ecol 2019 May-Jun;30(3):703-712. Epub 2019 Jan 29.

School of Biosciences, Cardiff University, Sir Martin Evans Building, Museum Avenue, Cardiff, UK.

Mutualistic interactions involve 2 species beneficially cooperating, but it is not clear how these interactions are maintained. In many mutualisms, one species interacts with multiple species, and since partners differ in terms of the commodities they trade, partner identity will directly influence the decisions and behaviors of interacting individuals. Here, we investigated the consequences of within and between-species diversity on a model cleaner-client interaction in a natural environment, by quantifying the behavior of both partners. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/beheco/arz007DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6562305PMC
January 2019
11 Reads

The behavioral origins of novelty: did increased aggression lead to scale-eating in pupfishes?

Behav Ecol 2019 Mar-Apr;30(2):557-569. Epub 2019 Jan 14.

Department of Biology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, NC, USA.

Behavioral changes in a new environment are often assumed to precede the origins of evolutionary novelties. Here, we examined whether an increase in aggression is associated with a novel scale-eating trophic niche within a recent radiation of pupfishes endemic to San Salvador Island, Bahamas. We measured aggression using multiple behavioral assays and used transcriptomic analyses to identify differentially expressed genes in aggression and other behavioral pathways across 3 sympatric species in the San Salvador radiation (generalist, snail-eating specialist, and scale-eating specialist) and 2 generalist outgroups. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://academic.oup.com/beheco/article/30/2/557/5289190
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/beheco/ary196DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6450202PMC
January 2019
15 Reads

Temporal plasticity in habitat selection criteria explains patterns of animal dispersal.

Behav Ecol 2019 Mar-Apr;30(2):528-540. Epub 2019 Jan 12.

Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, Rhinelander, WI, USA.

Patterns of dispersal behavior are often driven by the composition and configuration of suitable habitat in a matrix of unsuitable habitat. Interactions between animal behavior and landscapes can therefore influence population dynamics, population and species distributions, population genetic structure, and the evolution of behavior. Spatially explicit individual-based models (IBMs) are ideal tools for exploring the effects of landscape structure on dispersal. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/beheco/ary193DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6450207PMC
January 2019
1 Read

Juvenile social experience generates differences in behavioral variation but not averages.

Behav Ecol 2019 Mar-Apr;30(2):455-464. Epub 2018 Dec 21.

Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, USA.

Developmental plasticity is known to influence the mean behavioral phenotype of a population. Yet, studies on how developmental plasticity shapes patterns of variation within populations are comparatively rare and often focus on a subset of developmental cues (e.g. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://academic.oup.com/beheco/article/30/2/455/5255902
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/beheco/ary185DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6450201PMC
December 2018
21 Reads

Multiple environmental cues impact habitat choice during nocturnal homing of specialized reef shrimp.

Behav Ecol 2019 Mar-Apr;30(2):348-355. Epub 2018 Dec 15.

School of Marine Science and Policy, University of Delaware, Lewes, USA.

Habitat selection is a critical process for animals throughout their life, and adult organisms that travel to forage or mate must reselect habitat frequently. On coral reefs, competition for space has led to a high proportion of habitat specialists. Habitat selection is especially vital for organisms that require specialized habitat; however, research has primarily focused on the initial habitat choice made during the larval/juvenile stage. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/beheco/ary171DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6450203PMC
December 2018
1 Read

Individual variation and the source-sink group dynamics of extra-group paternity in a social mammal.

Behav Ecol 2019 Mar-Apr;30(2):301-312. Epub 2019 Jan 14.

Centre for Ecology and Conservation, University of Exeter, Penryn, Cornwall, UK.

Movement of individuals, or their genes, can influence eco-evolutionary processes in structured populations. We have limited understanding of the extent to which spatial behavior varies among groups and individuals within populations. Here, we use genetic pedigree reconstruction in a long-term study of European badgers () to characterize the extent of extra-group paternity, occurring as a consequence of breeding excursions, and to test hypothesized drivers of variation at multiple levels. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/beheco/ary164DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6450204PMC
January 2019
1 Read

Extrapair mating and the strength of sexual selection: insights from a polymorphic species.

Behav Ecol 2019 Mar-Apr;30(2):278-290. Epub 2019 Feb 9.

Department of Biology, Indiana State University, Terre Haute, IN, USA.

Extrapair mating could drive sexual selection in socially monogamous species, but support for this hypothesis remains equivocal. We used lifetime fitness data and a unique model species, the dimorphic white-throated sparrow (), to examine how extrapair mating affects the potential for sexual selection. In this species, the morphs employ distinct reproductive strategies, with white males pursuing extrapair mating at higher rates than tan counterparts. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/beheco/ary160DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6450205PMC
February 2019
1 Read

Gene expression shifts in yellow-bellied marmots prior to natal dispersal.

Behav Ecol 2019 Mar-Apr;30(2):267-277. Epub 2018 Dec 17.

Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USA.

The causes and consequences of vertebrate natal dispersal have been studied extensively, yet little is known about the molecular mechanisms involved. We used RNA-seq to quantify transcriptomic gene expression in blood of wild yellow-bellied marmots () prior to dispersing from or remaining philopatric to their natal colony. We tested 3 predictions. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/beheco/ary175DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6450206PMC
December 2018
6 Reads

Counting crows: population structure and group size variation in an urban population of crows.

Behav Ecol 2019 Jan-Feb;30(1):57-67. Epub 2018 Dec 8.

Department of Cognitive Biology, University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.

Social complexity arises from the formation of social relationships like social bonds and dominance hierarchies. In turn, these aspects may be affected by the degree of fission-fusion dynamics, i.e. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/beheco/ary157DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6398430PMC
December 2018
1 Read

Collective behavior and colony persistence of social spiders depends on their physical environment.

Behav Ecol 2019 Jan-Feb;30(1):39-47. Epub 2018 Dec 8.

Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Marine Biology, University of California Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA, USA.

The physical environment occupied by group-living animals can profoundly affect their cooperative social interactions and therefore their collective behavior and success. These effects can be especially apparent in human-modified habitats, which often harbor substantial variation in the physical environments available within them. For nest-building animal societies, this influence of the physical environment on collective behavior can be mediated by the construction of nests-nests could either buffer animal behavior from changes in the physical environment or facilitate shifts in behavior through changes in nest structure. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/beheco/ary158DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6398429PMC
December 2018
1 Read

Past and present resource availability affect mating rate but not mate choice in .

Behav Ecol 2018 Nov-Dec;29(6):1409-1414. Epub 2018 Aug 11.

Department of Zoology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, B.C., Canada.

The choices of when, where, and with whom to mate represent some of the most important decisions an individual can make to increase their fitness. Several studies have shown that the resources available to an individual during development can dramatically alter their mating rate later in life, and even the choice of mate. However, an individual's surroundings and available resources can change rapidly, and it is not clear how quickly the redistribution of resources towards reproduction can change. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/beheco/ary114DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6293226PMC
August 2018
2 Reads

Navigating infection risk during oviposition and cannibalistic foraging in a holometabolous insect.

Behav Ecol 2018 Nov-Dec;29(6):1426-1435. Epub 2018 Aug 9.

Institute of Evolutionary Biology, School of Biological Sciences, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK.

Deciding where to eat and raise offspring carries important fitness consequences for all animals, especially if foraging, feeding, and reproduction increase pathogen exposure. In insects with complete metamorphosis, foraging mainly occurs during the larval stage, while oviposition decisions are made by adult females. Selection for infection avoidance behaviors may therefore be developmentally uncoupled. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://academic.oup.com/beheco/advance-article/doi/10.1093/
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/beheco/ary106DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6257210PMC
August 2018
27 Reads

Experimental cross-fostering of eggs reveals effects of territory quality on reproductive allocation.

Behav Ecol 2018 Sep-Oct;29(5):1190-1198. Epub 2018 Jul 16.

Behavior, Ecology, Evolution, and Systematics Section, School of Biological Sciences, Illinois State University, Normal, IL, USA.

Parental and territory quality are often correlated in territorial birds, and both factors influence the resources allocated to offspring. Surprisingly, the relative contribution of these two components of variation in parental investment remains obscure. We experimentally decoupled the normal covariation between parental quality and territory quality to test the hypothesis that territory quality influences female prenatal and postnatal reproductive allocation. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/beheco/ary098DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6129948PMC
July 2018
3 Reads

Genomic analysis of MHC-based mate choice in the monogamous California mouse.

Behav Ecol 2018 Sep-Oct;29(5):1167-1180. Epub 2018 Jul 12.

Department of Integrative Biology, University of California, Berkeley, CA.

Variation at Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) genes is thought to be an important mechanism underlying mate choice in vertebrates, with individuals typically predicted to prefer MHC-dissimilar reproductive partners. However, analyses based on individual MHC loci have generated contradictory results regarding the role of these genes in mate-choice decisions. To provide a more comprehensive assessment of relationships between MHC variation and mating behavior, we used an exome capture strategy to characterize variability at 13 MHC loci, 312 innate immune system genes, and 1044 nonimmune genes in 25 obligate monogamous pairs of California mice () from 2 free-living populations of this species in Monterey County, California. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/beheco/ary096DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6129947PMC
July 2018
12 Reads

Organization enhances collective vigilance in the hovering guards of bees.

Behav Ecol 2018 Sep-Oct;29(5):1105-1112. Epub 2018 Jun 12.

Laboratory of Apiculture and Social Insects (LASI), School of Life Sciences, University of Sussex, Brighton, UK.

One benefit of group living is vigilance against predators. Previous studies have investigated the group size effect, where individual vigilance decreases as group size increases without reducing the overall ability of the group to detect predators. However, there has been comparatively little research on whether the positioning of individuals can improve the collective vigilance of the group. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/beheco/ary086DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6129946PMC
June 2018
3 Reads

Dynamic conflict among heterogeneous groups: a comment on Christensen and Radford.

Behav Ecol 2018 Sep-Oct;29(5):1016-1017. Epub 2018 Apr 27.

Centre for Ecology and Conservation, University of Exeter, Penryn Campus, Penryn, Cornwall, UK.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/beheco/ary044DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6129945PMC
April 2018
2 Reads

Odor alters color preference in a foraging jumping spider.

Behav Ecol 2018 Jul-Aug;29(4):833-839. Epub 2018 May 23.

Entomology and Nematology Department, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA.

In many prey taxa with aposematic coloration, prey defenses also involve signals in other modalities (odors, sounds, etc.), yet the selective forces that have driven multimodality in warning displays are not well understood. One potential hypothesis that has recently received support in the avian literature (but has yet to be examined in invertebrates) is that different signal components may interact synergistically, such that one component of a signal (odor) may trigger a predator's aversion to another component of a signal (color). Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/beheco/ary068DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6041943PMC
May 2018
5 Reads

Social interactions predict genetic diversification: an experimental manipulation in shorebirds.

Behav Ecol 2018 May-Jun;29(3):609-618. Epub 2018 Feb 14.

Milner Centre for Evolution, Department of Biology and Biochemistry, University of Bath, Claverton Down, Bath, UK.

Mating strategy and social behavior influence gene flow and hence affect levels of genetic differentiation and potentially speciation. Previous genetic analyses of closely related plovers spp. found strikingly different population genetic structure in Madagascar: Kittlitz's plovers are spatially homogenous whereas white-fronted plovers have well segregated and geographically distinct populations. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/beheco/ary012DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5946871PMC
February 2018
6 Reads

A marker of biological ageing predicts adult risk preference in European starlings, .

Behav Ecol 2018 May-Jun;29(3):589-597. Epub 2018 Feb 24.

Centre for Behaviour and Evolution, Institute of Neuroscience and Newcastle University Institute of Ageing, Henry Wellcome Building, Newcastle University, Framlington Place, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK.

Why are some individuals more prone to gamble than others? Animals often show preferences between 2 foraging options with the same mean reward but different degrees of variability in the reward, and such risk preferences vary between individuals. Previous attempts to explain variation in risk preference have focused on energy budgets, but with limited empirical support. Here, we consider whether biological ageing, which affects mortality and residual reproductive value, predicts risk preference. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/beheco/ary009DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5946890PMC
February 2018
5 Reads

Social and ecological drivers of reproductive seasonality in geladas.

Behav Ecol 2018 May-Jun;29(3):574-588. Epub 2018 Feb 17.

Department of Anthropology, University of Michigan, S. University Ave., West Hall, Ann Arbor, MI, USA.

Many nonseasonally breeding mammals demonstrate some degree of synchrony in births, which is generally associated with ecological factors that mediate fecundity. However, disruptive social events, such as alpha male replacements, also have the potential to affect the timing of female reproduction. Here, we examined reproductive seasonality in a wild population of geladas () living at high altitudes in an afro-alpine ecosystem in Ethiopia. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://academic.oup.com/beheco/article/29/3/574/4868863
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/beheco/ary008DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5946938PMC
February 2018
7 Reads

Temporal migration patterns and mating tactics influence size-assortative mating in .

Behav Ecol 2018 Mar-Apr;29(2):418-428. Epub 2018 Jan 10.

Museum für Naturkunde, Leibniz Institute for Evolution and Biodiversity Science, Berlin, Germany.

Assortative mating is a common pattern in sexually reproducing species, but the mechanisms leading to assortment remain poorly understood. By using the European common frog () as a model, we aim to understand the mechanisms leading to size-assortative mating in amphibians. With data from natural populations collected over several years, we first show a consistent pattern of size-assortative mating across our 2 study populations. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/beheco/arx188DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5873255PMC
January 2018
9 Reads

Joint care can outweigh costs of nonkin competition in communal breeders.

Behav Ecol 2018 Jan-Feb;29(1):169-178. Epub 2017 Oct 20.

School of Biological Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich Research Park, Norwich, UK.

Competition between offspring can greatly influence offspring fitness and parental investment decisions, especially in communal breeders where unrelated competitors have less incentive to concede resources. Given the potential for escalated conflict, it remains unclear what mechanisms facilitate the evolution of communal breeding among unrelated females. Resolving this question requires simultaneous consideration of offspring in noncommunal and communal nurseries, but such comparisons are missing. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/beheco/arx137DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5873242PMC
October 2017
7 Reads

Parental investment in Tibetan populations does not reflect stated cultural norms.

Authors:
Juan Du Ruth Mace

Behav Ecol 2018 Jan-Feb;29(1):106-116. Epub 2017 Oct 20.

Life Sciences, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou, Gansu Province, PRC.

In this paper, we examined both stated norms of sex preference and actual sex-biases in parental investment in a Tibetan pastoralist society. We collected detailed demographic data on infant mortality, infant feeding, the length of interbirth intervals, and a decision when giving gifts, to examine sex-biased parental investment. Our results indicate a mismatch between self-reported son preference and measures of actual parental investment that favor daughters. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/beheco/arx134DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5873243PMC
October 2017
5 Reads

Selfish partners: resource partitioning in male coalitions of Asiatic lions.

Behav Ecol 2017 Nov-Dec;28(6):1532-1539. Epub 2017 Sep 25.

Department of Animal Ecology & Conservation Biology, Wildlife Institute of India, Chandrabani, Dehra Dun, Uttarakhand 248 001, India.

Behavioral plasticity within species is adaptive which directs survival traits to take multiple pathways under varying conditions. Male-male cooperation is an evolutionary strategy often exhibiting an array of alternatives between and within species. African male lions coalesce to safeguard territories and mate acquisition. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/beheco/arx118DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5873260PMC
September 2017
6 Reads

A case for considering individual variation in diel activity patterns.

Behav Ecol 2017 Nov-Dec;28(6):1524-1531. Epub 2017 Sep 11.

Faculty of Environmental Sciences and Natural Resource Management, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, NO-1430 Ås, Norway.

There is a growing recognition of the role of individual variation in patterns emerging at higher levels of biological organization. Despite the importance of the temporal configuration of ecological processes and patterns, intraspecific individual variation in diel activity patterns is almost never accounted for in behavioral studies at the population level. We used individual-based monitoring data from 98 GPS-collared brown bears in Scandinavia to estimate diel activity patterns before the fall hunting season. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/beheco/arx122DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5873257PMC
September 2017
7 Reads