29 results match your criteria Bedside Ultrasonography Lumbar Puncture

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Optic nerve sonographic examination to predict raised intracranial pressure in idiopathic intracranial hypertension: The cut-off points.

Neuroradiol J 2018 Oct 19;31(5):490-495. Epub 2018 Jul 19.

3 Human physiology Department, Faculty of Medicine, Cairo University, Egypt.

Purpose Monitoring of raised intracranial pressure (ICP) in patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is required to prevent secondary optic nerve damage. Sonographic measurement of the optic nerve sheath diameter (ONSD) is a noninvasive method to evaluate intracranial hypertension. Different ONSD cut-off values have been reported probably due to ethnic variations. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1971400918789385DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6136137PMC
October 2018
19 Reads

Point-of-Care Ultrasound in Established Settings.

South Med J 2018 07;111(7):373-381

From the Departments of Emergency Medicine and Internal Medicine, Greenville Health System, University of South Carolina School of Medicine, Greenville, the Department of Medicine, Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, University of South Carolina School of Medicine, Columbia, and the Department of Medicine, Division of General and Hospital Medicine, University of Texas Health, San Antonio.

The original and most widely accepted applications for point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) are in the settings of trauma, shock, and bedside procedures. Trauma was the original setting for the introduction of POCUS and has been standardized under the four-plus view examination called the Focused Assessment with Sonography in Trauma (FAST). This examination was found to be especially practice changing for achieving rapid diagnoses in critically ill patients who are too unstable for the delays and transportation inherent in more advanced imaging with computed tomography. Read More

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http://sma.org/southern-medical-journal/article/point-of-car
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http://dx.doi.org/10.14423/SMJ.0000000000000838DOI Listing
July 2018
10 Reads

Lumbar Spine Anatomy in Women Sustaining Unintentional Dural Puncture During Labor Epidural Placement: A Descriptive Study Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Ultrasound.

Reg Anesth Pain Med 2018 Jan;43(1):92-96

Background And Objectives: Unintentional dural puncture is one of the most frequent complications of the epidural technique. One previous study suggested that atypical sonoanatomy of the ligamentum flavum/dura mater unit may be a risk factor for this complication. In this study, we describe the anatomy of the lumbar spine, assessed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasound, in women sustaining unintentional dural puncture during epidural catheter placement for labor analgesia. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/AAP.0000000000000693DOI Listing
January 2018
8 Reads

Noninvasive and quantitative intracranial pressure estimation using ultrasonographic measurement of optic nerve sheath diameter.

Sci Rep 2017 02 7;7:42063. Epub 2017 Feb 7.

Department of Neurology, The Neuroscience Center, The First Hospital of Jilin University, Jilin University, Changchun, China.

We aimed to quantitatively assess intracranial pressure (ICP) using optic nerve sheath diameter (ONSD) measurements. We recruited 316 neurology patients in whom ultrasonographic ONSD was measured before lumbar puncture. They were randomly divided into a modeling and a test group at a ratio of 7:3. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/srep42063DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5294647PMC
February 2017
7 Reads

How to do it: bedside ultrasound to assist lumbar puncture.

Pract Neurol 2017 Jan 28;17(1):47-50. Epub 2016 Nov 28.

Department of Neurology, Harrogate and District NHS Foundation Trust, Harrogate, UK.

For many neurologists, lumbar puncture is the only practical procedure that they undertake on a regular basis. Although anaesthetists and emergency physicians routinely employ ultrasound to assist lumbar puncture, neurologists do not. In this article, we outline the technique that we use for an ultrasound-assisted lumbar puncture, together with the evidence base that suggests that ultrasound has significant benefits. Read More

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http://pn.bmj.com/lookup/doi/10.1136/practneurol-2016-001463
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/practneurol-2016-001463DOI Listing
January 2017
29 Reads

The Effect of Bedside Ultrasonographic Skin Marking on Infant Lumbar Puncture Success: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

Ann Emerg Med 2017 May 14;69(5):610-619.e1. Epub 2016 Nov 14.

Division of Emergency Medicine, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA.

Study Objective: Lumbar puncture is a commonly performed procedure, although previous studies have documented low rates of successful completion in infants. Ultrasonography can visualize the anatomic landmarks for lumbar puncture and has been shown in some studies to reduce the failure rate of lumbar puncture in adults. We seek to determine whether ultrasonography-assisted site marking increases success for infant lumbar punctures. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.annemergmed.2016.09.014DOI Listing
May 2017
10 Reads

Voltage-gated potassium channel antibody limbic encephalitis: a case illustrating the neuropsychiatric and PET/CT features with clinical and imaging follow-up.

Australas Psychiatry 2016 Dec 2;24(6):538-540. Epub 2016 Sep 2.

Neurologist, Fiona Stanley Hospital, Perth, WA, Australia.

Objective: To illustrate the neuropsychiatric and imaging findings in a confirmed case of voltage-gated potassium channel antibody limbic encephalitis.

Method: Case report and review of the literature.

Results: A 64-year-old man presented with several months' history of obsessive thoughts and compulsions associated with faciobrachial dystonic seizures. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1039856216663734DOI Listing
December 2016
9 Reads

Can intracranial pressure be measured non-invasively bedside using a two-depth Doppler-technique?

J Clin Monit Comput 2017 Apr 14;31(2):459-467. Epub 2016 Mar 14.

Department Radiation Sciences - Biomedical Engineering, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.

Measurement of intracranial pressure (ICP) is necessary in many neurological and neurosurgical diseases. To avoid lumbar puncture or intracranial ICP probes, non-invasive ICP techniques are becoming popular. A recently developed technology uses two-depth Doppler to compare arterial pulsations in the intra- and extra-cranial segments of the ophthalmic artery for non-invasive estimation of ICP. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10877-016-9862-4DOI Listing
April 2017
4 Reads

Bedside Optic Nerve Sheath Diameter Assessment in the Identification of Increased Intracranial Pressure in Suspected Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension.

Pediatr Neurol 2016 Jan 28;54:35-8. Epub 2015 Aug 28.

Department of Pediatrics, University of Florida, Division of Pediatric Critical Care, Jacksonville, Florida.

Objective: We determined whether the bedside assessment of the optic nerve sheath diameter could identify elevated intracranial pressure in individuals with suspected idiopathic intracranial hypertension.

Methods: This was a single-center, prospective, rater-blinded study performed in a freestanding pediatric teaching hospital. Patients aged 12 to 18 years scheduled for an elective lumbar puncture with the suspicion of idiopathic intracranial hypertension were eligible to participate. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pediatrneurol.2015.08.009DOI Listing
January 2016
6 Reads

Fluoroscopy-Guided Lumbar Drainage of Cerebrospinal Fluid for Patients in Whom a Blind Beside Approach Is Difficult.

Korean J Radiol 2015 Jul-Aug;16(4):860-5. Epub 2015 Jul 1.

Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam 463-707, Korea.

Objective: To evaluate the rates of technical success, clinical success, and complications of fluoroscopy-guided lumbar cerebrospinal fluid drainage.

Materials And Methods: This retrospective study was approved by the Institutional Review Board of our hospital, and informed consent was waived. Ninety-six procedures on 60 consecutive patients performed July 2008 to December 2013 were evaluated. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3348/kjr.2015.16.4.860DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4499551PMC
February 2016
7 Reads

Can sonographic measurement of optic nerve sheath diameter be used to detect raised intracranial pressure in patients with tuberculous meningitis? A prospective observational study.

Indian J Radiol Imaging 2015 Apr-Jun;25(2):173-6

Department of Emergency Medicine, BJ Medical College, Civil Hospital, Ahmedabad, Gujarat, India.

Unlabelled: CNS Tuberculosis can manifest as meningitis, arachnoiditis and a tuberculoma. The rupture of a tubercle into the subarachnoid space leads to Tuberculosis Meningitis (TBME); the resulting hypersensitivity reaction can lead to an elevation of the intracranial pressure and hydrocephalus. While bedside optic nerve sheath diameter (ONSD) ultrasonography (USG) can be a sensitive screening test for elevated intracranial pressure in adult head injury, little is known regarding ONSD measurements in Tuberculosis Meningitis. Read More

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http://www.ijri.org/text.asp?2015/25/2/173/155869
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/0971-3026.155869DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4419427PMC
May 2015
8 Reads

Simulation-based educational curriculum for fluoroscopically guided lumbar puncture improves operator confidence and reduces patient dose.

Acad Radiol 2015 May;22(5):668-73

Department of Radiology, University of Tennessee Graduate School of Medicine, 1924 Alcoa Hwy, UTMC Nuclear Medicine, Knoxville, TN 37920; Department of Radiology, University of Tennessee Medical Center, Knoxville, Tennessee. Electronic address:

Rationale And Objectives: Fluoroscopically guided lumbar puncture (FGLP) is a commonly performed procedure with increased success rates relative to bedside technique. However, FGLP also exposes both patient and staff to ionizing radiation. The purpose of this study was to determine if the use of a simulation-based FGLP training program using an original, inexpensive lumbar spine phantom could improve operator confidence and efficiency, while also reducing patient dose. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S10766332150007
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.acra.2014.12.024DOI Listing
May 2015
5 Reads
1 Citation
2.080 Impact Factor

Transcranial ultrasound to detect elevated intracranial pressure: comparison of septum pellucidum undulations and optic nerve sheath diameter.

Ultrasound Med Biol 2015 May 28;41(5):1233-40. Epub 2015 Jan 28.

Department of Neurology, University Hospital Frankfurt, Frankfurt am Main, Germany. Electronic address:

Two ultrasound tests that can be used to assess increased intracranial pressure (ICP) at the bedside are described. In outpatients receiving lumbar puncture and in intensive care patients with invasive ICP monitoring, we measured the optic nerve sheath diameter (ONSD) with transbulbar B-mode sonography and septum pellucidum undulation (SPU) induced by repeated passive head rotation with transtemporal M-mode sonography. We assessed the sensitivity and specificity of ONSD and SPU in the prediction of ICP >20 cm H2O. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ultrasmedbio.2014.12.023DOI Listing
May 2015
29 Reads

Real-time optic nerve sheath diameter reduction measured with bedside ultrasound after therapeutic lumbar puncture in a patient with idiopathic intracranial hypertension.

Am J Emerg Med 2015 Jun 19;33(6):860.e5-7. Epub 2014 Dec 19.

Department of Emergency Medicine at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA. Electronic address:

Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH), also referred to as pseudotumor cerebri, is a condition of raised intracranial pressure (ICP) with unknown etiology. Sonographic measurement of optic nerve sheath diameter (ONSD) has been shown to be a reliable, noninvasive method to characterize elevated ICP in a variety of settings. However, little is known about the immediate response of ONSD to an acute reduction in ICP after lumbar puncture. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajem.2014.12.030DOI Listing
June 2015
6 Reads

The role of bedside ultrasound in pretherapeutic and posttherapeutic lumbar puncture in patient with idiopathic intracranial hypertension.

Am J Emerg Med 2014 Oct 26;32(10):1298.e3-4. Epub 2014 Mar 26.

NYMC, Metropolitan Hospital Center, Department of Emergency Medicine, New York, NY.

Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH), also known as pseudotumor cerebri, is often a debilitating condition characterized by headaches, blurry vision, nausea, and vomiting. Lumbar puncture (LP) is an essential component of the diagnostic and therapeutic approach; however, the procedure itself can cause postlumbar puncture headache. In addition to the clinical presentation, the use of bedside ultrasound to measure the optic nerve sheath diameter may aid in differentiating the 2 conditions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajem.2014.03.028DOI Listing
October 2014
4 Reads

Advanced ultrasound procedures.

Crit Care Clin 2014 Apr 4;30(2):305-29, vi. Epub 2013 Dec 4.

EM Residency Program, Department of Emergency Medicine, Maricopa Medical Center, University of Arizona College of Medicine-Phoenix, 2601 East Roosevelt Street, Phoenix, AZ 85008, USA.

Ultrasound guidance has become the standard of care for many bedside procedures, owing to its portability, ease of use, and significant reduction in complications. This article serves as an introduction to the use of ultrasonography in several advanced procedures, including pericardiocentesis, thoracentesis, paracentesis, lumbar puncture, regional anesthesia, and peritonsillar abscess drainage. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ccc.2013.10.005DOI Listing
April 2014
7 Reads

Usefulness of transcranial Doppler-derived cerebral hemodynamic parameters in the noninvasive assessment of intracranial pressure.

J Neuroimaging 2015 Jan-Feb;25(1):111-6. Epub 2014 Mar 5.

Division of Neurology, National University Health System, Singapore.

Background: Transcranial Doppler (TCD) ultrasonography is a noninvasive bedside tool that can evaluate cerebral blood flow hemodynamics in major intracranial arteries. TCD-derived pulsatility index (PI) is believed to be influenced by intracranial pressure (ICP).

Objective: To correlate TCD-PI with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure (representing ICP), measured by standard lumbar puncture (LP) manometry. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jon.12100DOI Listing
September 2015
6 Reads

Ultrasound-guided procedures in the emergency department-diagnostic and therapeutic asset.

Emerg Med Clin North Am 2013 Feb;31(1):117-49

Department of Emergency Medicine, Florida Hospital-East Orlando, 7727 Lake Underhill Road, Orlando, FL 32822, USA.

Bedside ultrasound is an extremely valuable and rapidly accessible diagnostic and therapeutic modality in potentially life- and limb-threatening situations in the emergency department. In this report, the authors discuss the role of ultrasound in quick assessment of pathologic conditions and its use to aid in diagnostic and therapeutic interventions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.emc.2012.09.009DOI Listing
February 2013
7 Reads

Bedside ultrasound education in pediatric emergency medicine fellowship programs in the United States.

Pediatr Emerg Care 2012 Sep;28(9):845-50

Division of Emergency Medicine, Children's National Medical Center, Washington, DC, USA.

Objectives: As the use of bedside ultrasound becomes more prevalent in pediatric emergency departments, the need for a national curriculum for fellows' training in pediatric emergency medicine (PEM) has increased. The objectives of this study were to describe the current state of bedside ultrasound education among existing PEM fellowship programs and to explore the interest in a national curriculum.

Methods: A 20-question survey was sent to all 57 PEM fellowship directors in the United States in February 2011. Read More

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http://content.wkhealth.com/linkback/openurl?sid=WKPTLP:land
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PEC.0b013e318267a771DOI Listing
September 2012
15 Reads

Positioning of infants in the neonatal intensive care unit for lumbar puncture as determined by bedside ultrasonography.

Arch Dis Child Fetal Neonatal Ed 2013 Mar 9;98(2):F133-5. Epub 2012 Jun 9.

Department of Paediatrics and Child Health, Kocaeli University Faculty of Medicine, Umuttepe Yerleskesi, Izmit, Kocaeli, 41380, Turkey.

Realising the paucity of data in the standardisation of the optimal position for lumbar puncture (LP) in hospitalised neonates, we have designed an observational study to measure the interspinous distance in infants in a university hospital setting. The infants were placed in two lateral recumbent and two upright positions (lateral recumbent without flexing the hips, lateral recumbent with maximal hip flexion, sitting without flexing the hips and sitting with maximal hip flexion) with concomitant heart rate (HR), transcutaneous oxygen saturation (OS) and interspinous distance (with ultrasonography) measurements. Having the patient sit with maximal hip flexion provided the largest interspinous space for the grand majority of the infants. Read More

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http://akademikpersonel.kocaeli.edu.tr/Selim.Oncel/sci/Selim
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http://fn.bmj.com/cgi/doi/10.1136/archdischild-2011-301475
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/archdischild-2011-301475DOI Listing
March 2013
6 Reads

The lumbar sedimentation sign: spinal MRI findings in patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage with no demonstrable intracranial aneurysm.

Br J Radiol 2011 Mar;84(999):279-81

Department of Neuroradiology, Derriford Hospital, Plymouth Hospitals NHS trust, Plymouth, Devon.

We present a new MRI finding within the lumbar spine in a series of six patients admitted with CT proven subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) where cerebral angiography demonstrated no aneurysm and who had not had a lumbar puncture. A retrospective audit of 130 patients presenting to a regional neurosciences centre over a 13 month period with a suspected diagnosis of SAH was performed. Seven patients with proven SAH underwent MRI of the lumbar spine during the same admission. Read More

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http://www.birpublications.org/doi/10.1259/bjr/68122723
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1259/bjr/68122723DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3473883PMC
March 2011
3 Reads

Positioning for lumbar puncture in children evaluated by bedside ultrasound.

Pediatrics 2010 May 19;125(5):e1149-53. Epub 2010 Apr 19.

Section of Pediatric Emergency Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Yale-New Haven Children's Hospital, New Haven, Connecticut, USA.

Background: Lumbar punctures are commonly performed in the pediatric emergency department. There is no standard, recommended, optimal position for children who are undergoing the procedure.

Objective: To determine a position for lumbar punctures where the interspinous space is maximized, as measured by bedside ultrasound. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1542/peds.2009-0646DOI Listing
May 2010
5 Reads

Ultrasound identification of landmarks preceding lumbar puncture: a pilot study.

Emerg Med J 2009 Apr;26(4):276-7

Wilford Hall Medical Center, Lackland AFB, Texas, USA.

Aim: To assess the utility of bedside ultrasound performed by an emergency physician in adults undergoing diagnostic lumbar puncture.

Method: Ultrasound was used as the primary means of determining the site of skin puncture, angle of needle advancement and depth needed to access the subarachnoid space.

Results: Cerebrospinal fluid was obtained from 36 of 39 patients (92. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/emj.2007.057455DOI Listing
April 2009
3 Reads

Bedside pediatric emergency evaluation through ultrasonography.

Pediatr Radiol 2008 Nov 23;38 Suppl 4:S679-84. Epub 2008 Sep 23.

Department of Pediatrics, Nationwide Children's Hospital, Ohio State University College of Medicine, Columbus, OH 43205, USA.

Bedside US has emerged as a valuable technology for the emergency department physician. It impacts clinical decision-making and the safety of procedures, and it decreases the time and increases the efficiency for completion of procedures. The portability, accuracy and noninvasive nature of US make it an ideal tool for the trained clinician. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/content/pdf/10.1007/s00247-008-0890
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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s00247-008-0890-1
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00247-008-0890-1DOI Listing
November 2008
9 Reads

Imaging of the neonatal CNS.

Eur J Radiol 2006 Nov 14;60(2):133-51. Epub 2006 Sep 14.

Department of Radiology, LKH Graz, University Hospital, Auenbruggenplatz 9, A-8036 Graz, Austria.

Imaging of the central nervous system is one of the major tasks of Paediatric Radiology, particularly in newborns, who present with a variety of conditions that need more or less urgent imaging. Imaging is usually performed primarily by bedside US, in rare cases supplemented by a skull or spine radiograph. For more detailed information and preoperatively, MRI has become the neuroimaging tool. Read More

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http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0720048X0600316
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ejrad.2006.07.019DOI Listing
November 2006
2 Reads

Detection of metallic ocular foreign bodies with handheld sonography in a porcine model.

J Ultrasound Med 2005 Oct;24(10):1341-6

Department of Emergency Medicine, Medical College of Georgia, 1120 15th St, AF-2056, Augusta, GA 30912-4007, USA.

Objective: Eye conditions are common in emergency departments. Intraocular foreign bodies (IOFBs) are a frequent concern. Orbital computed tomography (CT) is traditionally used for evaluation. Read More

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October 2005
3 Reads

Bedside ultrasound for difficult lumbar puncture.

J Emerg Med 2005 Feb;28(2):197-200

Department of Emergency Medicine, Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, Torrance, CA, USA.

Lumbar puncture is a common procedure performed in the emergency department for evaluation of several life-threatening conditions, including meningitis and subarachnoid hemorrhage. We describe the use of bedside ultrasound to assist in performance of the lumbar puncture in situations where the standard "blind" technique of needle insertion using palpable spinal landmarks is likely to be difficult or to fail. Use of ultrasound to guide lumbar puncture needle placement was originally reported 30 years ago in the Russian literature. Read More

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http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S073646790400335
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jemermed.2004.09.008DOI Listing
February 2005
8 Reads

Optimal patient position for lumbar puncture, measured by ultrasonography.

Emerg Radiol 2004 Feb 15;10(4):179-81. Epub 2003 Nov 15.

Department of Emergency Medicine, Beth Israel Medical Center, First Avenue and 16th Street, New York, NY 10003, USA.

The purpose of this study was to identify the patient position for lumbar puncture associated with the widest interspinous distance utilizing ultrasound. Sixteen healthy adult volunteers were placed in three positions commonly used for lumbar puncture (lateral recumbent with knees to chest, sitting and bent forward over an adjustable bedside stand, and sitting with feet supported and chest to knees) and the distance between lumbar spinous processes was measured by ultrasound. Measurements were compared between the three positions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10140-003-0286-3DOI Listing
February 2004
3 Reads

Quantification of neonatal cerebral ventricular volume by real-time ultrasonography. In vivo validation of the cylindrical coordinate method.

J Ultrasound Med 1990 Jan;9(1):9-15

Department of Pediatrics, University of New Mexico School of Medicine, Albuquerque 87131.

Posthemorrhagic ventricular dilation is a common clinical problem in preterm infants who have incurred an intraventricular hemorrhage. Presently there are no clinically applicable methods to follow quantitatively the progression of ventricular dilation at bedside. We describe the in vivo validation of a method to measure ventricular volume using bedside real-time cranial ultrasonography. Read More

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January 1990
3 Reads
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