1,010 results match your criteria BMJ Support Palliat Care[Journal]


Can video consultations replace face-to-face interviews? Palliative medicine and the Covid-19 pandemic: rapid review.

BMJ Support Palliat Care 2020 May 26. Epub 2020 May 26.

Department of Palliative Medicine, Oxford University Hospitals NHS Trust, Oxford, Oxfordshire, UK.

During the Covid-19 pandemic, a strategy to minimise face-to-face (FtF) visits and limit viral spread is essential. Video consultations offer clinical assessment despite restricted movement of people.We undertook a rapid literature review to identify the highest currently available level of evidence to inform this major change in clinical practice. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjspcare-2020-002326DOI Listing

High-protein compared with standard parenteral nutrition in palliative cancer care.

BMJ Support Palliat Care 2020 May 25. Epub 2020 May 25.

Palliative Home Care and Hospice Ward, Stockholms Sjukhem, Stockholm, Sweden

Objectives: High-protein parenteral nutrition (PN) has been developed to counteract muscle loss in patients with cancer treated with PN. Nevertheless, it is not clear if high-protein PN is as safe as standard PN in patients with palliative cancer. Our primary aim was to compare the proportion of patients with elevated liver enzymes between high-protein and standard PN in patients with palliative cancer enrolled to Medical Home Care. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjspcare-2019-002139DOI Listing

Oxaliplatin infusion-related venous pain: prevention by simultaneous intravenous fluids.

BMJ Support Palliat Care 2020 May 25. Epub 2020 May 25.

Internal Medicine, Jeroen Bosch Hospital, 's-Hertogenbosch, The Netherlands

Objective: Oxaliplatin is a cytotoxic agent frequently used in the treatment of gastrointestinal cancer patients. A known side effect of oxaliplatin administration via a peripheral vein is infusion-related pain. In this retrospective cohort study we compared the incidence of infusion-related pain in patients treated with oxaliplatin with or without simultaneous fluid infusion (FI) (800 mL glucose 5% in 2 hours). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjspcare-2019-002177DOI Listing

Early palliative care: the surprise question and the palliative care screening tool-better together.

BMJ Support Palliat Care 2020 May 25. Epub 2020 May 25.

Institute of Public Health, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan.

Objective: The 'surprise question' (SQ) and the palliative care screening tool (PCST) are the common assessment tools in the early identification of patients requiring palliative care. However, the comparison of their prognostic accuracies has not been extensively studied. This study aimed to compare the prognostic accuracy of SQ and PCST in terms of recognising patients nearing end of life (EOL) and those appropriate for palliative care. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjspcare-2019-002116DOI Listing

Mechanical ventilation withdrawal in motor neuron disease: an evaluation of practice.

BMJ Support Palliat Care 2020 May 21. Epub 2020 May 21.

University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust, Leicester, UK.

Objectives: Clinicians report that withdrawal of mechanical ventilation in motor neuron disease is challenging. We report on the evaluation of the process and outcomes called for by the Association for Palliative Medicine of Great Britain and Ireland (APM) guidance.

Methods: Excel analysis of a core data set, defined in the APM guidance, and thematic analysis of free-text comments, submitted by a UK clinician soon after withdrawal of mechanical ventilation in any care setting. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjspcare-2019-002170DOI Listing

Integrated palliative homecare in advanced dementia: reduced healthcare utilisation and costs.

BMJ Support Palliat Care 2020 May 20. Epub 2020 May 20.

Palliative Care Centre for Excellence in Research and Education, Singapore.

Objectives: To determine the economic benefit of an integrated home-based palliative care programme for advanced dementia (Programme Dignity), evaluation is required. This study aimed to estimate Programme Dignity's average monthly cost from a provider's perspective; and compare healthcare utilisation and costs of programme patients with controls, accounting for enrolment duration.

Methods: This was a retrospective cohort study. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjspcare-2019-002145DOI Listing

Intractable pain and cordotomy.

BMJ Support Palliat Care 2020 May 20. Epub 2020 May 20.

Pain Relief and Supportive Care, Private Hospital La Maddalena, Palermo 90146, Italy

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjspcare-2020-002360DOI Listing

Global and regional geographical prevalence of depression in gastric cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

BMJ Support Palliat Care 2020 May 20. Epub 2020 May 20.

Department of Epidemiology, Center for Health Related Social and Behavioral Sciences Research, Shahroud University of Medical Sciences, Sharoud, Iran

Background: Substantial uncertainty exists about the prevalence of depression in patients with gastric cancer. We aimed to summarise the global and regional pooled prevalence of depression among patients with gastric cancer.

Method: Up to February 2020, we searched PubMed/MEDLINE, Embase, Scopus, Web of science (ISI) and PsychINFO to identify published studies on the prevalence of depression among patients with gastric cancer. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjspcare-2019-002050DOI Listing

Medical assistance in dying: the downside.

BMJ Support Palliat Care 2020 May 19. Epub 2020 May 19.

Division of Medicine, Hunter New England Local Health District, New Lambton, New South Wales, Australia.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjspcare-2020-002350DOI Listing

Palliative care in advanced coronavirus disease in intensive care units.

BMJ Support Palliat Care 2020 May 15. Epub 2020 May 15.

Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, Department of Intensive Care Unit, Imam Khomeini Hospital, faculty of Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjspcare-2020-002338DOI Listing

Delirium screening practice in specialist palliative care units: a survey.

BMJ Support Palliat Care 2020 May 15. Epub 2020 May 15.

Wolfson Palliative Care Research Centre, Hull York Medical School, University of Hull, Hull, UK.

Objectives: Delirium is common and distressing in palliative care settings. This survey aims to describe current practice regarding delirium identification in specialist palliative care units (SPCU), such as inpatient hospices, in the UK.

Methods: An 18-item anonymous online survey was distributed by Hospice UK to their network of clinical leads (n=223), and to their research mailing list (n=228). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjspcare-2020-002251DOI Listing

Neuroleptic malignant syndrome in patients with cancer: a systematic review.

BMJ Support Palliat Care 2020 May 15. Epub 2020 May 15.

Department of Pharmacoepidemiology, Graduate School of Medicine and Public Health, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan

Background: Antipsychotics potentially cause a low incidence of the side effect called neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS), which has a high mortality rate. However, few studies on NMS among patients with cancer exist.

Aims: We aimed to examine the characteristics of antipsychotic-induced NMS among patients with cancer. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjspcare-2020-002200DOI Listing

Advance care planning: the future.

BMJ Support Palliat Care 2020 May 15. Epub 2020 May 15.

Palliative Medicine, Velindre NHS Trust, Cardiff, UK

Objectives: There is increased global focus on advance care planning (ACP) with attention from policymakers, more education programmes, laws and public awareness campaigns.

Methods: We provide a summary of the evidence about what ACP is, and how it should be conducted. We also address its barriers and facilitators and discuss current and future models of ACP, including a wider look at how to best integrate those who have diminished decisional capacity. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjspcare-2020-002304DOI Listing

Building scale and well-being in a hospice: a qualitative exploration.

BMJ Support Palliat Care 2020 May 14. Epub 2020 May 14.

KU Leuven, Department of Architecture, Research[x]Design, Leuven, Belgium.

Objective: This study explored how built space plays out in palliative care, focusing on spatial aspects that could support or hamper patients', relatives' and caregivers' well-being.

Methods: This study was conducted in a freestanding small-scale hospice combining a residential part for eight guests with a day-care part for groups of about five persons. Observations were combined with semistructured, individual interviews with eight guests (sometimes accompanied by relatives) and three focus-group interviews with staff, volunteers and relatives. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjspcare-2019-002151DOI Listing

Swallowing functional outcomes and nutritional status in head and neck cancer radiotherapy: longitudinal study.

BMJ Support Palliat Care 2020 May 13. Epub 2020 May 13.

Division of Medical and Surgical Nursing, Peking University School of Nursing, Beijing, China

Objective: To explore the relationships between swallowing functional outcomes and nutritional status in patients with head and neck cancer undergoing radiotherapy (RT).

Methods: This longitudinal study included 122 patients. Data were collected at three time points: baseline (T), the third week of RT (T) and the completion of RT (T). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjspcare-2020-002216DOI Listing

Off-label drugs in palliative care: a Group Delphi treatment recommendation process.

BMJ Support Palliat Care 2020 May 12. Epub 2020 May 12.

Department of Palliative Medicine, Ludwig Maximilians University Munich, Munchen, Bayern, Germany.

Objectives: The use of drugs beyond their marketing authorisation, that is, off-label use, is common practice in palliative care with over 70% of off-label use having little or no scientific support. The lack of evidence makes recommendations for off-label use essential, in order to increase the safety of drug therapy and thus patient safety. The aim of this study was to develop a guide for preparing and consenting drug-specific recommendations for off-label use in palliative care. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjspcare-2019-002165DOI Listing

Preferred and actual place of death in haematological malignancies: a report from the UK haematological malignancy research network.

BMJ Support Palliat Care 2020 May 11. Epub 2020 May 11.

Epidemiology & Cancer Statistics Group, Department of Health Sciences, University of York, York, North Yorkshire, UK.

Objectives: Hospital death is comparatively common in people with haematological cancers, but little is known about patient preferences. This study investigated actual and preferred place of death, concurrence between these and characteristics of preferred place discussions.

Methods: Set within a population-based haematological malignancy patient cohort, adults (≥18 years) diagnosed 2004-2012 who died 2011-2012 were included (n=963). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjspcare-2019-002097DOI Listing

Psychological concerns of Indian women with breast cancer in different national contexts: a systematic review and mixed-methods synthesis.

BMJ Support Palliat Care 2020 May 11. Epub 2020 May 11.

Wolfson Palliative Care Research Centre, Hull York Medical School, Hull, UK.

Background: Breast cancer is becoming the most common cancer among women of Indian origin. However, little is known about the psychological impact of the disease and its treatment among this population.

Aim: To improve understanding of psychological symptoms among Indian women with breast cancer. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjspcare-2019-002076DOI Listing

Nasal fentanyl alone plus buccal midazolam: an open-label, randomised, controlled feasibility study in the dying.

BMJ Support Palliat Care 2020 May 6. Epub 2020 May 6.

Palliative Medicine, Gloucestershire Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Cheltenham, Gloucestershire, UK.

Introduction: Many patients want to stay at home to die. They invariably become unable to take oral medication during their terminal phase. Symptoms are usually controlled by subcutaneous medications. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjspcare-2019-002029DOI Listing

Efficacy of naloxegol on symptoms and quality of life related to opioid-induced constipation in patients with cancer: a 3-month follow-up analysis.

BMJ Support Palliat Care 2020 May 6. Epub 2020 May 6.

Medical Department, E-C-BIO, S.L, Las Rozas, Spain.

Objectives: Opioid-induced constipation (OIC) can affect up to 63% of all patients with cancer. The objectives of this study were to assess quality of life as well as efficacy and safety of naloxegol, in patients with cancer with OIC.

Methods: An observational study was made of a cohort of patients with cancer and with OIC exhibiting an inadequate response to laxatives and treated with naloxegol. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjspcare-2020-002249DOI Listing

Hospital deaths dashboard: care indicators.

BMJ Support Palliat Care 2020 May 4. Epub 2020 May 4.

Palliative Medicine, Brighton and Sussex University Hospitals NHS Trust, Brighton, Brighton and Hove, UK.

Objectives: We wanted to create a medical/nursing led data collection tool to allow for an ongoing audit of the quality of deaths in a teaching hospital. We wanted to be able to produce a visual summary to monitor our involvement, use of PRN medication, recognition of death, treatment escalation plans and communication aspects. We feel these are good surrogate indicators for quality end-of-life care. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjspcare-2020-002223DOI Listing

End-of-life communication in advanced cancer: international trends (2009-2014).

BMJ Support Palliat Care 2020 Apr 27. Epub 2020 Apr 27.

Department of Family Medicine and Chronic Care, End-of-Life Care Research Group, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB) & Ghent University, Brussels, Belgium.

Objective: To examine trends in end-of-life communication with people with cancer in general practice.

Methods: Mortality follow-back survey among general practitioners (GPs) in representative epidemiological surveillance networks in Belgium (BE), the Netherlands (NL) and Spain (ES) in 2009-2010 (ES: 2010-2011) and 2013-2014. Using a standardised form, GPs registered all deceased adult patients in their practice and reported for five end-of-life care topics whether they had been discussed with the patient. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjspcare-2019-001999DOI Listing

Cancer immunotherapy and toxic epidermal necrolysis.

BMJ Support Palliat Care 2020 Apr 27. Epub 2020 Apr 27.

The Key Laboratory of Carcinogenesis and Translational Research (Ministry of Education), Department of GI Medical Oncology, Peking University School of Oncology, Beijing Cancer Hospital & Institute, Beijing, China.

Objectives: Immunotherapy has come to play an increasingly important role in cancer treatment. Accordingly, immune-related adverse events (irAEs) have drawn considerable attention. In this case, a young female patient developed immune-related toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjspcare-2019-002135DOI Listing

Challenges of concentrated oxygen delivery in a hospice.

BMJ Support Palliat Care 2020 Apr 27. Epub 2020 Apr 27.

Palliative Medicine, Farleigh Hospice, Chelmsford, UK.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjspcare-2019-002069DOI Listing

Methadone rotation for cancer pain: an observational study.

BMJ Support Palliat Care 2020 Apr 22. Epub 2020 Apr 22.

Palliative Care Centre for Excellence in Research and Education, Singapore

Context: Methadone is a useful option in the treatment of cancer pain. Despite its advantages, methadone use is complicated due to high interindividual variability in pharmacokinetics. Various rotation methods from other opioids have been proposed in mostly Caucasian populations. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjspcare-2019-002175DOI Listing

Palliative care knowledge test for nurses and physicians: validation and cross-cultural adaptation.

BMJ Support Palliat Care 2020 Apr 22. Epub 2020 Apr 22.

Department of Legal and Forensic Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Biomedical Research Institute (IMIB-Arrixaca), University of Murcia, Murcia, Spain.

Background: Palliative care knowledge is essential in primary healthcare due to the increasing number of patients who require attention in the final stage of their life. Health professionals (physicians and nurses) need to acquire specific knowledge and abilities to provide high-quality palliative care. The development of education programmes in palliative care is necessary. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjspcare-2019-002182DOI Listing

Sleep quality, anxiety and depression in advanced lung cancer: patients and caregivers.

BMJ Support Palliat Care 2020 Apr 6. Epub 2020 Apr 6.

Department of Oncology/ Medical Center for Overseas Patients, Southern Medical University Nanfang Hospital, Guangzhou, Guangdong, China

Objective: To investigate the clinical implications of sleep quality, anxiety and depression in patients with advanced lung cancer (LC) and their family caregivers (FCs).

Methods: A total of 98 patients with advanced LC and their FCs (n=98) were recruited from the Oncology Department in Nanfang Hospital. The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), consisting of seven components that evaluate subjective sleep quality, sleep latency, duration of sleep, sleep efficiency, sleep disturbances, sleep medication usage and daytime dysfunction, was used to assess sleep quality. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjspcare-2018-001684DOI Listing

Place-of-death preferences among patients with cancer and family caregivers in inpatient and outpatient palliative care.

BMJ Support Palliat Care 2020 Apr 6. Epub 2020 Apr 6.

Palliative, Rehabilitation and Integrative Medicine, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA.

Objective: Meeting the preferences of patients is considered an important palliative care outcome. Prior studies reported that more than 80% of patients with terminally ill cancer prefer to die at home. The purpose of this study was to determine place-of-death preference among palliative care patients in the outpatient centre and the palliative care unit (PCU) of a comprehensive cancer centre. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjspcare-2019-002019DOI Listing

NECPAL tool prognostication in advanced chronic illness: a rapid review and expert consensus.

BMJ Support Palliat Care 2020 Apr 2. Epub 2020 Apr 2.

Chair of Palliative Care, Faculty of Medicine, University of Vic ‒ Central University of Catalonia, Vic, Barcelona, Spain.

Objective: To develop a proposal for a 2-year mortality prognostic approach for patients with advanced chronic conditions based on the palliative care need (PCN) items of the (NECPAL) CCOMS-ICO V.3.1 2017 tool. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjspcare-2019-002126DOI Listing

Advance care plans and hospitalized frail older adults: a systematic review.

BMJ Support Palliat Care 2020 Apr 2. Epub 2020 Apr 2.

Primary Care Unit, Department of Public Health and Primary Care, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK.

Introduction: Frail older people are known to have low rates of advance care planning (ACP). Many frail patients prefer less aggressive treatment, but these preferences are often not known or respected. Frail patients often have multiple hospital admissions, potentially providing opportunities for ACP. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjspcare-2019-002093DOI Listing

Young adults with life-limiting or life-threatening conditions: sexuality and relationships support.

BMJ Support Palliat Care 2020 Apr 2. Epub 2020 Apr 2.

Faculty of Wellbeing, Education and Language Studies, The Open University, Milton Keynes, UK.

Objective: The research project addressed the need to support young adults with issues relating to sexuality and relationships though the development of guidance and standards for practice.

Methods: An action research project underpinned by an interpretivist qualitative framework. Participants were recruited to the project via three hospices in the UK. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjspcare-2019-002070DOI Listing

UK palliative medicine trainees and multisource communication skills feedback: an educational tool?

BMJ Support Palliat Care 2020 Mar 31. Epub 2020 Mar 31.

Department of Postgraduate Education, Royal College of Physicians of London, London, London, UK.

Background: Multisource feedback provides ratings of a trainee doctor's performance from a range of assessors and enables 360 degree feedback on communication skills and team working behaviours. It is a tool used throughout palliative medicine training in the UK. There are limited data on the value of multisource feedback from a palliative medicine trainee perspective. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjspcare-2019-002133DOI Listing

Hospice advice and rapid response service for ambulance clinicians.

BMJ Support Palliat Care 2020 Mar 27. Epub 2020 Mar 27.

St Luke's Hospice, Harrow, UK

Objective: Patients in the last year of life experience medical emergencies which may lead to an emergency attendance by ambulance clinicians and some patients having a transfer to hospital even when this is unwanted by patients, carers or professionals. Here we report the patient characteristics and outcomes of a 24-hour hospice nursing telephone advice service to support an ambulance service.

Method: An evaluation of the outcomes of ambulance calls to a nursing telephone advice service for people living in northwest London, UK, attended at home during a 6-month period by the London Ambulance Service, whose clinicians then sought advice from the hospice's 24 hours' telephone line. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjspcare-2019-001911DOI Listing

Early specialised palliative care: interventions, symptoms, problems.

BMJ Support Palliat Care 2020 Mar 27. Epub 2020 Mar 27.

The Research Unit, Department of Palliative Medicine, Bispebjerg Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark.

Background: Few studies have investigated the content of interventions provided in early specialised palliative care (SPC).

Objectives: To characterise the content of interventions delivered in early SPC in the Danish Palliative Care Trial (DanPaCT), a multicentre trial with six participating sites.

Methods: A retrospective qualitative and quantitative study coding all new interventions initiated by the palliative teams and documented in the medical records during the 8-week study period of DanPaCT. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjspcare-2019-002043DOI Listing

Percutaneous cervical cordotomy for cancer-related pain: national data.

BMJ Support Palliat Care 2020 Mar 27. Epub 2020 Mar 27.

Department of Oncology and Metabolism, The University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK

Objectives: Percutaneous cervical cordotomy (PCC) is an interventional ablative procedure in the armamentarium for cancer pain treatment, but there is limited evidence to support its use. This study aimed to assess the effectiveness and safety of PCC.

Methods: Analysis was undertaken of the first national (UK) prospective data repository of adult patients with cancer undergoing PCC for pain treatment. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjspcare-2019-002057DOI Listing

Confidence and skills for cystic fibrosis end-of-life care.

BMJ Support Palliat Care 2020 Mar 26. Epub 2020 Mar 26.

Oxford Adult Cystic Fibrosis Centre, Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Oxford, UK

Objectives: Optimal cystic fibrosis (CF) end-of-life care (EOLC) is a challenge. There is little formal guidance about who should deliver this and how CF multi-disciplinary teams should interact with specialist palliative care. We assessed the knowledge, experience and preparedness of both CF and palliative care professionals for CF EOLC. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjspcare-2020-002274DOI Listing

Preferred place of death in paediatric, teenage and young adult haemato-oncology patients: a retrospective review.

BMJ Support Palliat Care 2020 Mar 24. Epub 2020 Mar 24.

Paediatric Oncology, University College London Hospital, London, UK.

Objectives: Identifying the preferred place of death for children/young people with cancer and determining whether this is achieved is pertinent to inform palliative care service provision. The aims of this retrospective case series review were to determine where children/young people with cancer want to die and whether their preferred place of death was achieved.

Methods: Clinical/demographic details, including preferred and actual places of death, were recorded for 121 patients who died between 2012 and 2016 at a tertiary haematology-oncology centre. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjspcare-2019-002005DOI Listing

Clinical research in cancer palliative care: a metaresearch analysis.

BMJ Support Palliat Care 2020 Mar 24. Epub 2020 Mar 24.

Medical Department, EORTC Headquarters, Brussels, Belgium.

Objective: This metaresearch of the clinicaltrials.gov database aims to evaluate how clinical research on palliative care is conducted within the setting of advanced cancer.

Methods: Clinicaltrials. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjspcare-2019-002086DOI Listing

Enzyme replacement in advanced pancreatic cancer: patient perceptions.

BMJ Support Palliat Care 2020 Mar 22. Epub 2020 Mar 22.

Hospice and Palliative Care, Nurse Maude Association, Christchurch, New Zealand.

Purpose: Advanced pancreatic cancer has a universally poor survival rate. Patients frequently develop malabsorption that requires pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy (PERT). This study explores the experience of patient engagement with PERT and how the medication is taken and tolerated. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjspcare-2019-002153DOI Listing

Specialist palliative medicine physicians and nurses accuracy at predicting imminent death (within 72 hours): a short report.

BMJ Support Palliat Care 2020 Mar 22. Epub 2020 Mar 22.

Marie Curie Palliative Care Research Department, University College London, London, UK.

Objectives: Research suggests that clinicians are not very accurate at prognosticating in palliative care. The 'horizon effect' suggests that accuracy ought to be better when the survival of patients is shorter. The aim of this study was to determine the accuracy of specialist palliative care clinicians at identifying which patients are likely to die within 72 hours. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjspcare-2020-002224DOI Listing

We all want to die in peace - So why don't we?

BMJ Support Palliat Care 2020 Mar 13. Epub 2020 Mar 13.

Scientific Institute for Quality of Healthcare, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.

Objectives: Approximately 70% of Americans would prefer to die at home and avoid hospitalization or intensive care during the terminal phase of illness. Given the wish to die at home, it should follow the majority of Americans achieves their wish. However, recent data indicate ~60% of people dies away from home or hospice care. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjspcare-2019-002060DOI Listing

The dying parent and dependent children: a nationwide survey of hospice and community palliative care support services.

BMJ Support Palliat Care 2020 Mar 9. Epub 2020 Mar 9.

School of Health Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford, UK.

Background: Annually, across the world a substantial number of dependent children experience the death of a parent through life-limiting illness. Without support, this has long-term implications for children's emotional, social and physical well-being, impacting on health and social care services globally. Limited information exists on how service providers are meeting family needs when a parent with dependent children is dying. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjspcare-2019-001947DOI Listing

Bayesian methods in palliative care research: cancer-induced bone pain.

BMJ Support Palliat Care 2020 Mar 5. Epub 2020 Mar 5.

Division of Population Health and Genomics, University of Dundee, Dundee, UK.

Objective: To show how a simple Bayesian analysis method can be used to improve the evidence base in patient populations where recruitment and retention are challenging.

Methods: A Bayesian conjugate analysis method was applied to binary data from the Thermal testing in Bone Pain (TiBoP) study: a prospective diagnostic accuracy/predictive study in patients with cancer-induced bone pain (CIBP). This study aimed to evaluate the clinical utility of a simple bedside tool to identify who was most likely to benefit from palliative radiotherapy (XRT) for CIBP. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjspcare-2019-002160DOI Listing

Acupuncture for menstrual migraine: a systematic review.

BMJ Support Palliat Care 2020 Mar 2. Epub 2020 Mar 2.

School of Chinese Medicine, University of Hong Kong Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, Hong Kong, China.

Background And Objective: In clinical practice, the evidence of acupuncture used as a treatment for migraine without aura is employed interchangeably to guide treatment for menstrual migraine. However, its effect and safety are not substantiated. This study aimed to assess the efficacy of acupuncture on the frequency and pain intensity of menstrual migraine. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjspcare-2019-002024DOI Listing

Paediatric advance care plans: a cross-sectional survey of healthy young adults.

BMJ Support Palliat Care 2020 Feb 24. Epub 2020 Feb 24.

School of Psychology, University of New South Wales, Randwick, New South Wales, Australia.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjspcare-2019-001963DOI Listing
February 2020

Physical therapists in integrated palliative care: a qualitative study.

BMJ Support Palliat Care 2020 Feb 20. Epub 2020 Feb 20.

Human Movement Science department - Physical Therapy Program, Oakland University, Rochester, Michigan, USA.

Objectives: The purpose of this study was to explore the perceptions and experiences of physical therapists (PTs) regarding their role in palliative care (PC) when practising in nations with advanced integration of PC into mainstream healthcare.

Methods: This qualitative study included an electronic demographic survey and semistructured interview. Data analysis included descriptive statistics for demographics and the constant comparative method for interview results. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjspcare-2019-002161DOI Listing
February 2020

End-of-life care in general practice: clinic-based data collection.

BMJ Support Palliat Care 2020 Feb 17. Epub 2020 Feb 17.

Medical School, The University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.

Background: There are no processes that routinely assess end-of-life care in Australian general practice. This study aimed to develop a data collection process which could collect observational data on end-of-life care from Australian general practitioners (GPs) via a questionnaire and clinical data from general practice software.

Methods: The data collection process was developed based on a modified Delphi study, then pilot tested with GPs through online surveys across three Australian states and data extraction from general practice software, and finally evaluated through participant interviews. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjspcare-2019-002006DOI Listing
February 2020

ePTFE/FEP stents for malignant biliary obstruction.

BMJ Support Palliat Care 2020 Feb 13. Epub 2020 Feb 13.

Department of Radiology, Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Cambridge, UK

Background: Biliary obstruction due to malignant disease causes debilitating symptoms and palliation of the disease involves placement of biliary stents. Covered self-expanding metal biliary stents may provide a longer patency and a lower risk of complications and dysfunction compared to uncovered stents, making them better for patients' quality of life and cost effectiveness. This study aims to evaluate the indications and outcomes for a group of cases where expanded polytetrafluoroethylene/fluorinated ethylene propylene (ePTFE/FEP) covered metal stents were used to palliate malignant biliary obstruction. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjspcare-2019-001961DOI Listing
February 2020

'Hospice inpatient deep vein thrombosis detection (HIDDen) in advanced non-malignant diseases': a longitudinal pilot study.

BMJ Support Palliat Care 2020 Feb 11. Epub 2020 Feb 11.

Wolfson Palliative Care Research Centre, Hull York Medical School, University of Hull, Hull, Kingston upon Hull, UK.

Objectives: To gain preliminary data regarding the prevalence of proximal deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in those with non-malignant conditions admitted to specialist palliative care units (SPCUs).

Methods: Data were collected as part of a prospective longitudinal observational study in five SPCUs in England, Wales and Northern Ireland (Registration: ISRCTN97567719) to estimate the prevalence of proximal femoral vein DVT in people admitted to SPCUs. The primary outcome for this exploratory substudy was the prevalence of DVT in patients with non-malignant palliative conditions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjspcare-2019-002039DOI Listing
February 2020

Placebo response in trials of drug treatments for cancer-related fatigue: a systematic review, meta-analysis and meta-regression.

BMJ Support Palliat Care 2020 Feb 11. Epub 2020 Feb 11.

Marie Curie Palliative Care Research Department, University College London, London, UK

Background: Cancer-related fatigue (CRF) is one of the most distressing symptoms experienced by patients. There is no gold standard treatment, although multiple drugs have been tested with little evidence of efficacy. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of these drugs have commented on the existence or size of the placebo response (PR). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjspcare-2019-002163DOI Listing
February 2020