2,190 results match your criteria BMC medical research methodology[Journal]


How feasible is it to abandon statistical significance? A reflection based on a short survey.

BMC Med Res Methodol 2020 Jun 3;20(1):140. Epub 2020 Jun 3.

Laboratório de Inferência Causal em Epidemiologia da Universidade de São Paulo (LINCE-USP), São Paulo, Brazil.

Background: There is a growing trend in using the "statistically significant" term in the scientific literature. However, harsh criticism of this concept motivated the recommendation to withdraw its use of scientific publications. We aimed to validate the support and the feasibility of adherence to this recommendation, among researchers having declared in favor of removing the statistical significance. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12874-020-01030-xDOI Listing

The semi-automation of title and abstract screening: a retrospective exploration of ways to leverage Abstrackr's relevance predictions in systematic and rapid reviews.

BMC Med Res Methodol 2020 Jun 3;20(1):139. Epub 2020 Jun 3.

Alberta Research Centre for Health Evidence, Department of Pediatrics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.

Background: We investigated the feasibility of using a machine learning tool's relevance predictions to expedite title and abstract screening.

Methods: We subjected 11 systematic reviews and six rapid reviews to four retrospective screening simulations (automated and semi-automated approaches to single-reviewer and dual independent screening) in Abstrackr, a freely-available machine learning software. We calculated the proportion missed, workload savings, and time savings compared to single-reviewer and dual independent screening by human reviewers. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12874-020-01031-wDOI Listing

No one accelerometer-based physical activity data collection protocol can fit all research questions.

BMC Med Res Methodol 2020 Jun 3;20(1):141. Epub 2020 Jun 3.

Karolinska Institutet, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Physiotherapy, Alfred Nobels Allé 23, 141 83, Huddinge, Sweden.

Background: Measuring physical activity and sedentary behavior accurately remains a challenge. When describing the uncertainty of mean values or when making group comparisons, minimising Standard Error of the Mean (SEM) is important. The sample size and the number of repeated observations within each subject influence the size of the SEM. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12874-020-01026-7DOI Listing

Comparison of four algorithms on establishing continuous reference intervals for pediatric analytes with age-dependent trend.

BMC Med Res Methodol 2020 Jun 1;20(1):136. Epub 2020 Jun 1.

Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Evidence-based Medicine, Beijing Children's Hospital, Capital Medical University, National Center for Children Health, No.56 Nanlishi Road, Beijing, 100045, China.

Background: Continuous reference intervals (RIs) allow for more precise consideration of the dynamic changes of physiological development, which can provide new strategies for the presentation of laboratory test results. Our study aimed to establish continuous RIs using four different simulation methods so that the applicability of different methods could be further understood.

Methods: The data of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and serum creatinine (Cr) were obtained from the Pediatric Reference Interval in China study (PRINCE), in which healthy children aged 0-19 years were recruited. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12874-020-01021-yDOI Listing

Database combinations to retrieve systematic reviews in overviews of reviews: a methodological study.

BMC Med Res Methodol 2020 Jun 1;20(1):138. Epub 2020 Jun 1.

Institute for Research in Operative Medicine (IFOM), Faculty of Health, School of Medicine, Witten/Herdecke University, Ostmerheimer Str. 200, 51109, Cologne, Germany.

Background: When conducting an Overviews of Reviews on health-related topics, it is unclear which combination of bibliographic databases authors should use for searching for SRs. Our goal was to determine which databases included the most systematic reviews and identify an optimal database combination for searching systematic reviews.

Methods: A set of 86 Overviews of Reviews with 1219 included systematic reviews was extracted from a previous study. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12874-020-00983-3DOI Listing

Publication and related biases in health services research: a systematic review of empirical evidence.

BMC Med Res Methodol 2020 Jun 1;20(1):137. Epub 2020 Jun 1.

Warwick Centre for Applied Health Research & Delivery, Division of Health Sciences, Warwick Medical School, University of Warwick, Coventry, UK.

Background: Publication and related biases (including publication bias, time-lag bias, outcome reporting bias and p-hacking) have been well documented in clinical research, but relatively little is known about their presence and extent in health services research (HSR). This paper aims to systematically review evidence concerning publication and related bias in quantitative HSR.

Methods: Databases including MEDLINE, EMBASE, HMIC, CINAHL, Web of Science, Health Systems Evidence, Cochrane EPOC Review Group and several websites were searched to July 2018. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12874-020-01010-1DOI Listing

How are missing data in covariates handled in observational time-to-event studies in oncology? A systematic review.

BMC Med Res Methodol 2020 May 29;20(1):134. Epub 2020 May 29.

Department of Medical Statistics, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Keppel Street, London, UK.

Background: Missing data in covariates can result in biased estimates and loss of power to detect associations. It can also lead to other challenges in time-to-event analyses including the handling of time-varying effects of covariates, selection of covariates and their flexible modelling. This review aims to describe how researchers approach time-to-event analyses with missing data. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12874-020-01018-7DOI Listing

Summarizing the extent of visit irregularity in longitudinal data.

BMC Med Res Methodol 2020 May 29;20(1):135. Epub 2020 May 29.

Child Health Evaluative Sciences, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Background: Observational longitudinal data often feature irregular, informative visit times. We propose descriptive measures to quantify the extent of irregularity to select an appropriate analytic outcome approach.

Methods: We divided the study period into bins and calculated the mean proportions of individuals with 0, 1, and > 1 visits per bin. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12874-020-01023-wDOI Listing

A review of the use of propensity score diagnostics in papers published in high-ranking medical journals.

BMC Med Res Methodol 2020 May 27;20(1):132. Epub 2020 May 27.

Centre for Epidemiology Versus Arthritis, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research, Division of Musculoskeletal and Dermatological Sciences, School of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Biology, Medicine and Health, University of Manchester, Manchester, M13 9PT, UK.

Background: Propensity scores are widely used to deal with confounding bias in medical research. An incorrectly specified propensity score model may lead to residual confounding bias; therefore it is essential to use diagnostics to assess propensity scores in a propensity score analysis. The current use of propensity score diagnostics in the medical literature is unknown. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12874-020-00994-0DOI Listing

A typology of useful evidence: approaches to increase the practical value of intervention research.

BMC Med Res Methodol 2020 May 28;20(1):133. Epub 2020 May 28.

Procome research group, Department of Learning, Informatics, Management and Ethics, Medical Management Centre, Karolinska Institutet, SE 171 77, Stockholm, Sweden.

Background: Too often, studies of evidence-based interventions (EBIs) in preventive, community, and health care are not sufficiently useful to end users (typically practitioners, patients, policymakers, or other researchers). The ways in which intervention studies are conventionally conducted and reported mean that there is often a shortage of information when an EBI is used in practice. The paper aims to invite the research community to consider ways to optimize not only the trustworthiness but also the research's usefulness in intervention studies. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12874-020-00992-2DOI Listing

Application of the critical incident technique in refining a realist initial programme theory.

BMC Med Res Methodol 2020 May 26;20(1):131. Epub 2020 May 26.

University College Dublin Centre for Interdisciplinary Research, Education and Innovation in Health Systems (UCD IRIS), School of Nursing, Midwifery and Health Systems, University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland.

Background: As realist methodology is still evolving, there is a paucity of guidance on how to conduct theory driven interviews. Realist researchers can therefore struggle to collect interview data that can make a meaningful contribution to refining their initial programme theory. Collecting data to inform realist Inital Programme Theories (IPTs) in healthcare contexts is further compounded due to the healthcare workers' busy work schedules. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12874-020-01016-9DOI Listing

Translation method is validity evidence for construct equivalence: analysis of secondary data routinely collected during translations of the Health Literacy Questionnaire (HLQ).

BMC Med Res Methodol 2020 May 26;20(1):130. Epub 2020 May 26.

Centre for Global Health and Equity, Faculty of Health, Arts and Design, Swinburne University, Postal address: AMDC building, Level 9, Room 907, 453/469-477 Burwood Road, Hawthorn, Australia.

Background: Cross-cultural research with patient-reported outcomes measures (PROMs) assumes that the PROM in the target language will measure the same construct in the same way as the PROM in the source language. Yet translation methods are rarely used to qualitatively maximise construct equivalence or to describe the intents of each item to support common understanding within translation teams. This study aimed to systematically investigate the utility of the Translation Integrity Procedure (TIP), in particular the use of item intent descriptions, to maximise construct equivalence during the translation process, and to demonstrate how documented data from the TIP contributes evidence to a validity argument for construct equivalence between translated and source language PROMs. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12874-020-00962-8DOI Listing

Primary outcome reporting in adolescent depression clinical trials needs standardization.

BMC Med Res Methodol 2020 May 25;20(1):129. Epub 2020 May 25.

Child Health Evaluative Sciences, The Hospital for Sick Children Research Institute, 686 Bay Street, Room 11.9712, Toronto, Ontario, M5G 0A4, Canada.

Background: Evidence-based health care is informed by results of randomized clinical trials (RCTs) and their syntheses in meta-analyses. When the trial outcomes measured are not clearly described in trial publications, knowledge synthesis, translation, and decision-making may be impeded. While heterogeneity in outcomes measured in adolescent major depressive disorder (MDD) RCTs has been described, the comprehensiveness of outcome reporting is unknown. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12874-020-01019-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7247139PMC

Use of partitioned GMM marginal regression model with time-dependent covariates: analysis of Chinese Longitudinal Healthy Longevity Study.

BMC Med Res Methodol 2020 May 24;20(1):128. Epub 2020 May 24.

Department of Economic, W.P. Carey School of Business, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, 85287, USA.

Background: Elderly population's health is a major concern for most industrial nations. National health surveys provide a measure of the state of elderly health. One such survey is the Chinese Longitudinal Healthy Longevity Survey. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12874-020-01003-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7245823PMC

Re-engaging an inactive cohort of young adults: evaluating recruitment for the Kidskin Young Adult Myopia Study.

BMC Med Res Methodol 2020 May 24;20(1):127. Epub 2020 May 24.

Centre for Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Lions Eye Institute, University of Western Australia, 2 Verdun St, Nedlands WA, Perth, 6009, Australia.

Background: Recent changes in communication technologies, including increased reliance on mobile phones and the internet, may present challenges and/or opportunities to re-engaging inactive study cohorts. We evaluate our ability to recruit participants for the Kidskin Young Adult Myopia Study (KYAMS), a follow-up of the Kidskin Study.

Methods: KYAMS participants were recruited from the Kidskin Study, a sun exposure-intervention study for 5-6 year-olds running from 1995 to 1999 with most recent follow-up in 2005. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12874-020-00996-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7245800PMC

Optimal, minimax and admissible two-stage design for phase II oncology clinical trials.

BMC Med Res Methodol 2020 May 20;20(1):126. Epub 2020 May 20.

Department of Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Nanjing Medical University, SPH Building Room 418, 101 Longmian Avenue, Nanjing, 211166, Jiangsu, China.

Background: The article aims to compare the efficiency of minimax, optimal and admissible criteria in Simon's and Fleming's two-stage design.

Methods: Three parameter settings (p-p = 0.25-0. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12874-020-01017-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7240995PMC

Fuzzy cognitive mapping and soft models of indigenous knowledge on maternal health in Guerrero, Mexico.

BMC Med Res Methodol 2020 May 19;20(1):125. Epub 2020 May 19.

CIET-Participatory Research at McGill, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Family Medicine, McGill University, 5858 Chemin de la Côte des Neiges 3rd floor, Montreal, Quebec, H3S 1Z1, Canada.

Background: Effective health care requires services that are responsive to local needs and contexts. Achieving this in indigenous settings implies communication between traditional and conventional medicine perspectives. Adequate interaction is especially relevant for maternal health because cultural practices have a notable role during pregnancy, childbirth and the postpartum period. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12874-020-00998-wDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7238543PMC

A randomized trial of mail and email recruitment strategies for a physician survey on clinical trial accrual.

BMC Med Res Methodol 2020 May 19;20(1):123. Epub 2020 May 19.

Division of Epidemiology, Department of Population & Data Sciences, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, 5323 Harry Hines Blvd., Dallas, TX, 75390, USA.

Background: Patient participation in cancer clinical trials is suboptimal. A challenge to capturing physicians' insights about trials has been low response to surveys. We conducted a study using varying combinations of mail and email to recruit a nationally representative sample of medical, surgical, and radiation oncologists to complete a survey on trial accrual. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12874-020-01014-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7236338PMC

Frequently repeated measurements -our experience of collecting data with SMS.

BMC Med Res Methodol 2020 May 19;20(1):124. Epub 2020 May 19.

Institute of Environmental Medicine, Unit of Intervention and Implementation Research for Worker Health, Karolinska Institutet, Nobels väg 13, S- 171 77, Stockholm, Sweden.

Background: As technology is advancing, so are the possibilities for new data collection methods in research, potentially improving data quality and validity of the results. In Sweden, a system using frequent repeated data collection using text messages, SMS Track, has been used in clinical research for more than a decade. In this paper, compliance with repeated text message questions was examined across five different studies, i. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12874-020-01013-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7236444PMC

What feedback do reviewers give when reviewing qualitative manuscripts? A focused mapping review and synthesis.

BMC Med Res Methodol 2020 May 18;20(1):122. Epub 2020 May 18.

School of Nursing, College of Medical and Dental Sciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK.

Background: Peer review is at the heart of the scientific process. With the advent of digitisation, journals started to offer electronic articles or publishing online only. A new philosophy regarding the peer review process found its way into academia: the open peer review. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12874-020-01005-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7236308PMC

Methodological tools and sensitivity analysis for assessing quality or risk of bias used in systematic reviews published in the high-impact anesthesiology journals.

BMC Med Res Methodol 2020 May 18;20(1):121. Epub 2020 May 18.

Center for Evidence-Based Medicine and Health Care, Catholic University of Croatia, Ilica 242, 10000, Zagreb, Croatia.

Background: A crucial element in the systematic review (SR) methodology is the appraisal of included primary studies, using tools for assessment of methodological quality or risk of bias (RoB). SR authors can conduct sensitivity analyses to explore whether their results are sensitive to exclusion of low quality studies or a high RoB. However, it is unknown which tools do SR authors use for assessing quality/RoB, and how they set threshold for quality/RoB in sensitivity analyses. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12874-020-00966-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7236513PMC

Developing model biobanking consent language: what matters to prospective participants?

BMC Med Res Methodol 2020 May 15;20(1):119. Epub 2020 May 15.

Center for Biomedical Ethics and Society, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, 2525 West End Avenue, Suite 400, Nashville, TN, 37203, USA.

Background: Efforts to improve informed consent have led to calls for providing information a reasonable person would want to have, in a way that facilitates understanding of the reasons why one might or might not want to participate. At the same time, advances in large-scale genomic research have expanded both the opportunities and the risks for participants, families, and communities. To advance the use of effective consent materials that reflect this landscape, we used empirical data to develop model consent language, as well as brief questions to assist people in thinking about their own values relative to participation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12874-020-01001-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7227271PMC

Patient information, communication and competence empowerment in oncology (PIKKO) - evaluation of a supportive care intervention for overall oncological patients. Study protocol of a non-randomized controlled trial.

BMC Med Res Methodol 2020 May 15;20(1):120. Epub 2020 May 15.

Institute of Psychosocial Medicine and Psychotherapy, Jena University Hospital, Stoystrasse 3, 07740, Jena, Germany.

Background: Cancer patients have to undergo a difficult medical therapy and are also confronted with various psychological, social and economic problems. Support is available from many providers, but patients often gain no access to it. Accordingly, there is a need for a single point of contact that can provide advice, information and assistance. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12874-020-01002-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7227332PMC

Similar responses to EQ-5D-3L by two elicitation methods: visual analogue scale and time trade-off.

BMC Med Res Methodol 2020 May 14;20(1):118. Epub 2020 May 14.

School of Public Health, Xuzhou Medical University, Xuzhou, 221004, Jiangsu, China.

Background: Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) is often measured using EQ-5D-3L by the elicitation methods of visual analogue scale (VAS) and time trade-off (TTO). Although many countries have constructed both national VAS and TTO value sets, the fact that VAS and TTO value sets produces different values bewilders researchers and policymakers. The aim of this study is to explore certain conditions which could yield similar value sets using VAS and TTO. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12874-020-01008-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7227357PMC

Application of the matched nested case-control design to the secondary analysis of trial data.

BMC Med Res Methodol 2020 May 14;20(1):117. Epub 2020 May 14.

National Perinatal Epidemiology Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.

Background: A nested case-control study is an efficient design that can be embedded within an existing cohort study or randomised trial. It has a number of advantages compared to the conventional case-control design, and has the potential to answer important research questions using untapped prospectively collected data.

Methods: We demonstrate the utility of the matched nested case-control design by applying it to a secondary analysis of the Abnormal Doppler Enteral Prescription Trial. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12874-020-01007-wDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7227268PMC

Improving assent in health research: a rapid systematic review.

BMC Med Res Methodol 2020 May 13;20(1):114. Epub 2020 May 13.

Global Health Ethics Team, World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland.

Background: Enrolment in a research study requires the participant's informed consent. In the case of minors, informed consent of the respective legal guardian is obtained in conjunction with informed assent of the underage p articipant. Since comprehension of the information provided may be limited, effective interventions to improve understanding should be identified. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12874-020-01000-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7222594PMC

Current methods for development of rapid reviews about diagnostic tests: an international survey.

BMC Med Res Methodol 2020 May 13;20(1):115. Epub 2020 May 13.

Clinical Biostatistics Unit, Hospital Universitario Ramón y Cajal, IRYCIS, CIBER of Epidemiology and Public Health, Madrid, Spain.

Background: Rapid reviews (RRs) have emerged as an efficient alternative to time-consuming systematic reviews-they can help meet the demand for accelerated evidence synthesis to inform decision-making in healthcare. The synthesis of diagnostic evidence has important methodological challenges. Here, we performed an international survey to identify the current practice of producing RRs for diagnostic tests. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12874-020-01004-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7220561PMC

Social media as a recruitment platform for a nationwide online survey of COVID-19 knowledge, beliefs, and practices in the United States: methodology and feasibility analysis.

BMC Med Res Methodol 2020 05 13;20(1):116. Epub 2020 May 13.

Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, School of Global Public Health, New York University, 715 Broadway, New York, NY, 10003, USA.

Background: The COVID-19 pandemic has evolved into one of the most impactful health crises in modern history, compelling researchers to explore innovative ways to efficiently collect public health data in a timely manner. Social media platforms have been explored as a research recruitment tool in other settings; however, their feasibility for collecting representative survey data during infectious disease epidemics remain unexplored.

Objectives: This study has two aims 1) describe the methodology used to recruit a nationwide sample of adults residing in the United States (U. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12874-020-01011-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7220591PMC

A mixed methods case study investigating how randomised controlled trials (RCTs) are reported, understood and interpreted in practice.

BMC Med Res Methodol 2020 May 12;20(1):112. Epub 2020 May 12.

Centre for Surgical Research, Population Health Sciences, Bristol Medical School, University of Bristol, Canynge Hall, 39 Whatley Road, Clifton, Bristol, BS8 2PS, UK.

Background: While randomised controlled trials (RCTs) provide high-quality evidence to guide practice, much routine care is not based upon available RCTs. This disconnect between evidence and practice is not sufficiently well understood. This case study explores this relationship using a novel approach. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12874-020-01009-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7216481PMC

Obtaining and managing data sets for individual participant data meta-analysis: scoping review and practical guide.

BMC Med Res Methodol 2020 May 12;20(1):113. Epub 2020 May 12.

Department of Health Research Methods, Evidence, and Impact, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.

Background: Shifts in data sharing policy have increased researchers' access to individual participant data (IPD) from clinical studies. Simultaneously the number of IPD meta-analyses (IPDMAs) is increasing. However, rates of data retrieval have not improved. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12874-020-00964-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7218569PMC

Using alcohol consumption diary data from an internet intervention for outcome and predictive modeling: a validation and machine learning study.

BMC Med Res Methodol 2020 May 11;20(1):111. Epub 2020 May 11.

Centre for Psychiatry Research, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, & Stockholm Health Care Services, Stockholm County Council, Stockholm, Sweden.

Background: Alcohol use disorder (AUD) is highly prevalent and presents a large treatment gap. Self-help internet interventions are an attractive approach to lowering thresholds for seeking help and disseminating evidence-based programs at scale. Internet interventions for AUD however suffer from high attrition and since continuous outcome measurements are uncommon, little is known about trajectories and processes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12874-020-00995-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7212621PMC

Generation and evaluation of synthetic patient data.

BMC Med Res Methodol 2020 May 7;20(1):108. Epub 2020 May 7.

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Ave, Livermore, CA, USA.

Background: Machine learning (ML) has made a significant impact in medicine and cancer research; however, its impact in these areas has been undeniably slower and more limited than in other application domains. A major reason for this has been the lack of availability of patient data to the broader ML research community, in large part due to patient privacy protection concerns. High-quality, realistic, synthetic datasets can be leveraged to accelerate methodological developments in medicine. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12874-020-00977-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7204018PMC

Association between antipsychotic drug dose and length of clinical notes: a proxy of disease severity?

BMC Med Res Methodol 2020 May 7;20(1):107. Epub 2020 May 7.

Disease Systems Biology program, Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Protein Research, University of Copenhagen, Blegdamsvej 3B, DK-2200, Copenhagen N, Denmark.

Background: Most structured clinical data, such as diagnosis codes, are not sufficient to obtain precise phenotypes and assess disease burden. Text mining of clinical notes could provide a basis for detailed profiles of phenotypic traits. The objective of the current study was to determine whether drug dose, regardless of polypharmacy, is associated with the length of clinical notes, and to determine the frequency of adverse events per word in clinical notes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12874-020-00993-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7204249PMC

Psychometric properties of measures of substance use: a systematic review and meta-analysis of reliability, validity and diagnostic test accuracy.

BMC Med Res Methodol 2020 May 7;20(1):106. Epub 2020 May 7.

Department of Family Medicine and Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USA.

Background: Synthesis of psychometric properties of substance use measures to identify patterns of use and substance use disorders remains limited. To address this gap, we sought to systematically evaluate the psychometric properties of measures to detect substance use and misuse.

Methods: We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of literature on measures of substance classes associated with HIV risk (heroin, methamphetamine, cocaine, ecstasy, alcohol) that were published in English before June 2016 that reported at least one of the following psychometric outcomes of interest: internal consistency (alpha), test-retest/inter-rater reliability (kappa), sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12874-020-00963-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7203822PMC

Which interactions matter in economic evaluations? A systematic review and simulation study.

BMC Med Res Methodol 2020 May 7;20(1):109. Epub 2020 May 7.

Health Economics Research Centre, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Old Road Campus, Headington, Oxford, OX3 7LF, UK.

Background: We aimed to assess the magnitude of interactions in costs, quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) and net benefits within a sample of published economic evaluations of factorial randomised controlled trials (RCTs), evaluate the impact that different analytical methods would have had on the results and compare the performance of different criteria for identifying which interactions should be taken into account.

Methods: We conducted a systematic review of full economic evaluations conducted alongside factorial RCTs and reviewed the methods used in different studies, as well as the incidence, magnitude, statistical significance, and type of interactions observed within the trials. We developed the interaction-effect ratio as a measure of the magnitude of interactions relative to main effects. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12874-020-00978-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7203889PMC

Experts' perceptions on the use of visual analytics for complex mental healthcare planning: an exploratory study.

BMC Med Res Methodol 2020 May 7;20(1):110. Epub 2020 May 7.

Centre for Mental Health Research, Research School of Population Health, College of Health and Medicine, Australian National University, 63 Eggleston Road, Acton, ACT, 2601, Australia.

Background: Health experts including planners and policy-makers face complex decisions in diverse and constantly changing healthcare systems. Visual analytics may play a critical role in supporting analysis of complex healthcare data and decision-making. The purpose of this study was to examine the real-world experience that experts in mental healthcare planning have with visual analytics tools, investigate how well current visualisation techniques meet their needs, and suggest priorities for the future development of visual analytics tools of practical benefit to mental healthcare policy and decision-making. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12874-020-00986-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7206783PMC

An assessment of the quality of current clinical meta-analyses.

BMC Med Res Methodol 2020 May 7;20(1):105. Epub 2020 May 7.

Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Weill Cornell Medicine, 525 East 68th Street, New York, NY, 10065, USA.

Background: The objective of this study was to assess the overall quality of study-level meta-analyses in high-ranking journals using commonly employed guidelines and standards for systematic reviews and meta-analyses.

Methods: 100 randomly selected study-level meta-analyses published in ten highest-ranking clinical journals in 2016-2017 were evaluated by medical librarians against 4 assessments using a scale of 0-100: the Peer Review of Electronic Search Strategies (PRESS), Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA), Institute of Medicine's (IOM) Standards for Systematic Reviews, and quality items from the Cochrane Handbook. Multiple regression was performed to assess meta-analyses characteristics' associated with quality scores. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12874-020-00999-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7204021PMC
May 2020
2.270 Impact Factor

Baseline-adjusted proportional odds models for the quantification of treatment effects in trials with ordinal sum score outcomes.

BMC Med Res Methodol 2020 May 6;20(1):104. Epub 2020 May 6.

Department of Biostatistics, Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Prevention Institute, University of Zurich, Hirschengraben 84, Zurich, CH-8001, Switzerland.

Background: Sum scores of ordinal outcomes are common in randomized clinical trials. The approaches routinely employed for assessing treatment effects, such as t-tests or Wilcoxon tests, are not particularly powerful in detecting changes in relevant parameters or lack the ability to incorporate baseline information. Hence, tailored statistical methods are needed for the analysis of ordinal outcomes in clinical research. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12874-020-00984-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7204322PMC

Feasibility and evaluation of a large-scale external validation approach for patient-level prediction in an international data network: validation of models predicting stroke in female patients newly diagnosed with atrial fibrillation.

BMC Med Res Methodol 2020 May 6;20(1):102. Epub 2020 May 6.

Department of Medical Informatics, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.

Background: To demonstrate how the Observational Healthcare Data Science and Informatics (OHDSI) collaborative network and standardization can be utilized to scale-up external validation of patient-level prediction models by enabling validation across a large number of heterogeneous observational healthcare datasets.

Methods: Five previously published prognostic models (ATRIA, CHADS, CHADSVASC, Q-Stroke and Framingham) that predict future risk of stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation were replicated using the OHDSI frameworks. A network study was run that enabled the five models to be externally validated across nine observational healthcare datasets spanning three countries and five independent sites. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12874-020-00991-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7201646PMC

Evaluation of survival extrapolation in immuno-oncology using multiple pre-planned data cuts: learnings to aid in model selection.

BMC Med Res Methodol 2020 May 6;20(1):103. Epub 2020 May 6.

Oncology Brands & Life Cycle Management, Global Evidence & Value Development, EMD Serono, Inc, One Technology Place, Rockland, MA, 02370, USA.

Background: Due to limited duration of follow up in clinical trials of cancer treatments, estimates of lifetime survival benefits are typically derived using statistical extrapolation methods. To justify the method used, a range of approaches have been proposed including statistical goodness-of-fit tests and comparing estimates against a previous data cut (i.e. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12874-020-00997-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7204248PMC

Framing the numerical findings of Cochrane plain language summaries: two randomized controlled trials.

BMC Med Res Methodol 2020 May 6;20(1):101. Epub 2020 May 6.

Department of Research in Biomedicine and Health, University of Split School of Medicine, Šoltanska 2, 21000, Split, Croatia.

Background: Cochrane systematic review Plain language Summaries (CSR PLSs should serve as a tool for the evidence translation to non-medical population. However, the evidence of optimal type of numerical presentation in CSR PLSs is still scarce. The aim of this study was to investigate readers' comprehension and preferences for different presentation of findings, including framing and numerical data, in Cochrane systematic review Plain Language Summaries (CSR PLSs). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12874-020-00990-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7201737PMC

Adjusting for comorbidity in incidence-based DALY calculations: an individual-based modeling approach.

BMC Med Res Methodol 2020 May 6;20(1):100. Epub 2020 May 6.

Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Sciensano, Rue Juliette Wytsmanstraat 14, 1050, Brussels, Belgium.

Background: The co-occurrence of two or more medical conditions in the same individual is not uncommon. If disability-adjusted life year (DALY) calculations are carried out for each condition separately, multimorbidity may lead to an overestimation of the morbidity component, the Years Lived with Disability (YLD). Adjusting for comorbidity may be straightforward if all symptoms have same onset and duration; however, when the comorbid health states occur at different time points, an analytical solution to the comorbidity problem becomes more complex. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12874-020-00987-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7201540PMC

Application of principal component analysis and logistic regression model in lupus nephritis patients with clinical hypothyroidism.

BMC Med Res Methodol 2020 May 1;20(1):99. Epub 2020 May 1.

Department of Rheumatology, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Xiangya Road, Changsha, 410000, Hunan, China.

Background: Previous studies indicate that the prevalence of hypothyroidism is much higher in patients with lupus nephritis (LN) than in the general population, and is associated with LN's activity. Principal component analysis (PCA) and logistic regression can help determine relevant risk factors and identify LN patients at high risk of hypothyroidism; as such, these tools may prove useful in managing this disease.

Methods: We carried out a cross-sectional study of 143 LN patients diagnosed by renal biopsy, all of whom had been admitted to Xiangya Hospital of Central South University in Changsha, China, between June 2012 and December 2016. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12874-020-00989-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7195728PMC

Accurate confidence intervals for risk difference in meta-analysis with rare events.

BMC Med Res Methodol 2020 Apr 30;20(1):98. Epub 2020 Apr 30.

Epidemiology and Biostatistics Program, School of Public Health, University of Nevada Las Vegas, Las Vegas, USA.

Background: Meta-analysis provides a useful statistical tool to effectively estimate treatment effect from multiple studies. When the outcome is binary and it is rare (e.g. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12874-020-00954-8DOI Listing
April 2020
2.270 Impact Factor

Implications of sex offender classification on reporting demographic characteristics, health, and criminal careers: results from an Australian jurisdiction.

BMC Med Res Methodol 2020 Apr 28;20(1):97. Epub 2020 Apr 28.

Kirby Institute, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia.

Background: Cross-sectional and retrospective offence data are often used to classify sex offenders in epidemiological and survey research, but little empirical evidence exists regarding the practical implications of this for applied research. This study describes the classification of sex offenders from a cohort of prisoners recruited as part of an Australian inmate health survey and the implications for reporting results.

Methods: Data-linkage was used to join the New South Wales (NSW) Inmate Health Surveys to the states re-offending database to identify men with histories of sexual offending. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12874-020-00960-wDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7189498PMC

How are systematic reviews of prevalence conducted? A methodological study.

BMC Med Res Methodol 2020 Apr 26;20(1):96. Epub 2020 Apr 26.

Programa de Pós-Graduação em Epidemiologia, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.

Background: There is a notable lack of methodological and reporting guidance for systematic reviews of prevalence data. This information void has the potential to result in reviews that are inconsistent and inadequate to inform healthcare policy and decision making. The aim of this meta-epidemiological study is to describe the methodology of recently published prevalence systematic reviews. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12874-020-00975-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7184711PMC

Ordinal logistic regression model describing factors associated with extent of nodal involvement in oral cancer patients and its prospective validation.

BMC Med Res Methodol 2020 Apr 26;20(1):95. Epub 2020 Apr 26.

Department of Surgical Oncology, Dr BRA-IRCH, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India.

Background: Oral cancer is the most common cancer among Indian men, and has strong tendency of metastatic spread to neck lymph node which strongly influences prognosis especially 5 year survival-rate and also guides the related managements more effectively. Therefore, a reliable and accurate means of preoperative evaluation of extent of nodal involvement becomes crucial. However, earlier researchers have preferred to address mainly its dichotomous form (involved/not-involved) instead of ordinal form while dealing with epidemiology of nodal involvement. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12874-020-00985-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7183690PMC

Study design factors influencing patients' willingness to participate in clinical research: a randomised vignette-based study.

BMC Med Res Methodol 2020 Apr 26;20(1):93. Epub 2020 Apr 26.

Division of Clinical Epidemiology and Department of health and community medicine, Geneva University Hospitals and Faculty of Medicine, 6 Rue Gabrielle Perret-Gentil, 1211, 14, Geneva, Switzerland.

Background: High patient participation in clinical research reduces selection bias and ensures the generalizability of study findings. We explored study-related factors that may influence patients' willingness to participate in research.

Methods: We submitted by mail two vignettes that described clinical research studies - a drug trial and a diagnostic study - to patients recently discharged from hospital and assessed their willingness to participate. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12874-020-00979-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7183682PMC

Bayesian joint modelling of longitudinal and time to event data: a methodological review.

BMC Med Res Methodol 2020 Apr 26;20(1):94. Epub 2020 Apr 26.

Department of Health Data Science, Institute of Population Health, University of Liverpool, L69 3GL, Liverpool, UK.

Background: In clinical research, there is an increasing interest in joint modelling of longitudinal and time-to-event data, since it reduces bias in parameter estimation and increases the efficiency of statistical inference. Inference and prediction from frequentist approaches of joint models have been extensively reviewed, and due to the recent popularity of data-driven Bayesian approaches, a review on current Bayesian estimation of joint model is useful to draw recommendations for future researches.

Methods: We have undertaken a comprehensive review on Bayesian univariate and multivariate joint models. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12874-020-00976-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7183597PMC

schema: an open-source, distributed mobile platform for deploying mHealth research tools and interventions.

BMC Med Res Methodol 2020 Apr 25;20(1):91. Epub 2020 Apr 25.

Centre for Social and Early Emotional Development, School of Psychology, Faculty of Health, Deakin University, Geelong, Australia.

Background: Mobile applications for health, also known as 'mHealth apps', have experienced increasing popularity over the past ten years. However, most publicly available mHealth apps are not clinically validated, and many do not utilise evidence-based strategies. Health researchers wishing to develop and evaluate mHealth apps may be impeded by cost and technical skillset barriers. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12874-020-00973-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7183633PMC