2,398 results match your criteria BMC medical education[Journal]


Student motivation to learn: is self-belief the key to transition and first year performance in an undergraduate health professions program?

BMC Med Educ 2019 Apr 18;19(1):111. Epub 2019 Apr 18.

Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Hwy, Nedlands, Western Australia, 6009, Australia.

Background: Student motivation to learn has been undervalued to date though has been identified as an area influencing student success and retention at university. The transition into university has been highlighted as a key period affecting student outcomes as well as well-being. Early identification of those students at risk may assist the transition for many students moving into higher education. Read More

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https://bmcmededuc.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12909
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12909-019-1539-5DOI Listing
April 2019
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Paediatric Physiotherapy curriculum: an audit and survey of Australian entry-level Physiotherapy programs.

BMC Med Educ 2019 Apr 16;19(1):109. Epub 2019 Apr 16.

Faculty of Health Sciences and Medicine, Bond Institute of Health and Sport, Bond University, Robina, QLD, Gold Coast, 4226, Australia.

Background: No documented standard or core competencies exist for paediatric curriculum in entry-level physiotherapy programs in Australia. Consequently, extensive variability is thought to exist amongst Australian entry-level physiotherapy programs for preparing physiotherapists to work safely and effectively with children. The purpose of this study was to explore the landscape of paediatric curriculum in Australian entry-level physiotherapy programs and identify the paediatric content being covered, its perceived importance according to university academics who teach paediatrics, the mode of delivery and assessment, and the strengths, weaknesses, barriers and facilitators to implementing paediatric curriculum. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12909-019-1540-zDOI Listing

Medical education today: all that glitters is not gold.

BMC Med Educ 2019 Apr 16;19(1):110. Epub 2019 Apr 16.

Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, McGovern Medical School, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth), 6431 Fannin St., MSB2.276, Houston, TX, 77005, USA.

Background: The medical education system based on principles advocated by Flexner and Osler has produced generations of scientifically grounded and clinically skilled physicians whose collective experiences and contributions have served medicine and patients well. Yet sweeping changes launched around the turn of the millennium have constituted a revolution in medical education. In this article, a critique is presented of the new undergraduate medical education (UME) curricula in relationship to graduate medical education (GME) and clinical practice. Read More

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https://bmcmededuc.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12909
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12909-019-1535-9DOI Listing
April 2019
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'Standardized patients' in teaching the communication skill of history-taking to four-year foreign medical undergraduates in the department of obstetrics and gynaecology.

BMC Med Educ 2019 Apr 15;19(1):108. Epub 2019 Apr 15.

Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, West China Second University Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan, People's Republic of China.

Background: Many foreign students have difficulty taking histories from Chinese patients, especially in clinical context of the Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology. The efficacy of using standardized patients to prepare foreign students for communicating with Chinese patients and taking their histories was evaluated in this study.

Methods: Ninety-four four-year foreign students were assigned to one of three clinical sub-departments (gynaecology, obstetrics, and reproductive endocrinology) to practice history-taking; after practicing in one sub-department, the students were then crossed over to a different department. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12909-019-1541-yDOI Listing

Using deliberate practice framework to assess the quality of feedback in undergraduate clinical skills training.

BMC Med Educ 2019 Apr 11;19(1):105. Epub 2019 Apr 11.

Clinical and Professional Practice, School of Clinical Medicine, College of Health Sciences, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, 4000, South Africa.

Background: In this research paper we report on the quality of feedback provided in the logbooks of pre-clinical undergraduate students based on a model of 'actionable feedback'. Feedback to clinical learners about their performance is crucial to their learning, which ultimately impacts on their development into competent clinicians. Due to students' concerns regarding the inconsistency and quality of feedback provided by clinicians, a structured feedback improvement strategy to move feedback forward was added to the clinical skills logbook. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12909-019-1547-5DOI Listing

Feedback learning opportunities from medical student logs of paediatric patients.

BMC Med Educ 2019 Apr 11;19(1):107. Epub 2019 Apr 11.

The Rural Clinical School of Western Australia, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Western Australia, M706, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, WA, 6009, Australia.

Background: Feedback can alter medical student logging practices, although most learners feel feedback is inadequate. A varied case mix in rural and urban contexts offers diverse clinical encounters. Logs are an indicator of these clinical experiences, and contain opportunities for feedback, which can greatly influence learning: we labelled these 'feedback learning opportunities' (FLOs). Read More

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https://bmcmededuc.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12909
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12909-019-1533-yDOI Listing
April 2019
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How does 'banter' influence trainee doctors' choice of career? A qualitative study.

BMC Med Educ 2019 Apr 11;19(1):104. Epub 2019 Apr 11.

Department for Health, University of Bath, Claverton Campus, Bath, BA2 7AY, UK.

Background: Negative comments from senior colleagues about specialties, such as general practice and psychiatry, are known to influence trainees' career choice, but little is known about the extent of this influence or the mechanism by which it works. There have been calls to ban these disparaging comments, also known as 'banter'. This study explored how recently qualified doctors make sense of banter in the context of other experiences and information. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12909-019-1531-0DOI Listing

The association between deep learning approach and case based learning.

BMC Med Educ 2019 Apr 11;19(1):106. Epub 2019 Apr 11.

St George's University of London, Cranmer Terrace, Tooting, London, SW17 0RE, England, UK.

Being medical students, and having experienced different learning approaches ourselves, here, we discuss and critically analyse the importance of the deep learning approach that Chonkar et al. have presented, alongside emphasizing Case Based Learning, and their roles in life long medical learning. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12909-019-1516-zDOI Listing

Impact of structured reporting on developing head and neck ultrasound skills.

BMC Med Educ 2019 Apr 11;19(1):102. Epub 2019 Apr 11.

Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University Medical Center Mainz, Langenbeckstraße 1, 55131, Mainz, Germany.

Background: Reports of head and neck ultrasound examinations are frequently written by hand as free texts. This is a serious obstacle to the learning process of the modality due to a missing report structure and terminology. Therefore, there is a great inter-observer variability in overall report quality. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12909-019-1538-6DOI Listing

Impact of funded global health electives on career development of residents in a U.S. obstetrics and gynecology program: a cross-sectional survey.

BMC Med Educ 2019 Apr 11;19(1):103. Epub 2019 Apr 11.

Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Biology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.

Background: The aims of this study were to identify factors influencing participation in global health electives during residency and to understand the career impact of global health electives on alumni of an Obstetrics and Gynecology (OB/GYN) residency program.

Methods: This was a cross-sectional, web-based survey of alumni of a residency program in the United States.

Results: The response rate was 49%. Read More

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https://bmcmededuc.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12909
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12909-019-1536-8DOI Listing
April 2019
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Perfecting practice: a protocol for assessing simulation-based mastery learning and deliberate practice versus self-guided practice for bougie-assisted cricothyroidotomy performance.

BMC Med Educ 2019 Apr 5;19(1):100. Epub 2019 Apr 5.

McMaster Education Research, Innovation and Theory (MERIT) program, McMaster University, Hamilton, Canada.

Background: Simulation-based medical education (SBME) is a cornerstone for procedural skill training in residency education. Multiple studies have concluded that SBME is highly effective, superior to traditional clinical education, and translates to improved patient outcomes. Additionally it is widely accepted that mastery learning, which comprises deliberate practice, is essential for expert level performance for routine skills; however, given that highly structured practice is more time and resource-intensive, it is important to assess its value for the acquisition of rarely performed technical skills. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12909-019-1537-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6451236PMC
April 2019
1 Read

Prediction of academic achievement based on learning strategies and outcome expectations among medical students.

BMC Med Educ 2019 Apr 5;19(1):99. Epub 2019 Apr 5.

Department of biostatistics & epidemiology, Arak University of Medical Sciences, A'lam-Al-Hoda Street, Shahid Shiroodi Street, Arak, Markazi Province, Zip Code: 3819693345, Iran.

Background: One of the most important indicators of the effectiveness of teaching can be the academic achievement of learners, which can be influenced by different factors such as learning methods and individual motivations. The purpose of this study was to determine the ability of predicting academic achievement based on learning motivation strategies and outcome expectations based on a theoretical model.

Methods: This descriptive-analytic study was conducted with the participation of 380 male and female students of nine faculties of medical sciences of Shahid Beheshti University of Tehran. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12909-019-1527-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6451267PMC

Acceptance of interprofessional learning between medical and pharmacy students in a prescribing skills training workshop: pre-post intervention study.

BMC Med Educ 2019 Apr 5;19(1):101. Epub 2019 Apr 5.

Medical Education and Research Development Unit (MERDU), Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

Background: The success of interprofessional collaboration in healthcare services requires a paradigm shift in the training of future health profession practitioners. This study aimed to develop and validate an instrument to measure Student Acceptance of Interprofessional Learning (SAIL) in Malaysia, and to assess this attribute among medical and pharmacy students using a prescribing skills training workshop.

Methods: The study consisted of two phases. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12909-019-1525-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6451269PMC
April 2019
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A qualitative review of the design thinking framework in health professions education.

BMC Med Educ 2019 Apr 4;19(1):98. Epub 2019 Apr 4.

NC State University College of Design, Raleigh, North Carolina, USA.

Background: Design thinking is a problem-solving framework that has been used to enhance patient experiences, improve clinical outcomes, and refine medical curricula. This study reviewed the use of design thinking in health professions education.

Methods: A search yielded 169 articles, which were excluded if they were: (1) not related to education; (2) lacking an application of design thinking; or (3) not associated with healthcare. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12909-019-1528-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6449899PMC

The impact of feedback during formative testing on study behaviour and performance of (bio)medical students: a randomised controlled study.

BMC Med Educ 2019 Apr 3;19(1):97. Epub 2019 Apr 3.

Department of Physiology (392), Radboud Institute for Health Sciences, Radboud University Medical Center, PO box 9101, 6500 HB, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.

Background: A potential concern of formative testing using web-based applications ("apps") is provision of limited feedback. Adopting a randomised controlled trial in 463 first year (bio) medical students, we explored if providing immediate, detailed feedback during "app"-based formative testing can further improve study behaviour and study performance of (bio)medical students.

Methods: Students had access to a formative testing "app", which involved 7 formative test modules throughout the 4-week course. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12909-019-1534-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6446354PMC
April 2019
2 Reads

The art of note taking with mobile devices in medical education.

BMC Med Educ 2019 Apr 2;19(1):96. Epub 2019 Apr 2.

Department of Anatomy, Medicum, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 63, 00014, Helsinki, Finland.

Background: Students use mobile devices extensively in their everyday life, and the new technology is adopted in study usage. Since 2013, the University of Helsinki has given new medical and dental students iPads for study use. Simultaneously, an action research project on mobile learning started focusing on these students' mobile device usage throughout their study years. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12909-019-1529-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6446288PMC
April 2019
1 Read

Stress and stressors of medical student near-peer tutors during courses: a psychophysiological mixed methods study.

BMC Med Educ 2019 Apr 2;19(1):95. Epub 2019 Apr 2.

Clinic for General Internal Medicine and Psychosomatics, University Hospital Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 410, 69120, Heidelberg, Germany.

Background: Structured peer-led tutorial courses are widespread and indispensable teaching methods that relieve teaching staff and contribute to the development of students' competencies. Nevertheless, despite high general stress levels in medical students and associated increases in psychopathology, specific knowledge of peer tutors' additional burdens is very limited.

Methods: Sixty student near-peer tutors from two structured peer-teaching programmes volunteered to participate. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12909-019-1521-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6444608PMC

What keeps medical students healthy and well? A systematic review of observational studies on protective factors for health and well-being during medical education.

BMC Med Educ 2019 Apr 1;19(1):94. Epub 2019 Apr 1.

Department of General Practice, Carl Gustav Carus Faculty of Medicine, Dresden, Germany.

Background: Despite the growing evidence of a negative impact of medical school on students' health and well-being, little is known about protective factors for staying healthy and well during medical education. Therefore, a systematic review of peer-reviewed studies aiming to identify such predictors was conducted.

Methods: Medline, Embase, and PsychInfo were systematically searched by using preselected MeSH terms to identify English- and German-language peer-reviewed articles (observational studies) examining predictors for medical students' health and well-being, published between January 2001 and April 2018. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12909-019-1532-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6444449PMC
April 2019
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Self-handicapping among nursing students: an interventional study.

BMC Med Educ 2019 Apr 1;19(1):26. Epub 2019 Apr 1.

Department of Humanistic Sciences, Faculty of Human Sciences, Islamic Azad University of Yazd, Yazd, Iran.

Background: Self-handicapping is an effective defense strategy in an individual's behavior that leads to weak performance in different situations like education. This study aimed to investigate how training problem solving skills affected the rate of self-handicapping among nursing students.

Methods: This interventional study was done in Jahrom, Fars province, Iran during 2016-2017. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12909-018-1441-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6442433PMC
April 2019
1 Read

Does reality meet expectations? An analysis of medical students' expectations and perceived learning during mandatory research projects.

BMC Med Educ 2019 Mar 29;19(1):93. Epub 2019 Mar 29.

Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Nobelsväg 12 a, 171 77, Stockholm, Sweden.

Background: Although much has been written about structure and outcomes of medical students' curricular research projects, less attention has been paid to the expectations on such projects. In order to foster students' scientific understanding and improve the quality of mandatory research projects, we compared students' pre-course expectations with their post-course insights regarding learning and transferable skills.

Methods: A prospective cross-sectional questionnaire study. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12909-019-1526-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6439984PMC

Social change agent training program tailored to occupational therapists' needs: a design-based study protocol.

BMC Med Educ 2019 Mar 29;19(1):92. Epub 2019 Mar 29.

School of Rehabilitation, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Université de Sherbrooke, 12e avenue Nord, Sherbrooke, Québec, J1H 5N4, Canada.

Background: As social change agents (SCAs), occupational therapists (OTs) are expected to defend the rights of their clients, advocate for and with them, and try to influence organizational and political decision-makers. However, OTs do not generally feel equipped to take effective action. The overall goal of this research partnership is to support practising OTs in acquiring the knowledge and skills required to act as SCAs through a specific SCA training program and a toolkit that summarizes the key training points. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12909-019-1530-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6440116PMC

Attitudes towards psychiatry amongst medical and nursing students in Singapore.

BMC Med Educ 2019 Mar 27;19(1):91. Epub 2019 Mar 27.

Research Division, Institute of Mental Health, Buangkok Green Medical Park, 10 Buangkok View, Singapore, 539747, Singapore.

Background: A shortage of specialists in psychiatry, both in terms of psychiatrists and psychiatric nurses is evident worldwide. While there are multiple factors leading to an individual's decision to specialize in psychiatry, the individual's perceptions and attitudes towards psychiatry tend to play an essential role. This study thus aimed to explore attitudes towards psychiatry amongst medical and nursing students in Singapore and examine factors associated with these attitudes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12909-019-1518-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6437870PMC
March 2019
1 Read
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Face yourself! - learning progress and shame in different approaches of video feedback: a comparative study.

BMC Med Educ 2019 Mar 27;19(1):88. Epub 2019 Mar 27.

Department of Psychosomatic medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tuebingen, Osianderstr. 5, D-72076, Tuebingen, Germany.

Background: Feedback is a crucial part of medical education and with on-going digitalisation, video feedback has been increasingly in use. Potentially shameful physician-patient-interactions might particularly benefit from it, allowing a meta-perspective view of ones own performance from a distance. We thus wanted to explore different approaches on how to deliver specifically video feedback by investigating the following hypotheses: 1. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12909-019-1519-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6437998PMC

A physician-scientist preceptorship in clinical and translational research enhances training and mentorship.

BMC Med Educ 2019 Mar 27;19(1):89. Epub 2019 Mar 27.

Medical Scientist Training Program, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, USA.

Background: Dual degree program MD/PhD candidates typically train extensively in basic science research and in clinical medicine, but often receive little formal experience or mentorship in clinical and translational research.

Methods: To address this educational and curricular gap, the University of Wisconsin Medical Scientist Training Program partnered with the University of Wisconsin Institute for Clinical and Translational Research to create a new physician-scientist preceptorship in clinical and translational research. This six-week apprentice-style learning experience-guided by a physician-scientist faculty mentor-integrates both clinical work and a translational research project, providing early exposure and hands-on experience with clinically oriented research and the integrated career of a physician-scientist. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12909-019-1523-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6438136PMC

The impact of clinical placements on the emotional intelligence of occupational therapy, physiotherapy, speech pathology, and business students: a longitudinal study.

BMC Med Educ 2019 Mar 27;19(1):90. Epub 2019 Mar 27.

School of Occupational Therapy, Social Work, and Speech Pathology, Curtin University, GPO Box U1985, Perth, 6845, Australia.

Background: Emotional intelligence (EI) is a critical skill for healthcare practitioners. Minimal longitudinal research has tracked the changes in EI of therapy students over their final full-time clinical placements.

Methods: The Emotional Quotient Inventory (EQ-i) measured the EI of 283 therapy students and 93 business students (control group who do no clinical placements) at three time points over a 16-month period, the same period that the therapy students participated in clinical placements. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12909-019-1520-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6437894PMC

Effects on postgraduate-year-I residents of simulation-based learning compared to traditional lecture-style education led by postgraduate-year-II residents: a pilot study.

BMC Med Educ 2019 Mar 20;19(1):87. Epub 2019 Mar 20.

Department of General Medicine, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, 2-5-1 Shikata-cho, Kita-ku, Okayama, 700-8558, Japan.

Background: Simulation-based learning plays an important role in contemporary medical education, although there are problems providing tutors. Peer-assisted learning has begun being formally adopted in medical education. Although it is considered useful for simulation-based learning, its effectiveness remains unclear. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12909-019-1509-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6425645PMC

Correction to: Multisource feedback as part of the medical board of Australia's professional performance framework: outcomes from a preliminary study.

BMC Med Educ 2019 03 4;19(1):73. Epub 2019 Mar 4.

School of Medicine, Gold Coast Campus, Griffith University, Southport, Australia.

Following publication of the original article [1], the author reported that Fig. 4 was missing. This has now been corrected in the original article. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12909-019-1490-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6425611PMC

'A melting pot of cultures' -challenges in social adaptation and interactions amongst international medical students.

BMC Med Educ 2019 Mar 18;19(1):86. Epub 2019 Mar 18.

Anatomy Department, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, 123 St Stephen's Green, Dublin, 2, Ireland.

Background: The internationalisation of higher level education and the profiles - nationalities, ethnicities and cultural identities - of students who migrate to undertake higher level education programmes in a different country are increasingly complex. This article explores the way in which cultural backgrounds impact the student's experiences of an international medical school, and how these experiences have the potential to inform the development and design of student support services for those students who are not coping well with the transition.

Methods: Thirty one first year students were interviewed by sixteen second year students who were trained and supervised by an experienced researcher. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12909-019-1514-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6423840PMC

Informing the medical education reform in Tajikistan: evidence on the learning environment at two nursing colleges.

BMC Med Educ 2019 Mar 18;19(1):85. Epub 2019 Mar 18.

Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute, Socinstrasse 57, PO Box 4002, Basel, Switzerland.

Background: The Tajik medical education system is undergoing a complex reform to enhance the transition of the healthcare system from its soviet legacy of emphasizing secondary level care/specialisation to become more family medicine and primary health care oriented. The current study presents the first empirical evaluation of the educational environment for nursing students in Tajikistan using the Dundee Ready Educational Environment Measure (DREEM). The study results contribute to the benchmarking efforts of monitoring and positively steering the educational environment over time. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12909-019-1515-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6423760PMC

Moving healthcare professionals - a whole system approach to embed physical activity in clinical practice.

BMC Med Educ 2019 Mar 15;19(1):84. Epub 2019 Mar 15.

Public Health, Birmingham City Council, Birmingham, UK.

Background: Healthcare professionals are key informants to support individual behaviour change, and although there has been some progress in empowering clinicians to promote physical activity and health at work, an effective strategy overarching the whole medical educational journey is still lacking. This report provides an overview from the Moving Healthcare Professionals programme (MHPP), a whole-system educational approach to embed prevention and physical activity promotion into clinical practice.

Methods: The MHPP model integrates educational resources into three core domains of medical education: undergraduate education, postgraduate education and continuing professional development. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12909-019-1517-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6419815PMC

Capacity building in health care professions within the Gulf cooperation council countries: paving the way forward.

BMC Med Educ 2019 Mar 14;19(1):83. Epub 2019 Mar 14.

Institute for Population Health, Weill Cornell Medicine-Qatar, Doha, Qatar.

Background: There is a worldwide shortage of health care workers. This problem is particularly severe in the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries because of shortages in certain medical disciplines, due to a lack of nationally-trained professionals and a less developed educational system compared to other high income countries. Consequently, GCC countries are heavily dependent on an expatriate health care workforce; a problem exacerbated by high turnover. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12909-019-1513-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6417223PMC
March 2019
3 Reads

A new tool for assessing short debriefings after immersive simulation: validity of the SHORT scale.

BMC Med Educ 2019 Mar 12;19(1):82. Epub 2019 Mar 12.

Apprentiss Centre (simulation centre), Laval University, Quebec, Canada.

Background: Simulation is being increasingly used worldwide in healthcare education. However, it is costly both in terms of finances and human resources. As a consequence, several institutions have designed programs offering several short immersive simulation sessions, each followed by short debriefings. Read More

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https://bmcmededuc.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12909
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12909-019-1503-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6419351PMC
March 2019
7 Reads

A survey comparison of educational interventions for teaching pneumatic otoscopy to medical students.

BMC Med Educ 2019 Mar 12;19(1):79. Epub 2019 Mar 12.

Department of Pediatrics, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, 225 East Chicago, Box 86, Chicago, IL, 60611, USA.

Background: Though pneumatic otoscopy improves accurate diagnosis of ear disease, trainees lack proficiency. We evaluated the effect of three different training techniques on medical students' subsequent reported use of basic and pneumatic otoscopy in patient encounters.

Methods: Pediatric clerkship students participated in an ear exam workshop with randomization to one of three educational interventions: task trainer (Life/form®, Fort Atkinson WI), instructional video, or peer practice. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12909-019-1507-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6417091PMC
March 2019
2 Reads

Bachelor completion and dropout rates of selected, rejected and lottery-admitted medical students in the Netherlands.

BMC Med Educ 2019 Mar 12;19(1):80. Epub 2019 Mar 12.

Department of Research in Education, Amsterdam UMC, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, VUmc School of Medical Sciences, Amsterdam, the Netherlands.

Background: Evidence for the effectiveness of the selection of medical students is weak. This study aimed to examine the added value of a two-step selection procedure (first step non-academic, second step academic tests) to a pre-university GPA-based lottery procedure. Because previous research has suggested that participation in selection (regardless of the outcome) is a predictor of study success, this study is the first to include students who initially applied for selection, then refrained from (actively) participating in selection and were eventually admitted through lottery. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12909-019-1511-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6417017PMC

Students' perspectives on the use of digital versus conventional dental impression techniques in orthodontics.

BMC Med Educ 2019 Mar 12;19(1):81. Epub 2019 Mar 12.

Department of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany.

Background: Despite the increasing use of digital impressions in orthodontics, this technique does not usually form part of the learning objectives in dental training. The aim of this study was to determine how students assess the user-friendliness of intraoral scanners compared to a conventional impression technique after a theoretical and practical teaching module.

Methods: Thirty-one dental students in their seventh semester (4th year) received and conducted digital (3 M, St. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12909-019-1512-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6417015PMC
March 2019
2 Reads

Tutor assessment of PBL process: does tutor variability affect objectivity and reliability?

BMC Med Educ 2019 Mar 8;19(1):76. Epub 2019 Mar 8.

Faculty of Medical Sciences, The University of the West Indies, Cave Hill Campus, Bridgetown, Barbados.

Background: Ensuring objectivity and maintaining reliability are necessary in order to consider any form of assessment valid. Evaluation of students in Problem-Based Learning (PBL) tutorials by the tutors has drawn the attention of critiques citing many challenges and limitations. The aim of this study was to determine the extent of tutor variability in assessing the PBL process in the Faculty of Medical Sciences, The University of the West Indies, St Augustine Campus, Trinidad and Tobago. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12909-019-1508-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6407196PMC
March 2019
1 Read
1.409 Impact Factor

Thai medical students' attitudes regarding what constitutes a "good death": a multi-center study.

BMC Med Educ 2019 Mar 8;19(1):78. Epub 2019 Mar 8.

Residency training in Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen, Thailand.

Background: Few studies exist regarding the perception of medical students toward older adults' wishes during their end-of-life period. Better understanding of students' perceptions regarding this topic could help improve palliative education. The purposes of this study were to examine the perceptions of medical students regarding what constitutes a "good death" and to demonstrate the factors associated with the necessary care decisions in older patients. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12909-019-1510-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6408792PMC
March 2019
1 Read

Cross sectional analysis of student-led surgical societies in fostering medical student interest in Canada.

BMC Med Educ 2019 Mar 8;19(1):77. Epub 2019 Mar 8.

Division of Thoracic Surgery, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada.

Background: The objective of this study was to examine how surgery interest groups (SIGs) across Canada function and influence medical students' interest in surgical careers.

Methods: Two unique surveys were distributed using a cross sectional design. The first was sent to SIG executives and the second to SIG members enrolled at a Canadian medical school in the 2016/17 academic year. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12909-019-1502-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6408764PMC
March 2019
1 Read
1.409 Impact Factor

Implementing an initiative to promote evidence-informed practice: part 1 - a description of the Evidence Rounds programme.

BMC Med Educ 2019 Mar 6;19(1):74. Epub 2019 Mar 6.

Health Research Board Trials Methodology Research Network, Galway, Ireland.

Background: Evidence-informed practice is fundamental to the delivery of high quality health care. Delays and gaps in the translation of research into practice can impact negatively on patient care. Previous studies have reported that problems facing health care professionals such as information overload, underdeveloped critical appraisal skills, lack of time and other individual, organisational and system-level contextual factors are barriers to the uptake of evidence. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12909-019-1489-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6402167PMC
March 2019
7 Reads

Implementing an initiative promote evidence-informed practice: part 2-healthcare professionals' perspectives of the evidence rounds programme.

BMC Med Educ 2019 Mar 6;19(1):75. Epub 2019 Mar 6.

Health Research Board Trials Methodology Research Network, School of Nursing and Midwifery, National University of Ireland Galway, Galway, Ireland.

Background: The translation of research into clinical practice is a key component of evidence-informed decision making. We implemented a multi-component dissemination and implementation strategy for healthcare professionals (HCPs) called Evidence Rounds. We report the findings of focus groups and interviews with HCPs to explore their perceptions of Evidence Rounds and help inform the implementation of future similar initiatives. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12909-019-1488-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6402168PMC
March 2019
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Different ways to present clinical cases in a classroom: video projection versus live representation of a simulated clinical scene with actors.

BMC Med Educ 2019 Mar 4;19(1):70. Epub 2019 Mar 4.

Geriatric Department Consorcio Parc de Salut Mar de Barcelona, Paseo Marítimo, 25-29, 08003, Barcelona, Spain.

Background: Use of the video digital format in the classroom is a common way to present clinical cases to stimulate discussion and increase learning. A simulated live performance with actors, also in the classroom, could be an alternative way to present cases that may be more attractive to arouse students' interest and attention. The aim of the present study was to compare the learning process between a group of students who saw a clinical case as a simulated live scene in the classroom and others seeing the same clinical case projected by video. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12909-019-1494-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6399977PMC
March 2019
6 Reads

Correction to: Randomized study showing the benefit of medical students writing multiple choice questions on their learning.

BMC Med Educ 2019 03 4;19(1):72. Epub 2019 Mar 4.

Department of Internal Medicine, Clínica Universidad de Navarra, Avenida Pío XII, 36, 31, 008, Pamplona, Spain.

Following publication of the original article [1], the author reported an error in the title; the word study should be changed to students as indicated below. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12909-019-1506-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6399937PMC
March 2019
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Effects of an evidence-based practice education program using multifaceted interventions: a quasi-experimental study with undergraduate nursing students.

BMC Med Educ 2019 Mar 4;19(1):71. Epub 2019 Mar 4.

College of Nursing, Gerontological Health Research Center in Institute of Health Sciences, Gyeongsang National University, 52727, 816-15, Jinju-daero, Jinju, Gyeongnam, South Korea.

Background: Although Evidence-Based Practice (EBP) should be introduced early on in nursing education to develop students' independence and self-learning ability, there are few such courses for undergraduate nursing students in Korea. This study examined the effects of the EBP education program for undergraduate nursing students (EBP-EPUNS) on nursing students' knowledge, skills, attitudes, competencies, and future use of EBP.

Methods: A quasi-experimental study design with pre-test, intervention, and post-test was used. Read More

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https://bmcmededuc.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12909
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12909-019-1501-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6399807PMC
March 2019
8 Reads

Multimedia-assisted instruction on pain assessment learning of new nurses: a quasi-experimental study.

BMC Med Educ 2019 Mar 4;19(1):68. Epub 2019 Mar 4.

Department of Nursing, Chang Gung University of Science & Technology, Taoyuan, Taiwan.

Background: Pain assessment and treatment are key factors affecting the quality and safety of care for patients and capabilities related to them are crucial for new nursing staff. Consequently, we developed a multimedia-assisted teaching program for nursing newcomers' pain assessment learning to facilitate their practical pain assessment ability. The goal of this study was to evaluate a multimedia instructional program to boost new nurses' ability to conduct pain assessment and treatment, through simulated scenario instruction. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12909-019-1496-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6398238PMC
March 2019
2 Reads

Medical student wellbeing - a consensus statement from Australia and New Zealand.

BMC Med Educ 2019 Mar 4;19(1):69. Epub 2019 Mar 4.

Medical Programme Directorate, Faculty of Medical & Health Sciences, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand.

Background: Medical student wellbeing - a consensus statement from Australia and New Zealand outlines recommendations for optimising medical student wellbeing within medical schools in our region. Worldwide, medical schools have responsibilities to respond to concerns about student psychological, social and physical wellbeing, but guidance for medical schools is limited. To address this gap, this statement clarifies key concepts and issues related to wellbeing and provides recommendations for educational program design to promote both learning and student wellbeing. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12909-019-1505-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6399899PMC
March 2019
1 Read
1.409 Impact Factor

Educational outreach visits to improve knee osteoarthritis management in primary care.

BMC Med Educ 2019 Mar 1;19(1):66. Epub 2019 Mar 1.

Academic Center for General Practice, KU Leuven, Kapucijnenvoer 33, J building, 3000, Leuven, Belgium.

Background: Knee osteoarthritis is a common problem, but often underdiagnosed and undertreated in primary care as compared to evidence-based guidelines. Educational outreach visits are an effective strategy to improve guideline adherence, but its contribution to knee osteoarthritis management is largely unknown. The aim of this study was to evaluate the overall effectiveness of educational outreach visits on process quality indicators for knee osteoarthritis management, more specifically on the referral for physical therapy. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12909-019-1504-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6397491PMC
March 2019
1 Read

Learning by teaching basic life support: a non-randomized controlled trial with medical students.

BMC Med Educ 2019 Mar 1;19(1):67. Epub 2019 Mar 1.

Departamento de Propedêutica Complementar, Faculdade de Medicina - Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil.

Background: Cardiopulmonary resuscitation is usually taught in universities through theoretical lectures and simulations on mannequins with low retention of knowledge and skills. New teaching methodologies have been used to improve the learning, placing the student at the center of the process. Likewise, the outside community knows next to nothing about cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12909-019-1500-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6397499PMC
March 2019
2 Reads

Investigating the self-study phase of an inverted biochemistry classroom - collaborative dyadic learning makes the difference.

BMC Med Educ 2019 Feb 28;19(1):64. Epub 2019 Feb 28.

Institute for Medical Education, University Hospital, LMU Munich, 80336, Munich, Germany.

Background: The inverted classroom approach is characterized by a primary self-study phase for students followed by an on-site, face-to-face teaching phase that is used to deepen the prior acquired knowledge. Obviously, this teaching approach relies on the students preparing before the on-site phase, which in turn requires optimized preparatory material as well as defined working instructions. The major aim of this study, therefore, was to investigate the effect of different preparatory materials and working instructions for the self-study phase of an e-learning-based inverted classroom on the knowledge gained by medical students in biochemistry. Read More

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https://bmcmededuc.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12909
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12909-019-1497-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6393989PMC
February 2019
7 Reads

Development of a scale to evaluate medical professional identity formation.

Authors:
Masami Tagawa

BMC Med Educ 2019 Feb 28;19(1):63. Epub 2019 Feb 28.

Center for Innovation in Medical and Dental Education, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima, 890-8544, Japan.

Background: Medical educators now focus on professional identity formation (PIF), which is a process of psychological development and socialization in the community of practice. This study aimed to develop an instrument to evaluate PIF that can be applied to a large group of medical trainees.

Methods: A self-administered questionnaire was created with items on priorities, behavior standards, attitudes, and emotional control of well-developed physicians, in addition to items on their background and experience in playing the role of a physician. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12909-019-1499-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6394027PMC
February 2019
4 Reads

Paediatric vision screening by non-healthcare volunteers: evidence based practices.

BMC Med Educ 2019 Feb 28;19(1):65. Epub 2019 Feb 28.

Office of Surgical Research Services, Department of Surgery, McMaster University, 39 Charlton Avenue East, Hamilton, ON, L8N 1Y3, Canada.

Background: The purpose of this study was to test the sensitivity and specificity of eight undergraduate volunteer examiners conducting vision screening tests in a community setting, in order to determine if non-eye care professionals were able to be trained to an appropriate level of skill.

Methods: Eight undergraduate volunteer examiners were trained to conduct vision screening tests to address a gap in pediatric community eye care. Phase I of the study was implemented in the pediatric ophthalmology clinic, and phase II was conducted in nine local schools. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12909-019-1498-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6394097PMC
February 2019
2 Reads