4,117 results match your criteria BMC evolutionary biology[Journal]


Computed tomography sheds new light on the affinities of the enigmatic euarthropod Jianshania furcatus from the early Cambrian Chengjiang biota.

BMC Evol Biol 2020 Jun 1;20(1):62. Epub 2020 Jun 1.

Yunnan Key Laboratory for Palaeobiology, Institute of Palaeontology, Yunnan University, Kunming, 650500, China.

Background: The Chengjiang biota is one of the most species-rich Cambrian Konservat-Lagerstätten, and preserves a community dominated by non-biomineralized euarthropods. However, several Chengjiang euarthropods have an unfamiliar morphology, are extremely rare, or incompletely preserved.

Results: We employed micro-computed tomography to restudy the enigmatic euarthropod Jianshania furcatus. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12862-020-01625-4DOI Listing

The green-brown polymorphism of the club-legged grasshopper Gomphocerus sibiricus is heritable and appears genetically simple.

BMC Evol Biol 2020 Jun 1;20(1):63. Epub 2020 Jun 1.

Population Ecology Group, Institute of Ecology and Evolution, Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Dornburger Straße 159, 07743, Jena, Germany.

Background: Local coexistence of distinct, genetically determined color morphs can be unstable and transitional. Stable, long-term coexistence requires some form of balancing selection to protect morphs from getting lost by directional selection or genetic drift. However, not all phenotypic polymorphism need to have a genetic basis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12862-020-01630-7DOI Listing

Hybridization and introgression between Helicoverpa armigera and H. zea: an adaptational bridge.

BMC Evol Biol 2020 May 25;20(1):61. Epub 2020 May 25.

Department of Entomology and Acarology, University of São Paulo, Luiz de Queiroz College of Agriculture, Piracicaba, São Paulo, 13418900, Brazil.

Background: Invasion of organisms into new ecosystems is increasingly common, due to the global trade in commodities. One of the most complex post-invasion scenarios occurs when an invasive species is related to a native pest, and even more so when they can hybridize and produce fertile progeny. The global pest Helicoverpa armigera was first detected in Brazil in 2013 and generated a wave of speculations about the possibility of hybridization with the native sister taxon Helicoverpa zea. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12862-020-01621-8DOI Listing

The puzzling mitochondrial phylogeography of the black soldier fly (Hermetia illucens), the commercially most important insect protein species.

BMC Evol Biol 2020 May 24;20(1):60. Epub 2020 May 24.

VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland Ltd, TT2 Tietotie 2, P.O. Box 1000, FI-02044 VTT, Espoo, Finland.

Background: The black soldier fly (Diptera: Stratiomyidae, Hermetia illucens) is renowned for its bioconversion ability of organic matter, and is the worldwide most widely used source of insect protein. Despite varying extensively in morphology, it is widely assumed that all black soldier flies belong to the same species, Hermetia illucens. We here screened about 600 field-collected and cultured flies from 39 countries and six biogeographic regions to test this assumption based on data for three genes (mitochondrial COI, nuclear ITS2 & 28S rDNA) and in order to gain insights into the phylogeography of the species. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12862-020-01627-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7247124PMC

Aligning functional network constraint to evolutionary outcomes.

BMC Evol Biol 2020 May 24;20(1):58. Epub 2020 May 24.

Department of Biological and Marine Sciences, University of Hull, Cottingham Road, Kingston-Upon-Hull, HU6 7RX, UK.

Background: Functional constraint through genomic architecture is suggested to be an important dimension of genome evolution, but quantitative evidence for this idea is rare. In this contribution, existing evidence and discussions on genomic architecture as constraint for convergent evolution, rapid adaptation, and genic adaptation are summarized into alternative, testable hypotheses. Network architecture statistics from protein-protein interaction networks are then used to calculate differences in evolutionary outcomes on the example of genomic evolution in yeast, and the results are used to evaluate statistical support for these longstanding hypotheses. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12862-020-01613-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7245893PMC

The features of polyglutamine regions depend on their evolutionary stability.

BMC Evol Biol 2020 May 24;20(1):59. Epub 2020 May 24.

Institute of Organismic and Molecular Evolution, Faculty of Biology, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Hanns-Dieter-Hüsch-Weg 15, 55128, Mainz, Germany.

Background: Polyglutamine regions (polyQ) are one of the most studied and prevalent homorepeats in eukaryotes. They have a particular length-dependent codon usage, which relates to a characteristic CAG-slippage mechanism. Pathologically expanded tracts of polyQ are known to form aggregates and are involved in the development of several human neurodegenerative diseases. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12862-020-01626-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7247214PMC

MtOrt: an empirical mitochondrial amino acid substitution model for evolutionary studies of Orthoptera insects.

BMC Evol Biol 2020 May 19;20(1):57. Epub 2020 May 19.

College of Life Sciences, Shaanxi Normal University, No. 620, West Chang'an Avenue, Xi'an, 710119, Shaanxi, China.

Background: Amino acid substitution models play an important role in inferring phylogenies from proteins. Although different amino acid substitution models have been proposed, only a few were estimated from mitochondrial protein sequences for specific taxa such as the mtArt model for Arthropoda. The increasing of mitochondrial genome data from broad Orthoptera taxa provides an opportunity to estimate the Orthoptera-specific mitochondrial amino acid empirical model. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12862-020-01623-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7236349PMC

The amylase gene cluster in house mice (Mus musculus) was subject to repeated introgression including the rescue of a pseudogene.

BMC Evol Biol 2020 May 15;20(1):56. Epub 2020 May 15.

Max-Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, 24306, Plön, Germany.

Background: Amylase gene clusters have been implicated in adaptive copy number changes in response to the amount of starch in the diet of humans and mammals. However, this interpretation has been questioned for humans and for mammals there is a paucity of information from natural populations.

Results: Using optical mapping and genome read information, we show here that the amylase cluster in natural house mouse populations is indeed copy-number variable for Amy2b paralogous gene copies (called Amy2a1 - Amy2a5), but a direct connection to starch diet is not evident. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12862-020-01624-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7227347PMC

Improving the performance of Bayesian phylogenetic inference under relaxed clock models.

BMC Evol Biol 2020 May 14;20(1):54. Epub 2020 May 14.

School of Computer Science, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand.

Background: Bayesian MCMC has become a common approach for phylogenetic inference. But the growing size of molecular sequence data sets has created a pressing need to improve the computational efficiency of Bayesian phylogenetic inference algorithms.

Results: This paper develops a new algorithm to improve the efficiency of Bayesian phylogenetic inference for models that include a per-branch rate parameter. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12862-020-01609-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7222466PMC

The TERB1-TERB2-MAJIN complex of mouse meiotic telomeres dates back to the common ancestor of metazoans.

BMC Evol Biol 2020 May 14;20(1):55. Epub 2020 May 14.

Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, Biocenter, University of Würzburg, 97074, Würzburg, Germany.

Background: Meiosis is essential for sexual reproduction and generates genetically diverse haploid gametes from a diploid germ cell. Reduction of ploidy depends on active chromosome movements during early meiotic prophase I. Chromosome movements require telomere attachment to the nuclear envelope. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12862-020-01612-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7227075PMC

A coarse-graining, ultrametric approach to resolve the phylogeny of prokaryotic strains with frequent homologous recombination.

Authors:
Tin Yau Pang

BMC Evol Biol 2020 May 7;20(1):52. Epub 2020 May 7.

Computational Cell Biology, Heinrich Heine University, 40225, Düsseldorf, Germany.

Background: A frequent event in the evolution of prokaryotic genomes is homologous recombination, where a foreign DNA stretch replaces a genomic region similar in sequence. Recombination can affect the relative position of two genomes in a phylogenetic reconstruction in two different ways: (i) one genome can recombine with a DNA stretch that is similar to the other genome, thereby reducing their pairwise sequence divergence; (ii) one genome can recombine with a DNA stretch from an outgroup genome, increasing the pairwise divergence. While several recombination-aware phylogenetic algorithms exist, many of these cannot account for both types of recombination; some algorithms can, but do so inefficiently. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12862-020-01616-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7204016PMC

A life-history perspective on sexual selection in a polygamous species.

BMC Evol Biol 2020 May 7;20(1):53. Epub 2020 May 7.

Institute for Biodiversity and Ecosystem Dynamics, University of Amsterdam, Science Park 904, 1098 XH, Amsterdam, Netherlands.

Background: Ever since Darwin, evolutionary biologists have studied sexual selection driving differences in appearance and behaviour between males and females. An unchallenged paradigm in such studies is that one sex (usually the male) signals its quality as a mate to the other sex (usually the female), who is choosy in accepting a partner. Here, we hypothesize that in polygamous species these roles change dynamically with the mating status of males and females, depending on direct reproductive costs and benefits of multiple matings, and on sperm competition. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12862-020-01618-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7206733PMC

Chloroplast (Cp) Transcriptome of P. davidiana Dode×P. bolleana Lauch provides insight into the Cp drought response and Populus Cp phylogeny.

BMC Evol Biol 2020 May 6;20(1):51. Epub 2020 May 6.

State Key Laboratory of Tree Genetics and Breeding, Northeast Forestry University, 26 Hexing Road, Harbin, 150040, China.

Background: Raw second-generation (2G) lignocellulosic biomass materials have the potential for development into a sustainable and renewable source of energy. Poplar is regarded as a promising 2G material (P. davidiana Dode×P. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12862-020-01622-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7201580PMC

Shedding light: a phylotranscriptomic perspective illuminates the origin of photosymbiosis in marine bivalves.

BMC Evol Biol 2020 May 1;20(1):50. Epub 2020 May 1.

Organismic and Evolutionary Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, USA.

Background: Photosymbiotic associations between metazoan hosts and photosynthetic dinoflagellates are crucial to the trophic and structural integrity of many marine ecosystems, including coral reefs. Although extensive efforts have been devoted to study the short-term ecological interactions between coral hosts and their symbionts, long-term evolutionary dynamics of photosymbiosis in many marine animals are not well understood. Within Bivalvia, the second largest class of mollusks, obligate photosymbiosis is found in two marine lineages: the giant clams (subfamily Tridacninae) and the heart cockles (subfamily Fraginae), both in the family Cardiidae. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12862-020-01614-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7195748PMC

The genetic basis of hybrid male sterility in sympatric Primulina species.

BMC Evol Biol 2020 Apr 29;20(1):49. Epub 2020 Apr 29.

Key Laboratory of Plant Resources Conservation and Sustainable Utilization, South China Botanical Garden, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou, 510650, China.

Background: Sympatric sister species provide an opportunity to investigate the genetic mechanisms and evolutionary forces that maintain species boundaries. The persistence of morphologically and genetically distinct populations in sympatry can only occur if some degree of reproductive isolation exists. A pair of sympatric sister species of Primulina (P. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12862-020-01617-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7191819PMC

Pattern and timing of diversification in the African freshwater fish genus Distichodus (Characiformes: Distichodontidae).

BMC Evol Biol 2020 Apr 26;20(1):48. Epub 2020 Apr 26.

Department of Ichthyology, American Museum of Natural History, Central Park West at 79th Street, New York, NY, 10024, USA.

Background: Distichodus is a clade of tropical freshwater fishes currently comprising 25 named species distributed continent-wide throughout the Nilo-Sudan and most Sub-Saharan drainages. This study investigates the phylogenetic relationships, timing of diversification, and biogeographic history of the genus from a taxonomically comprehensive mutilocus dataset analyzed using Maximum Likelihood and Bayesian methods of phylogenetic inference, coalescence-based species-tree estimation, divergence time estimation, and inference of geographic range evolution.

Results: Analyses of comparative DNA sequence data in a phylogenetic context reveal the existence of two major clades of similar species-level diversity and provide support for the monophyletic status of most sampled species. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12862-020-01615-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7184684PMC

Maladaptive plasticity facilitates evolution of thermal tolerance during an experimental range shift.

BMC Evol Biol 2020 Apr 23;20(1):47. Epub 2020 Apr 23.

School of Biological Sciences, Zoology Building, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, AB24 2TZ, UK.

Background: Many organisms are responding to climate change with dramatic range shifts, involving plastic and genetic changes to cope with novel climate regimes found at higher latitudes. Using experimental lineages of the seed beetle Callosobruchus maculatus, we simulated the initial phase of colonisation to progressively cooler and/or more variable conditions, to investigate how adaptation and phenotypic plasticity contribute to shifts in thermal tolerance during colonisation of novel climates.

Results: We show that heat and cold tolerance rapidly evolve during the initial stages of adaptation to progressively cooler and more variable climates. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12862-020-1589-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7181507PMC

Ultramicrostructural reductions in teeth: implications for dietary transition from non-avian dinosaurs to birds.

BMC Evol Biol 2020 Apr 21;20(1):46. Epub 2020 Apr 21.

Key Laboratory of Vertebrate Evolution and Human Origins of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 142 Xizhimenwai Street, Beijing, 100044, China.

Background: Tooth morphology within theropod dinosaurs has been extensively investigated and shows high disparity throughout the Cretaceous. Changes or diversification in feeding ecology, i.e. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12862-020-01611-wDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7171806PMC

Phylogeography and genetic diversity of the copepod family Cyclopidae (Crustacea: Cyclopoida) from freshwater ecosystems of Southeast Nigeria.

BMC Evol Biol 2020 Apr 21;20(1):45. Epub 2020 Apr 21.

MOE Key Laboratory for Biodiversity Science and Ecological Engineering, School of Life Science, Fudan University, Songhu Road 2005, Shanghai, China.

Background: Copepods are key components of aquatic ecosystems and can help regulate the global carbon cycle. Much attention has been paid to the species diversity of copepods worldwide, but the phylogeography and genetic diversity of copepods in Nigeria is unexplored.

Results: Using a mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I marker, we preformed phylogenetic and phylogeographic analyses for Cyclopidae copepods in Southeast Nigeria. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12862-020-01608-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7171763PMC

Nuclear phylogeography of the temperate tree species Chiranthodendron pentadactylon (Malvaceae): Quaternary relicts in Mesoamerican cloud forests.

BMC Evol Biol 2020 Apr 19;20(1):44. Epub 2020 Apr 19.

Departamento de Botánica y Zoología, Centro Universitario de Ciencias Biológicas y Agropecuarias, Universidad de Guadalajara, Camino Ing. Ramón Padilla Sánchez 2100, Nextipac, 45200, Nextipac, Zapopan, Jalisco, México.

Background: The Mexican hand tree or Canac (Chiranthodendron pentadactylon) is a temperate tree species of cloud and pine-oak forests of southern Mexico and Guatemala. Its characteristic hand-shaped flower is used in folk medicine and has constituted the iconic symbol of the Sociedad Botánica de México since 1940. Here, the evolutionary history of this species was estimated through phylogeographic analyses of nuclear DNA sequences obtained through restriction site associated DNA sequencing and ecological niche modeling. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12862-020-01605-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7168997PMC

Host-parasite interactions in non-native invasive species are dependent on the levels of standing genetic variation at the immune locus.

BMC Evol Biol 2020 Apr 16;20(1):43. Epub 2020 Apr 16.

Mammal Research Institute, Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. Stoczek 1, 17-230, Białowieża, Poland.

Background: Parasites may mediate the success of biological invasions through their effect on host fitness and thus, on host population growth and stability. However, a release from the pressure of parasites is strongly related to the genetic differentiation of the host. In invasive host populations, the number of available genetic variants, allowing them to 'fight' the infection, are likely to be influenced by founder events and genetic drift. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12862-020-01610-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7164242PMC

A unified nomenclature for vertebrate olfactory receptors.

BMC Evol Biol 2020 Apr 15;20(1):42. Epub 2020 Apr 15.

Department of Molecular Genetics, Weizmann Institute of Science, 76100, Rehovot, Israel.

Background: Olfactory receptors (ORs) are G protein-coupled receptors with a crucial role in odor detection. A typical mammalian genome harbors ~ 1000 OR genes and pseudogenes; however, different gene duplication/deletion events have occurred in each species, resulting in complex orthology relationships. While the human OR nomenclature is widely accepted and based on phylogenetic classification into 18 families and further into subfamilies, for other mammals different and multiple nomenclature systems are currently in use, thus concealing important evolutionary and functional insights. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12862-020-01607-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7160942PMC

Transcriptome Ortholog Alignment Sequence Tools (TOAST) for phylogenomic dataset assembly.

BMC Evol Biol 2020 Mar 30;20(1):41. Epub 2020 Mar 30.

Department of Molecular Biomedical Sciences, NC State University, Raleigh, NC, USA.

Background: Advances in next-generation sequencing technologies have reduced the cost of whole transcriptome analyses, allowing characterization of non-model species at unprecedented levels. The rapid pace of transcriptomic sequencing has driven the public accumulation of a wealth of data for phylogenomic analyses, however lack of tools aimed towards phylogeneticists to efficiently identify orthologous sequences currently hinders effective harnessing of this resource.

Results: We introduce TOAST, an open source R software package that can utilize the ortholog searches based on the software Benchmarking Universal Single-Copy Orthologs (BUSCO) to assemble multiple sequence alignments of orthologous loci from transcriptomes for any group of organisms. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12862-020-01603-wDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7106827PMC

Distinct patterns of pigment development underlie convergent hyperpigmentation between nocturnal and diurnal geckos (Squamata: Gekkota).

BMC Evol Biol 2020 Mar 27;20(1):40. Epub 2020 Mar 27.

Department of Biology and Center for Biodiversity and Ecosystem Stewardship, Villanova University, 800 Lancaster Avenue, Villanova, PA, 19085, USA.

Background: Evolutionary transitions in temporal niche necessitates specialized morphology, physiology, and behaviors. Diurnal, heliothermic squamates (lizards and snakes) that bask require protection from ultraviolet radiation (UV) that can damage internal organs such as the brain, viscera, and gonads. Many smaller squamates have accomplished this protection by hyperpigmentation of the peritoneum and subcutaneous dorsum. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12862-020-01604-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7099784PMC

Multiple independent chromosomal fusions accompanied the radiation of the Antarctic teleost genus Trematomus (Notothenioidei:Nototheniidae).

BMC Evol Biol 2020 Mar 20;20(1):39. Epub 2020 Mar 20.

Sorbonne Université, CNRS, Université des Antilles, Evolution Paris Seine - Institut de Biologie Paris Seine (EPS - IBPS), 75005, Paris, France.

Background: Chromosomal rearrangements are thought to be an important driving force underlying lineage diversification, but their link to speciation continues to be debated. Antarctic teleost fish of the family Nototheniidae (Notothenioidei) diversified in a changing environmental context, which led to ecological, morphological, and genetic differentiation among populations. In addition, extensive chromosomal repatterning accompanied species divergence in several clades. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12862-020-1600-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7082932PMC

Complex patterns of reticulate evolution in opportunistic weeds (Potentilla L., Rosaceae), as revealed by low-copy nuclear markers.

BMC Evol Biol 2020 Mar 18;20(1):38. Epub 2020 Mar 18.

Department of Natural History, University Museum, University of Bergen, Postboks 7800, N-5020, Bergen, Norway.

Background: Most cinquefoils (Potentilla L., Rosaceae) are polyploids, ranging from tetraploid (4x) to dodecaploid (12x), diploids being a rare exception. Previous studies based on ribosomal and chloroplast data indicated that Norwegian cinquefoil (P. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12862-020-1597-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7079425PMC

Genus level molecular phylogeny of Aegisthidae Gisbrecht, 1893 (Copepoda: Harpacticoida) reveals morphological adaptations to deep-sea and plagic habitats.

BMC Evol Biol 2020 03 14;20(1):36. Epub 2020 Mar 14.

Senckenberg am Meer, German Centre for Marine Biodiversity Research, Südstrand 44, 26382, Wilhelmshaven, Germany.

Background: The family Aegisthidae is known as typical component of deep-sea hyperbenthic waters that gradually colonized other marine environments. The phylogenetic relationships within this family have been examined here including hyperbenthic, planktonic, benthic forms and two associated Aegisthidae species.

Results: Ninety four specimens belong to 14 genera were studied using 18S and 28S rRNA and COI mtDNA. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12862-020-1594-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7071595PMC

Delimitation of five astome ciliate species isolated from the digestive tube of three ecologically different groups of lumbricid earthworms, using the internal transcribed spacer region and the hypervariable D1/D2 region of the 28S rRNA gene.

BMC Evol Biol 2020 03 14;20(1):37. Epub 2020 Mar 14.

Department of Zoology, Faculty of Natural Sciences, Comenius University in Bratislava, Bratislava, 842 15, Slovak Republic.

Background: Various ecological groups of earthworms very likely constitute sharply isolated niches that might permit speciation of their symbiotic ciliates, even though no distinct morphological features appear to be recognizable among ciliates originating from different host groups. The nuclear highly variable ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region and the hypervariable D1/D2 region of the 28S rRNA gene have proven to be useful tools for the delimitation of species boundaries in closely related free-living ciliate taxa. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12862-020-1601-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7071660PMC

Juvenile diet quality and intensity of sexual conflict in the mite Sancassania berlesei.

BMC Evol Biol 2020 03 12;20(1):35. Epub 2020 Mar 12.

Evolutionary Biology Group, Faculty of Biology, Adam Mickiewicz University Poznań, ul. Uniwersytetu Poznańskiego 6, 61-614, Poznań, Poland.

Background: Differing evolutionary interests of males and females may result in sexual conflict, whereby traits or behaviours that are beneficial for male reproductive success (e.g., traits related to male-male competition) are costly for females. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12862-020-1599-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7069193PMC

Phenology-dependent cold exposure and thermal performance of Ostrinia nubilalis ecotypes.

BMC Evol Biol 2020 03 6;20(1):34. Epub 2020 Mar 6.

Department of Biology, Tufts University, 200 Boston Ave, Suite 4700, Medford, MA, 02155, USA.

Background: Understanding adaptation involves establishing connections between selective agents and beneficial population responses. However, relatively little attention has been paid to seasonal adaptation, in part, because it requires complex and integrative knowledge about seasonally fluctuating environmental factors, the effects of variable phenology on exposure to those factors, and evidence for temporal specialization. In the European corn borer moth, Ostrinia nubilalis, sympatric pheromone strains exploit the same host plant (Zea mays) but may genetically differ in phenology and be reproductively "isolated by time. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12862-020-1598-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7059338PMC

Unusual sequence characteristics of human chromosome 19 are conserved across 11 nonhuman primates.

BMC Evol Biol 2020 02 27;20(1):33. Epub 2020 Feb 27.

Human Genome Sequencing Center, Baylor College of Medicine, One Baylor Plaza, Mail Stop: BCM226, Houston, TX, 77030, USA.

Background: Human chromosome 19 has many unique characteristics including gene density more than double the genome-wide average and 20 large tandemly clustered gene families. It also has the highest GC content of any chromosome, especially outside gene clusters. The high GC content and concomitant high content of hypermutable CpG sites raises the possibility chromosome 19 exhibits higher levels of nucleotide diversity both within and between species, and may possess greater variation in DNA methylation that regulates gene expression. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12862-020-1595-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7045612PMC
February 2020

Macroevolutionary bursts and constraints generate a rainbow in a clade of tropical birds.

BMC Evol Biol 2020 02 24;20(1):32. Epub 2020 Feb 24.

Department of Ornithology, American Museum of Natural History, Central Park West at 79th Street, New York, NY, 10024, USA.

Background: Bird plumage exhibits a diversity of colors that serve functional roles ranging from signaling to camouflage and thermoregulation. However, birds must maintain a balance between evolving colorful signals to attract mates, minimizing conspicuousness to predators, and optimizing adaptation to climate conditions. Examining plumage color macroevolution provides a framework for understanding this dynamic interplay over phylogenetic scales. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12862-020-1577-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7041239PMC
February 2020

The origins of dengue and chikungunya viruses in Ecuador following increased migration from Venezuela and Colombia.

BMC Evol Biol 2020 02 19;20(1):31. Epub 2020 Feb 19.

Viral Diseases Branch, Walter Reed Army institute of Research, Silver Spring, MD, USA.

Background: In recent years, Ecuador and other South American countries have experienced an increase in arboviral diseases. A rise in dengue infections was followed by introductions of chikungunya and Zika, two viruses never before seen in many of these areas. Furthermore, the latest socioeconomic and political instability in Venezuela and the mass migration of its population into the neighboring countries has given rise to concerns of infectious disease spillover and escalation of arboviral spread in the region. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12862-020-1596-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7031975PMC
February 2020

The modular nature of protein evolution: domain rearrangement rates across eukaryotic life.

BMC Evol Biol 2020 02 14;20(1):30. Epub 2020 Feb 14.

Institute for Evolution and Biodiversity, University of Münster, Hüfferstrasse 1, Münster, 48149, Germany.

Background: Modularity is important for evolutionary innovation. The recombination of existing units to form larger complexes with new functionalities spares the need to create novel elements from scratch. In proteins, this principle can be observed at the level of protein domains, functional subunits which are regularly rearranged to acquire new functions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12862-020-1591-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7023805PMC
February 2020

Multilocus phylogeny and cryptic diversity of white-toothed shrews (Mammalia, Eulipotyphla, Crocidura) in China.

BMC Evol Biol 2020 02 14;20(1):29. Epub 2020 Feb 14.

Sichuan Academy of Forestry, Chengdu, 610081, China.

Background: Crocidura, the most speciose mammalian genus, occurs across much of Asia, Europe and Africa. The taxonomy of Chinese representatives has been studied primarily based on cursory morphological comparisons and their molecular phylogenetic analyses remain unexplored. In order to understand the phylogeny of this group in China, we estimated the first multilocus phylogeny and conducted species delimitation, including taxon sampling throughout their distribution range. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12862-020-1588-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7023792PMC
February 2020

High-throughput quantification of protein structural change reveals potential mechanisms of temperature adaptation in Mytilus mussels.

BMC Evol Biol 2020 02 13;20(1):28. Epub 2020 Feb 13.

Department of Biological Sciences, California State University East Bay, Hayward, CA, 94542, USA.

Background: Temperature exerts a strong influence on protein evolution: species living in thermally distinct environments often exhibit adaptive differences in protein structure and function. However, previous research on protein temperature adaptation has focused on small numbers of proteins and on proteins adapted to extreme temperatures. Consequently, less is known about the types and quantity of evolutionary change that occurs to proteins when organisms adapt to small shifts in environmental temperature. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12862-020-1593-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7020559PMC
February 2020

Population-specific, recent positive directional selection suggests adaptation of human male reproductive genes to different environmental conditions.

BMC Evol Biol 2020 02 13;20(1):27. Epub 2020 Feb 13.

Department of Behavioural Biology, University of Vienna, Althanstrasse 14, 1090, Vienna, Austria.

Background: Recent human transcriptomic analyses revealed a very large number of testis-enriched genes, many of which are involved in spermatogenesis. This comprehensive transcriptomic data lead us to the question whether positive selection was a decisive force influencing the evolution and variability of testis-enriched genes in humans. We used two methodological approaches to detect different levels of positive selection, namely episodic positive diversifying selection (i. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12862-019-1575-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7020506PMC
February 2020

Evolutionary history of two cryptic species of northern African jerboas.

BMC Evol Biol 2020 02 13;20(1):26. Epub 2020 Feb 13.

CIBIO-InBIO Associate Laboratory, Research Centre in Biodiversity and Genetic Resources, University of Porto, Vairão, 4485-661, Vairão, Portugal.

Background: Climatic variation and geologic change both play significant roles in shaping species distributions, thus affecting their evolutionary history. In Sahara-Sahel, climatic oscillations shifted the desert extent during the Pliocene-Pleistocene interval, triggering the diversification of several species. Here, we investigated how these biogeographical and ecological events have shaped patterns of genetic diversity and divergence in African Jerboas, desert specialist rodents. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12862-020-1592-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7020373PMC
February 2020

Expansion of sweet taste receptor genes in grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idellus) coincided with vegetarian adaptation.

BMC Evol Biol 2020 02 11;20(1):25. Epub 2020 Feb 11.

The Key Laboratory of Aquaculture Nutrition and Feeds, Ministry of Agriculture, The Key Laboratory of Mariculture, Ministry of Education, Ocean University of China, Qingdao, 266003, Shandong, China.

Background: Taste is fundamental to diet selection in vertebrates. Genetic basis of sweet taste receptor in the shaping of food habits has been extensively studied in mammals and birds, but scarcely studied in fishes. Grass carp is an excellent model for studying vegetarian adaptation, as it exhibits food habit transition from carnivory to herbivory. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12862-020-1590-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7014666PMC
February 2020

Characterizing lineage-specific evolution and the processes driving genomic diversification in chordates.

BMC Evol Biol 2020 02 11;20(1):24. Epub 2020 Feb 11.

Department of Biology and Center for Computational Genetics and Genomics, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, 19122, USA.

Background: Understanding the origins of genome content has long been a goal of molecular evolution and comparative genomics. By examining genome evolution through the guise of lineage-specific evolution, it is possible to make inferences about the evolutionary events that have given rise to species-specific diversification. Here we characterize the evolutionary trends found in chordate species using The Adaptive Evolution Database (TAED). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12862-020-1585-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7011509PMC
February 2020

Phylogeographic history of flat periwinkles, Littorina fabalis and L. obtusata.

BMC Evol Biol 2020 02 10;20(1):23. Epub 2020 Feb 10.

CIBIO, Centro de Investigação em Biodiversidade e Recursos Genéticos, InBIO, Laboratório Associado, Universidade do Porto, Vairão, Portugal.

Background: The flat periwinkles, Littorina fabalis and L. obtusata, are two sister species widely distributed throughout the Northern Atlantic shores with high potential to inform us about the process of ecological speciation in the intertidal. However, whether gene flow has occurred during their divergence is still a matter of debate. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12862-019-1561-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7011314PMC
February 2020

A mitogenomic phylogeny of chitons (Mollusca: Polyplacophora).

BMC Evol Biol 2020 02 5;20(1):22. Epub 2020 Feb 5.

Department of Biodiversity and Evolutionary Biology, Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales (MNCN-CSIC), c/ José Gutiérrez Abascal 2, 28006, Madrid, Spain.

Background: Polyplacophora, or chitons, have long fascinated malacologists for their distinct and rather conserved morphology and lifestyle compared to other mollusk classes. However, key aspects of their phylogeny and evolution remain unclear due to the few morphological, molecular, or combined phylogenetic analyses, particularly those addressing the relationships among the major chiton lineages.

Results: Here, we present a mitogenomic phylogeny of chitons based on 13 newly sequenced mitochondrial genomes along with eight available ones and RNAseq-derived mitochondrial sequences from four additional species. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12862-019-1573-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7003433PMC
February 2020

A new macrofossil ephedroid plant with unusual bract morphology from the Lower Cretaceous Jiufotang Formation of northeastern China.

BMC Evol Biol 2020 02 4;20(1):19. Epub 2020 Feb 4.

Department of Paleontology, University of Vienna, 1090, Vienna, Austria.

Background: The evolution of the Jehol Biota of western Liaoning in China includes three phases, initiation in the Dabeigou phase, radiation in the Yixian phase, and decline in the Jiufotang phase. Numerous ephedroid macrofossils were reported from the Lower Cretaceous Yixian Formation. However, so far none has been found in the younger Jiufotang Formation (ca. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12862-019-1569-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7001366PMC
February 2020
3.368 Impact Factor

Negative frequency dependent selection contributes to the maintenance of a global polymorphism in mitochondrial DNA.

BMC Evol Biol 2020 02 4;20(1):20. Epub 2020 Feb 4.

Animal Ecology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Evolutionary Biology Center, Uppsala University, Norbyvägen 18D, SE-752 36, Uppsala, Sweden.

Background: Understanding the forces that maintain diversity across a range of scales is at the very heart of biology. Frequency-dependent processes are generally recognized as the most central process for the maintenance of ecological diversity. The same is, however, not generally true for genetic diversity. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12862-020-1581-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7001298PMC
February 2020

Influence of female cuticular hydrocarbon (CHC) profile on male courtship behavior in two hybridizing field crickets Gryllus firmus and Gryllus pennsylvanicus.

BMC Evol Biol 2020 02 4;20(1):21. Epub 2020 Feb 4.

Department of Biology, Williams College, Williamstown, MA, USA.

Background: The hybridizing field crickets, Gryllus firmus and Gryllus pennsylvanicus have several barriers that prevent gene flow between species. The behavioral pre-zygotic mating barrier, where males court conspecifics more intensely than heterospecifics, is important because by acting earlier in the life cycle it has the potential to prevent a larger fraction of hybridization. The mechanism behind such male mate preference is unknown. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12862-020-1587-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7001378PMC
February 2020

Sex-specific patterns of senescence in artificial insect populations varying in sex-ratio to manipulate reproductive effort.

BMC Evol Biol 2020 02 3;20(1):18. Epub 2020 Feb 3.

UMR CNRS 6282 BioGéoSciences, Équipe Écologie Évolutive, Université Bourgogne-Franche Comté, Dijon, France.

Background: The disposable soma theory of ageing assumes that organisms optimally trade-off limited resources between reproduction and longevity to maximize fitness. Early reproduction should especially trade-off against late reproduction and longevity because of reduced investment into somatic protection, including immunity. Moreover, as optimal reproductive strategies of males and females differ, sexually dimorphic patterns of senescence may evolve. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12862-020-1586-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6998128PMC
February 2020

Basal hsp70 expression levels do not explain adaptive variation of the warm- and cold-climate O and O gene arrangements of Drosophila subobscura.

BMC Evol Biol 2020 01 31;20(1):17. Epub 2020 Jan 31.

Grup de Genòmica, Bioinformàtica i Biologia Evolutiva (GGBE), Departament de Genètica i de Microbiologia, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Bellaterra, 08193, Barcelona, Spain.

Background: Drosophila subobscura exhibits a rich inversion polymorphism, with some adaptive inversions showing repeatable spatiotemporal patterns in frequencies related to temperature. Previous studies reported increased basal HSP70 protein levels in homokaryotypic strains for a warm-climate arrangement compared to a cold-climate one. These findings do not match the similar hsp70 genomic organization between arrangements, where gene expression levels are expected to be similar. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12862-020-1584-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6995229PMC
January 2020

Molecular genetic diversity and differentiation of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus, L. 1758) in East African natural and stocked populations.

BMC Evol Biol 2020 01 30;20(1):16. Epub 2020 Jan 30.

Institute for Integrative Nature Conservation Research, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences Vienna (BOKU), Gregor Mendel Straße 33, 1180, Wien, Austria.

Background: The need for enhancing the productivity of fisheries in Africa triggered the introduction of non-native fish, causing dramatic changes to local species. In East Africa, the extensive translocation of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) is one of the major factors in this respect. Using 40 microsatellite loci with SSR-GBS techniques, we amplified a total of 664 individuals to investigate the genetic structure of O. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12862-020-1583-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6990601PMC
January 2020

New insights on intercontinental origins of paternal lineages in Northeast Brazil.

BMC Evol Biol 2020 01 29;20(1):15. Epub 2020 Jan 29.

Human and Medical Genetics Laboratory, Federal University of Pará, Av. Augusto Corrêa, 01 - Cidade Universitária Prof. José Silveira Netto - Guamá, Belém, PA, 66075-110, Brazil.

Background: The current Brazilian population is the product of centuries of admixture between intercontinental founding groups. Although previous results have revealed a heterogeneous distribution of mitochondrial lineages in the Northeast region, the most targeted by foreign settlers during the sixteenth century, little is known about the paternal ancestry of this particular population. Considering historical records have documented a series of territorial invasions in the Northeast by various European populations, we aimed to characterize the male lineages found in Brazilian individuals in order to discover to what extent these migrations have influenced the present-day gene pool. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12862-020-1579-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6990597PMC
January 2020

The evolutionary arms race between transposable elements and piRNAs in Drosophila melanogaster.

BMC Evol Biol 2020 01 28;20(1):14. Epub 2020 Jan 28.

State Key Laboratory of Protein and Plant Gene Research, Center for Bioinformatics, College of Life Sciences and Peking-Tsinghua Center for Life Sciences, Peking University, Beijing, 100871, China.

Background: The piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that specifically repress transposable elements (TEs) in the germline of Drosophila. Despite our expanding understanding of TE:piRNA interaction, whether there is an evolutionary arms race between TEs and piRNAs was unclear.

Results: Here, we studied the population genomics of TEs and piRNAs in the worldwide strains of D. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12862-020-1580-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6988346PMC
January 2020