650 results match your criteria BMC Palliative Care [Journal]


Cultural safety strategies for rural Indigenous palliative care: a scoping review.

BMC Palliat Care 2019 Feb 14;18(1):21. Epub 2019 Feb 14.

School of Nursing, Faculty of Health and Social Development, Okanagan Campus, University of British Columbia, Kelowna, British Columbia, Canada.

Background: There is little scholarship on culturally safe approaches to palliative care, especially for rural Indigenous clients. Thus, it is important to articulate how cultural safety can be enacted to support rural Indigenous Peoples and communities at end of life. We sought to identify strategies described in existing literature that have potential to deepen our understanding of culturally safe approaches to palliative care within rural and small-town settings in Canada. Read More

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https://bmcpalliatcare.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s1
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-019-0404-yDOI Listing
February 2019
2 Reads

Hospice care education needs of nursing home staff in South Korea: a cross-sectional study.

BMC Palliat Care 2019 Feb 12;18(1):20. Epub 2019 Feb 12.

The Catholic University of Korea College of Nursing, 222 Banpo-Daero, Seocho-Gu, Seoul, 06591, South Korea.

Background: While the importance of hospice care education in nursing homes is recognized, the volume of research on the specific educational needs of caregivers in hospice care in nursing homes is still lacking. This study aimed to assess educational needs in hospice care among the nursing home staff in South Korea, and to examine factors related to their education needs.

Methods: This is a cross-sectional descriptive study. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-019-0405-xDOI Listing
February 2019

Development and validation of a French questionnaire concerning patients' perspectives of the quality of palliative care: the QUALI-PALLI-Patient.

BMC Palliat Care 2019 Feb 11;18(1):19. Epub 2019 Feb 11.

Haute Autorité de Santé, Saint Denis, France.

Background: Indicators for the quality of palliative care are a priority of caregivers and managers to allow improvement of various care settings and their comparison. The involvement of patients and families is of paramount, although this is rarely achieved in practice. No validated assessment tools are available in French. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-019-0403-zDOI Listing
February 2019

What do patients and family-caregivers value from hospice care? A systematic mixed studies review.

BMC Palliat Care 2019 Feb 8;18(1):18. Epub 2019 Feb 8.

St Davids Hospice, Llandudno, North Wales, UK.

Background: It is not known which attributes of care are valued the most by those who experience hospice services. Such knowledge is integral to service development as it facilitates opportunities for continuous improvement of hospice care provision. The objectives of this mixed-studies systematic review were to explore patients' and their family carer views and experiences, to determine what they valued about adult hospice care in the UK. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-019-0401-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6368799PMC
February 2019

Enabling activity in palliative care: focus groups among occupational therapists.

BMC Palliat Care 2019 Feb 7;18(1):17. Epub 2019 Feb 7.

Faculty of Medicine and Health, School of Health Sciences, Örebro University, S-70182, Örebro, Sweden.

Background: Activity participation may support clients in palliative care to maintain dignity and quality of life. Literature and policy documents state that occupational therapists should be part of the team in palliative care but provide limited guidance on how interventions should be employed. Thus, the aim was to describe occupational therapists' experiences of enabling activity for seriously ill and dying clients. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-019-0394-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6367774PMC
February 2019

"Small small interventions, big big roles"- a qualitative study of patient, care-giver and health-care worker experiences of a palliative care programme in Kerala, India.

BMC Palliat Care 2019 Feb 4;18(1):16. Epub 2019 Feb 4.

Department of Community Medicine, Government T.D Medical College Alappuzha, Vandanam P.O, Alappuzha, Kerala, India.

Background: Home-based palliative care is an essential resource for many communities. We conducted a qualitative study to explore perceptions of a home-based palliative care programme in Kerala, India, from the perspective of patients, their care-givers and the doctors, nurses and volunteers running the intervention.

Methods: A descriptive qualitative study was carried out. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-019-0400-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6362568PMC
February 2019
1 Read

A pattern language of compassion in intensive care and palliative care contexts.

BMC Palliat Care 2019 Feb 2;18(1):15. Epub 2019 Feb 2.

Department of Community Health Sciences, Office of Health and Medical Education Scholarship, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada.

Background: Compassion has been identified as important for therapeutic relationships in clinical medicine however there have been few empirical studies looking at how compassion is expressed different contexts. The purpose of this study was to explore how context impacts perceptions and expressions of compassion in the intensive care unit and in palliative care.

Methods: This was an inductive qualitative study that employed sensitizing concepts from activity theory, realist inquiry, phenomenology and autoethnography. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-019-0402-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6359837PMC
February 2019

"Song of Life (SOL)" study protocol: a multicenter, randomized trial on the emotional, spiritual, and psychobiological effects of music therapy in palliative care.

BMC Palliat Care 2019 Jan 30;18(1):14. Epub 2019 Jan 30.

Center of Pain Therapy and Palliative Care Medicine, Department of Anesthesiology, University Hospital Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 131, 69120, Heidelberg, Germany.

Background: Although patients in palliative care commonly report high emotional and spiritual needs, effective psychosocial treatments based on high quality studies are rare. First research provides evidence for benefits of psychosocial interventions in advanced cancer care. To specifically address end-of-life care requirements, life review techniques and creative-arts based therapies offer a promising potential. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-019-0397-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6354383PMC
January 2019
1 Read

Timing of palliative care referral and aggressive cancer care toward the end-of-life in pancreatic cancer: a retrospective, single-center observational study.

BMC Palliat Care 2019 Jan 28;18(1):13. Epub 2019 Jan 28.

Mercy Hospital for Women, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.

Background: Pancreatic cancer is noted for its late presentation at diagnosis, limited prognosis and physical and psychosocial symptom burden. This study examined associations between timing of palliative care referral (PCR) and aggressive cancer care received by pancreatic cancer patients in the last 30 days of life through a single health service.

Method: A retrospective cohort analysis of end-of-life (EOL) care outcomes of patients with pancreatic cancer who died between 2012 and 2016. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-019-0399-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6350289PMC
January 2019
1 Read

"Just too busy living in the moment and surviving": barriers to accessing health care for structurally vulnerable populations at end-of-life.

BMC Palliat Care 2019 Jan 26;18(1):11. Epub 2019 Jan 26.

Institute on Aging and Lifelong Health, University of Victoria, 3800 Finnerty Road, Victoria, BC, V8P 5C2, Canada.

Background: Despite access to quality care at the end-of-life (EOL) being considered a human right, it is not equitable, with many facing significant barriers. Most research examines access to EOL care for homogenous 'normative' populations, and as a result, the experiences of those with differing social positioning remain unheard. For example, populations experiencing structural vulnerability, who are situated along the lower rungs of social hierarchies of power (e. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-019-0396-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6348076PMC
January 2019
1 Read

Study protocol for a multi-methods study: SAVOIR - evaluation of specialized outpatient palliative care (SAPV) in Germany: outcomes, interactions, regional differences.

BMC Palliat Care 2019 Jan 26;18(1):12. Epub 2019 Jan 26.

Department of Palliative Care, Jena University Hospital, Am Klinikum 1, 07747, Jena, Germany.

Background: Since 2007, the German statutory health insurance covers Specialized Outpatient Palliative Care (SAPV). SAPV offers team-based home care for patients with advanced and progressive disease, complex symptoms and life expectancy limited to days, weeks or months. The introduction of SAPV is ruled by a directive (SAPV directive). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-019-0398-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6348077PMC
January 2019
1 Read

Caregiver exposure to critical events and distress in home-based palliative care in Germany a cross-sectional study using the Stressful Caregiving Adult Reactions to Experiences of Dying (SCARED) scale.

BMC Palliat Care 2019 Jan 24;18(1). Epub 2019 Jan 24.

Institute of Occupational, Social, and Environmental Medicine, Centre for Health and Society, Faculty of Medicine, University of Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf, Germany.

Background: Lay family caregivers of patients receiving palliative care often confront stressful situations in the care of their loved ones. This is particularly true for families in the home-based palliative care settings, where the family caregivers are responsible for a substantial amount of the patient's care. Yet, to our knowledge, no study to date has examined the family caregivers' exposure to critical events and distress with home-based palliative care has been reported from Germany. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-019-0395-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6346516PMC
January 2019

How to conserve dignity in palliative care: suggestions from older patients, significant others, and healthcare professionals in Swedish municipal care.

BMC Palliat Care 2019 Jan 24;18(1):10. Epub 2019 Jan 24.

Centre for Collaborative Palliative Care, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Linnaeus University, Kalmar/Växjö, Sweden.

Background: An essential aspect of palliative care nursing is to conserve the dignity of the patient. A Dignity Care Intervention (DCI) has been developed in Scotland to facilitate this role for nurses. The DCI is now being adapted to a Swedish context (DCI-SWE) and a central step is to identify culturally relevant, dignity-conserving care actions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-019-0393-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6346549PMC
January 2019

"An odyssey without receiving proper care" - experts' views on palliative care provision for patients with migration background in Germany.

BMC Palliat Care 2019 Jan 21;18(1). Epub 2019 Jan 21.

Clinic for Palliative Medicine, University Medical Center Goettingen, Robert Koch-Str. 40, 37075, Goettingen, Germany.

Background: Migrants seem to be underrepresented in palliative care in Germany. Access barriers and challenges in care remain unclear. We aimed to provide a comprehensive insight into palliative care for migrants, using expert interviews. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-019-0392-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6341678PMC
January 2019
3 Reads

Integrated respiratory and palliative care leads to high levels of satisfaction: a survey of patients and carers.

BMC Palliat Care 2019 Jan 19;18(1). Epub 2019 Jan 19.

Chair of Palliative Medicine, University of Melbourne, St Vincent's Hospital and Victorian Comprehensive Cancer Centre, Melbourne, Australia.

Background: The Advanced Lung Disease Service is a unique, new model of integrated respiratory and palliative care, which aims to address the unmet needs of patients with advanced, non-malignant, respiratory diseases. This study aimed to explore patients' and carers' experiences of integrated palliative care and identify valued aspects of care.

Methods: All current patients of the integrated service and their carers were invited to complete a confidential questionnaire by post or with an independent researcher. Read More

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https://bmcpalliatcare.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s1
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-019-0390-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6339689PMC
January 2019
5 Reads

Caregivers' perspectives and experiences of withdrawing acetylcholinesterase inhibitors and memantine in advanced dementia: a qualitative analysis of an online discussion forum.

BMC Palliat Care 2019 Jan 17;18(1). Epub 2019 Jan 17.

School of Pharmacy, Queen's University Belfast, 97 Lisburn Road, Belfast, BT9 7BL, UK.

Background: There is considerable uncertainty surrounding the medications used to delay the progression of dementia, especially their long-term efficacy and when to withdraw treatment with these agents. Current research regarding the optimal use of antidementia medication is limited, contributing to variability in practice guidelines and in clinicians' prescribing practices. Little is currently known about the experiences encountered by caregivers of people with dementia after antidementia medication is withdrawn. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-018-0387-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6337775PMC
January 2019
1 Read

Trends in descriptions of palliative care in the cancer clinical practice guidelines before and after enactment of the Cancer Control Act (2007): content analysis.

BMC Palliat Care 2019 Jan 12;18(1). Epub 2019 Jan 12.

Department of Health Informatics, Kyoto University School of Public Health, Yoshida honcho sakyo-ku, Kyoto, Japan.

Background: Palliative care was a priority issue in the Cancer Control Act enacted in 2007 in Japan, and this has resulted in efforts being made toward educational goals in clinical settings. An investigation of how descriptions of palliative care for the treatment of cancer have changed in clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) could be expected to provide a better understanding of palliative care-related decision-making. This study aimed to identify trends in descriptions of palliative care in cancer CPGs in Japan before and after enactment of the Cancer Control Act. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-019-0391-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6330565PMC
January 2019
2 Reads
1.787 Impact Factor

Assessing the exertion required to induce breathlessness in a population with advanced cancer: matching measures to the level of physical function.

BMC Palliat Care 2019 Jan 10;18(1). Epub 2019 Jan 10.

IMPACCT, Faculty of Health, University of Technology Sydney, PO Box 123, Ultimo, NSW, 2007, Australia.

Background: The aim of the study was to assess four evidence-based assessments utilising exercise challenges that induce breathlessness, each with progressively less demanding levels of exertion, which can be tailored to people with a range of functional capabilities in the setting of advanced cancer for research studies. Functional cut off points for these assessments have not previously been defined.

Methods: A cross sectional study of four exercise tests attempted by all participants: 6 min walk test (6MWT); (derived) 2 min walk test (2MWT); arm exercises; and reading numbers aloud. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-018-0386-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6329151PMC
January 2019
1 Read

Potential quality indicators for seriously ill home care clients: a cross-sectional analysis using Resident Assessment Instrument for Home Care (RAI-HC) data for Ontario.

BMC Palliat Care 2019 Jan 9;18(1). Epub 2019 Jan 9.

Juravinski Cancer Centre, 699 Concession Street, 4th Floor, Room 4-229, Hamilton, Ontario, L8V 5C2, Canada.

Background: Currently, there are no formalized measures for the quality of home based palliative care in Ontario. This study developed a set of potential quality indicators for seriously ill home care clients using a standardized assessment.

Methods: Secondary analysis of Resident Assessment Instrument for Home Care data for Ontario completed between 2006 and 2013 was used to develop quality indicators (QIs) thought to be relevant to the needs of older (65+) seriously ill clients. Read More

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https://bmcpalliatcare.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s1
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-018-0389-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6325754PMC
January 2019
10 Reads

Are care staff equipped for end-of-life communication? A cross-sectional study in long-term care facilities to identify determinants of self-efficacy.

BMC Palliat Care 2019 Jan 8;18(1). Epub 2019 Jan 8.

Amsterdam UMC, Department of Public and Occupational Health, VUmc Expertise Center for Palliative Care, Amsterdam Public Health Research Institute, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, P.O. Box 7057, 1007, Amsterdam, MB, Netherlands.

Background: End-of-life conversations are rarely initiated by care staff in long-term care facilities. A possible explanation is care staff's lack of self-efficacy in such conversations. Research into the determinants of self-efficacy for nurses and care assistants in end-of-life communication is scarce and self-efficacy might differ between care staff of mental health facilities, nursing homes, and care homes. Read More

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https://bmcpalliatcare.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s1
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-018-0388-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6323808PMC
January 2019
2 Reads

Non-pharmacological solutions to sleep and circadian rhythm disruption: voiced bedside experiences of hospice and end-of-life staff caregivers.

BMC Palliat Care 2018 Dec 22;17(1):131. Epub 2018 Dec 22.

Center for Sleep Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical Center, New York, NY, USA.

Background: Sleep disturbance is a significant issue, particularly for patients with advanced terminal illness. Currently, there are no practice-based recommended approaches for managing sleep and circadian disruptions in this population. To address this gap, a cross-sectional focus group study was performed engaging 32 staff members at four hospices/end-of-life programs in three demographically diverse counties in New York State. Read More

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https://bmcpalliatcare.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s1
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-018-0385-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6303860PMC
December 2018
10 Reads

Delay in commencement of palliative care service episodes provided to Indigenous and non-Indigenous patients: cross-sectional analysis of an Australian multi-jurisdictional dataset.

BMC Palliat Care 2018 Dec 22;17(1):130. Epub 2018 Dec 22.

Western Australian Centre for Rural Health, School of Population and Global Health, The University of Western Australia (M706), 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, WA, 6009, Australia.

Background: Rapid effective responsiveness to patient needs is pivotal to high quality palliative care. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander (Indigenous) people are susceptible to life-limiting illnesses at younger ages than other Australians and experience inequity of health service provision. The Palliative Care Outcomes Collaboration collects Australia-wide health service data on patient care, and has established performance benchmarks for specialist palliative care services. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-018-0380-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6303928PMC
December 2018
1 Read

Facilitating successful implementation of a person-centred intervention to support family carers within palliative care: a qualitative study of the Carer Support Needs Assessment Tool (CSNAT) intervention.

BMC Palliat Care 2018 Dec 20;17(1):129. Epub 2018 Dec 20.

Division of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK.

Background: An understanding of how to implement person-centred interventions in palliative and end of life care is lacking, particularly for supporting family carers. To address this gap, we investigated components related to successful implementation of the Carer Support Needs Assessment Tool (CSNAT) intervention, a person-centred process of carer assessment and support, using Promoting Action on Research Implementation in Health Services (PARIHS) as a theoretical framework. This study identifies how the PARIHS component of 'facilitation' and its interplay with the components of 'context' and 'evidence' affect implementation success. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-018-0382-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6302509PMC
December 2018
1 Read

End-of-life decisions guiding the palliative care of cancer patients visiting emergency department in South Western Finland: a retrospective cohort study.

BMC Palliat Care 2018 Dec 17;17(1):128. Epub 2018 Dec 17.

Department of Oncology and Radiotherapy, Turku University Hospital, PO Box 52, FI-20521, Turku, Finland.

Background: Until recently, palliative care (PC) resources in Finland have been sparse. To meet the increasing need for PC an end-of-life (EOL) care project has been ongoing in South Western Finland since 2012, and in 2015, a weekday palliative outpatient clinic was established in Turku University Hospital (TUH). The aim of this study was to explore the effect of the project and the PC clinic on the management practices of EOL cancer patients attending the Emergency Department (ED) of TUH from 2013 to 2016. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-018-0383-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6297980PMC
December 2018
1 Read

Advance care planning after hospital discharge: qualitative analysis of facilitators and barriers from patient interviews.

BMC Palliat Care 2018 Dec 5;17(1):127. Epub 2018 Dec 5.

Department of Medicine, The Ottawa Hospital, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada.

Background: Patients who engage in Advance Care Planning (ACP) are more likely to get care consistent with their values. We sought to determine the barriers and facilitators to ACP engagement after discharge from hospital.

Methods: Prior to discharge from hospital eligible patients received a standardized conversation about prognosis and ACP. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-018-0379-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6282276PMC
December 2018
1 Read

Quality of life in men with metastatic prostate cancer in their final years before death - a retrospective analysis of prospective data.

BMC Palliat Care 2018 Dec 3;17(1):126. Epub 2018 Dec 3.

Department of Nursing, Umeå University, 901 87, Umeå, Sweden.

Background: Quality of Life (QoL) is the most important outcome for patients in palliative care along with symptom alleviation. Metastatic prostate cancer (mPC) is a life-threatening illness, and hence, a palliative care approach may be beneficial to this group. Over time, new life-prolonging treatments have been developed for men with mPC, but the possibility to prolong life should also be balanced against the men's QoL, particularly because there are side effects involved with these treatments. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-018-0381-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6278096PMC
December 2018
2 Reads

A randomised controlled pilot and feasibility study of music therapy for improving the quality of life of hospice inpatients.

BMC Palliat Care 2018 Nov 27;17(1):125. Epub 2018 Nov 27.

School of Nursing and Midwifery, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland.

Background: Evidence about the effectiveness of music therapy for improving the quality of life of palliative care patients is positive but weak in terms of risk of bias.

Methods: This study aimed to determine the feasibility of a randomised controlled trial to evaluate the effectiveness of music therapy for improving the quality of life of hospice inpatients, as measured by the McGill Quality of Life questionnaire. Objectives included recruitment of 52 participants over 12 months and provision of data to support the calculation of the required sample size for a definitive randomised trial, taking into account the retention rates of recruited participants; and evaluation of the viability of the intervention and the acceptability of the assessment tool. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-018-0378-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6260709PMC
November 2018
1 Read

Anticipatory grief of spousal and adult children caregivers of people with dementia.

BMC Palliat Care 2018 Nov 20;17(1):124. Epub 2018 Nov 20.

School of Nursing, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Room FG425, Hung Hom, Kowloon, Hong Kong.

Background: Anticipatory grief (AG) among caregivers of people with dementia is common and has been found to be related to negative health outcomes. Previous studies showed different patterns of AG between spousal and adult children caregivers of people with dementia (PWD) at different stages; however, the levels of such grief are not yet compared. The findings in Western studies are very limited, and inconsistencies have also been found in Asian studies. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-018-0376-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6247750PMC
November 2018
6 Reads

Addressing the needs of terminally-ill patients in Bosnia-Herzegovina: patients' perceptions and expectations.

BMC Palliat Care 2018 Nov 19;17(1):123. Epub 2018 Nov 19.

Division of Tropical and Humanitarian Medicine, Geneva University Hospitals, Rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil 6, 1205, Geneva, Switzerland.

Background: Many terminally ill patients in Bosnia-Herzegovina (BiH) fail to receive needed medical attention and social support. In 2016 a primary healthcare centreer (PHCC) in Doboj (BiH) requested the methodological and technical support of a local partner (Fondacija fami) and the Geneva University Hospitals to address the needs of terminally ill patients living at home. In order to design acceptable, affordable and sustainable solutions, we involved patients and their families in exploring needs, barriers and available resources. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-018-0377-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6245800PMC
November 2018
11 Reads

Bereaved parents' experiences of research participation.

BMC Palliat Care 2018 Nov 7;17(1):122. Epub 2018 Nov 7.

School of Nursing and Midwifery, La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia.

Background: As understandings of the impacts of end-of-life experiences on parents' grief and bereavement increase, so too does the inclusion of bereaved parents into research studies exploring these experiences. However, designing and obtaining approval for these studies can be difficult, as guidance derived from bereaved parents' experiences of the research process are limited within the current literature.

Methods: We aimed to explore bereaved parents' experiences of research participation in a larger grounded theory study exploring experiences of the death of a child in the paediatric intensive care unit. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-018-0375-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6223065PMC
November 2018
8 Reads

Correction to: The prognosis in palliative care study II (PiPS2): study protocol for a multi-centre, prospective, observational, cohort study.

BMC Palliat Care 2018 11 3;17(1):121. Epub 2018 Nov 3.

Marie Curie Palliative Care Research Department, Division of Psychiatry, UCL, 6th Floor, Maple House, 149 Tottenham Court Road, London, W1T 7NF, UK.

After publication, the authors noticed some minor errors in "Nested qualitative sub-study" section, first paragraph of the section, page 7 of the published article. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-018-0373-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6215351PMC
November 2018
2 Reads

A public health approach to palliative care in the response to drug resistant TB: an ethnographic study in Bengaluru, India.

BMC Palliat Care 2018 Oct 31;17(1):120. Epub 2018 Oct 31.

Departments of Clinical Research and Global Health and Development, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Keppel Street, London, WC1E 7HT, UK.

Background: The treatment of Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis represents one of the most significant challenges to global health. Despite guidance on improving treatment outcomes, there is little focus on how to support individuals in their suffering. Palliative care is therefore proposed as a necessary component in the global strategy to fight Tuberculosis. Read More

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https://bmcpalliatcare.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s1
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-018-0374-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6211508PMC
October 2018
10 Reads

Access to palliative care for homeless people: complex lives, complex care.

BMC Palliat Care 2018 Oct 24;17(1):119. Epub 2018 Oct 24.

Netherlands Institute for Health Services Research (Nivel), P.O. Box 1568, 3500, BN, Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Background: People experiencing homelessness often encounter progressive incurable somatic diseases in combination with psychiatric and psychosocial problems, and many need palliative care at the end of their lives. Little is known about how palliative care for this group can be started in good time and provided optimally. The objective of this paper is to give insight into the extent people experiencing homelessness have access to good palliative care. Read More

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https://bmcpalliatcare.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s1
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-018-0368-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6201635PMC
October 2018
17 Reads

Talk CPR - a technology project to improve communication in do not attempt cardiopulmonary resuscitation decisions in palliative illness.

BMC Palliat Care 2018 Oct 19;17(1):118. Epub 2018 Oct 19.

Palliative Care Department, Velindre University NHS Trust, Cardiff, UK.

Background: A national Do Not Attempt Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation policy was rolled out for the National Health Service in Wales in 2015. A national steering group led on producing information videos and a website for patients, carers and healthcare professionals, forming part of a quality improvement program. Videos were planned, scripted and produced with healthcare professionals and patient/carer representatives, and were completed with both English and Welsh language versions. Read More

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https://bmcpalliatcare.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s1
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-018-0370-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6195698PMC
October 2018
5 Reads

Voices that matter: end-of-life care in two acute hospitals from the perspective of bereaved relatives.

BMC Palliat Care 2018 Oct 19;17(1):117. Epub 2018 Oct 19.

Trinity Centre for Practice and Healthcare Innovation, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Trinity College Dublin, 24 D'Olier Street, Dublin, D02 T283, Ireland.

Background: End-of-life care (EoLC) is an experience that touches the lives of everyone. Dying in an acute hospital is a common occurrence in developed countries across the world. Previous studies have shown that there is wide variation in EoLC and at times is experienced as being of poor quality. Read More

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https://bmcpalliatcare.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s1
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-018-0365-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6195738PMC
October 2018
11 Reads

The experience of caring for patients at the end-of-life stage in non-palliative care settings: a qualitative study.

BMC Palliat Care 2018 Oct 17;17(1):116. Epub 2018 Oct 17.

School of Nursing, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Hong Kong.

Background: More patients are dying in non-palliative care settings than in palliative care settings. How health care providers care for adult patients at the end-of-life stage in non-palliative care settings has not been adequately explored. The aim of this study was to explore the experiences of health care providers in caring for patients at the end-of-life stage in non-palliative care settings. Read More

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https://bmcpalliatcare.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s1
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-018-0372-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6193297PMC
October 2018
23 Reads

Attitudes to specialist palliative care and advance care planning in people with COPD: a multi-national survey of palliative and respiratory medicine specialists.

BMC Palliat Care 2018 Oct 15;17(1):115. Epub 2018 Oct 15.

Palliative Medicine, St Vincent's Hospital and Victorian Comprehensive Cancer Centre, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia.

Background: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) guidelines recommend early access to palliative care together with optimal, disease-directed therapy for people with advanced disease, however, this occurs infrequently. This study explored the approaches of respiratory and palliative medicine specialists to palliative care and advance care planning (ACP) in advanced COPD.

Methods: An online survey was emailed to all specialists and trainees in respiratory medicine in Australia and New Zealand (ANZ), and to all palliative medicine specialists and trainees in ANZ and the United Kingdom. Read More

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https://bmcpalliatcare.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s1
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-018-0371-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6190649PMC
October 2018
10 Reads

Allow natural death versus do-not-resuscitate: titles, information contents, outcomes, and the considerations related to do-not-resuscitate decision.

BMC Palliat Care 2018 Oct 10;17(1):114. Epub 2018 Oct 10.

Department of Psychology, College of Humanities and Social Sciences, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan.

Background: As the "do not resuscitate" (DNR) discussion involves communication, this study explored (1) the effects of a title that included "allow natural death", and of information contents and outcomes of the decision; and (2) the information needs and consideration of the DNR decision, and benefits and barriers of the DNR discussion.

Methods: Healthy adults (n = 524) were presented with a scenario with different titles, information contents, and outcomes, and they rated the probability of a DNR decision. A questionnaire including information needs, consideration of the decision, and benefits and barriers of DNR discussion was also used. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-018-0367-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6180419PMC
October 2018
6 Reads

First year experiences with a palliative out-patients structure for patients with COPD: a qualitative study of health professionals' expectations and experiences.

BMC Palliat Care 2018 Oct 8;17(1):113. Epub 2018 Oct 8.

Neuroscience Centre, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Section 2091, Inge Lehmanns Vej 7, 2100, Copenhagen Ø, Denmark.

Background: To improve the care of patients with advanced COPD and be able to address their palliative needs a new outpatient organization (CAPTAIN) was developed and implemented. CAPTAIN was inspired by best practice and existing guidelines and changed the traditional organization of an outpatient structure including the roles of nurses and doctors. Only sparse knowledge exists of the health professionals' expectations and experiences to organizational changes in an outpatient setting. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-018-0369-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6176513PMC
October 2018
3 Reads

End-of-life situations in cardiology: a qualitative study of physicians' and nurses' experience in a large university hospital.

BMC Palliat Care 2018 Oct 5;17(1):112. Epub 2018 Oct 5.

Department of Cardiology, University Hospital Jean Minjoz, 3 Boulevard Fleming, 25000, Besançon, France.

Background: Professional societies call for integration of end-of-life discussions early in the trajectory of heart failure, yet it remains unclear where current practices stand in relation to these recommendations. We sought to describe the perceptions and attitudes of caregivers in cardiology regarding end-of-life situations.

Methods: We performed a qualitative study using semi-directive interviews in the cardiology department of a university teaching hospital in France. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-018-0366-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6173879PMC
October 2018
3 Reads

Study protocol: evaluation of specialized outpatient palliative care in the German state of Hesse (ELSAH study) - work package I: assessing the quality of care.

BMC Palliat Care 2018 Oct 2;17(1):111. Epub 2018 Oct 2.

Department of General Practice/ Family Medicine, Philipps-University Marburg, Karl-von-Frisch-Strasse 4, 35032, Marburg, Germany.

Background: In Germany, patients suffering from life-limiting conditions are eligible for specialized outpatient palliative care (SOPC). Evaluation of the quality of this service lacks currently integration of patient-relevant outcomes. There is also no scientific consensus how to prove quality of care in the special context of SOPC adequately. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-018-0363-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6169025PMC
October 2018
16 Reads

The Palliative Radiotherapy and Inflammation Study (PRAIS) - protocol for a longitudinal observational multicenter study on patients with cancer induced bone pain.

BMC Palliat Care 2018 Sep 28;17(1):110. Epub 2018 Sep 28.

European Palliative Care Research Centre (PRC), Department of Clinical and Molecular Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, NTNU, Norwegian University of Science and Technology and St. Olavs hospital, Trondheim University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway.

Background: Radiation therapy (RT) results in pain relief for about 6 of 10 patients with cancer induced bone pain (CIBP) caused by bone metastases. The high number of non-responders, the long median time from RT to pain response and the risk of adverse effects, makes it important to determine predictors of treatment response. Clinical features such as cancer type, performance status and pain intensity, and biomarkers for osteoclast activity are proposed as predictors of response to RT. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-018-0362-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6162927PMC
September 2018
4 Reads
1.790 Impact Factor

Examining palliative and end of life care research in Ireland within a global context: a systematic mapping review of the evidence.

BMC Palliat Care 2018 Sep 27;17(1):109. Epub 2018 Sep 27.

International Observatory on End of Life Care, Lancaster University, Lancaster, UK.

Background: Globally the state of palliative care research remains uncertain. Questions remain regarding impact, funding, and research priorities. Building upon previous research, this review examines palliative care research in Ireland and contributes to a wider international debate on the state of palliative care research. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-018-0364-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6161399PMC
September 2018
14 Reads

Assessing the credibility and transferability of the patient compassion model in non-cancer palliative populations.

BMC Palliat Care 2018 Sep 13;17(1):108. Epub 2018 Sep 13.

Faculty of Nursing, University of Calgary, 2500 University Drive NW, Calgary, AB, T2N 1N4, Canada.

Background: A lack of evidence and psychometrically sound measures of compassion necessitated the development of the first known, empirically derived, theoretical Patient Compassion Model (PCM) generated from qualitative interviews with advanced cancer inpatients. We aimed to assess the credibility and transferability of the PCM across diverse palliative populations and settings.

Methods: Semi-structured, audio-recorded qualitative interviews were conducted with 20 patients with life-limiting diagnoses, recruited from 4 settings (acute care, homecare, residential care, and hospice). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-018-0358-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6137734PMC
September 2018
3 Reads

Exploring the vagueness of Religion & Spirituality in complex pediatric decision-making: a qualitative study.

BMC Palliat Care 2018 Sep 12;17(1):107. Epub 2018 Sep 12.

Department of Pediatrics, Duke University School of Nursing, 307 Trent Drive, Durham, NC, 27710, USA.

Background: Medical advances have led to new challenges in decision-making for parents of seriously ill children. Many parents say religion and spirituality (R&S) influence their decisions, but the mechanism and outcomes of this influence are unknown. Health care providers (HCPs) often feel unprepared to discuss R&S with parents or address conflicts between R&S beliefs and clinical recommendations. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-018-0360-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6134505PMC
September 2018
4 Reads

Intranasal fentanyl for respiratory distress in children and adolescents with life-limiting conditions.

BMC Palliat Care 2018 Sep 10;17(1):106. Epub 2018 Sep 10.

Department of Children's Pain Therapy and Paediatric Palliative Care, Witten/Herdecke University, Faculty of Health - School of Medicine, Witten, Germany.

Background: Respiratory distress is one of the most common and frightening symptoms of children with life-limiting conditions. Because treatment of the underlying cause is frequently impossible or insufficient, in many children, symptomatic treatment is warranted. The purpose of this study was to describe the circumstances of the use of intranasal fentanyl in an acute attack of respiratory distress (AARD) in children receiving palliative care, as well as to describe outcomes and adverse events after its use. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-018-0361-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6131941PMC
September 2018
2 Reads

Scopolaminebutyl given prophylactically for death rattle: study protocol of a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial in a frail patient population (the SILENCE study).

BMC Palliat Care 2018 Sep 7;17(1):105. Epub 2018 Sep 7.

Erasmus MC Cancer Institute, Department of Medical Oncology, P.O. box 2040, 3000CA, Rotterdam, the Netherlands.

Background: Death rattle (DR), caused by mucus in the respiratory tract, occurs in about half of patients who are in the dying phase. Relatives often experience DR as distressing. Anticholinergics are recommended to treat DR, although there is no evidence for the effect of these drugs. Read More

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https://bmcpalliatcare.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s1
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-018-0359-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6128983PMC
September 2018
3 Reads

Determinants of favorable or unfavorable opinion about euthanasia in a sample of French cancer patients receiving palliative care.

BMC Palliat Care 2018 Aug 29;17(1):104. Epub 2018 Aug 29.

Aix Marseille University, 13005, Marseille, France.

Background: Opinion about euthanasia has been explored among the general population and recently in patients receiving palliative care. 96% of the French population declared themselves in favor of euthanasia while less of 50% of palliative care patients are. The aim of the present study was to explore and identify potential determinant factors associated with favorable or unfavorable opinion about euthanasia in a French population of cancer patients receiving palliative care. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-018-0357-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6114533PMC
August 2018
5 Reads

Negative pain management index scores do not necessarily indicate inadequate pain management: a cross-sectional study.

BMC Palliat Care 2018 Aug 24;17(1):102. Epub 2018 Aug 24.

Department of Palliative Care, Japan Red Cross Medical Center, 4-1-22 Hiroo, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo, 150-0012, Japan.

Background: The Pain Management Index (PMI) is widely used in the assessment of pain management, and negative scores are traditionally considered to indicate inadequate pain management. However, it is not known whether negative PMI scores are always problematic.

Methods: In this prospective observational study, we examined the data of 1156 patients with cancer and pain who were hospitalized in a cancer care hospital in Japan from July 2012 to January 2015 and compared the proportion of patients with PI across various PMI scores in this cohort. Read More

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https://bmcpalliatcare.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s1
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-018-0355-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6109332PMC
August 2018
5 Reads