825 results match your criteria BMC Palliative Care [Journal]


Adverse events in deceased hospitalised cancer patients as a measure of quality and safety in end-of-life cancer care.

BMC Palliat Care 2020 Jun 1;19(1):76. Epub 2020 Jun 1.

Institute of Community Medicine, The Arctic University of Norway, PO Box 6, 9038, Tromsø, Norway.

Background: Anticancer treatment exposes patients to negative consequences such as increased toxicity and decreased quality of life, and there are clear guidelines recommending limiting use of aggressive anticancer treatments for patients near end of life. The aim of this study is to investigate the association between anticancer treatment given during the last 30 days of life and adverse events contributing to death and elucidate how adverse events can be used as a measure of quality and safety in end-of-life cancer care.

Methods: Retrospective cohort study of 247 deceased hospitalised cancer patients at three hospitals in Norway in 2012 and 2013. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-020-00579-0DOI Listing

End-of-life care in a pediatric intensive care unit: the impact of the development of a palliative care unit.

BMC Palliat Care 2020 May 28;19(1):74. Epub 2020 May 28.

Disorders of Immunity and Respiration of the Pediatric Critical Patient Research Group, Institut Recerca Hospital Sant Joan de Déu, Universitat de Barcelona, Passeig Sant Joan de Déu, 2, Esplugues de Llobregat, 08950, Barcelona, Spain.

Background: The purpose of this paper is to describe how end-of-life care is managed when life-support limitation is decided in a Pediatric Intensive Care Unit and to analyze the influence of the further development of the Palliative Care Unit.

Methods: A 15-year retrospective study of children who died after life-support limitation was initiated in a pediatric intensive care unit. Patients were divided into two groups, pre- and post-palliative care unit development. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-020-00575-4DOI Listing

Systematic symptom and problem assessment at admission to the palliative care ward - perspectives and prognostic impacts.

BMC Palliat Care 2020 May 28;19(1):75. Epub 2020 May 28.

Department of Oncology, Hematology and BMT, Palliative Care Unit, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Martinistr. 52, 20246, Hamburg, Germany.

Background: Symptom assessment is essential in palliative care, but holds challenges concerning implementation and relevance. This study aims to evaluate patients' main symptoms and problems at admission to a specialist inpatient palliative care (SIPC) ward using physician proxy- and patient self-assessment, and aims to identify their prognostic impact as well as the agreement between both assessments.

Methods: Within 12 h after admission, palliative care specialists completed the Symptom and Problem Checklist of the German Hospice and Palliative Care Evaluation (HOPE-SP-CL). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-020-00576-3DOI Listing

Understanding family caregivers' needs to support relatives with advanced progressive disease at home: an ethnographic study in rural Portugal.

BMC Palliat Care 2020 May 25;19(1):73. Epub 2020 May 25.

Cicely Saunders Institute of Palliative Care, Policy & Rehabilitation, Florence Nightingale Faculty of Nursing, Midwifery & Palliative Care, King's College of London, London, UK.

Background: Family caregivers play an important role supporting their relatives with advanced progressive disease to live at home. There is limited research to understand family caregiver needs over time, particularly outside of high-income settings. The aim of this study was to explore family caregivers' experiences of caring for a relative living with advanced progressive disease at home, and their perceptions of met and unmet care needs over time. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-020-00583-4DOI Listing

Implementing volunteer-navigation for older persons with advanced chronic illness (Nav-CARE): a knowledge to action study.

BMC Palliat Care 2020 May 22;19(1):72. Epub 2020 May 22.

University of British Columbia Okanagan, 1147 Research Road. Arts 3rd Floor, Kelowna, BC, V1V 1V7, Canada.

Background: Nav-CARE is a volunteer-led intervention designed to build upon strategic directions in palliative care: a palliative approach to care, a public health/compassionate community approach to care, and enhancing the capacity of volunteerism. Nav-CARE uses specially trained volunteers to provide lay navigation for older persons and family living at home with advanced chronic illness. The goal of this study was to better understand the implementation factors that influenced the utilization of Nav-CARE in eight diverse Canadian contexts. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-020-00578-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7245025PMC

Equity and the financial costs of informal caregiving in palliative care: a critical debate.

BMC Palliat Care 2020 May 19;19(1):71. Epub 2020 May 19.

School of Nursing, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand.

Background: Informal caregivers represent the foundation of the palliative care workforce and are the main providers of end of life care. Financial pressures are among the most serious concerns for many carers and the financial burden of end of life caregiving can be substantial.

Methods: The aim of this critical debate paper was to review and critique some of the key evidence on the financial costs of informal caregiving and describe how these costs represent an equity issue in palliative care. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-020-00577-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7236957PMC

Ethical challenges in family caregivers of patients with advanced cancer - a qualitative study.

BMC Palliat Care 2020 May 18;19(1):70. Epub 2020 May 18.

Palliative Care Unit, Department of Oncology, Hematology and BMT, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany.

Background: Caring for patients with advanced or terminal diseases can confront family caregivers (FC) with ethical challenges. The present study aims at tracing paths connected to ethical challenges among FC of advanced cancer patients by exploring morally troubling situations and related burden, as well as strategies to handle the situation and experience of moral distress from the grieving FC's perspective.

Methods: Within a qualitative design, interviews with 12 grieving FC were conducted using a semi-structured interview guide. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-020-00573-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7236546PMC

Determining the prevalence of palliative needs and exploring screening accuracy of depression and anxiety items of the integrated palliative care outcome scale - a multi-centre study.

BMC Palliat Care 2020 May 14;19(1):69. Epub 2020 May 14.

Centre for Health Studies and Research, Av. Dias da Silva, 165, 3000-512, Coimbra, Portugal.

Background: patients with palliative needs often experience high symptom burden which causes suffering to themselves and their families. Depression and psychological distress should not be considered a "normal event" in advanced disease patients and should be screened, diagnosed, acted on and followed-up. Psychological distress has been associated with greater physical symptom severity, suffering, and mortality in cancer patients. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-020-00571-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7226940PMC

Role of nurses in medication management at the end of life: a qualitative interview study.

BMC Palliat Care 2020 May 13;19(1):68. Epub 2020 May 13.

Department of Public Health, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, Netherlands.

Background: Patients in the last phase of their lives often use many medications. Physicians tend to lack awareness that reviewing the usefulness of medication at the end of patients' lives is important. The aim of this study is to gain insight into the perspectives of patients, informal caregivers, nurses and physicians on the role of nurses in medication management at the end of life. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-020-00574-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7222510PMC

Evaluation of a communication skills training to facilitate addressing palliative care related topics in advanced cancer patients: study protocol of a multicenter randomized controlled trial (PALLI-KOM).

BMC Palliat Care 2020 May 12;19(1):67. Epub 2020 May 12.

Department of Medical Psychology, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany.

Background: Early integration of palliative care concurrently to standard cancer care is associated with several benefits for patients and their caregivers. However, communication barriers on part of the caring physicians often impede a timely referral to palliative care. This study describes the protocol of the evaluation of a communication skills training aiming to strengthen the ability of physicians to address palliative care related topics adequately and early during disease trajectory. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-020-00568-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7218622PMC

An exploration of the experiences of professionals supporting patients approaching the end of life in medicines management at home. A qualitative study.

BMC Palliat Care 2020 May 11;19(1):66. Epub 2020 May 11.

School of Health Sciences, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK.

Background: The management of medicines towards the end of life can place increasing burdens and responsibilities on patients and families. This has received little attention yet it can be a source of great difficulty and distress patients and families. Dose administration aids can be useful for some patients but there is no evidence for their wide spread use or the implications for their use as patients become increasing unwell. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-020-0537-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7216477PMC

The required competencies of physicians within palliative care from the perspectives of multi-professional expert groups: a qualitative study.

BMC Palliat Care 2020 May 9;19(1):65. Epub 2020 May 9.

Faculty of Medicine and Health Technology, Tampere University, Tampere, Finland.

Background: Although statements on the competencies required from physicians working within palliative care exist, these requirements have not been described within different levels of palliative care provision by multi-professional workshops, comprising representatives from working life. Therefore, the aim of this study was to describe the competencies required from physicians working within palliative care from the perspectives of multi-professional groups of representatives from working life.

Methods: A qualitative approach, using a workshop method, was conducted, wherein the participating professionals and representatives of patient organizations discussed the competencies that are required in palliative care, before reaching and documenting a consensus. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-020-00566-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7211329PMC

Two faces of the same coin: a qualitative study of patients' and carers' coexistence with chronic breathlessness associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

BMC Palliat Care 2020 May 6;19(1):64. Epub 2020 May 6.

Discipline, Palliative and Supportive Services, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, SA, 5001, Australia.

Background: Chronic breathlessness is a recognized clinical syndrome that severely impacts patients and carers, who become increasingly restricted in their daily activities. Often, patients become reliant on their carers, who are required to provide constant support. Although individual experiences of breathlessness have been previously investigated, there are few studies exploring contemporaneous experiences of breathlessness of the patient and their carer. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-020-00572-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7203967PMC
May 2020
1.787 Impact Factor

Effect of palliative care training on perceived self-efficacy of the nurses.

BMC Palliat Care 2020 May 4;19(1):63. Epub 2020 May 4.

Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Faculty of Health, Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences and Health Services, Yazd, Iran.

Background: Nurses are involved in providing end-of-life care for end stage individuals and their self-efficacy is one of the key factors bearing on such care. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of palliative care on perceived self-efficacy of the nurses.

Methods: This is a quasi-experimental study with pretest-posttest design. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-020-00567-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7199299PMC

Complementary music therapy for cancer patients in at-home palliative care and their caregivers: protocol for a multicentre randomised controlled trial.

BMC Palliat Care 2020 May 2;19(1):61. Epub 2020 May 2.

Department of Nursing, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Malaga, Malaga, Spain.

Background: Patients with advanced cancer, receiving at-home palliative care, are subject to numerous symptoms that are changeable and often require attention, a stressful situation that also impacts on the family caregiver. It has been suggested that music therapy may benefit both the patient and the caregiver. We propose a study to analyse the efficacy and cost utility of a music intervention programme, applied as complementary therapy, for cancer patients in palliative care and for their at-home caregivers, compared to usual treatment. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-020-00570-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7196216PMC

Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) for Palliative Care in German Comprehensive Cancer Centers - an evaluation of the implementation status.

BMC Palliat Care 2020 May 2;19(1):62. Epub 2020 May 2.

Department of Palliative Medicine, CCC Erlangen - EMN, Universitätsklinikum Erlangen, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU), Krankenhausstraße 12, 91054, Erlangen, Germany.

Background: The working group for palliative medicine within the Comprehensive Cancer Center (CCC) network funded by the German Cancer Aid in Germany has developed and published 14 Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) for palliative care in CCCs. This study analyzed to what extent these SOPs have been implemented in the clinical routine in the CCC network one year after their publication.

Methods: An online-based survey on the implementation status, limitations in daily practice and further themes was conducted between April and July 2018. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-020-00565-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7196237PMC

Severe pain at the end of life: a population-level observational study.

BMC Palliat Care 2020 Apr 30;19(1):60. Epub 2020 Apr 30.

Department of Medicine, Division of Palliative Care, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.

Background: Pain is a prevalent symptom at the end of life and negatively impacts quality of life. Despite this, little population level data exist that describe pain frequency and associated factors at the end of life. The purpose of this study was to explore the prevalence of clinically significant pain at the end of life and identify predictors of increased pain. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-020-00569-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7193354PMC
April 2020
1.787 Impact Factor

Battle, Journey, Imprisonment and Burden: patterns of metaphor use in blogs about living with advanced cancer.

BMC Palliat Care 2020 Apr 25;19(1):59. Epub 2020 Apr 25.

Center for Collaborative Palliative Care, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Linnaeus University, SE-35195, Växjö, Sweden.

Background: The significance of metaphors for the experience of cancer has been the topic of extensive previous research, with "Battle" and "Journey" metaphors standing out as key. Adaptation to the patient's use of metaphor is generally believed to be an important aspect of person-centered care, especially in palliative care. The aim of this study was to investigate the use of metaphors in blogs written in Swedish by people living with advanced cancer and explore possible patterns associated with individuals, age and gender. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-020-00557-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7183615PMC

Differences in well-being and fear of death among female hospice employees and volunteers in Hungary.

BMC Palliat Care 2020 Apr 24;19(1):58. Epub 2020 Apr 24.

Faculty of Medicine, Institute of Behavioural Sciences, Semmelweis University, 1089 Budapest, Nagyvárad tér 4, Budapest, Hungary.

Background: Voluntary work plays a significant role in hospice care, but international research has mainly been conducted on the mental health and fear of death of paid hospice staff. The aim of the present study was to compare the Hungarian hospice volunteers with paid employees with regard to attitudes and fear of death, as well as mental health in order to see their role in hospice work and their psychological well-being more clearly.

Methods: The target population of the cross-sectional questionnaire study was hospice care providers in Hungary (N = 1255). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-020-00550-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7183127PMC

Social regulation activities in end-of-life: a qualitative study on completion of advance directives in Swiss nursing homes.

BMC Palliat Care 2020 Apr 23;19(1):57. Epub 2020 Apr 23.

Institut et Haute Ecole de la Santé La Source, Avenue Vinet 30, CH - 1004, Lausanne, Switzerland.

Background: In Switzerland as in many countries, steady trend is observed in nursing homes to promote writing of advanced directives (ADs). Implementation of ADs reflects the rise in public concern for the persons' right to self-determination and informed decision. The issue of end-of-life conditions is particularly acute in situations with dementia. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-020-00562-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7181527PMC

Palliative Performance Scale: cross cultural adaptation and psychometric validation for Polish hospice setting.

BMC Palliat Care 2020 Apr 22;19(1):52. Epub 2020 Apr 22.

Clinic of Pain Treatment and Palliative Care, Chair of Internal Medicine and Geriatrics, Jagiellonian University Medical College, Krakow, Poland.

Background: Measuring functional status in palliative care may help clinicians to assess a patient's prognosis, recommend adequate therapy, avoid futile or aggressive medical care, consider hospice referral, and evaluate provided rehabilitation outcomes. An optimized, widely used, and validated tool is preferable. The Palliative Performance Scale Version 2 (PPSv2) is currently one of the most commonly used performance scales in palliative settings. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-020-00563-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7178730PMC

Disseminating research findings using a massive online open course for maximising impact and developing recommendations for practice.

BMC Palliat Care 2020 Apr 22;19(1):54. Epub 2020 Apr 22.

International Observatory on end of Life Care, Lancaster University, Lancaster, UK.

Background: Developing recommendations for how we deliver healthcare is often left to leading experts in a field. Findings from the Integrated Palliative Care in cancer and chronic conditions (InSup-C) study, which aimed to identify best practice in integrated palliative care in cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and heart failure, led to recommendations developed through an expert consultation process. We also wanted to develop these recommendations further with participants who were largely clinicians and members of the public. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-020-00564-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7178937PMC
April 2020
1.787 Impact Factor

The use of olanzapine as an antiemetic in palliative medicine: a systematic review of the literature.

BMC Palliat Care 2020 Apr 22;19(1):56. Epub 2020 Apr 22.

Palliative care unit, Oscar Lambret center, 3 rue Frédéric Combemale, F-59020, Lille, France.

Background: Olanzapine is an atypical antipsychotic that has affinity for many central nervous system receptors. Its efficacy is supported by several studies in the prevention and treatment of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting. No recommendations exist on the antiemetic use of olanzapine in the palliative care setting. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-020-00559-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7178955PMC

Challenges on the provision of palliative care for patients with cancer in low- and middle-income countries: a systematic review of reviews.

BMC Palliat Care 2020 Apr 22;19(1):55. Epub 2020 Apr 22.

School of Nursing, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Kowloon, Hong Kong.

Background: Despite the significant benefits of palliative care (PC) services for cancer patients, multiple challenges hinder the provision of PC services for these patients. Low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) are witnessing a sharp growth in the burden of non-communicable diseases. There is a significant gap between demand and supply of PC in LMICs in current health services. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-020-00558-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7178566PMC

Early palliative care versus standard care in haematologic cancer patients at their last active treatment: study protocol of a feasibility trial.

BMC Palliat Care 2020 Apr 22;19(1):53. Epub 2020 Apr 22.

Scientific Directorate, Azienda USL-IRCCS di Reggio Emilia, Reggio Emilia, Italy.

Background: Patients with advanced haematological malignancies suffer from a very high symptom burden and psychological, spiritual, social and physical symptoms comparable with patients with metastatic non-haematological malignancy. Referral to palliative care services for these patients remains limited or often confined to the last days of life. We developed a palliative care intervention (PCI) integrated with standard haematological care. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-020-00561-wDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7178743PMC

Profiles of family caregivers of patients at the end of life at home: a Q-methodological study into family caregiver' support needs.

BMC Palliat Care 2020 Apr 21;19(1):51. Epub 2020 Apr 21.

Amsterdam UMC, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Department of Public and Occupational Health, Amsterdam Public Health research institute, Expertise Center for Palliative Care, P.O. Box 7057, 1007 MB, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

Background: Family caregivers of patients at the end of life often experience care-related burden. To prevent caregiver burden and to enhance the capacity to provide care it is important to have insight in their support needs. The purpose of this study was to identify profiles of family caregivers who provide care to patients at the end of life at home. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-020-00560-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7175554PMC

The family talk intervention for families when a parent is cared for in palliative care - potential effects from minor children's perspectives.

BMC Palliat Care 2020 Apr 16;19(1):50. Epub 2020 Apr 16.

Department of Health Care Sciences, Palliative Research Centre, Ersta Sköndal Bräcke University College, Box 11189, 100 61, Stockholm, Sweden.

Background: Children show long-term psychological distress if family communication and illness-related information are poor during and after a parent's illness and death. Few psychosocial interventions for families with minor children living with a parent who has a life-threatening illness have been evaluated rigorously. Even fewer interventions have been family-centered. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-020-00551-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7164202PMC

The desire to die in palliative care: a sequential mixed methods study to develop a semi-structured clinical approach.

BMC Palliat Care 2020 Apr 16;19(1):49. Epub 2020 Apr 16.

Department of Palliative Medicine, Medical Faculty, University of Cologne, Kerpener Str. 62, 50937, Cologne, Germany.

Background: Although desire to die of varying intensity and permanence is frequent in patients receiving palliative care, uncertainty exists concerning appropriate therapeutic responses to it. To support health professionals in dealing with patients´ potential desire to die, a training program and a semi-structured clinical approach was developed. This study aimed for a revision of and consensus building on the clinical approach to support proactively addressing desire to die and routine exploration of death and dying distress. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-020-00548-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7164236PMC

Impact of socioeconomic status on end-of-life costs: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

BMC Palliat Care 2020 Mar 23;19(1):35. Epub 2020 Mar 23.

Department of Medicine, University Health Network, 27 King's College Cir, Toronto, ON, M5S 1A1, Canada.

Background: Socioeconomic inequalities in access to, and utilization of medical care have been shown in many jurisdictions. However, the extent to which they exist at end-of-life (EOL) remains unclear.

Methods: Studies in MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, ProQuest, Web of Science, Web of Knowledge, and OpenGrey databases were searched through December 2019 with hand-searching of in-text citations. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-020-0538-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7087362PMC

"From good hearted community members we get volunteers" - an exploratory study of palliative care volunteers across Africa.

BMC Palliat Care 2020 Apr 14;19(1):48. Epub 2020 Apr 14.

Institute for Palliative Medicine, University of Bonn, Bonn, Germany.

Background: Volunteers play a significant role in supporting hospice and palliative care in Africa, but little is known about the types of volunteers, their motivations and roles in service delivery.

Methods: Palliative care experts from 30 African countries were invited to participate in an online survey, conducted in English and French, that consisted of 58 questions on: socio-demographics, the activities, motivation and coordination of volunteers, and an appraisal of recent developments in volunteering. The questionnaire was pre-tested in Uganda. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-020-00545-wDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7158085PMC

Palliative care utilization in oncology and hemato-oncology: a systematic review of cognitive barriers and facilitators from the perspective of healthcare professionals, adult patients, and their families.

BMC Palliat Care 2020 Apr 13;19(1):47. Epub 2020 Apr 13.

Swiss Paraplegic Research, Person-centered Healthcare & Health Communication; University of Lucerne, Department of Health Sciences and Medicine, Guido A. Zäch Strasse 4, 6207, Nottwil, Switzerland.

Background: Despite the high potential to improve the quality of life of patients and families, palliative care services face significant obstacles to their use. In countries with high-resource health systems, the nonfinancial and nonstructural obstacles to palliative care services are particularly prominent. These are the cognitive barriers -knowledge and communication barriers- to the use of palliative care. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-020-00556-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7155286PMC

Trauma to Transformation: the lived experience of bereaved parents of children with chronic life-threatening illnesses in Singapore.

BMC Palliat Care 2020 Apr 6;19(1):46. Epub 2020 Apr 6.

Psychology Programme, School of Social Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, Singapore.

Background: In 2016, over 6.6 million children died globally, and 245 children died in Singapore. Chronic illnesses are prevalent causes of child mortality around the world. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-020-00555-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7137327PMC

The views of physicians and nurses on the potentials of an electronic assessment system for recognizing the needs of patients in palliative care.

BMC Palliat Care 2020 Apr 4;19(1):45. Epub 2020 Apr 4.

Institute for Occupational Medicine, Social Medicine and Health Services Research, University Hospital Tuebingen, Wilhelmstraße 27, D-72074, Tuebingen, Germany.

Objectives: Patients in oncological and palliative care (PC) often have complex needs, which require a comprehensive treatment approach. The assessment of patient-reported outcomes (PROs) has been shown to improve identification of patient needs and foster adjustment of treatment. This study explores occupational routines, attitudes and expectations of physicians and nurses with regards to a planned electronic assessment system of PROs. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-020-00554-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7129326PMC

A mixed methods investigation of end-of-life surrogate decisions among older adults.

BMC Palliat Care 2020 Apr 2;19(1):44. Epub 2020 Apr 2.

Aston University, Birmingham, England.

Background: A large number of end-of-life decisions are made by a next-of-kin for a patient who has lost their decision-making capacity. This has given rise to investigations into how surrogates make these decisions. The experimental perspective has focused on examining how the decisions we make for others differ from our own, whereas the qualitative perspective has explored surrogate insights into making these decisions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-020-00553-wDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7119279PMC

Fatigue, barriers to physical activity and predictors for motivation to exercise in advanced Cancer patients.

BMC Palliat Care 2020 Mar 31;19(1):43. Epub 2020 Mar 31.

West German Cancer Center, Department of Medical Oncology, University Hospital Essen, 45147, Essen, Germany.

Background: In order to counteract fatigue, physical activity (PA) is recommended for all stages of cancer. However, only few advanced cancer patients (ACP) are physically active. Quantitative data with high numbers of ACP reporting barriers to PA are missing. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-020-00542-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7110817PMC

Outcomes after long-term mechanical ventilation of cancer patients.

BMC Palliat Care 2020 Mar 30;19(1):42. Epub 2020 Mar 30.

Thoracic Service, Department of Surgery, Memorial Hospital, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, 1275 York Avenue, New York, NY, 10065, USA.

Background: The probability of weaning and of long-term survival of chronically mechanically ventilated cancer patients is unknown, with incomplete information available to guide therapeutic decisions. We sought to determine the probability of weaning and overall survival of cancer patients requiring long-term mechanical ventilation in a specialized weaning unit.

Methods: A single-institution retrospective review of patients requiring mechanical ventilation outside of a critical care setting from 2008 to 2012 and from January 1 to December 31, 2018, was performed. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-020-00544-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7106688PMC

Implementation of palliative care consult Service in Hungary - integration barriers and facilitators.

BMC Palliat Care 2020 Mar 27;19(1):41. Epub 2020 Mar 27.

Center for Health Technology Assessment, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary.

Background: The Palliative Care Consult Service (PCCS) programme was among the first initiations in Hungary to provide palliative care for patients admitted to hospital. The PCCS team provides palliative care for mainly cancer patients and their family members and manages the patient pathway after being discharged from the hospital. The service started in 2014 with 300-400 patient visits per year. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-020-00541-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7102442PMC
March 2020
1.787 Impact Factor

Psychometric properties of the Czech Integrated Palliative Outcome Scale: reliability and content validity analysis.

BMC Palliat Care 2020 Mar 25;19(1):39. Epub 2020 Mar 25.

Center for Palliative Care, Dykova 15, 110 00, Prague, Czech Republic.

Background: Outcome measurement is an essential part of the evaluation of palliative care and the measurements need to be reliable, valid and adapted to the culture in which they are used. The Integrated Palliative Outcome Scale (IPOS) is a widely used tool for assessing personal-level outcomes in palliative care. The aim of this study was to provide Czech version of IPOS and assess its psychometric properties. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-020-00552-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7098098PMC

Measuring quality of life in life-threatening illness - content validity and response processes of MQOL-E and QOLLTI-F in Swedish patients and family carers.

BMC Palliat Care 2020 Mar 25;19(1):40. Epub 2020 Mar 25.

Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Linnaeus University, Kalmar, Sweden.

Background: The McGill Quality of Life Questionnaire - Expanded (MQOL-E) and the Quality of Life in Life-Threatening Illness-Family Carer/Caregiver version (QOLLTI-F) are developed for use with patients facing the end of life and their family carers, respectively. They are also developed for possible use as companion instruments. Contemporary measurement validity theory places emphasis on response processes, i. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-020-00549-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7098088PMC

End-of-life care preferences of the general public and recommendations of healthcare providers: a nationwide survey in Japan.

BMC Palliat Care 2020 Mar 24;19(1):38. Epub 2020 Mar 24.

Faculty of Medicine, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennoudai, Tsukuba, 305-8575, Ibaraki, Japan.

Background: A better understanding of differences between the preferences of the general public and the recommendations of healthcare providers with regard to end-of-life (EOL) care may facilitate EOL discussion.

Methods: The aim of this study was to clarify differences between preferences of the general public and recommendations of healthcare providers with regard to treatment, EOL care, and life-sustaining treatment (LST) based on a hypothetical scenario involving a patient with advanced cancer. This study comprised exploratory post-hoc analyses of "The Survey of Public Attitude Towards Medical Care at the End of life", which was a population based, cross-sectional anonymous survey in Japan to investigate public attitudes toward medical care at the end of life. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-020-00546-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7093951PMC

The impact of the duration of the palliative care period on cancer patients with regard to the use of hospital services and the place of death: a retrospective cohort study.

BMC Palliat Care 2020 Mar 24;19(1):37. Epub 2020 Mar 24.

Department of Palliative Care, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Helsinki University Hospital, and Faculty of Medicine, Helsinki University, Helsinki, Finland.

Background: In order to avoid unnecessary use of hospital services at the end-of-life, palliative care should be initiated early enough in order to have sufficient time to initiate and carry out good quality advance care planning (ACP). This single center study assesses the impact of the PC decision and its timing on the use of hospital services at EOL and the place of death.

Methods: A randomly chosen cohort of 992 cancer patients treated in a tertiary hospital between Jan 2013 -Dec 2014, who were deceased by the end of 2014, were selected from the total number of 2737 identified from the hospital database. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-020-00547-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7093948PMC

How to ensure basic competencies in end of life care - a mixed methods study with post-graduate trainees in primary care in Germany.

BMC Palliat Care 2020 Mar 24;19(1):36. Epub 2020 Mar 24.

Department of General Practice and Health Services Research, University Hospital Heidelberg, Marsilius Arkaden, INF 130.3, Turm West, 69120, Heidelberg, Germany.

Background: Providing end of life care (EoLC) is an important aspect of primary care, which reduces the risk of hospital admission for most patients. However, general practitioners (GPs) seem to have low confidence in their ability to provide EoLC. Little is known about an adequate volume and kind of training in EoLC among GP trainees. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-020-00540-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7093985PMC

A phenomenological study of nurses experience about their palliative approach and their use of mobile palliative care teams in medical and surgical care units in France.

BMC Palliat Care 2020 Mar 20;19(1):34. Epub 2020 Mar 20.

University of montpellier CEPS platform, site Saint Charles, 34000, Montpellier, France.

Background: Despite a broad consensus and recommendations, numerous international reports or studies have shown the difficulties of implementing palliative care within healthcare services. The objective of this study was to understand the palliative approach of registered nurses in hospital medical and surgical care units and their use of mobile palliative care teams.

Methods: Qualitative study using individual in depth semi-structured interviews and focus group of registered nurses. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-020-0536-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7085140PMC

Increasing preparedness for caregiving and death in family caregivers of patients with severe illness who are cared for at home - study protocol for a web-based intervention.

BMC Palliat Care 2020 Mar 17;19(1):33. Epub 2020 Mar 17.

The Department of Health Care Science/Palliative Research Centre, Ersta Sköndal Bräcke University College, Stigbergsgatan 30, 100 61, Stockholm, Sweden.

Background: Family caregivers of patients with severe illness and in need for a palliative care approach, face numerous challenges and report having insufficient preparedness for the caregiver role as well as a need for information and psychosocial support. Preparing to care for a severely ill family members also means becoming aware of death. Feelings of being prepared are associated with positive aspects and regarded protective against negative health consequences. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-020-0530-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7079472PMC

Frequency of discussing and documenting advance care planning in primary care: secondary analysis of a multicenter cross-sectional observational study.

BMC Palliat Care 2020 Mar 17;19(1):32. Epub 2020 Mar 17.

Department of Palliative Medicine, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe, Hyogo, Japan.

Background: To improve the quality of advance care planning (ACP) in primary care, it is important to understand the frequency of and topics involved in the ACP discussion between patients and their family physicians (FPs).

Methods: A secondary analysis of a previous multicenter cross-sectional observational study was performed. The primary outcome of this analysis was the frequency of and topics involved in the ACP discussion between outpatients and FPs. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-020-00543-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7079526PMC

Development and testing of an informative guide about palliative care for family caregivers of people with advanced dementia.

BMC Palliat Care 2020 Mar 12;19(1):30. Epub 2020 Mar 12.

School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Technical University of Munich, Ismaninger Str. 22, 81675, Munich, Germany.

Background: Since people with advanced dementia are usually not able to make complex decisions, it is usually the family caregivers, as proxies, who have to decide on treatments and their termination. However, these decisions are difficult for the caregivers to make, as they are often inadequately informed and cannot properly assess the consequences; moreover, they are concerned about harming the sick person. We aimed to first develop an informative booklet about palliative care issues for caregivers of people with advanced dementia. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-020-0533-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7068859PMC

First referral to an integrated onco-palliative care program: a retrospective analysis of its timing.

BMC Palliat Care 2020 Mar 12;19(1):31. Epub 2020 Mar 12.

Unité Mobile de Soins Palliatifs, Hôpital Cochin, AP-HP Centre, Paris, France.

Background: Palliative care (PC) referral is recommended early in the course of advanced cancer. This study aims to describe, in an integrated onco-palliative care program (IOPC), patient's profile when first referred to this program, timing of this referral and its impact on the trajectory of care at end-of-life.

Methods: The IOPC combined the weekly onco-palliative meeting (OPM) dedicated to patients with incurable cancer, and/or the clinical evaluation by the PC team. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-020-0539-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7069048PMC

When a child dies: a systematic review of well-defined parent-focused bereavement interventions and their alignment with grief- and loss theories.

BMC Palliat Care 2020 Mar 12;19(1):28. Epub 2020 Mar 12.

Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, Universiteitsweg 100, 3584 CG, Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Background: The availability of interventions for bereaved parents have increased. However, most are practice based. To enhance the implementation of bereavement care for parents, an overview of interventions which are replicable and evidence-based are needed. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-020-0529-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7068872PMC

Coping and wellbeing in bereavement: two core outcomes for evaluating bereavement support in palliative care.

BMC Palliat Care 2020 Mar 12;19(1):29. Epub 2020 Mar 12.

Marie Curie Research Centre, Division of Population Medicine, Cardiff University, 8th Floor Neuadd Meirionydd, Heath Park Way, Cardiff, CF14 4YS, UK.

Background: Bereavement support is a core part of palliative care. However, the evidence base is limited by a lack of consistency in the outcomes used to evaluate services and models of support, which makes it difficult to compare approaches. Core Outcome Sets (COS) represent the minimum that should be measured in research into specific conditions or services. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-020-0532-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7068975PMC

The assessment of spiritual well-being in cancer patients with advanced disease: which are its meaningful dimensions?

BMC Palliat Care 2020 Mar 6;19(1):26. Epub 2020 Mar 6.

Azienda USL-IRCCS di Reggio Emilia, Reggio Emilia, Italy.

Background: Spirituality is particularly important for patients suffering from life-threatening illness. Despite research showing the benefits of spiritual assessment and care for terminally ill patients, their spiritual needs are rarely addressed in clinical practice. This study examined the factor structure and reliability of the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Spiritual (FACIT-Sp) in patients with advanced cancer. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-020-0534-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7059276PMC