2,163 results match your criteria BMC Medicine[Journal]


High-throughput, non-invasive prenatal testing for fetal rhesus D status in RhD-negative women: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

BMC Med 2019 Feb 14;17(1):37. Epub 2019 Feb 14.

Centre for Reviews and Dissemination, University of York, York, YO10 5DD, UK.

Background: High-throughput non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT) for fetal Rhesus D (RhD) status could avoid unnecessary treatment with anti-D immunoglobulin for RhD-negative women found to be carrying an RhD-negative fetus. We aimed to assess the diagnostic accuracy of high-throughput NIPT for fetal RhD status in RhD-negative women not known to be sensitized to the RhD antigen, by performing a systematic review and meta-analysis.

Methods: Prospective cohort studies of high-throughput NIPT used to determine fetal RhD status were included. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12916-019-1254-4DOI Listing
February 2019

Disaggregating catastrophic health expenditure by disease area: cross-country estimates based on the World Health Surveys.

BMC Med 2019 Feb 13;17(1):36. Epub 2019 Feb 13.

Department of Global Health and Population, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, 665 Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA, 02115, USA.

Background: Financial risk protection (FRP) is a key objective of national health systems and a core pillar of universal health coverage (UHC). Yet, little is known about the disease-specific distribution of catastrophic health expenditure (CHE) at the national level.

Methods: Using the World Health Surveys (WHS) from 39 countries, we quantified CHE, or household health spending that surpasses 40% of capacity-to-pay by key disease areas. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12916-019-1266-0DOI Listing
February 2019

Does regulation increase the rate at which doctors leave practice? Analysis of routine hospital data in the English NHS following the introduction of medical revalidation.

BMC Med 2019 Feb 11;17(1):33. Epub 2019 Feb 11.

Alliance Manchester Business School, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK.

Background: In 2012, the UK introduced medical revalidation, whereby to retain their licence all doctors are required to show periodically that they are up to date and fit to practise medicine. Early reports suggested that some doctors found the process overly onerous and chose to leave practice. This study investigates the effect of medical revalidation on the rate at which consultants (senior hospital doctors) leave NHS practice, and assesses any differences between the performance of consultants who left or remained in practice before and after the introduction of revalidation. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12916-019-1270-4DOI Listing
February 2019

Leukemia relapse after transplantation - a consensus on monitoring, prevention, and treatment in China.

Authors:
Huichun Zhan

BMC Med 2019 Feb 12;17(1):34. Epub 2019 Feb 12.

Division of Hematology and Oncology, Department of Medicine, Stony Brook School of Medicine, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY, 11794, USA.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12916-019-1273-1DOI Listing
February 2019

On the estimation of population cause-specific mortality fractions from in-hospital deaths.

BMC Med 2019 Feb 8;17(1):29. Epub 2019 Feb 8.

School of Population and Global Health, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Australia.

Background: Almost all countries without complete vital registration systems have data on deaths collected by hospitals. However, these data have not been widely used to estimate cause of death (COD) patterns in populations because only a non-representative fraction of people in these countries die in health facilities. Methods that can exploit hospital mortality statistics to reliably estimate community COD patterns are required to strengthen the evidence base for disease and injury control programs. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://bmcmedicine.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s1291
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12916-019-1267-zDOI Listing
February 2019
2 Reads

Deferred and referred deliveries contribute to stillbirths in the Indian state of Bihar: results from a population-based survey of all births.

BMC Med 2019 Feb 7;17(1):28. Epub 2019 Feb 7.

Public Health Foundation of India, Sector 44, Institutional Area, Gurugram, National Capital Region, India.

Background: The India Newborn Action Plan (INAP) aims for < 10 stillbirths per 1000 births by 2030. A population-based understanding of risk factors for stillbirths compared with live births that could assist with reduction of stillbirths is not readily available for the Indian population.

Methods: Detailed interviews were conducted in a representative sample of all births between January and December 2016 from 182,486 households (96. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12916-019-1265-1DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Adverse events and nocebo phenomena: treatment or disease specific?

BMC Med 2019 Feb 5;17(1):30. Epub 2019 Feb 5.

Collingham Child and Family Centre, Central and North West London NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12916-019-1272-2DOI Listing
February 2019

Prenatal cadmium exposure is associated with shorter leukocyte telomere length in Chinese newborns.

BMC Med 2019 Feb 6;17(1):27. Epub 2019 Feb 6.

Key Laboratory of Environment and Health, Ministry of Education and Ministry of Environmental Protection, and State Key Laboratory of Environmental Health (Incubation), School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Hangkong Road 13, Wuhan, 430030, Hubei, China.

Background: Newborn telomere length (TL) is considered a potential marker for future disease and lifelong health, but few epidemiological studies have examined the determinants of TL in early life. The study aim was to investigate whether there is an association between prenatal cadmium exposure and relative cord blood TL in Chinese newborns.

Methods: Participants were 410 mother-newborn pairs drawn from a prospective birth cohort study conducted in Wuhan, China, between November 2013 and March 2015. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12916-019-1262-4DOI Listing
February 2019

The potential impact and cost-effectiveness of tobacco reduction strategies for tuberculosis prevention in Canadian Inuit communities.

BMC Med 2019 Feb 4;17(1):26. Epub 2019 Feb 4.

Montreal Chest Institute, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.

Background: Tuberculosis (TB) remains a significant public health problem in Canadian Inuit communities. In 2016, Canadian Inuit had an incidence rate 35 times the Canadian average. Tobacco use is an important risk factor for TB, and over 60% of Inuit adults smoke. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12916-019-1261-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6360759PMC
February 2019

Are China's oldest-old living longer with less disability? A longitudinal modeling analysis of birth cohorts born 10 years apart.

BMC Med 2019 Feb 1;17(1):23. Epub 2019 Feb 1.

School of Demography, Research School of Social Sciences, Australian National University, 9 Fellows Road, Acton, ACT, Canberra, 2601, Australia.

Background: China has transitioned from being one of the fastest-growing populations to among the most rapidly aging countries worldwide. In particular, the population of oldest-old individuals, those aged 80+, is projected to quadruple by 2050. The oldest-old represent a uniquely important group-they have high demand for personal assistance and the highest healthcare costs of any age group. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12916-019-1259-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6357399PMC
February 2019

Discontinuation of adjuvant hormone therapy among breast cancer patients not previously attending mammography screening.

BMC Med 2019 Jan 31;17(1):24. Epub 2019 Jan 31.

Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Nobels väg 12 A, 171 77, Stockholm, Sweden.

Background: Breast cancer patients who have not previously attended mammography screening may be more likely to discontinue adjuvant hormone therapy and therefore have a worse disease prognosis.

Methods: We conducted a population-based cohort study using data from Stockholm Mammography Screening Program, Stockholm-Gotland Breast Cancer Register, Swedish Prescribed Drug Register, and Swedish Cause of Death Register. Women in Stockholm who were diagnosed with breast cancer between 2001 and 2008 were followed until December 31, 2015. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://bmcmedicine.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s1291
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12916-019-1252-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6354407PMC
January 2019
2 Reads

Antibody responses to merozoite antigens after natural Plasmodium falciparum infection: kinetics and longevity in absence of re-exposure.

BMC Med 2019 Jan 30;17(1):22. Epub 2019 Jan 30.

Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, 171 76, Stockholm, Sweden.

Background: Antibodies against merozoite antigens are key components of malaria immunity. The naturally acquired antibody response to these antigens is generally considered short-lived; however, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Prospective studies of travellers with different levels of prior exposure, returning to malaria-free countries with Plasmodium infection, offer a unique opportunity to investigate the kinetics and composition of the antibody response after natural infection. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12916-019-1255-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6352425PMC
January 2019
10 Reads

Disparities in access to diagnosis and care in Blantyre, Malawi, identified through enhanced tuberculosis surveillance and spatial analysis.

BMC Med 2019 Jan 29;17(1):21. Epub 2019 Jan 29.

Malawi-Liverpool-Wellcome Trust Clinical Research Programme, Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital, Blantyre, Malawi.

Background: A sizeable fraction of tuberculosis (TB) cases go undiagnosed. By analysing data from enhanced demographic, microbiological and geospatial surveillance of TB registrations, we aimed to identify modifiable predictors of inequitable access to diagnosis and care.

Methods: Governmental community health workers (CHW) enumerated all households in 315 catchment areas during October-December 2015. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://bmcmedicine.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s1291
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12916-019-1260-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6350280PMC
January 2019
3 Reads

Mortality after inpatient treatment for diarrhea in children: a cohort study.

BMC Med 2019 Jan 28;17(1):20. Epub 2019 Jan 28.

KEMRI/Wellcome Trust Research Programme, Centre for Geographic Medicine Research - Coast, PO Box 230, Kilifi, 80108, Kenya.

Background: There is an increasing recognition that children remain at elevated risk of death following discharge from health facilities in resource-poor settings. Diarrhea has previously been highlighted as a risk factor for post-discharge mortality.

Methods: A retrospective cohort study was conducted to estimate the incidence and demographic, clinical, and biochemical features associated with inpatient and 1-year post-discharge mortality amongst children aged 2-59 months admitted with diarrhea from 2007 to 2015 at Kilifi County Hospital and who were residents of Kilifi Health and Demographic Surveillance System (KHDSS). Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12916-019-1258-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6348640PMC
January 2019
1 Read
7.249 Impact Factor

A randomised controlled trial of a mitochondrial therapeutic target for bipolar depression: mitochondrial agents, N-acetylcysteine, and placebo.

BMC Med 2019 Jan 25;17(1):18. Epub 2019 Jan 25.

IMPACT Strategic Research Centre, School of Medicine, Barwon Health, Deakin University, P.O. Box 291, Geelong, VIC, Australia.

Background: A phasic dysregulation of mitochondrial bioenergetics may operate in bipolar disorder, increased in mania and decreased in depression. We aimed to examine efficacy of two add-on treatments in bipolar depression: N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and NAC with a combination of nutraceutical agents that may increase mitochondrial biogenesis.

Methods: A three-arm 16-week, double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled trial, adjunctive to usual treatment, was conducted. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://bmcmedicine.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s1291
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12916-019-1257-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6346513PMC
January 2019
2 Reads

The association between adherence to the Mediterranean diet and hepatic steatosis: cross-sectional analysis of two independent studies, the UK Fenland Study and the Swiss CoLaus Study.

BMC Med 2019 Jan 24;17(1):19. Epub 2019 Jan 24.

Medical Research Council Epidemiology Unit, University of Cambridge School of Clinical Medicine, Cambridge, CB2 0QQ, UK.

Background And Aims: The risk of hepatic steatosis may be reduced through changes to dietary intakes, but evidence is sparse, especially for dietary patterns including the Mediterranean diet. We investigated the association between adherence to the Mediterranean diet and prevalence of hepatic steatosis.

Methods: Cross-sectional analysis of data from two population-based adult cohorts: the Fenland Study (England, n = 9645, 2005-2015) and CoLaus Study (Switzerland, n = 3957, 2009-2013). Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12916-019-1251-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6345041PMC
January 2019

Clinical and economic outcomes of remotely delivered cognitive behaviour therapy versus treatment as usual for repeat unscheduled care users with severe health anxiety: a multicentre randomised controlled trial.

BMC Med 2019 Jan 23;17(1):16. Epub 2019 Jan 23.

Department of Psychiatry, Imperial College, South Kensington Campus, London, SW7 2AZ, UK.

Background: It is challenging to engage repeat users of unscheduled healthcare with severe health anxiety in psychological help and high service costs are incurred. We investigated whether clinical and economic outcomes were improved by offering remote cognitive behaviour therapy (RCBT) using videoconferencing or telephone compared to treatment as usual (TAU).

Methods: A single-blind, parallel group, multicentre randomised controlled trial was undertaken in primary and general hospital care. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://bmcmedicine.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s1291
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12916-019-1253-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6343350PMC
January 2019
5 Reads

From high to low malaria transmission in Zanzibar-challenges and opportunities to achieve elimination.

BMC Med 2019 Jan 22;17(1):14. Epub 2019 Jan 22.

Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.

Background: Substantial global progress in the control of malaria in recent years has led to increased commitment to its potential elimination. Whether this is possible in high transmission areas of sub-Saharan Africa remains unclear. Zanzibar represents a unique case study of such attempt, where modern tools and strategies for malaria treatment and vector control have been deployed since 2003. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://bmcmedicine.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s1291
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12916-018-1243-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6341737PMC
January 2019
3 Reads

The effect of a lifestyle intervention in obese pregnant women on gestational metabolic profiles: findings from the UK Pregnancies Better Eating and Activity Trial (UPBEAT) randomised controlled trial.

BMC Med 2019 Jan 21;17(1):15. Epub 2019 Jan 21.

MRC Integrative Epidemiology Unit at the University of Bristol, Oakfield House, Oakfield Grove, Bristol, BS8 2BN, UK.

Background: Pregnancy is associated with widespread change in metabolism, which may be more marked in obese women. Whether lifestyle interventions in obese pregnant women improve pregnancy metabolic profiles remains unknown. Our objectives were to determine the magnitude of change in metabolic measures during obese pregnancy, to indirectly compare these to similar profiles in a general pregnant population, and to determine the impact of a lifestyle intervention on change in metabolic measures in obese pregnant women. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://bmcmedicine.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s1291
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12916-018-1248-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6340185PMC
January 2019
3 Reads

The democratization of scientific publishing.

BMC Med 2019 Jan 18;17(1):12. Epub 2019 Jan 18.

Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada.

Where should I submit my paper? This is a question that young scientists and trainees frequently ask. In this Commentary, we advise on how to make such a decision whilst balancing the risks and benefits. We argue that trying to publish in top tier journals may not always be the best option and that publishing in indexed, open access journals may expose research to the same or larger audiences. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12916-019-1249-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6337838PMC
January 2019
1 Read

Association of mutations in the Plasmodium falciparum Kelch13 gene (Pf3D7_1343700) with parasite clearance rates after artemisinin-based treatments-a WWARN individual patient data meta-analysis.

Authors:

BMC Med 2019 Jan 17;17(1). Epub 2019 Jan 17.

Background: Plasmodium falciparum infections with slow parasite clearance following artemisinin-based therapies are widespread in the Greater Mekong Subregion. A molecular marker of the slow clearance phenotype has been identified: single genetic changes within the propeller region of the Kelch13 protein (pfk13; Pf3D7_1343700). Global searches have identified almost 200 different non-synonymous mutant pfk13 genotypes. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12916-018-1207-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6335805PMC
January 2019
1 Read
7.249 Impact Factor

Real-world data and the patient perspective: the PROmise of social media?

BMC Med 2019 Jan 16;17(1):11. Epub 2019 Jan 16.

Evidera, London, UK.

Understanding the patient perspective is fundamental to delivering patient-centred care. In most healthcare systems, however, patient-reported outcomes are not regularly collected or recorded as part of routine clinical care, despite evidence that doing so can have tangible clinical benefit. In the absence of the routine collection of these data, research is beginning to turn to social media as a novel means to capture the patient voice. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://bmcmedicine.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s1291
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12916-018-1247-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6334434PMC
January 2019
3 Reads

Serious adverse events reported in placebo randomised controlled trials of oral naltrexone: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

BMC Med 2019 Jan 15;17(1):10. Epub 2019 Jan 15.

Division of Population Health, Health Services Research and Primary Care, School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Biology, Medicine and Health, University of Manchester, Manchester, M13 9PL, UK.

Background: Naltrexone is an opioid antagonist used in many different conditions, both licensed and unlicensed. It is used at widely varying doses from 3 to 250 mg. The aim of this review was to extensively evaluate the safety of oral naltrexone by examining the risk of serious adverse events and adverse events in randomised controlled trials of naltrexone compared to placebo. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://bmcmedicine.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s1291
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12916-018-1242-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6332608PMC
January 2019
6 Reads

Effects of a lifestyle intervention during pregnancy to prevent excessive gestational weight gain in routine care - the cluster-randomised GeliS trial.

BMC Med 2019 Jan 14;17(1). Epub 2019 Jan 14.

Else Kröner-Fresenius-Centre for Nutritional Medicine, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technical University of Munich, Georg-Brauchle-Ring 62, 80992, Munich, Germany.

Background: Excessive gestational weight gain (GWG) leads to obstetric complications, maternal postpartum weight retention and an increased risk of offspring obesity. The GeliS study examines the effect of a lifestyle intervention during pregnancy on the proportion of women with excessive GWG and pregnancy and obstetric complications, as well as the long-term risk of maternal and infant obesity.

Methods: The GeliS study is a cluster-randomised multicentre controlled trial including 2286 women with a pre-pregnancy BMI between 18. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12916-018-1235-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6330753PMC
January 2019
2 Reads

Morbidity, mortality and missed appointments in healthcare: a national retrospective data linkage study.

BMC Med 2019 Jan 11;17(1). Epub 2019 Jan 11.

General Practice and Primary Care, School of Medicine, Dentistry and Nursing, MVLS, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 9LX, UK.

Background: Recently, studies have examined the underlying patient and practice factors for missed appointments, but less is known about the impact on patient health. People with one or more long-term conditions who fail to attend appointments may be at risk of premature death. This is the first study to examine the effect of missed primary healthcare appointments on all-cause mortality in those with long-term mental and physical health conditions. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12916-018-1234-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6329132PMC
January 2019
1 Read
7.249 Impact Factor

The impact of repeated vaccination on influenza vaccine effectiveness: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

BMC Med 2019 Jan 10;17(1). Epub 2019 Jan 10.

Public Health Ontario, 480 University Avenue Suite 300, Toronto, Ontario, M5G 1V2, Canada.

Background: Conflicting results regarding the impact of repeated vaccination on influenza vaccine effectiveness (VE) may cause confusion regarding the benefits of receiving the current season's vaccine.

Methods: We systematically searched MEDLINE, Embase, PubMed, and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature from database inception to August 17, 2016, for observational studies published in English that reported VE against laboratory-confirmed influenza for the following four vaccination groups: current season only, prior season only, both seasons, and neither season. We pooled differences in VE (∆VE) between vaccination groups by influenza season and type/subtype using a random-effects model. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12916-018-1239-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6327561PMC
January 2019
1 Read

HIV-1 molecular transmission clusters in nine European countries and Canada: association with demographic and clinical factors.

BMC Med 2019 Jan 8;17(1). Epub 2019 Jan 8.

Department of Hygiene, Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, Medical School, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, 75 Mikras Asias Street, 115 27, Athens, Greece.

Background: Knowledge of HIV-1 molecular transmission clusters (MTCs) is important, especially in large-scale datasets, for designing prevention programmes and public health intervention strategies. We used a large-scale HIV-1 sequence dataset from nine European HIV cohorts and one Canadian, to identify MTCs and investigate factors associated with the probability of belonging to MTCs.

Methods: To identify MTCs, we applied maximum likelihood inferences on partial pol sequences from 8955 HIV-positive individuals linked to demographic and clinical data. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12916-018-1241-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6323837PMC
January 2019
2 Reads

NMR-based metabolomics identifies patients at high risk of death within two years after acute myocardial infarction in the AMI-Florence II cohort.

BMC Med 2019 Jan 7;17(1). Epub 2019 Jan 7.

Department of Experimental and Clinical Medicine, University of Florence, Florence, Italy.

Background: Risk stratification and management of acute myocardial infarction patients continue to be challenging despite considerable efforts made in the last decades by many clinicians and researchers. The aim of this study was to investigate the metabolomic fingerprint of acute myocardial infarction using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy on patient serum samples and to evaluate the possible role of metabolomics in the prognostic stratification of acute myocardial infarction patients.

Methods: In total, 978 acute myocardial infarction patients were enrolled in this study; of these, 146 died and 832 survived during 2 years of follow-up after the acute myocardial infarction. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://bmcmedicine.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s1291
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12916-018-1240-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6323789PMC
January 2019
4 Reads

The SMILES trial: do undisclosed recruitment practices explain the remarkably large effect?

BMC Med 2018 Dec 28;16(1):243. Epub 2018 Dec 28.

Institute of Psychology, Clinical Psychology Unit, Leiden University, Leiden, The Netherlands.

The SMILES trial showed substantial improvement of depressive symptoms following seven consultations on healthy dieting. The very large effect size on depression reduction seems remarkable and we suggest that selectively induced expectancy and a loss of blinding have contributed to the observed effect. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12916-018-1221-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6309075PMC
December 2018
1 Read

Correction to: Mapping malaria by combining parasite genomic and epidemiologic data.

BMC Med 2018 Dec 28;16(1):241. Epub 2018 Dec 28.

Department of Epidemiology, Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA.

The original article [1] contained an error in the presentation of Figure 1; this error has now been rectified and Figure 1 is now presented correctly. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12916-018-1232-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6309057PMC
December 2018
1 Read

The SMILES trial: an important first step.

BMC Med 2018 Dec 28;16(1):237. Epub 2018 Dec 28.

IMPACT Strategic Research Centre, Deakin University, Geelong, VIC, Australia.

The SMILES trial was the first intervention study to test dietary improvement as a treatment strategy for depression. Molendijk et al. propose that expectation bias and difficulties with blinding might account for the large effect size. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12916-018-1228-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6309069PMC
December 2018
1 Read

Correction to: Small contribution of gold mines to the ongoing tuberculosis epidemic in South Africa: a modeling-based study.

BMC Med 2018 Dec 28;16(1):242. Epub 2018 Dec 28.

Institute for Disease Modeling, Bellevue, Washington, USA.

The original article [1] did not contain comprehensive information regarding two authors' affiliations that may be considered a potential competing interest. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12916-018-1238-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6309054PMC
December 2018
1 Read

Correction to: A randomised controlled trial of dietary improvement for adults with major depression (the 'SMILES' trial).

BMC Med 2018 Dec 28;16(1):236. Epub 2018 Dec 28.

IMPACT Strategic Research Centre, Deakin University, Geelong, VIC, Australia.

The original version of this paper [1] did not specify that a website was used in the final year of recruitment, in addition to the other stated recruitment methods. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12916-018-1220-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6309070PMC
December 2018
1 Read

Addressing ethnic inequalities in the pathways to care for psychosis.

BMC Med 2018 Dec 21;16(1):240. Epub 2018 Dec 21.

PsyLife Group, Division of Psychiatry, University College London, 6th Floor Maple House, 149 Tottenham Court Road, London, W1T 7NF, UK.

Delays in accessing appropriate care affect patients with most major health conditions, including psychosis. These delays may also be affected by pathways to care. In a recent article in BMC Medicine, Bhui and colleagues review the current evidence for ethnic differences in pathways to care for psychosis in England. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12916-018-1236-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6302422PMC
December 2018
1 Read

Practice variation in the use of tests in UK primary care: a retrospective analysis of 16 million tests performed over 3.3 million patient years in 2015/16.

BMC Med 2018 Dec 20;16(1):229. Epub 2018 Dec 20.

Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine, Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences, University of Oxford, Radcliffe Observatory Quarter, Oxford, OX2 6GG, UK.

Background: The UK's National Health Service (NHS) is currently subject to unprecedented financial strain. The identification of unnecessary healthcare resource use has been suggested to reduce spending. However, there is little very research quantifying wasteful test use, despite the £3 billion annual expenditure. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12916-018-1217-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6300913PMC
December 2018
1 Read

Mass drug administration for malaria elimination: do we understand the settings well enough?

BMC Med 2018 Dec 19;16(1):239. Epub 2018 Dec 19.

Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute, P.O. Box, 4002, Basel, Switzerland.

Mass drug administration (MDA) of antimalarials has re-emerged as a recommended tool for interrupting malaria transmission, but evidence from low endemicity settings is scarce. A trial in Zanzibar found that two rounds of MDA made no significant impact on malaria incidence, and many questions on the optimal mode and setting for implementing MDA remain unanswered. A more thorough understanding of local sources and drivers of transmission, and a better toolbox for evaluating interventions in near-elimination settings are essential. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12916-018-1230-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6299650PMC
December 2018
1 Read

Avoiding rash decisions about zoster vaccination: insights from cost-effectiveness evidence.

BMC Med 2018 Dec 18;16(1):238. Epub 2018 Dec 18.

University of Pittsburgh School of Pharmacy, Pittsburgh, PA, 15213, USA.

de Boer and colleagues present a cost-effectiveness analysis based in the Netherlands of two vaccines available for the prevention of herpes zoster. Zostavax® was the first vaccine available for the prevention of herpes zoster in older adults. A live-attenuated vaccine, Zostavax is not free of limitations, which include a relatively low efficacy that wanes over time and its contraindication among immunocompromised individuals. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12916-018-1231-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6298010PMC
December 2018
2 Reads

Treatment of chronic hepatitis B in sub-Saharan Africa: 1-year results of a pilot program in Ethiopia.

BMC Med 2018 Dec 17;16(1):234. Epub 2018 Dec 17.

Centre for Imported and Tropical Diseases, Oslo University Hospital, Ullevål, PO Box 4956 Nydalen, 0424, Oslo, Norway.

Background: The World Health Organization has set an ambitious goal of eliminating viral hepatitis as a major public health threat by 2030. However, in sub-Saharan Africa, antiviral treatment of chronic hepatitis B (CHB) is virtually unavailable. Herein, we present the 1-year results of a pilot CHB treatment program in Ethiopia. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12916-018-1229-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6296040PMC
December 2018
1 Read
7.249 Impact Factor

Reporting guidelines: doing better for readers.

Authors:
David Moher

BMC Med 2018 Dec 14;16(1):233. Epub 2018 Dec 14.

Centre for Journalology, Clinical Epidemiology Program, The Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, The Ottawa Hospital - General Campus, 501 Smyth Rd, Room L1288, Ottawa, ON, K1H 8L6, Canada.

There is clear guidance on the responsibilities of editors to ensure that the research they publish is of the highest possible quality. Poor reporting is unethical and directly impacts patient care. Reporting guidelines are a relatively recent development to help improve the accuracy, clarity, and transparency of biomedical publications. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12916-018-1226-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6293542PMC
December 2018
1 Read

Correction to: Frailty, nutrition-related parameters, and mortality across the adult age spectrum.

BMC Med 2018 Dec 14;16(1):235. Epub 2018 Dec 14.

Centre for Health Care of the Elderly, QEII Health Sciences Centre, Nova Scotia Health Authority, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada.

The original article [1] contained an error whereby Table 5 within the Appendix is presented incorrectly. This error has now been corrected and Table 5 is presented appropriately. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12916-018-1227-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6293499PMC
December 2018
4 Reads

Insulin translates unfavourable lifestyle into obesity.

BMC Med 2018 Dec 13;16(1):232. Epub 2018 Dec 13.

Faculty of Medicine, University of Duesseldorf, Moorenstr. 5, 40225, Duesseldorf, Germany.

Lifestyle factors conferring increased diabetes risk are associated with elevated basal insulin levels (hyperinsulinaemia). The latter predicts later obesity in children and adolescents.A causal role of hyperinsulinaemia for adipose tissue growth is probable because pharmacological reduction of insulin secretion lowers body weight in people who are obese. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12916-018-1225-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6292073PMC
December 2018
2 Reads

Fitness to practise sanctions in UK doctors are predicted by poor performance at MRCGP and MRCP(UK) assessments: data linkage study.

BMC Med 2018 Dec 7;16(1):230. Epub 2018 Dec 7.

Research Department of Medical Education, UCL Medical School, University College London, Gower Street, London, WC1E 6BT, UK.

Background: The predictive validity of postgraduate examinations, such as MRCGP and MRCP(UK) in the UK, is hard to assess, particularly for clinically relevant outcomes. The sanctions imposed on doctors by the UK's General Medical Council (GMC), including erasure from the Medical Register, are indicators of serious problems with fitness to practise (FtP) that threaten patient safety or wellbeing. This data linkage study combined data on GMC sanctions with data on postgraduate examination performance. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12916-018-1214-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6284295PMC
December 2018
1 Read

Ethnic inequalities and pathways to care in psychosis in England: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

BMC Med 2018 Dec 12;16(1):223. Epub 2018 Dec 12.

Centre for Psychiatry, Wolfson Institute of Preventive Medicine, Barts and the London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London, Charterhouse Square, London, EC1M 6BQ, UK.

Background: As part of a national programme to tackle ethnic inequalities, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of research on ethnic inequalities in pathways to care for adults with psychosis living in England and/or Wales.

Methods: Nine databases were searched from inception to 03.07. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12916-018-1201-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6290527PMC
December 2018
2 Reads

A cluster randomised controlled trial of two rounds of mass drug administration in Zanzibar, a malaria pre-elimination setting-high coverage and safety, but no significant impact on transmission.

BMC Med 2018 Dec 10;16(1):215. Epub 2018 Dec 10.

Department of Microbiology, Tumor, and Cell Biology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.

Background: Mass drug administration (MDA) has the potential to interrupt malaria transmission and has been suggested as a tool for malaria elimination in low-endemic settings. This study aimed to determine the effectiveness and safety of two rounds of MDA in Zanzibar, a pre-elimination setting.

Methods: A cluster randomised controlled trial was conducted in 16 areas considered as malaria hotspots, with an annual parasite index of > 0. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12916-018-1202-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6287359PMC
December 2018
2 Reads

Living at home after emergency hospital admission: prospective cohort study in older adults with and without cognitive spectrum disorder.

BMC Med 2018 Dec 11;16(1):231. Epub 2018 Dec 11.

Dementia and Ageing Research Group, Faculty of Social Science, University of Stirling, Stirling, FK9 4LA, Scotland.

Background: Cognitive spectrum disorders (CSDs) are common in hospitalised older adults and associated with adverse outcomes. Their association with the maintenance of independent living has not been established. The aim was to establish the role of CSDs on the likelihood of living at home 30 days after discharge or being newly admitted to a care home. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://bmcmedicine.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s1291
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12916-018-1199-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6288896PMC
December 2018
4 Reads

Cost-effectiveness of vaccination of immunocompetent older adults against herpes zoster in the Netherlands: a comparison between the adjuvanted subunit and live-attenuated vaccines.

BMC Med 2018 Dec 6;16(1):228. Epub 2018 Dec 6.

Unit of PharmacoTherapy, -Epidemiology & -Economics (PTE2), University of Groningen, Groningen Research Institute of Pharmacy, Groningen, The Netherlands.

Background: The newly registered adjuvanted herpes zoster subunit vaccine (HZ/su) has a higher efficacy than the available live-attenuated vaccine (ZVL). National decision-makers soon need to decide whether to introduce HZ/su or to prefer HZ/su above ZVL.

Methods: Using a Markov model with a decision tree, we conducted a cost-effectiveness analysis of vaccination with HZ/su (two doses within 2 months) or zoster vaccine live (ZVL) (single dose, or single dose with a booster after 10 years) for cohorts of 50-, 60-, 70- or 80-year-olds in the Netherlands. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://bmcmedicine.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s1291
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12916-018-1213-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6282315PMC
December 2018
5 Reads

How can clinicians, specialty societies and others evaluate and improve the quality of apps for patient use?

Authors:
Jeremy C Wyatt

BMC Med 2018 Dec 3;16(1):225. Epub 2018 Dec 3.

Wessex Institute of Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of Southampton, Southampton, SO16 7NS, UK.

Background: Health-related apps have great potential to enhance health and prevent disease globally, but their quality currently varies too much for clinicians to feel confident about recommending them to patients. The major quality concerns are dubious app content, loss of privacy associated with widespread sharing of the patient data they capture, inaccurate advice or risk estimates and the paucity of impact studies. This may explain why current evidence about app use by people with health-related conditions is scanty and inconsistent. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12916-018-1211-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6276222PMC
December 2018
1 Read

Intensity of perinatal care, extreme prematurity and sensorimotor outcome at 2 years corrected age: evidence from the EPIPAGE-2 cohort study.

BMC Med 2018 Dec 5;16(1):227. Epub 2018 Dec 5.

INSERM UMR 1153, Obstetrical, Perinatal and Pediatric Epidemiology Research Team (EPOPé), Centre for Epidemiology and Statistics Sorbonne Paris Cité, DHU Risks in Pregnancy, Paris Descartes University, Hôpital Tenon, Rue de la Chine, Paris, 75020, France.

Background: Emerging evidence suggests intensity of perinatal care influences survival for extremely preterm babies. We evaluated the effect of differences in perinatal care intensity between centres on sensorimotor morbidity at 2 years of age. We hypothesised that hospitals with a higher intensity of perinatal care would have improved survival without increased disability. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12916-018-1206-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6280378PMC
December 2018
2 Reads

Spatiotemporal analysis of malaria for new sustainable control strategies.

BMC Med 2018 Dec 4;16(1):226. Epub 2018 Dec 4.

Aix Marseille Univ, APHM, INSERM, IRD, SESSTIM, Hop Timone, BioSTIC, Biostatistic & ICT, Marseille, France.

Malaria transmission is highly heterogeneous through time and space, and mapping of this heterogeneity is necessary to better understand local dynamics. New targeted policies are needed as numerous countries have placed malaria elimination on their public health agenda for 2030. In this context, developing national health information systems and collecting information at sufficiently precise scales (at least at the 'week' and 'village' scales), is of strategic importance. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12916-018-1224-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6278049PMC
December 2018
2 Reads