6,922 results match your criteria BMC Health Services Research[Journal]


A new understanding of health related empowerment in the context of an active and healthy ageing.

BMC Health Serv Res 2019 Apr 24;19(1):242. Epub 2019 Apr 24.

Life Supporting Technologies, ETSI Telecomunicación, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Madrid, Spain.

Background: Recently, several initiatives have focused on how to create true person-centred health services. This calls for a new understanding of health-related empowerment in relation to people living with one or more chronic conditions. We report on a Delphi investigation among participants in the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing that has led to a new understanding of health-related empowerment. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12913-019-4082-5DOI Listing

Priorities and challenges for health leadership and workforce management globally: a rapid review.

BMC Health Serv Res 2019 Apr 24;19(1):239. Epub 2019 Apr 24.

School of Public Health and Community Medicine, University of New South Wales, UNSW, Sydney, 2052, Australia.

Background: Health systems are complex and continually changing across a variety of contexts and health service levels. The capacities needed by health managers and leaders to respond to current and emerging issues are not yet well understood. Studies to date have been country-specific and have not integrated different international and multi-level insights. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12913-019-4080-7DOI Listing

Integrative hospital treatment in older patients to benchmark and improve outcome and length of stay - the In-HospiTOOL study.

BMC Health Serv Res 2019 Apr 23;19(1):237. Epub 2019 Apr 23.

Medical University Department, Division of General Internal and Emergency Medicine, Kantonsspital Aarau, Tellstrasse, CH-5001, Aarau, Switzerland.

Background: A comprehensive in-hospital patient management with reasonable and economic resource allocation is arguably the major challenge of health-care systems worldwide, especially in elderly, frail, and polymorbid patients. The need for patient management tools to improve the transition process and allocation of health care resources in routine clinical care particularly for the inpatient setting is obvious. To address these issues, a large prospective trial is warranted. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12913-019-4045-xDOI Listing
April 2019
2 Reads

Conceptual model of managing health care volunteers in disasters: a mixed method study.

BMC Health Serv Res 2019 Apr 24;19(1):241. Epub 2019 Apr 24.

Reproductive Health, Research Center for Nursing and Midwifery Care, Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences, Yazd, Iran.

Background: Shortage of specialized healthcare volunteers is a major challenge during disasters and one solution could be pre-identified healthcare volunteers. This study aimed to develop a conceptual model of managing Iranian healthcare volunteers in disasters.

Methods: This mixed method study was designed in two phases. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12913-019-4073-6DOI Listing

Post-incident review after restraint in mental health care -a potential for knowledge development, recovery promotion and restraint prevention. A scoping review.

BMC Health Serv Res 2019 Apr 23;19(1):235. Epub 2019 Apr 23.

Department of Public Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Stavanger, NO-4036, Stavanger, Norway.

Background: Use of physical restraint is a common practice in mental healthcare, but is controversial due to risk of physical and psychological harm to patients and creating ethical dilemmas for care providers. Post-incident review (PIR), that involve patient and care providers after restraints, have been deployed to prevent harm and to reduce restraint use. However, this intervention has an unclear scientific knowledge base. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12913-019-4060-yDOI Listing

What does it cost to redispense unused medications in the pharmacy? A micro-costing study.

BMC Health Serv Res 2019 Apr 24;19(1):243. Epub 2019 Apr 24.

Division of Pharmacoepidemiology and Clinical Pharmacology, Utrecht Institute for Pharmaceutical Sciences, Utrecht University, Universiteitsweg 99, 3584, CG, Utrecht, the Netherlands.

Background: Redispensing unused medications that have been returned to outpatient pharmacies by patients may reduce waste and healthcare costs. However, little is known regarding the extra costs associated with this process, nor the price level of medications for which this is economically beneficial. The objective of this study was to assess costs associated with redispensing unused medications in the pharmacy and the price level at which redispensing becomes cost-beneficial. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12913-019-4065-6DOI Listing

Magnitude of delayed turnaround time of laboratory results in Amhara Public Health Institute, Bahir Dar, Ethiopia.

BMC Health Serv Res 2019 Apr 24;19(1):240. Epub 2019 Apr 24.

Amhara Public Health Institute, P.O.Box 447, Bahir Dar, Amhara, Ethiopia.

Background: Clinical decisions depend on timely laboratory result reporting. The timeliness is commonly expressed in turnaround time and serves as a quality improvement tool to assess the effectiveness and efficiency of the laboratory. According to the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) guidelines, each laboratory shall establish turnaround times for each of its examinations that reflect clinical needs, and shall periodically evaluate whether or not it is meeting the established turnaround times. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12913-019-4077-2DOI Listing

Reasons, perceived outcomes and characteristics of second-opinion seekers: are there differences in private vs. public settings?

BMC Health Serv Res 2019 Apr 23;19(1):238. Epub 2019 Apr 23.

Department of Primary Care and Public Health, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, The Reynolds Building, St. Dunstan's Road, London, W6 8RP, UK.

Background: In most countries, patients can get a second opinion (SO) through public or private healthcare systems. There is lack of data on SO utilization in private vs. public settings. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12913-019-4067-4DOI Listing

Primary care provider perceptions and experiences of implementing hepatitis C virus birth cohort testing: a qualitative formative evaluation.

BMC Health Serv Res 2019 Apr 23;19(1):236. Epub 2019 Apr 23.

Center for Healthcare Organization and Implementation Research, VA Boston Healthcare System, Boston, MA, USA.

Background: In 2014, the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) adopted a screening test policy for hepatitis C virus (HCV) in all "Baby Boomers" - those born between 1945 and 1965. About 1 in 12 Veterans were estimated to be infected with HCV yet approximately 34% of the birth cohort remained untested. Early HCV diagnosis and successful antiviral treatment decrease the risk of onward transmission, cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma, liver transplant, and death. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12913-019-4043-zDOI Listing

Evaluation of facility and community-based active household tuberculosis contact investigation in Ethiopia: a cross-sectional study.

BMC Health Serv Res 2019 Apr 22;19(1):234. Epub 2019 Apr 22.

International Training and Education Center for Health (I-TECH Ethiopia), Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

Background: No established strategy for household tuberculosis (TB) contact investigation (HTCI) exists in Ethiopia. We implemented integrated, active HTCI model into two hospitals and surrounding community health services to determine yield of active HTCI of all forms of TB and explore factors associated with active TB diagnosis in household contacts (HHCs).

Methods: Case managers obtained HHC information from index cases at TB/DOTS clinic and liaised with health extension workers (HEWs) who screened HHCs for TB at household and referred contacts under five and presumptive cases for diagnostic investigation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12913-019-4074-5DOI Listing

Tuberculosis care for migrant patients in Portugal: a mixed methods study with primary healthcare providers.

BMC Health Serv Res 2019 Apr 18;19(1):233. Epub 2019 Apr 18.

Global Health and Tropical Medicine, GHTM, Instituto de Higiene e Medicina Tropical, IHMT, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, UNL, Rua da Junqueira 100, 1349-008, Lisbon, Portugal.

Background: Tuberculosis (TB) is still a major global health problem. The increasing number of cases observed among foreign-born populations contrasts with the decreasing trends observed in later years in some high-income countries. Healthcare providers are key interveners in the control of TB and HIV-TB infections. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12913-019-4050-0DOI Listing

Effect of a typical systemic hospital reform on inpatient expenditure for rural population: the Sanming model in China.

BMC Health Serv Res 2019 Apr 16;19(1):231. Epub 2019 Apr 16.

Department of Health Service Management, School of Humanities and Social Sciences, China Medical University, No.77 Puhe Road, Shenyang, 110122, Liaoning, China.

Background: Considering catastrophic health expenses in rural households with hospitalised members were unproportionally high, in 2013, China developed a model of systemic reform in Sanming by adjusting payment method, pharmaceutical system, and medical services price. The reform was expected to control the excessive growth of hospital expenditures by reducing inefficiency and waste in health system or shortening the length of stay. This study analyzed the systemic reform's impact on the financial burden and length of stay for the rural population in Sanming. Read More

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https://bmchealthservres.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12913-019-4048-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6469113PMC
April 2019
1 Read

Healthcare professionals' knowledge, attitude and acceptance of influenza vaccination in Saudi Arabia: a multicenter cross-sectional study.

BMC Health Serv Res 2019 Apr 15;19(1):229. Epub 2019 Apr 15.

College of Pharmacy, University of Hail, P.O. Box 6166, Hail City, zip code 81442, Saudi Arabia.

Background: All healthcare professionals (HCPs) are at high risk of influenza infection. Therefore, immunization is recommended for all HCPs. Due to safety and effectiveness concerns, HCPs have a low vaccination rate. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12913-019-4054-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6469139PMC

A mixed-methods approach to understanding partnership experiences and outcomes of projects from an integrated knowledge translation funding model in rehabilitation.

BMC Health Serv Res 2019 Apr 16;19(1):230. Epub 2019 Apr 16.

School of Physical and Occupational Therapy, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada.

Background: Integrated knowledge translation (IKT) can optimize the uptake of research evidence into clinical practice by incorporating knowledge users as equal partners in the entire research process. Although several studies have investigated stakeholder involvement in research, the literature on partnerships between researchers and clinicians in rehabilitation and their impact on clinical practice is scarce. This study described the individual research projects, the outcomes of these projects on clinical practice and the partnership experiences of an initiative that funds IKT projects co-led by a rehabilitation clinician and a researcher. Read More

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https://bmchealthservres.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12913-019-4061-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6469130PMC
April 2019
1 Read

Delay in tuberculosis diagnosis and treatment in Amhara state, Ethiopia.

BMC Health Serv Res 2019 Apr 16;19(1):232. Epub 2019 Apr 16.

North Shoa Zone Health Department Tuberculosis, HIV and Leprosy program coordinator, Debre Birhan, Shoa, Ethiopia.

Background: Delayed presentation is a major problem contributing to the high burden and transmission of tuberculosis (TB) in developing countries. The delay may be due to patient delay if the patient visits health-facility for diagnosis after the onset of symptoms of more than 3 weeks or health system delay if the patient is not diagnosed and treated at the time of the first visit. Ethiopia, where no more than two-thirds of TB cases are detected is no exception. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12913-019-4056-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6469046PMC

Outpatient primary and tertiary healthcare utilisation among public rental housing residents in Singapore.

BMC Health Serv Res 2019 Apr 15;19(1):227. Epub 2019 Apr 15.

SingHealth Regional Health System, Singapore Health Services, 169608, Outram Road, Singapore, Singapore.

Background: Globally, public housing is utilized to provide affordable housing for low-income households. Studies have shown an association between public housing and negative health outcomes. There is paucity of data pertaining to outpatient primary and tertiary healthcare resources utilization among public rental housing residents in Singapore. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12913-019-4047-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6466644PMC
April 2019
1.659 Impact Factor

Evaluating the design and implementation of the whole systems integrated care programme in North West London: why commissioning proved (again) to be the weakest link.

BMC Health Serv Res 2019 Apr 15;19(1):228. Epub 2019 Apr 15.

Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, corporate member of Freie Universität Berlin, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, and Berlin Institute of Health; Division of Evidence-Based Medicine (dEBM), Charitéplatz 1, 10117, Berlin, Germany.

Background: Commissioning is a term used in the English National Health Service (NHS) to refer to what most health systems call health planning or strategic purchasing. Drawing on research from a recent in-depth mixed methods study of a major integrated care initiative in North West London, we examine the role of commissioning in attempts to secure large-scale change within and between health and social care services to support the delivery of integrated care for people living with complex long-term conditions.

Methods: We analysed data collected in semi-structured interviews, surveys, workshops and non-participant observations using a thematic framework derived both deductively from the literature on commissioning and integrated care, as well as inductively from our coding and analysis of interview data. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12913-019-4013-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6466786PMC

Engaging multiple stakeholders to improve speech and language therapy services in schools: an appreciative inquiry-based study.

BMC Health Serv Res 2019 Apr 15;19(1):226. Epub 2019 Apr 15.

School of Allied Health, Faculty of Education & Health Sciences, University of Limerick, Limerick, V94 T9PX, Ireland.

Background: Effective collaboration between speech and language therapists (SLTs) and teachers is essential in meeting the needs of children with developmental language disorders in school, but it is difficult to achieve. Currently, many children receive inadequate speech and language therapy services and/or support in school. The aim of this study was to engage key stakeholders (SLTs, teachers, parents and children with DLD) in the co-design of their ideal speech and language therapy service and support in school. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12913-019-4051-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6466713PMC

Can a continuous quality improvement program create culturally safe emergency departments for Aboriginal people in Australia? A multiple baseline study.

BMC Health Serv Res 2019 Apr 11;19(1):222. Epub 2019 Apr 11.

NSW Ministry of Health, 73 Miller Street, North Sydney, NSW, 2060, Australia.

Background: Providing culturally safe health care can contribute to improved health among Aboriginal people. However, little is known about how to make hospitals culturally safe for Aboriginal people. This study assessed the impact of an emergency department (ED)-based continuous quality improvement program on: the accuracy of recording of Aboriginal status in ED information systems; incomplete ED visits among Aboriginal patients; and the cultural appropriateness of ED systems and environments. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12913-019-4049-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6458761PMC

Older persons' experiences of adapting to daily life at home after hospital discharge: a qualitative metasummary.

BMC Health Serv Res 2019 Apr 11;19(1):224. Epub 2019 Apr 11.

Department of Nursing and Health Promotion, Faculty of Health Sciences, OsloMet - Oslo Metropolitan University, Oslo, Norway.

Background: Researchers have shown that hospitalisation can decrease older persons' ability to manage life at home after hospital discharge. Inadequate practices of discharge can be associated with adverse outcomes and an increased risk of readmission. This review systematically summarises qualitative findings portraying older persons' experiences adapting to daily life at home after hospital discharge. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12913-019-4035-zDOI Listing

Delayed illness recognition and multiple referrals: a qualitative study exploring care-seeking trajectories contributing to maternal and newborn illnesses and death in southern Tanzania.

BMC Health Serv Res 2019 Apr 11;19(1):225. Epub 2019 Apr 11.

Department of Health Systems, Impact Evaluation and Policy, Ifakara Health Institute, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.

Background: Maternal and neonatal mortality remain high in southern Tanzania despite an increasing number of births occurring in health facilities. In search for reasons for the persistently high mortality rates, we explored illness recognition, decision-making and care-seeking for cases of maternal and neonatal illness and death.

Methods: We conducted 48 in-depth interviews (16 participants who experienced maternal illnesses, 16 mothers whose newborns experienced illness, eight mothers whose newborns died, and eight family members of a household with a maternal death), and five focus group discussions with community leaders in two districts of Mtwara region. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12913-019-4019-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6460539PMC

Access to cardiac rehabilitation and the role of language barriers in the provision of cardiac rehabilitation to migrants.

BMC Health Serv Res 2019 Apr 11;19(1):223. Epub 2019 Apr 11.

Knowledge Centre for Rehabilitation and Palliative Care (REHPA) Odense University Hospital and University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.

Background: Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) has proven health benefits and, according to international guidelines, CR must be offered to all eligible patients. Studies have reported lower uptake of CR among migrants, and migrants are known to face several barriers in their access to healthcare, of which language is the most common. The aim of this study is to examine the provision of CR core components for migrants; and the role of language barriers in the provision of CR in Danish hospitals and municipalities. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12913-019-4041-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6458700PMC

An administrative model for benchmarking hospitals on their 30-day sepsis mortality.

BMC Health Serv Res 2019 Apr 11;19(1):221. Epub 2019 Apr 11.

CRISMA Center, Department of Critical Care Medicine, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA, USA.

Background: Given the increased attention to sepsis at the population level there is a need to assess hospital performance in the care of sepsis patients using widely-available administrative data. The goal of this study was to develop an administrative risk-adjustment model suitable for profiling hospitals on their 30-day mortality rates for patients with sepsis.

Methods: We conducted a retrospective cohort study using hospital discharge data from general acute care hospitals in Pennsylvania in 2012 and 2013. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12913-019-4037-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6458755PMC
April 2019
1 Read

Caregivers' experiences of a home support program after the hospital discharge of an older family member: a qualitative analysis.

BMC Health Serv Res 2019 Apr 11;19(1):220. Epub 2019 Apr 11.

School of Nursing, Midwifery and Paramedicine, Curtin University , GPO Box U1987, Perth, Western Australia, 6845, Australia.

Background: The ageing global population has seen increasing numbers of older people living with chronic health problems, declining function, and frailty. As older people seek to live out their years at home, family members, friends and neighbours (informal caregivers) are increasingly relied upon for support. Moreover, pressured health systems and shorter hospital length of stay mean that informal caregivers can find themselves supporting the older person who is still unwell after discharge. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12913-019-4042-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6458630PMC

Patient consultation rate and clinical and NHS outcomes: a cross-sectional analysis of English primary care data from 2.7 million patients in 238 practices.

BMC Health Serv Res 2019 Apr 6;19(1):219. Epub 2019 Apr 6.

Centre for Academic Primary Care, Bristol Medical School, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK.

Background: Primary care workload is high and increasing in the United Kingdom. We sought to examine the association between rates of primary care consultation and outcomes in England.

Methods: Cross sectional observational study of routine electronic health care records in 283 practices from the Clinical Practice Research Datalink from April 2013 to March 2014. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12913-019-4036-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6451312PMC
April 2019
1 Read

Psychometric evaluation of an interview-administered version of the WHOQOL-BREF questionnaire for use in a cross-sectional study of a rural district in Bangladesh: an application of Rasch analysis.

BMC Health Serv Res 2019 Apr 5;19(1):216. Epub 2019 Apr 5.

Department of Statistics, Data Science and Epidemiology; Faculty of Health, Arts and Design; Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn, VIC, 3122, Australia.

Background: This study aimed to validate the psychometric properties of the World Health Organization Quality of Life Instrument, Short Form (WHOQOL-BREF) questionnaire for use in a rural district of Bangladesh.

Methods: This cross-sectional study recruited a multi-stage cluster random sample of 2425 participants from the rural district Narail of Bangladesh in May-July 2017. Rasch analysis was carried out using the sampled participants, as well as multiple validation random sub-samples of 300 participants, to validate four domains of the WHOQOL-BREF questionnaire: physical, psychological, social and environmental. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12913-019-4026-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6451264PMC

Explaining patient delay in healthcare seeking and loss to diagnostic follow-up among patients with presumptive tuberculosis in Tanzania: a mixed-methods study.

BMC Health Serv Res 2019 Apr 5;19(1):217. Epub 2019 Apr 5.

Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute, Basel, Switzerland.

Background: Delay in healthcare seeking and loss to diagnostic follow-up (LDFU) contribute to substantial increase in tuberculosis (TB) morbidity and mortality. We examined factors, including perceived causes and prior help seeking, contributing to delay and LDFU during referral to a TB clinic among patients with presumptive TB initially seeking help at the pharmacies in Dar es Salaam Tanzania.

Methods: In a TB clinic, a semi-structured interview based on the explanatory model interview catalogue (EMIC) framework for cultural epidemiology was administered to presumptive TB patients enrolled at pharmacies during an intervention study. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12913-019-4030-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6451234PMC
April 2019
3 Reads

Clinical predictors of protracted length of stay in Ontario Complex Continuing Care hospitals.

BMC Health Serv Res 2019 Apr 5;19(1):218. Epub 2019 Apr 5.

School of Public Health and Health Systems, University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue West, Waterloo, ON, N2L 3G1, Canada.

Background: Post-acute care hospitals are often subject to patient flow pressures because of their intermediary position along the continuum of care between acute care hospitals and community care or residential long-term care settings. The purpose of this study was to identify patient attributes associated with a prolonged length of stay in Complex Continuing Care hospitals.

Methods: Using information collected using the interRAI Resident Assessment Instrument Minimum Data Set 2. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12913-019-4024-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6451230PMC
April 2019
4 Reads

Identifying barriers to the use of ultrasound in the perioperative period: a survey of southwestern Ontario anesthesiologists.

BMC Health Serv Res 2019 Apr 4;19(1):214. Epub 2019 Apr 4.

Department of Anesthesia & Perioperative Medicine, Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, Western University, London, ON, Canada.

Background: Ultrasound (US) can be used for many perioperative procedures, but evidence is lacking as to its frequency of use and barrier of application. The objectives of this survey were to determine i) how often US guidance was used perioperatively for vascular access placement, nerve blocks, and heart and lung assessment, and ii) to identify the barriers and the limitations of using US amongst anesthesiologists in southwestern Ontario.

Methods: We conducted a web-based survey in over 40 academic or community hospitals at southwestern Ontario. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12913-019-4040-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6449934PMC
April 2019
1 Read

Effects and determinants of tuberculosis drug stockouts in South Africa.

BMC Health Serv Res 2019 Apr 3;19(1):213. Epub 2019 Apr 3.

Erasmus School of Health Policy and Management, Erasmus University Rotterdam, Burgemeester Oudlaan 50, Rotterdam, PA, 3062, The Netherlands.

Background: The frequent occurrence of medicine stockouts represents a significant obstacle to tuberculosis control in South Africa. Stockouts can lead to treatment alterations or interruptions, which can impact treatment outcomes. This study investigates the determinants and effects of TB drug stockouts and whether poorer districts are disproportionately affected. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12913-019-3972-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6448237PMC
April 2019
1 Read

The politics and ethics of hospital infection prevention and control: a qualitative case study of senior clinicians' perceptions of professional and cultural factors that influence doctors' attitudes and practices in a large Australian hospital.

BMC Health Serv Res 2019 Apr 2;19(1):212. Epub 2019 Apr 2.

Sydney Health Ethics, University of Sydney, Level 1, Building 1, Medical Foundation Building, 92/94 Parramatta Rd, Camperdown, NSW, 2050, Australia.

Background: Hospital infection prevention and control (IPC) programs are designed to minimise rates of preventable healthcare-associated infection (HAI) and acquisition of multidrug resistant organisms, which are among the commonest adverse effects of hospitalisation. Failures of hospital IPC in recent years have led to nosocomial and community outbreaks of emerging infections, causing preventable deaths and social disruption. Therefore, effective IPC programs are essential, but can be difficult to sustain in busy clinical environments. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12913-019-4044-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6444390PMC

Healthcare worker experiences with Option B+ for prevention of mother-to-child HIV transmission in eSwatini: findings from a two-year follow-up study.

BMC Health Serv Res 2019 Apr 2;19(1):210. Epub 2019 Apr 2.

ICAP at Columbia University, Mailman School of Public Health, New York, NY, USA.

Background: Prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) across sub-Saharan Africa has rapidly shifted towards Option B+, an approach in which all HIV+ pregnant and breastfeeding women initiate lifelong antiretroviral therapy (ART) independent of CD4+ count. Healthcare workers (HCW) are critical to the success of Option B+, yet little is known regarding HCW acceptability of Option B+, particularly over time.

Methods: Ten health facilities in the Manzini and Lubombo regions of eSwatini transitioned from Option A to Option B+ between 2013 and 2014 as part of the Safe Generations study examining PMTCT retention. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12913-019-3997-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6444445PMC

Understanding healthcare self-referral in Nigeria from the service users' perspective: a qualitative study of Niger state.

BMC Health Serv Res 2019 Apr 2;19(1):209. Epub 2019 Apr 2.

Faculty of Health & Life Sciences, De Montfort University, Edith Murphy House, The Gateway. Leicester, Leicester, LE1 9BH, UK.

Background: The by-pass of the primary level of care to the referral facilities has continued to raise concerns for the healthcare delivery system. About 60-90% of patients in Nigeria are reported to self-refer to a referral level of care. Thus, this study sought to identify the factors that influence service-users' decision to self-refer to the secondary healthcare facilities in Nigeria by exploring the perceptions and experiences of the service-users. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12913-019-4046-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6444603PMC
April 2019
1 Read

The Philani MOVIE study: a cluster-randomized controlled trial of a mobile video entertainment-education intervention to promote exclusive breastfeeding in South Africa.

BMC Health Serv Res 2019 Apr 2;19(1):211. Epub 2019 Apr 2.

Heidelberg Institute of Global Health (HIGH), Medical Faculty and University Hospital, Heidelberg University, Heidelberg, Germany.

Background: In South Africa, rates of exclusive breastfeeding remain low and breastfeeding promotion is a national health priority. Mobile health and narrative entertainment-education are recognized strategies for health promotion. In-home counseling by community health workers (CHWs) is a proven breastfeeding promotion strategy. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12913-019-4000-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6444854PMC
April 2019
1 Read

Evaluation of a Tennessee statewide initiative to reduce early elective deliveries using quasi-experimental methods.

BMC Health Serv Res 2019 Apr 2;19(1):208. Epub 2019 Apr 2.

Department of Preventive Medicine, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, 66 N Pauline, Memphis, TN, 38163, USA.

Background: Concerted quality improvement (QI) efforts have been taken to discourage the practice of early elective deliveries (EEDs), but few studies have robustly examined the impact of directed QI interventions in reducing EED practices. Using quasi-experimental methods, we sought to evaluate the impact of a statewide QI intervention to reduce the practice of EEDs.

Methods: Retrospective cohort study of vital records data (2007 to 2013) for all singleton births occurring ≥36 weeks in 66 Tennessee hospitals grouped into three QI cohorts. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12913-019-4033-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6444673PMC
April 2019
5 Reads

Pharmacists expand access to reproductive heaLthcare: PEARL study protocol.

BMC Health Serv Res 2019 Apr 1;19(1):207. Epub 2019 Apr 1.

Center for Health Systems Effectiveness, Oregon Health &Science University, Portland, USA.

Background: In 2016, Oregon became the first of eight states to allow pharmacists to directly prescribe hormonal contraception (HC), including the pill, patch, or ring, without a clinic visit. In the two years following this policy change, the majority of ZIP codes across the state of Oregon had a pharmacist certified to prescribe HC.

Methods: We will utilize complementary methodologies to evaluate the effect of this policy change on convenient access to contraception (cost, supply dispensed), safety, contraceptive continuation and unintended pregnancy rates. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12913-019-4038-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6444429PMC
April 2019
1 Read

Barriers and facilitators with medication use during the transition from hospital to home: a qualitative study among patients.

BMC Health Serv Res 2019 Mar 29;19(1):204. Epub 2019 Mar 29.

Department of Clinical Pharmacy, OLVG hospital, Amsterdam, 1061AE, The Netherlands.

Background: During transitions from hospital to home, up to half of all patients experience medication-related problems, such as adverse drug events. To reduce these problems, knowledge of patient experiences with medication use during this transition is needed. This study aims to identify the perspectives of patients on barriers and facilitators with medication use, during the transition from hospital to home. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12913-019-4028-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6441233PMC

Improving continuity of patient care across sectors: study protocol of a quasi-experimental multi-centre study regarding an admission and discharge model in Germany (VESPEERA).

BMC Health Serv Res 2019 Mar 29;19(1):206. Epub 2019 Mar 29.

Department for General Practice and Health Services Research, University Hospital Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 130.3, 69120, Heidelberg, Germany.

Background: Hospitalisations are a critical event in the care process. Insufficient communication and uncoordinated follow-up care often impede the recovery process of the patient resulting in a high number of rehospitalisations and increased health care costs. The overall aim of this study is the development, implementation and evaluation of a structured programme (VESPEERA) to improve the admission and discharge process. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12913-019-4022-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6441227PMC
March 2019
1 Read

Validity and reliability of measures to assess constructs from the inner setting domain of the consolidated framework for implementation research in a pediatric clinic network implementing HPV programs.

BMC Health Serv Res 2019 Mar 29;19(1):205. Epub 2019 Mar 29.

Center for Health Promotion and Prevention Research, Department of Health Promotion & Behavioral Sciences, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston School of Public Health, 7000 Fannin St., Houston, TX, 77030, USA.

Background: Accurate and valid measures for implementation constructs are critical to advance research and guide implementation efforts. However, there is a continued need for valid and reliable measures for implementation research. The purpose of this study was to assess the psychometric properties of measures for the Inner Setting domain of the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research (CFIR) in a network of pediatric clinics. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12913-019-4021-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6441163PMC

Perceived cultural differences in healthcare for foreign patients visiting South Korea: tool development and measurement.

BMC Health Serv Res 2019 Mar 28;19(1):197. Epub 2019 Mar 28.

College of Nursing, Seoul National University, 103 Daehak-ro, Jongno-gu, Seoul, 03080, Republic of Korea.

Background: We developed a 41-item tool measuring cultural differences in healthcare as perceived by foreign patients visiting South Korea.

Methods: The tool was tested on 256 foreign patients who visited three tertiary hospitals in Seoul, South Korea. Content validity was explored by two physicians and eight nurses working in an international healthcare department. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12913-019-3965-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6437978PMC

Exploring adolescents and young people's candidacy for utilising health services in a rural district, South Africa.

BMC Health Serv Res 2019 Mar 28;19(1):195. Epub 2019 Mar 28.

London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, Keppel Street, London, WC1E 7HT, UK.

Background: We use the 'candidacy framework' to describe adolescents' and young people's (AYP) experiences of health services in a rural KwaZulu-Natal district, South Africa.

Methods: A qualitative approach was used including group discussions, in-depth and key informant interviews with a purposive sample of AYP (n = 70), community leaders (n = 15), school health teams (n = 10), and health service providers (n = 6).

Results: Findings indicate tacit understanding among AYP that they are candidates for general health services. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12913-019-3960-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6438017PMC

Socio-demographic differences in the frequent use of emergency department care by older persons: a population-based study in Stockholm County.

BMC Health Serv Res 2019 Mar 29;19(1):202. Epub 2019 Mar 29.

Department of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institutet, Plan 6, Solnavägen 1 E, 113 65, Stockholm, Sweden.

Background: In Sweden, the number of older people using emergency department (ED) care is rising. Among older persons an ED visit is a stressful event, which potentially could have been prevented or treated at other levels of care. Frequent ED use (> 4 visits a year) by older persons might reflect issues in the organisation of health care system to address their needs. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12913-019-4029-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6440084PMC

Uptake and correlates of HIV testing among men in Malawi: evidence from a national population-based household survey.

BMC Health Serv Res 2019 Mar 29;19(1):203. Epub 2019 Mar 29.

Kamuzu College of Nursing, University of Malawi, Lilongwe, Malawi.

Background: HIV testing is one of the key strategies in the HIV/AIDS prevention and control programmes. However, studies examining utilization of this service by men in Malawi are limited. The aim of this study was to assess the uptake and determinants of HIV testing among men in Malawi. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12913-019-4031-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6440107PMC

Are family planning vouchers effective in increasing use, improving equity and reaching the underserved? An evaluation of a voucher program in Pakistan.

BMC Health Serv Res 2019 Mar 29;19(1):200. Epub 2019 Mar 29.

Department of Research, Monitoring and Evaluation, Marie Stopes Society, Karachi, Pakistan.

Background: Low modern contraceptive prevalence rate and high unmet need in Pakistan aggravates the vulnerabilities of unintended pregnancies and births contributing to maternal morbidity and mortality. This research aims to assess the effectiveness of a free, single-purpose voucher approach in increasing the uptake, use and better targeting of modern contraceptives among women from the lowest two wealth quintiles in rural and urban communities of Punjab province, Pakistan.

Methods: A quasi-interventional study with pre- and post-phases was implemented across an intervention (Chakwal) and a control district (Bhakkar) in Punjab province (August 2012-January 2015). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12913-019-4027-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6440079PMC
March 2019
1.659 Impact Factor

Correction to: Will the reformed Cancer Drugs Fund address the most common types of uncertainty? An analysis of NICE cancer drug appraisals.

BMC Health Serv Res 2019 Mar 28;19(1):198. Epub 2019 Mar 28.

Oxford-UCL Centre for the Advancement of Sustainable Medical Innovation, Radcliffe Department of Medicine, University of Oxford, Room 4403, Level 4, John Radcliffe Hospital, Headley Way, Headington, Oxford, OX3 9DU, UK.

. Read More

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https://bmchealthservres.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12913-019-4039-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6437939PMC
March 2019
3 Reads

Exploring the views of being a proxy from the perspective of unpaid carers and paid carers: developing a proxy version of the Adult Social Care Outcomes Toolkit (ASCOT).

BMC Health Serv Res 2019 Mar 29;19(1):201. Epub 2019 Mar 29.

Quality and Outcomes of person-centred care policy Research Unit (QORU), PSSRU Kent, University of Kent, Cornwallis Building, Canterbury, CT2 7NF, UK.

Background: Outcomes-based policy and administration of public services present a compelling argument for the value of outcomes data. However, there are a number of challenges inherent in collecting these data from people who are unable to complete a paper-based survey or interview due to cognitive or communication impairments. In this paper, we explore the views of being a proxy from the perspective of unpaid carers and paid carers who may be asked to act as a proxy on behalf of the person(s) they care for. Read More

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https://bmchealthservres.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12913-019-4025-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6440097PMC
March 2019
4 Reads

"I just have to take it" - patient safety in acute care: perspectives and experiences of patients with chronic kidney disease.

BMC Health Serv Res 2019 Mar 28;19(1):199. Epub 2019 Mar 28.

College of Pharmacy and Nutrition, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, Canada.

Background: Frequent hospitalizations and dependency on technology and providers place individuals with chronic kidney disease (CKD) at high risk for multiple safety events. Threats to their safety may be physical, emotional, or psychological. This study sought to explore patient safety from the perspectives and experiences of patients with CKD in acute care settings, and to describe willingness to report incidents utilizing an existing safety reporting system. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12913-019-4014-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6437896PMC

Subscribers' perception of quality of services provided by Ghana's National Health Insurance Scheme - what are the correlates?

BMC Health Serv Res 2019 Mar 28;19(1):196. Epub 2019 Mar 28.

Department of Public Administration and Health Services Management, University of Ghana, University of Ghana Business School, Legon, Accra, Ghana.

Background: Ghana's National Health Insurance Scheme (NHIS) has witnessed an upsurge in enrollment since its inception in 2003, with over 40% of the Ghanaian population actively enrolled in the scheme. While the scheme strives to achieve universal health coverage, this quest is derailed by negative perceptions of the quality of services rendered to NHIS subscribers. This paper presents an analysis on perceptions of service quality provided to subscribers of Ghana's NHIS with emphasis on rural and urban scheme policy holders, using a nationally representative data. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12913-019-4023-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6437960PMC
March 2019
1.659 Impact Factor

Healthcare utilization after stroke in Canada- a population based study.

BMC Health Serv Res 2019 Mar 27;19(1):192. Epub 2019 Mar 27.

Department of Physical Therapy, The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.

Background: More people are surviving stroke but are living with functional limitations that pose increasing demands on their families and the healthcare system. The aim of this study was to determine the extent to which stroke survivors use healthcare services on a population level compared to people without a stroke.

Methods: This was a cross-sectional population-based survey that collected information related to health status, healthcare utilization and health determinants using the 2014 Canadian Community Health Survey. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12913-019-4020-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6438024PMC