490 results match your criteria BMC Ecology [Journal]


The effect of buffer strip width and selective logging on streamside plant communities.

BMC Ecol 2019 Feb 9;19(1). Epub 2019 Feb 9.

Department of Biological and Environmental Science, University of Jyväskylä, P.O. Box 35, FI-40014, Jyväskylä, Finland.

Background: Riparian forests surrounding streams host high biodiversity values, but are threatened by clear-cut logging. Narrow buffer strips of about 15 m are commonly left between the stream and the clear-cut, but studies suggest that the buffer width should be at least 30 m to protect riparian plant communities. Moreover, selective logging is often allowed on the buffer strips in order to increase economic gain. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-019-0225-0DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Ecological plasticity and commercial impact of invasive marbled crayfish populations in Madagascar.

BMC Ecol 2019 Feb 6;19(1). Epub 2019 Feb 6.

Division of Epigenetics, DKFZ-ZMBH Alliance, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 580, 69120, Heidelberg, Germany.

Background: The marbled crayfish (Procambarus virginalis) is a monoclonal, parthenogenetically reproducing freshwater crayfish species that has formed multiple stable populations worldwide. Madagascar hosts a particularly large and rapidly expanding colony of marbled crayfish in a unique environment characterized by a very high degree of ecological diversity.

Results: Here we provide a detailed characterization of five marbled crayfish populations in Madagascar and their habitats. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-019-0224-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6366054PMC
February 2019
1 Read

The relationship between oxidative stress, reproduction, and survival in a bdelloid rotifer.

BMC Ecol 2019 Feb 1;19(1). Epub 2019 Feb 1.

Department of Biological Sciences, University of Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, MA, 01854, USA.

Background: A proposed mediator of trade-offs between survival and reproduction is oxidative stress resistance. Investments in reproduction are associated with increased oxidative stress that reduces lifespan. We used the bdelloid rotifer Adineta vaga to examine baseline patterns of survival, reproduction, and measures of oxidative stress, as well as how these patterns change in the face of treatments known to induce oxidative stress. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-019-0223-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6359782PMC
February 2019

A meta-analysis shows that seaweeds surpass plants, setting life-on-Earth's limit for biomass packing.

BMC Ecol 2019 Jan 31;19(1). Epub 2019 Jan 31.

Departamento de Ecologia, Instituto de Biologia Roberto Alcântara Gomes, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Rua São Francisco Xavier 524, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, 20550-900, Brazil.

Background: As plants, algae and some sessile invertebrates may grow in nearly monospecific assemblies, their collective biomass increases and if they compete hard enough some die, freeing up space. The concurrent increase in biomass and decrease in density is called self-thinning, and its trajectory over time or maximum values represent a boundary condition. For a single stand developing over time the boundary defines the carrying capacity of the environment but the most extreme trajectories emulate the efficiency of species in packing biomass into space. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-019-0218-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6357480PMC
January 2019
3 Reads

Phase- and season-dependent changes in social behaviour in cyclic vole populations.

BMC Ecol 2019 Jan 25;19(1). Epub 2019 Jan 25.

Faculty of Applied Ecology, Agricultural Science and Biotechnology, Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences, 2480, Koppang, Norway.

Background: Social behaviour has been linked to hypotheses explaining multiannual population cycles of small rodents. In this paper we aimed to test empirically that the degree of space sharing among adult breeding female voles is higher during the increase phase than in the crash phase, and that the degree of sociality is positively related to population growth rate as suggested by Lambin and Krebs (Oikos 61:126-132, 1991) and Andreassen et al. (Oikos 122:507-515, 2013). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-019-0222-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6347810PMC
January 2019

A model for the biomass-density dynamics of seagrasses developed and calibrated on global data.

BMC Ecol 2019 Jan 25;19(1). Epub 2019 Jan 25.

Departamento de Ecologia, Instituto de Biologia Roberto Alcântara Gomes, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Rua São Francisco Xavier 524, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, 20559-900, Brazil.

Background: Seagrasses are foundation species in estuarine and lagoon systems, providing a wide array of services for the ecosystem and the human population. Understanding the dynamics of their stands is essential in order to better assess natural and anthropogenic impacts. It is usually considered that healthy seagrasses aim to maximize their stand biomass (g DW m) which may be constrained by resource availability i. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-019-0221-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6346591PMC
January 2019

Using transect sampling to determine the distribution of some key non-timber forest products across habitat types near Boumba-Bek National Park, South-east Cameroon.

BMC Ecol 2019 Jan 22;19(1). Epub 2019 Jan 22.

Institute of Agricultural Research for Development (IRAD), P.O. Box: 230, Bertoua, Cameroon.

Background: Understanding the variation in distribution and abundance of non-timber forest products (NTFP) species is a crucial step in achieving their conservation and sustainable use. At the northern periphery of the Boumba-Bek National Park in Southeast Cameroon, little is known about which habitat type contain the highest abundance of NTFP species. In this study, we assessed habitat diversity and variation in the abundance of eight priority NTFP species comprising: Afrostyrax lepidophyllus, Baillonella toxisperma, Irvingia gabonensis, Panda oleosa, Pentaclethra macrophylla, Ricinodendron heudelotii, Scorodophloeus zenkeri and Tetrapleura tetraptera. Read More

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https://bmcecol.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12898-01
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-019-0219-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6343285PMC
January 2019
5 Reads

Eggs of the copepod Acartia tonsa Dana require hypoxic conditions to tolerate prolonged embryonic development arrest.

BMC Ecol 2019 Jan 15;19(1). Epub 2019 Jan 15.

Department of Science and Environment, Roskilde University, Roskilde, Denmark.

Background: Copepods make up the largest zooplankton biomass in coastal areas and estuaries and are pivotal for the normal development of fish larva of countless species. During spring in neritic boreal waters, the copepod pelagic biomass increases rapidly from near absence during winter. In the calanoid species Acartia tonsa, a small fraction of eggs are dormant regardless of external conditions and this has been hypothesized to be crucial for sediment egg banks and for the rapid biomass increase during spring. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-018-0217-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6332675PMC
January 2019
1 Read

Ecological and life history traits are associated with Ross River virus infection among sylvatic mammals in Australia.

Authors:
Michael G Walsh

BMC Ecol 2019 Jan 15;19(1). Epub 2019 Jan 15.

Marie Bashir Institute for Infectious Diseases and Biosecurity, The University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia.

Background: Ross River virus (RRV) is Australia's most important arbovirus given its annual burden of disease and the relatively large number of Australians at risk for infection. This mosquito-borne arbovirus is also a zoonosis, making its epidemiology and infection ecology complex and cryptic. Our grasp of enzootic, epizootic, and zoonotic RRV transmission dynamics is imprecise largely due to a poor understanding of the role of wild mammalian hosts in the RRV system. Read More

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https://bmcecol.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12898-01
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-019-0220-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6334474PMC
January 2019
4 Reads

Coping with change in predation risk across space and time through complementary behavioral responses.

BMC Ecol 2018 Dec 20;18(1):60. Epub 2018 Dec 20.

Laboratoire Biométrie et Biologie Evolutive, CNRS, UMR 5558, Université de Lyon, Université Lyon I Claude Bernard, Villeurbanne, France.

Background: Our picture of behavioral management of risk by prey remains fragmentary. This partly stems from a lack of studies jointly analyzing different behavioral responses developed by prey, such as habitat use and fine-scale behavior, although they are expected to complement each other. We took advantage of a simple system on the Kerguelen archipelago, made of a prey species, European rabbit Oryctolagus cuniculus, a predator, feral cat Felis catus, and a mosaic of closed and open foraging patches, allowing reliable assessment of spatio-temporal change in predation risk. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-018-0215-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6302475PMC
December 2018
1 Read

The impact of cattle dung pats on earthworm distribution in grazed pastures.

BMC Ecol 2018 Dec 19;18(1):59. Epub 2018 Dec 19.

UCD School of Agriculture and Food Science, University College Dublin, Dublin 4, Ireland.

Background: Grazed grassland management regimes can have various effects on soil fauna. For example, effects on earthworms can be negative through compaction induced by grazing animals, or positive mediated by increases in sward productivity and cattle dung pats providing a food source. Knowledge gaps exist in relation to the behaviour of different earthworm species i. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-018-0216-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6299995PMC
December 2018
1 Read

Transition of Ethiopian highland forests to agriculture-dominated landscapes shifts the soil microbial community composition.

BMC Ecol 2018 Dec 17;18(1):58. Epub 2018 Dec 17.

Department of Soil Ecology, UFZ-Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Theodor-Lieser-Str. 4, 06120, Halle (Saale), Germany.

Background: Land use changes and related land management practices significantly alter soil physicochemical properties; however, their effects on the soil microbial community structure are still unclear. In this study, we used automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis to determine the fungal and bacterial community composition in soils from different land use areas in the Ethiopian highlands. Soil samples were collected from five areas with different land uses, natural forest, eucalyptus plantation, exclosure, grassland and cropland, which had all historically been natural forest. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-018-0214-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6298011PMC
December 2018
3 Reads

Dietary nutrient allocation to somatic tissue synthesis in emerging subimago freshwater mayfly Ephemera danica.

BMC Ecol 2018 Dec 14;18(1):57. Epub 2018 Dec 14.

Limnological Institute, University of Konstanz, Mainaustrasse 252, 78464, Constance, Germany.

Background: The relative importance of nutrients derived from different sources for tissue synthesis is crucial for predicting a species responds to changes in food availability. The ecological and physiological strategies that govern the incorporation and routing of nutrients for reproduction are often well understood. However, the role and adaptive value of both species and individual variation during early life-stage remain elusive. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-018-0213-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6295106PMC
December 2018
2 Reads

Inter-individual consistency in habitat selection patterns and spatial range constraints of female little bustards during the non-breeding season.

BMC Ecol 2018 Dec 5;18(1):56. Epub 2018 Dec 5.

Departament de Biologia Evolutiva, Ecologia i Ciències Ambientals, Institut de Recerca de la Biodiversitat (IRBio), Universitat de Barcelona, Avinguda Diagonal 643, 08028, Barcelona, Spain.

Background: Identifying the factors that affect ranging behavior of animals is a central issue to ecology and an essential tool for designing effective conservation policies. This knowledge provides the information needed to predict the consequences of land-use change on species habitat use, especially in areas subject to major habitat transformations, such as agricultural landscapes. We evaluate inter-individual variation relative to environmental predictors and spatial constraints in limiting ranging behavior of female little bustards (Tetrax tetrax) in the non-breeding season. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-018-0205-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6280389PMC
December 2018
3 Reads

Interactions between commercial fishing vessels and a pelagic seabird in the southern Mediterranean Sea.

BMC Ecol 2018 Dec 4;18(1):54. Epub 2018 Dec 4.

Department of Animal Ecology and Systematics, Justus Liebig University Giessen, Heinrich-Buff-Ring 26, 35392, Giessen, Germany.

Background: Fishing activities can influence foraging behaviour of many seabird species worldwide. Seabirds are attracted by fishing vessels which can facilitate access to demersal fish as a novel food resource that otherwise would be unavailable. On the other hand, intense fishing activities cause depletion of fish stocks with a reduction of natural prey available for seabirds. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-018-0212-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6280427PMC
December 2018
2 Reads

Silicon uptake by a pasture grass experiencing simulated grazing is greatest under elevated precipitation.

BMC Ecol 2018 Dec 4;18(1):53. Epub 2018 Dec 4.

Hawkesbury Institute for the Environment, Western Sydney University, Richmond, NSW, Australia.

Background: Grasses are hyper-accumulators of silicon (Si) and often up-regulate Si following herbivory. Positive correlations exist between Si and plant water content, yet the extent to which Si uptake responses can be mediated by changes in soil water availability has rarely been studied and never, to our knowledge, under field conditions. We used field-based rain-exclusion shelters to investigate how simulated grazing (shoot clipping) and altered rainfall patterns (drought and elevated precipitation, representing 50% and 150% of ambient precipitation levels, respectively) affected initial patterns of root- and shoot-Si uptake in a native Australian grass (Microlaena stipoides) in Si-supplemented and untreated soils. Read More

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https://bmcecol.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12898-01
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-018-0208-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6280423PMC
December 2018
2 Reads

Seasonal deviation effects foliar endophyte assemblage and diversity in Asparagus racemosus and Hemidesmus indicus.

BMC Ecol 2018 Dec 4;18(1):52. Epub 2018 Dec 4.

Department of Pharmacology, College of Medicine, University of Illinois, Chicago, USA.

Background: Fungal endophytes are the living symbionts which cause no apparent damage to the host tissue. The distribution pattern of these endophytes within a host plant is mediated by environmental factors. This study was carried out to explore the fungal endophyte community and their distribution pattern in Asparagus racemosus and Hemidesmus indicus growing in the study area. Read More

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https://bmcecol.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12898-01
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-018-0211-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6278056PMC
December 2018
7 Reads

Flower strip networks offer promising long term effects on pollinator species richness in intensively cultivated agricultural areas.

BMC Ecol 2018 Dec 4;18(1):55. Epub 2018 Dec 4.

Bayer AG, Bee Care Centre, 40789, Monheim, Germany.

Background: Intensively cultivated agricultural landscapes often suffer from substantial pollinator losses, which may be leading to decreasing pollination services for crops and wild flowering plants. Conservation measures that are easy to implement and accepted by farmers are needed to halt a further loss of pollinators in large areas under intensive agricultural management. Here we report the results of a replicated long-term study involving networks of mostly perennial flower strips covering 10% of a conventionally managed agricultural landscape in southwestern Germany. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-018-0210-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6280486PMC
December 2018
1 Read

Combining high-throughput imaging flow cytometry and deep learning for efficient species and life-cycle stage identification of phytoplankton.

BMC Ecol 2018 Dec 3;18(1):51. Epub 2018 Dec 3.

Software Engineering for Safety-Critical Systems Group, Technische Universität Ilmenau, Ehrenbergstraße 29, 98693, Ilmenau, Germany.

Background: Phytoplankton species identification and counting is a crucial step of water quality assessment. Especially drinking water reservoirs, bathing and ballast water need to be regularly monitored for harmful species. In times of multiple environmental threats like eutrophication, climate warming and introduction of invasive species more intensive monitoring would be helpful to develop adequate measures. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-018-0209-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6276140PMC
December 2018
2 Reads

Fox sightings in a city are related to certain land use classes and sociodemographics: results from a citizen science project.

BMC Ecol 2018 Nov 29;18(1):50. Epub 2018 Nov 29.

Institute of Zoology, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna, Gregor Mendel Strasse 33, 1180, Vienna, Austria.

Background: Red foxes (Vulpes vulpes L.) have become successful inhabitants of urban areas in recent years. However, our knowledge about the occurrence, distribution and association with land uses of these urban foxes is poor, partly because many favoured habitats are on private properties and therefore hardly accessible to scientists. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-018-0207-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6267792PMC
November 2018
2 Reads

Species-specific interference exerted by the shrub Cistus clusii Dunal in a semi-arid Mediterranean gypsum plant community.

BMC Ecol 2018 Nov 29;18(1):49. Epub 2018 Nov 29.

Instituto Pirenaico de Ecología, CSIC, Avda. Montañana, 1005, 50059, Saragossa, Spain.

Background: The gypsovag shrub Cistus clusii is locally dominant in semi-arid gypsum plant communities of North-Eastern Spain. This species commonly grows in species-poor patches even though it has nurse potential, suggesting interference on neighbouring species. Other Cistus species exert a chemically mediated interference on plant communities, suggesting that it might be a common phenomenon in this genus. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-018-0204-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6267893PMC
November 2018
1 Read

Fake spawns and floating particles: a rebuttal of Karkarey et al. "Alternative reproductive tactics and inverse size-assortment in a high-density fish spawning aggregation".

BMC Ecol 2018 Nov 27;18(1):48. Epub 2018 Nov 27.

Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Marine Biology, University of California Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA, 93016, USA.

Courtship and spawning behaviors of coral reef fishes are very complex, and sufficient sampling effort and proper methods are required to draw informed conclusions on their mating systems that are grounded in contemporary theories of mate choice and sexual selection. We reviewed the recent study by Karkarey et al. (BMC Ecol 17:10, 2017) on the spawning behavior of Squaretail coralgrouper (Plectropomus areolatus) from India and found no evidence to support their findings of alternative reproductive tactics, unique school-spawning involving a single male with multiple females, or inverse size-assortment. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-018-0206-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6260699PMC
November 2018
1 Read

Classifying development stages of primeval European beech forests: is clustering a useful tool?

BMC Ecol 2018 Nov 20;18(1):47. Epub 2018 Nov 20.

Sachgebiet Waldnaturschutz/Naturwald, Nordwestdeutsche Forstliche Versuchsanstalt NW-FVA, Grätzelstrasse 2, 37079, Goettingen, Germany.

Background: Old-growth and primeval forests are passing through a natural development cycle with recurring stages of forest development. Several methods for assigning patches of different structure and size to forest development stages or phases do exist. All currently existing classification methods have in common that a priori assumptions about the characteristics of certain stand structural attributes such as deadwood amount are made. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-018-0203-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6247681PMC
November 2018
17 Reads

Enhancing soil organic carbon, particulate organic carbon and microbial biomass in semi-arid rangeland using pasture enclosures.

BMC Ecol 2018 Nov 6;18(1):45. Epub 2018 Nov 6.

Department of Forest Ecology and Management, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU), 90183, Umeå, Sweden.

Background: Rehabilitation of degraded rangelands through the establishment of enclosures (fencing grazing lands) is believed to improve soil quality and livelihoods, and enhance the sustainability of rangelands. Grazing dominated enclosure (GDE) and contractual grazing enclosure (CGE) are the common enclosure management systems in West Pokot County, Kenya. Under CGE, a farmer owning few animals leases the enclosure to households with relatively more livestock, while GDE is where the livestock utilizing the enclosure are purely owned by the farmer. Read More

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https://bmcecol.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12898-01
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-018-0202-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6219041PMC
November 2018
13 Reads

Demographic consequences of reproductive interference in multi-species communities.

BMC Ecol 2018 Nov 6;18(1):46. Epub 2018 Nov 6.

Department of Ecology & Evolutionary Biology, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, M5S3B2, Canada.

Background: Reproductive interference can mediate interference competition between species through sexual interactions that reduce the fitness of one species by another. Theory shows that the positive frequency-dependent effects of such costly errors in mate recognition can dictate species coexistence or exclusion even with countervailing resource competition differences between species. While usually framed in terms of pre-mating or post-zygotic costs, reproductive interference manifests between individual Caenorhabditis nematodes from negative interspecies gametic interactions: sperm cells from interspecies matings can migrate ectopically to induce female sterility and premature death. Read More

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https://bmcecol.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12898-01
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-018-0201-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6219154PMC
November 2018
8 Reads

The biomass-density relationship in seagrasses and its use as an ecological indicator.

BMC Ecol 2018 10 19;18(1):44. Epub 2018 Oct 19.

Departamento de Ecologia, Instituto de Biologia Roberto Alcântara Gomes, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Rua São Francisco Xavier 524, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, 20559-900, Brazil.

Background: Biomass-density relations have been at the centre of a search for an index which describes the health of seagrass meadows. However, this search has been complicated by the intricacy of seagrass demographics and their complex biomass-density relations, a consequence mainly of their modular growth and clonality. Concomitantly, biomass-density upper boundaries have been determined for terrestrial plants and algae, reflecting their asymptotic maximum efficiencies of space occupation. Read More

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https://bmcecol.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12898-01
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-018-0200-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6195692PMC
October 2018
7 Reads

Is stemflow a vector for the transport of small metazoans from tree surfaces down to soil?

BMC Ecol 2018 10 11;18(1):43. Epub 2018 Oct 11.

Animal Ecology, Bielefeld University, Konsequenz 45, 33615, Bielefeld, Germany.

Background: Stemflow is an essential hydrologic process shaping the soil of forests by providing a concentrated input of rainwater and solutions. However, the transport of metazoans by stemflow has yet to be investigated. This 8-week study documented the organisms (< 2 mm) present in the stemflow of different tree species. Read More

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https://bmcecol.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12898-01
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-018-0198-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6182836PMC
October 2018
17 Reads

Fagus sylvatica seedlings show provenance differentiation rather than adaptation to soil in a transplant experiment.

BMC Ecol 2018 10 3;18(1):42. Epub 2018 Oct 3.

Institute of Plant Sciences, University of Bern, Altenbergrain 21, 3013, Bern, Switzerland.

Background: Understanding and predicting the response of tree populations to climate change requires understanding the pattern and scale of their adaptation. Climate is often considered the major driver of local adaptation but, although biotic factors such as soil pathogens or mutualists could be as important, their role has typically been neglected. Biotic drivers might also interact with climate to affect performance and mycorrhizae, in particular, are likely to play a key role in determining drought resistance, which is important in the context of adaptation to future environmental change. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-018-0197-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6171197PMC
October 2018
1 Read

Quantifying suitable late summer brood habitats for willow ptarmigan in Norway.

BMC Ecol 2018 10 3;18(1):41. Epub 2018 Oct 3.

Norwegian Institute for Nature Research, Torgarden, P.O.Box 5685, Trondheim, 7485, Norway.

Background: Habitat models provide information about which habitat management should target to avoid species extinctions or range contractions. The willow ptarmigan inhabits alpine- and arctic tundra habitats in the northern hemisphere and is listed as near threatened (NT) in the Norwegian red list due to declining population size. Habitat alteration is one of several factors affecting willow ptarmigan populations, but there is a lack of studies quantifying and describing habitat selection in willow ptarmigan. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-018-0196-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6171150PMC
October 2018
1 Read

The relationship between the abundance of the Nigeria-Cameroon chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes ellioti) and its habitat: a conservation concern in Mbam-Djerem National Park, Cameroon.

BMC Ecol 2018 10 1;18(1):40. Epub 2018 Oct 1.

Laboratory of Applied Ecology, Faculty of Agronomic Sciences, University of Abomey-Calavi, 01 P.O.Box 526, Cotonou, Benin.

Background: Understanding the relationship between great apes and their habitat is essential for the development of successful conservation strategies. The chimpanzee Pan troglodytes ellioti is endemic to Nigeria and Cameroon, and occupies an ecologically diverse range of habitats from forests to forest-savannah mosaic in Mbam-Djerem National Park (MDNP) in Cameroon. The habitat variation in chimpanzees is poorly understood in MDNP which provides an excellent opportunity to assess ecological factors that shape the abundance and distribution patterns of P. Read More

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https://bmcecol.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12898-01
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-018-0199-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6167774PMC
October 2018
4 Reads

Drivers of daily movement patterns affecting an endangered vulture flight activity.

BMC Ecol 2018 09 29;18(1):39. Epub 2018 Sep 29.

Department of Animal Science, Faculty of Life Sciences and Engineering, University of Lleida, 25198, Lleida, Spain.

Background: The development of satellite tracking technology enables the gathering of huge amounts of accurate data on animal movements over measured time intervals, to reveal essential information about species' patterns of spatial use. This information is especially important in optimizing the design of conservation and management strategies for endangered species. In this study, we analysed the main drivers of daily patterns in the flight activity of the threatened Bearded Vulture Gypaetus barbatus. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-018-0195-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6162909PMC
September 2018
1 Read

Leaf herbivory by insects during summer reduces overwinter browsing by moose.

BMC Ecol 2018 09 27;18(1):38. Epub 2018 Sep 27.

Institute of Arctic Biology, Department of Biology and Wildlife, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA.

Background: Damage to plants by herbivores potentially affects the quality and quantity of the plant tissue available to other herbivore taxa that utilize the same host plants at a later time. This study addresses the indirect effects of insect herbivores on mammalian browsers, a particularly poorly-understood class of interactions. Working in the Alaskan boreal forest, we investigated the indirect effects of insect damage to Salix interior leaves during the growing season on the consumption of browse by moose during winter, and on quantity and quality of browse production. Read More

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https://bmcecol.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12898-01
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-018-0192-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6161349PMC
September 2018
12 Reads

Environmental causes of between-population difference in growth rate of a high-altitude lizard.

BMC Ecol 2018 09 24;18(1):37. Epub 2018 Sep 24.

Key Laboratory of Animal Ecology and Conservation Biology, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100101, China.

Background: Ectothermic animals living in cold (high latitude or high elevation) regions are predicted to grow slower due to limited thermal opportunities for activity and food resources than those living in warm regions. However, the Qinghai toad-headed lizards (Phrynocephalus vlangalii) grow faster and reach a larger adult size at a high-elevation site than at a low-elevation site. In this study, we aimed to identify the genetic and environmental causes of this between-population difference in growth rate by conducting mark-recapture and common garden experiments on juvenile growth rate, and investigating the thermal environment, lizard body temperature, potential prey availability at the two elevation sites. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-018-0194-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6154872PMC
September 2018
1 Read

Environmental niche unfilling but limited options for range expansion by active dispersion in an alien cavity-nesting wasp.

BMC Ecol 2018 09 20;18(1):36. Epub 2018 Sep 20.

Instituto de Ciencias Ambientales (ICAM), Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, Avenida Carlos III, s/n, 45071, Toledo, Spain.

Background: Predicting the patterns of range expansion of alien species is central to develop effective strategies for managing potential biological invasions. Here, we present a study on the potential distribution of the American cavity-nesting, Orthoptera-hunting and solitary wasp, Isodontia mexicana (Hymenoptera: Sphecidae), which was first detected as alien species in France in 1960 and now is present in many European countries. After having updated its current distribution, we estimated the environmental space (based on bioclimatic data and altitude) occupied by the species and subsequently predicted its environmental potential distribution under both present and future climatic conditions at global scale. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-018-0193-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6148766PMC
September 2018
1 Read

Fungal infection has sublethal effects in a lowland subtropical amphibian population.

BMC Ecol 2018 09 14;18(1):34. Epub 2018 Sep 14.

Department of Biological Sciences, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA.

Background: The amphibian chytrid fungus, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), has been implicated as a primary cause of decline in many species around the globe. However, there are some species and populations that are known to become infected in the wild, yet declines have not been observed. Here we conducted a yearlong capture-mark-recapture study and a 2-year long disease monitoring study of northern cricket frogs, Acris crepitans, in the lowland subtropical forests of Louisiana. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-018-0189-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6137908PMC
September 2018
1 Read

Cluster analysis of hemorrhagic disease in Missouri's white-tailed deer population: 1980-2013.

BMC Ecol 2018 09 14;18(1):35. Epub 2018 Sep 14.

Department of Math and Statistics, University of Missouri-Kansas City, 5120 Rockhill Road, Kansas City, MO, 64110, USA.

Background: Outbreaks of deer hemorrhagic disease (HD) have been documented in the USA for many decades. In the year 2012, there was a severe HD outbreak in Missouri with mortalities reaching approximately 6.9 per thousand. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-018-0188-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6137738PMC
September 2018
2 Reads

A random survival forest illustrates the importance of natural enemies compared to host plant quality on leaf beetle survival rates.

BMC Ecol 2018 09 10;18(1):33. Epub 2018 Sep 10.

Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences, Stockholm University, 106 91, Stockholm, Sweden.

Background: Wetlands are habitats where variation in soil moisture content and associated environmental conditions can strongly affect the survival of herbivorous insects by changing host plant quality and natural enemy densities. In this study, we combined natural enemy exclusion experiments with random survival forest analyses to study the importance of local variation in host plant quality and predation by natural enemies on the egg and larval survival of the leaf beetle Galerucella sagittariae along a soil moisture gradient.

Results: Our results showed that the exclusion of natural enemies substantially increased the survival probability of G. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-018-0187-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6131828PMC
September 2018
1 Read

Benefits and limitations of three-dimensional printing technology for ecological research.

BMC Ecol 2018 09 10;18(1):32. Epub 2018 Sep 10.

Integrative Ecology Lab, Center for Biodiversity, Department of Biology, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, USA.

Background: Ecological research often involves sampling and manipulating non-model organisms that reside in heterogeneous environments. As such, ecologists often adapt techniques and ideas from industry and other scientific fields to design and build equipment, tools, and experimental contraptions custom-made for the ecological systems under study. Three-dimensional (3D) printing provides a way to rapidly produce identical and novel objects that could be used in ecological studies, yet ecologists have been slow to adopt this new technology. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-018-0190-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6131837PMC
September 2018
1 Read

Response of growth and development of the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) to thermal discharge from a nuclear power plant.

BMC Ecol 2018 09 6;18(1):31. Epub 2018 Sep 6.

Lianyungang Muyang Aquaculture Co., Ltd., Lianyungang, 222042, Jiangsu, China.

Background: During electricity generation of nuclear power plant, heat energy cannot be completely converted into electrical energy, and a part of it is lost in the form of thermal discharge into the environment. The thermal discharge is harmful to flora and fauna leading to environmental deterioration, biological diversity decline, and even biological extinction.

Results: The present study investigated the influence of thermal discharge from a nuclear power plant on the growth and development of Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas which is widely used as bio indicator to monitor environmental changes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-018-0191-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6127899PMC
September 2018
2 Reads

Grazing effects on the nutritive value of dominant species in steppe grasslands of northern China.

BMC Ecol 2018 09 3;18(1):30. Epub 2018 Sep 3.

Department of Grassland Science, College of Animal Science and Technology, China Agricultural University, Beijing, 100193, China.

Background: Forage nutritive value plays an important role in livestock nutrition and maintaining sustainable grassland ecosystems, and grazing management can affect the quality of forage. In this study, we investigated the effects of different grazing intensities on the nutritive values of Leymus chinensis (Trin.) Tzvelev, Artemisia spp. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-018-0186-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6122722PMC
September 2018
24 Reads

Experimental herbivore exclusion, shrub introduction, and carbon sequestration in alpine plant communities.

BMC Ecol 2018 08 30;18(1):29. Epub 2018 Aug 30.

Department of Biology, NTNU, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Høgskoleringen 5, 7491, Trondheim, Norway.

Background: Shrub cover in arctic and alpine ecosystems has increased in recent decades, and is predicted to further increase with climate change. Changes in shrub abundance may alter ecosystem carbon (C) sequestration and storage, with potential positive feedback on global C cycling. Small and large herbivores may reduce shrub expansion and thereby counteract the positive feedback on C cycling, but herbivore pressures have also changed in the alpine-arctic tundra; the increased shrub cover together with changes in herbivore pressure is leading to unpredictable changes in carbon sequestration and storage. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-018-0185-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6117883PMC
August 2018
13 Reads

Pollen limitation and resource limitation affect the reproductive success of Medicago sativa L.

BMC Ecol 2018 08 29;18(1):28. Epub 2018 Aug 29.

Northwest Institute of Eco-Environment and Resources, CAS, Lanzhou, 730000, China.

Background: A large proportion of the flowers and ovules of plants do not develop into fruits and seeds. Plant reproduction may be limited because of pollen limitation and resource limitation. Medicago sativa L. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-018-0184-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6114519PMC
August 2018
2 Reads

Effects of permafrost collapse on soil bacterial communities in a wet meadow on the northern Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau.

BMC Ecol 2018 08 22;18(1):27. Epub 2018 Aug 22.

Key Laboratory of Western China's Environmental Systems (Ministry of Education), College of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou, 730000, China.

Background: Permafrost degradation may develop thermokarst landforms, which substantially change physico-chemical characteristics in the soil as well as the soil carbon stock. However, little is known about changes of bacterial community among the microfeatures within thermokarst area.

Results: We investigated bacterial communities using the Illumina sequencing method and examined their relationships with soil parameters in a thermokarst feature on the northern Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-018-0183-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6103961PMC
August 2018
10 Reads

Field studies reveal a close relative of C. elegans thrives in the fresh figs of Ficus septica and disperses on its Ceratosolen pollinating wasps.

BMC Ecol 2018 08 21;18(1):26. Epub 2018 Aug 21.

Department of Biology, Institute of Ecology and Evolution, University of Oregon, Eugene, OR, USA.

Background: Biotic interactions are ubiquitous and require information from ecology, evolutionary biology, and functional genetics in order to be understood. However, study systems that are amenable to investigations across such disparate fields are rare. Figs and fig wasps are a classic system for ecology and evolutionary biology with poor functional genetics; Caenorhabditis elegans is a classic system for functional genetics with poor ecology. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-018-0182-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6102938PMC
August 2018
2 Reads

A comparison of the larvivorous habits of exotic Poecilia reticulata and native Aplocheilus parvus.

BMC Ecol 2018 08 14;18(1):25. Epub 2018 Aug 14.

Anti Malaria Campaign, Colombo 05, Sri Lanka.

Background: The exotic fish Poecilia reticulata is promoted in the tropics as a biological control agent for aquatic pathogenic carriers, such as mosquitoes. Such control measures are often adopted blindly, ignoring the potential of native species and the adverse effects of introduced species. The present study was conducted to assess the diet composition of two species of fish, the native Aplocheilus parvus and exotic P. Read More

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https://bmcecol.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12898-01
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-018-0180-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6092854PMC
August 2018
14 Reads

Life history traits in a capital breeding pine caterpillar: effect of host species and needle age.

BMC Ecol 2018 08 8;18(1):24. Epub 2018 Aug 8.

College of Forestry, Jiangxi Agricultural University, Nanchang, 330045, Jiangxi, China.

Background: For capital breeding Lepidoptera, larval food quality is a key determinant of their fitness. A series of studies have suggested that the larval host species or varieties dramatically impact their development and reproductive output. However, few studies have reported the role of foliar age and adult mating success has often been ignored in these studies. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-018-0181-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6083516PMC
August 2018
5 Reads

Occurrence of the invasive Spanish slug in gardens: can a citizen science approach help deciphering underlying factors?

BMC Ecol 2018 08 2;18(1):23. Epub 2018 Aug 2.

Institute of Zoology, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna, Vienna, Austria.

Background: The Spanish slug (Arion vulgaris, also known as A. lusitanicus) is considered one of the most invasive species in agriculture, horticulture and private gardens all over Europe. Although this slug has been problematic for decades, there is still not much known about its occurrence across private gardens and the underlying meteorological and ecological factors. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-018-0179-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6071400PMC
August 2018
2 Reads

Are sleeping site ecology and season linked to intestinal helminth prevalence and diversity in two sympatric, nocturnal and arboreal primate hosts (Lepilemur edwardsi and Avahi occidentalis)?

BMC Ecol 2018 07 13;18(1):22. Epub 2018 Jul 13.

Institute for Parasitology, University of Veterinary Medicine Hannover, Buenteweg 17, 30559, Hannover, Germany.

Background: Various factors, such as climate, body size and sociality are often linked to parasitism. This constrains the identification of other determinants driving parasite infections. Here, we investigate for the first time intestinal parasites in two sympatric arboreal primate species, which share similar activity patterns, feeding ecology, body size and sociality, and cope with the same climate conditions, but differ in sleeping site ecology: the Milne-Edward's sportive lemur (Lepilemur edwardsi) and the Western woolly lemur (Avahi occidentalis). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-018-0178-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6043982PMC
July 2018
4 Reads

Quantifying the unquantifiable: why Hymenoptera, not Coleoptera, is the most speciose animal order.

BMC Ecol 2018 07 12;18(1):21. Epub 2018 Jul 12.

Department of Biology, University of Iowa, 434 Biology Building, Iowa City, IA, 52242, USA.

Background: We challenge the oft-repeated claim that the beetles (Coleoptera) are the most species-rich order of animals. Instead, we assert that another order of insects, the Hymenoptera, is more speciose, due in large part to the massively diverse but relatively poorly known parasitoid wasps. The idea that the beetles have more species than other orders is primarily based on their respective collection histories and the relative availability of taxonomic resources, which both disfavor parasitoid wasps. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-018-0176-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6042248PMC
July 2018
16 Reads

Species-habitat associations in an old-growth temperate forest in northeastern China.

BMC Ecol 2018 07 9;18(1):20. Epub 2018 Jul 9.

Center for Ecological Research, Northeast Forestry University, Harbin, 150040, China.

Background: Species coexistence mechanisms and maintenance of biodiversity have long been considered important components of community ecology research. As one of the important mechanisms, species coexistence theory based on niche differentiation has received attention in past years. Thus, topography, through the formation of habitat heterogeneity, affects species distributions and coexistence. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-018-0177-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6038321PMC
July 2018
19 Reads