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    8 results match your criteria Aviation Space and Environmental Medicine [Journal]

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    Manned interplanetary missions: prospective medical problems.
    Environ Med 1998 Dec;42(2):83-94
    Institute of Biomedical Problems, State Scientific Center, Moscow, Russia.
    The present review aimed to suggest approaches to prospective medical problems related to the health maintenance of space crews during future manned interplanetary, particularly Martian, missions up to 2-3 years with a possible stay on a planet with gravity different from that on Earth. The approaches are based on knowledge so far obtained from our analysis of the medical support of long-term orbital flights up to one year, as well as on the consideration of specific conditions of interplanetary missions. These specific conditions include not only long-term exposure to microgravity, but also a prolonged stay of unpredictable duration (2-3 years) on board a spacecraft or on a planet without direct contact with Earth, and living in a team with a risk of psychological incompatibility and the impossibility of an urgent return to Earth. Read More

    Changes in muscle sympathetic nerve activity and effect of breathing maneuvers during microgravity induced by parabolic flight in humans.
    Environ Med 1998 Dec;42(2):152-5
    Department of Autonomic Neuroscience, Nagoya University, Japan.
    Unlabelled: This study aimed to clarify how muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) in humans, which plays an important role in blood pressure control against gravity, is altered under microgravity (microG) conditions, and how the MSNA change is modified by breathing maneuvers. Ten subjects seated themselves in a jet aircraft with their knees extended. MSNA was recorded microneurographically from the left tibial nerve with simultaneous monitoring of ECG, blood pressure, respiration, and intrathoracic blood volume estimated by the impedance method during parabolic flight in a jet aircraft. Read More

    Sympathetic nerve response to microgravity induced by parabolic flight.
    Environ Med 1997 Dec;41(2):141-4
    Department of Autonomic Neuroscience, Nagoya University, Japan.
    The aim of this study was to clarify how muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) in humans, which plays an important role in blood pressure control against gravity, is altered under microgravity conditions. Subjects were seated in a jet aircraft with their legs extended. MSNA was recorded microneurographically from the tibial nerve of the sitting subjects with simultaneous monitoring of electrocardiogram, blood pressure, respiration, and intrathoracic blood volume during parabolic flights. Read More

    Effects of space flight on endocrine system function in experimental animals.
    Environ Med 1996 Dec;40(2):95-111
    Space Medicine Research Center, Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, Nagoya University, Nagoya, Japan.
    The effects exposing rats to space flights of various lengths in a series of COSMOS satellites are reported based on an evaluation of plasma hormone levels and several enzyme activities in the tissues. The results after space flights are compared with those obtained from rats exposed to acute or repeated stress. Space flight induced selective morphological responses in the corticotrophs and gonadotrophs of the pituitary. Read More

    The mechanisms involved in cardiovascular system changes during long space flights.
    Environ Med 1996 Oct;40(1):1-11
    Institute of Biomedical Problems, Moscow, Russia.
    Analyzing the mechanism responsible for changes in the circulatory system which develop in microgravity depends on the results of medical examinations during long-term space flights. The primary component involves the elimination of gravity-related deformities and mechanical tension among body structures responsible for modifying gravireceptor impulse inputs, fluid redistribution and functional load reductions in the muscular system. This causes the circulatory system to change. Read More

    The looping behavior of fish in microgravity.
    Environ Med 1995 Oct;39(2):149-52
    School of Health Sciences, Fujita Health University, Toyoake.
    Fish subjected to microgravity during space flight were monitored for their swimming behavior, particularly the looping response. Experiments were performed on normal fish, unilaterally labyrinthectomized fish, and bilaterally labyrinthectomized fish. Observation were compared against the behavior of other species which had been evaluated in microgravity during parabolic flight. Read More

    Human space experiments in SL-J: preparation and conducted.
    Environ Med 1993 ;37(1):11-9
    Space Medicine Research Center, Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, Nagoya University, Nagoya, Japan.
    This experiment investigated how human beings achieve visual stability during body movements, including fine motion on the ground. When humans are exposed to an environment with different gravity vectors, the programmed behavior on the ground must be changed, that is, it is reprogrammed. This is called habituation or familiarization. Read More

    The effect of space flight on human cellular immunity.
    Environ Med 1993 ;37(2):107-16
    Space Medicine Research Center, Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, Nagoya University, Nagoya, Japan.
    T-lymphocyte responsiveness to mitogens is depressed by an average of 56% in humans (129 subjects) tested during and after space flight. Although there is not yet conclusive evidence of a clinical significance of the test, it is clear that factors of space flight like stress, closed environment and cosmic radiation may affect immune responsiveness. The data obtained from space crews may be compared to the depression seen in subjects undergoing heavy physical stress of head down tilt bedrest. Read More

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