103 results match your criteria Avian Conservation And Ecology[Journal]


Trait-environment relationships differ between mixed-species flocking and non-flocking bird assemblages.

Ecology 2020 Jun 21:e03124. Epub 2020 Jun 21.

Guangdong Key Laboratory of Animal Conservation and Resource Utilization, Guangdong Public Laboratory of Wild Animal Conservation and Utilization, Guangdong Institute of Applied Biological Resources, Guangdong Academy of Science, Guangzhou, 510260, China.

Hypotheses about the mechanisms of community assembly suggest that biotic and abiotic filters constrain species establishment through selection on their functional traits. It is unclear how differences in traits influence the niche dimensions of closely-related bird species when they co-exist in spatiotemporally heterogeneous environments. Further, it is necessary to take into account their participation in mixed-species flocks, social systems that can include both competition and facilitation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ecy.3124DOI Listing

Full lifetime perspectives on the costs and benefits of lay-date variation in tree swallows.

Ecology 2020 May 26:e03109. Epub 2020 May 26.

Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee, 37996, USA.

Animals must balance various costs and benefits when deciding when to breed. The costs and benefits of breeding at different times have received much attention, but most studies have been limited to investigating short-term season-to-season fitness effects. However, breeding early, versus late, in a season may influence lifetime fitness over many years, trading off in complex ways across the breeder's lifespan. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ecy.3109DOI Listing

Year-round spatiotemporal distribution pattern of a threatened sea duck species breeding on Kolguev Island, south-eastern Barents Sea.

BMC Ecol 2020 May 25;20(1):31. Epub 2020 May 25.

Department of Animal Ecology and Systematics, Justus Liebig University Giessen, Heinrich-Buff-Ring 26-32, 35392, Giessen, Germany.

Background: The long-tailed duck (Clangula hyemalis) was categorized as ´Vulnerable` by the IUCN after a study revealed a rapid wintering population decline of 65% between 1992-1993 and 2007-2009 in the Baltic Sea. As knowledge about the European long-tailed duck's life cycle and movement ecology is limited, we investigate its year-round spatiotemporal distribution patterns. Specifically, we aimed to identify the wintering grounds, timing of migration and staging of this population via light-level geolocation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-020-00299-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7249297PMC

The role of native and introduced birds in transmission of avian malaria in Hawaii.

Ecology 2020 Jul 7;101(7):e03038. Epub 2020 Apr 7.

Department Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of California, 130 McAllister Way, Santa Cruz, California, 95060, USA.

The introduction of nonnative species and reductions in native biodiversity have resulted in substantial changes in vector and host communities globally, but the consequences for pathogen transmission are poorly understood. In lowland Hawaii, bird communities are composed of primarily introduced species, with scattered populations of abundant native species. We examined the influence of avian host community composition, specifically the role of native and introduced species, as well as host diversity, on the prevalence of avian malaria (Plasmodium relictum) in the southern house mosquito (Culex quinquefasciatus). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ecy.3038DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7332373PMC

Increased songbird nest depredation due to Aleppo pine (Pinus halepensis) encroachment in Mediterranean shrubland.

BMC Ecol 2019 12 17;19(1):52. Epub 2019 Dec 17.

School of Zoology, The George S. Wise Faculty of Life Sciences, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel.

Background: In recent decades, a decrease of passerine densities was documented in Mediterranean shrublands. At the same time, a widespread encroachment of Aleppo pines (Pinus halepensis) to Mediterranean shrubland occurred. Such changes in vegetation structure may affect passerine predator assemblage and densities, and in turn impact passerine densities. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-019-0270-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6918703PMC
December 2019

Wandering woodpeckers: foray behavior in a social bird.

Ecology 2020 Feb 12;101(2):e02943. Epub 2020 Jan 12.

Old Dominion University, Norfolk, Virginia, 23529, USA.

In many cooperatively breeding taxa, nonbreeding subordinates, or helpers, use extra-territorial forays to discover dispersal opportunities. Such forays are considered energetically costly and foraying birds face aggression from conspecific members of the territories they visit. In contrast, breeders in cooperatively breeding taxa are expected to foray seldomly. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ecy.2943DOI Listing
February 2020

FragSAD: A database of diversity and species abundance distributions from habitat fragments.

Ecology 2019 Dec 1;100(12):e02861. Epub 2019 Oct 1.

Department of Life Sciences, Spatial Ecology Laboratory, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva, 84105, Israel.

Habitat destruction is the single greatest anthropogenic threat to biodiversity. Decades of research on this issue have led to the accumulation of hundreds of data sets comparing species assemblages in larger, intact, habitats to smaller, more fragmented, habitats. Despite this, little synthesis or consensus has been achieved, primarily because of non-standardized sampling methodology and analyses of notoriously scale-dependent response variables (i. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ecy.2861DOI Listing
December 2019
4 Reads
4.656 Impact Factor

Predicting invasiveness of exotic woody species using a traits-based framework.

Ecology 2019 10 15;100(10):e02797. Epub 2019 Jul 15.

Department of Forestry and Natural Resources, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana, 47906, USA.

Identifying potentially invasive species and preventing their introduction and establishment are of critical importance in invasion ecology and land management. Although an extensive body of research has been dedicated to identifying traits that confer invasiveness, our current knowledge is still often inconclusive due to limitations in geographic extent and/or scope of traits analyzed. Here, using a comprehensive set of 45 traits, we performed a case study of invasive traits displayed by exotic woody plants in the United States (U. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ecy.2797DOI Listing
October 2019
12 Reads

A practical guide for combining data to model species distributions.

Ecology 2019 06 9;100(6):e02710. Epub 2019 May 9.

Department of Biology, San Francisco State University, 1600 Holloway Avenue, San Francisco, California, 94132, USA.

Understanding and accurately modeling species distributions lies at the heart of many problems in ecology, evolution, and conservation. Multiple sources of data are increasingly available for modeling species distributions, such as data from citizen science programs, atlases, museums, and planned surveys. Yet reliably combining data sources can be challenging because data sources can vary considerably in their design, gradients covered, and potential sampling biases. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ecy.2710DOI Listing
June 2019
1 Read

Disentangling data discrepancies with integrated population models.

Ecology 2019 06 13;100(6):e02714. Epub 2019 May 13.

Department of Integrative Biology, Michigan State University, 288 Farm Lane RM 203, East Lansing, Michigan, 48824, USA.

A common challenge for studying wildlife populations occurs when different survey methods provide inconsistent or incomplete inference on the trend, dynamics, or viability of a population. A potential solution to the challenge of conflicting or piecemeal data relies on the integration of multiple data types into a unified modeling framework, such as integrated population models (IPMs). IPMs are a powerful approach for species that inhabit spatially and seasonally complex environments. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ecy.2714DOI Listing
June 2019
2 Reads

ATLANTIC BIRD TRAITS: a data set of bird morphological traits from the Atlantic forests of South America.

Authors:
Rodolpho Credo Rodrigues Érica Hasui Julia Camara Assis João Carlos Castro Pena Renata L Muylaert Vinicius Rodrigues Tonetti Felipe Martello André Luis Regolin Thiago Vernaschi Vieira da Costa Mauro Pichorim Eduardo Carrano Leonardo Esteves Lopes Marcelo Ferreira de Vasconcelos Carla Suertegaray Fontana Andrei Langeloh Roos Fernando Gonçalves Cristina Banks-Leite Vagner Cavarzere Marcio Amorim Efe Maria Alice S Alves Alexandre Uezu Jean Paul Metzger Paulo de Tarso Zuquim de Antas Katia Maria Paschoaletto Micchi de Barros Ferraz Larissa Corsini Calsavara Arthur Angelo Bispo Helder F P Araujo Charles Duca Augusto João Piratelli Luciano N Naka Rafael Antunes Dias Cassiano A F R Gatto Marcelo Alejandro Villegas Vallejos Gregório Dos Reis Menezes Leandro Bugoni Henrique Rajão Jairo José Zocche Guilherme Willrich Elsimar Silveira da Silva Lilian Tonelli Manica André de Camargo Guaraldo Giulyana Althmann Patricia Pereira Serafini Mercival Roberto Francisco Camile Lugarini Caio Graco Machado Fernando Marques-Santos Rafaela Bobato Elivan Arantes de Souza Reginaldo José Donatelli Carolina Demetrio Ferreira José Carlos Morante-Filho Natalia Dantas Paes-Macarrão Arthur Macarrão Marcos Robalinho Lima Lucilene Inês Jacoboski Carlos Candia-Gallardo Vanesa Bejarano Alegre Alex E Jahn Karlla Vanessa de Camargo Barbosa Cesar Cestari José Nilton da Silva Natalia Stefanini Da Silveira Ana Cristina Vara Crestani Adeliane Peterle Petronetto Alex Augusto Abreu Bovo Anderson Durão Viana Andrea Cardoso Araujo Andressa Hartuiq Dos Santos Andreza Clarinda Araújo do Amaral Ariane Ferreira Arnaldo Honorato Vieira-Filho Bianca Costa Ribeiro Caio C C Missagia Camila Bosenbecker Cesar Augusto Bronzato Medolago Cid Rodrigo Rodriguez Espínola Claudenice Faxina Cristiane Estrela Campodonio Nunes Cristine Prates Daniela Tomasio Apolinario da Luz Daniele Janina Moreno Daniele Mariz Deborah Faria Douglas Meyer Eder Afonso Doná Eduardo Roberto Alexandrino Erich Fischer Fabiane Girardi Felipe Borba Giese Felipe Leonardo Santos Shibuya Fernando Azevedo Faria Fernando Bittencourt de Farias Fernando de Lima Favaro Fernando José Ferneda Freitas Flávia G Chaves Flor Maria Guedes Las-Casas Gabriel L M Rosa Gabriel Massaccesi De La Torre Gabriela Menezes Bochio Giselle Evelise Bonetti Glauco Kohler Guilherme Santos Toledo-Lima Gustavo Piletti Plucenio Ícaro Menezes Ingrid Maria Denóbile Torres Ivan Celso Carvalho Provinciato Ivan Réus Viana James Joseph Roper Jaqueline Evelyn Persegona Jean Júnior Barcik Jimi Martins-Silva João Paulo Gava Just João Paulo Tavares-Damasceno João Ricardo de Almeida Ferreira Jonas Rafael Rodrigues Rosoni José Eduardo Teixeira Falcon Laura Maria Schaedler Leonardo Brioschi Mathias Leonardo Rafael Deconto Licléia da Cruz Rodrigues Marcela Afonso P Meyer Márcio Repenning Marcos Antônio Melo Maria Amélia Santos de Carvalho Marcos Rodrigues Maria Flavia Conti Nunes Maria Halina Ogrzewalska Mariana Lopes Gonçalves Maurício B Vecchi Maurício Bettio Michelle Noronha da Matta Baptista Murilo Sérgio Arantes Nicolás Luciano Ruiz Paulo Guilherme Bisetto de Andrade Pedro Henrique Lima Ribeiro Pedro Manoel Galetti Junior Phoeve Macario Rafael de Oliveira Fratoni Rafael Meurer Rafael S Saint-Clair Rafael Spilere Romagna Raquel Caroline Alves Lacerda Ricardo Augusto Serpa Cerboncini Ricardo Brioschi Lyra Ricardo Lau Roberta Costa Rodrigues Rogério Rodrigues Faria Rudi Ricardo Laps Sérgio Luiz Althoff Shayana de Jesus Sumiko Namba Talita Vieira Braga Tamara Molin Thanyria P França Câmara Thayz Rodrigues Enedino Uschi Wischhoff Vanessa Cristina de Oliveira Victor Leandro-Silva Vitor Araújo-Lima Vitor de Oliveira Lunardi Reginaldo Farias de Gusmão Jozélia Maria de Souza Correia Lucas P Gaspar Renata Cristina Batista Fonseca Paulo Affonso Fonseca Pires Neto Ana Carla Medeiros Morato de Aquino Bruna Betagni de Camargo Beatriz Azevedo Cezila Leonardo Marques Costa Roberta Montanheiro Paolino Claudia Zukeran Kanda Erison C S Monteiro Júlia Emi F Oshima Milene Alves-Eigenheer Marco Aurelio Pizo Luís F Silveira Mauro Galetti Milton Cezar Ribeiro

Ecology 2019 06 12;100(6):e02647. Epub 2019 Apr 12.

Laboratório de Ecologia Espacial e Conservação (LEEC), Departamento de Ecologia, Instituto de Biociências, Universidade Estadual Paulista (UNESP), Câmpus Rio Claro, Avenida 24 A, 1515, 13506-900, Rio Claro, São Paulo, Brazil.

Scientists have long been trying to understand why the Neotropical region holds the highest diversity of birds on Earth. Recently, there has been increased interest in morphological variation between and within species, and in how climate, topography, and anthropogenic pressures may explain and affect phenotypic variation. Because morphological data are not always available for many species at the local or regional scale, we are limited in our understanding of intra- and interspecies spatial morphological variation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ecy.2647DOI Listing
June 2019
36 Reads

Joint species movement modeling: how do traits influence movements?

Ecology 2019 04 21;100(4):e02622. Epub 2019 Feb 21.

Grupo de Ecología Cuantitativa, INIBIOMA-CRUB, CONICET, Avenida Pioneros 2350, S.C. de Bariloche, Río Negro, Argentina.

Joint species distribution modeling has enabled researchers to move from species-level to community-level analyses, leading to statistically more efficient and ecologically more informative use of data. Here, we propose joint species movement modeling (JSMM) as an analogous approach that enables inferring both species- and community-level movement parameters from multispecies movement data. The species-level movement parameters are modeled as a function of species traits and phylogenetic relationships, allowing one to ask how species traits influence movements, and whether phylogenetically related species are similar in their movement behavior. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ecy.2622DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6850360PMC
April 2019
3 Reads

Inter-individual consistency in habitat selection patterns and spatial range constraints of female little bustards during the non-breeding season.

BMC Ecol 2018 12 5;18(1):56. Epub 2018 Dec 5.

Departament de Biologia Evolutiva, Ecologia i Ciències Ambientals, Institut de Recerca de la Biodiversitat (IRBio), Universitat de Barcelona, Avinguda Diagonal 643, 08028, Barcelona, Spain.

Background: Identifying the factors that affect ranging behavior of animals is a central issue to ecology and an essential tool for designing effective conservation policies. This knowledge provides the information needed to predict the consequences of land-use change on species habitat use, especially in areas subject to major habitat transformations, such as agricultural landscapes. We evaluate inter-individual variation relative to environmental predictors and spatial constraints in limiting ranging behavior of female little bustards (Tetrax tetrax) in the non-breeding season. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-018-0205-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6280389PMC
December 2018
7 Reads

Immature survival, fertility, and density dependence drive global population dynamics in a long-lived species.

Ecology 2018 12 13;99(12):2823-2832. Epub 2018 Nov 13.

MUSE - Museo delle Scienze, Sezione Zoologia dei Vertebrati, Corso del Lavoro e della Scienza 3, 38122, Trento, Italy.

Disentangling the influence of demographic parameters and the role of density dependence on species' population dynamics is a challenge, especially when fractions of the population are unobservable. Additionally, due to the difficulty of gathering data at large spatial scales, most studies ignore the global dynamic of a species, which would integrate local heterogeneity dynamics and remove the noise of dispersal. We developed an integrated population model (IPM) at a global scale to disentangle the main demographic drivers of population dynamics in a long-lived species. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ecy.2515DOI Listing
December 2018

Drivers of daily movement patterns affecting an endangered vulture flight activity.

BMC Ecol 2018 09 29;18(1):39. Epub 2018 Sep 29.

Department of Animal Science, Faculty of Life Sciences and Engineering, University of Lleida, 25198, Lleida, Spain.

Background: The development of satellite tracking technology enables the gathering of huge amounts of accurate data on animal movements over measured time intervals, to reveal essential information about species' patterns of spatial use. This information is especially important in optimizing the design of conservation and management strategies for endangered species. In this study, we analysed the main drivers of daily patterns in the flight activity of the threatened Bearded Vulture Gypaetus barbatus. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-018-0195-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6162909PMC
September 2018
3 Reads

BRAZIL ROAD-KILL: a data set of wildlife terrestrial vertebrate road-kills.

Authors:
Clara Grilo Michely R Coimbra Rafaela C Cerqueira Priscilla Barbosa Rubem A P Dornas Larissa O Gonçalves Fernanda Z Teixeira Igor Pfeifer Coelho Brenda R Schmidt Diana L K Pacheco Gabriela Schuck Isadora B Esperando Juan A Anza Júlia Beduschi Nicole R Oliveira Paula F Pinheiro Alex Bager Helio Secco Marcello Guerreiro Carine F Carvalho Aline C Veloso Ana E I Custódio Oswaldo Marçal Giordano Ciocheti Julia Assis Milton Cezar Ribeiro Beatriz S S Francisco Jorge J Cherem Tatiane C Trigo Márcia M A Jardim Ingridi C Franceschi Caroline Espinosa Flávia P Tirelli Vlamir J Rocha Margareth L Sekiama Gedimar P Barbosa Helen R Rossi Tainah C Moreira Marcelo Cervini Clarissa Alves Rosa Lucas Gonçalves Silva Claudia M M Ferreira Augusto César Janaina Casella Sérgio L Mendes Juliana Zina Deivson F O Bastos Ricardo A T Souza Paulo A Hartmann Angela C G Deffaci Jéssica Mulinari Siane C Luzzi Tiago Rezzadori Cassiane Kolcenti Tiago Xavier Reis Vanessa S C Fonseca Camilo F Giorgi Raissa P Migliorini Carlos Benhur Kasper Cecília Bueno Marcela Sobanski Ana P F G Pereira Fernanda A G Andrade Marcus E B Fernandes Luiz L C Corrêa Adriana Nepomuceno Aureo Banhos Wellington Hannibal Rogério Fonseca Lizit A Costa Emilia P Medici Aline Croce Karin Werther Juliana P Oliveira Julia M Ribeiro Mariele de Santi Aline E Kawanami Livia Perles Caroline do Couto Daniela S Figueiró Eduardo Eizirik Antonio A Correia Fabio M Corrêa Diego Queirolo André L Quagliatto Bruno H Saranholi Pedro M Galetti Karen G Rodriguez-Castro Vivian S Braz Frederico G R França Gerson Buss Josias A Rezini Marília B Lion Carolina C Cheida Ana C R Lacerda Carlos Henrique Freitas Fernando Venâncio Cristina H Adania Augusto F Batisteli Carla G Z Hegel José A Mantovani Flávio H G Rodrigues Tathiana Bagatini Nelson H A Curi Luciano Emmert Renato H Erdmann Raoni R G F Costa Agustín Martinelli Clarice V F Santos Andreas Kindel

Ecology 2018 Nov 19;99(11):2625. Epub 2018 Sep 19.

NERF-UFRGS, Núcleo de Ecologia de Rodovias e Ferrovias, Departamento de Biologia, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS, 96203-900, Brazil.

Mortality from collision with vehicles is the most visible impact of road traffic on wildlife. Mortality due to roads (hereafter road-kill) can affect the dynamic of populations of many species and can, therefore, increase the risk of local decline or extinction. This is especially true in Brazil, where plans for road network upgrading and expansion overlaps biodiversity hotspot areas, which are of high importance for global conservation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ecy.2464DOI Listing
November 2018
27 Reads
4.660 Impact Factor

The importance of accounting for imperfect detection when estimating functional and phylogenetic community structure.

Ecology 2018 09 25;99(9):2103-2112. Epub 2018 Jul 25.

Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut, 06269, USA.

Incorporating imperfect detection when estimating species richness has become commonplace in the past decade. However, the question of how imperfect detection of species affects estimates of functional and phylogenetic community structure remains untested. We used long-term counts of breeding bird species that were detected at least once on islands in a land-bridge island system, and employed multi-species occupancy models to assess the effects of imperfect detection of species on estimates of bird diversity and community structure by incorporating species traits and phylogenies. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ecy.2438DOI Listing
September 2018
33 Reads

Habitat specialist birds disperse farther and are more migratory than habitat generalist birds.

Ecology 2018 09 27;99(9):2058-2066. Epub 2018 Jul 27.

Geomatics and Landscape Ecology Laboratory (GLEL), Carleton University, 1125 Colonel By Drive, Ottawa, Ontario, K1S 5B6, Canada.

Some theories predict habitat specialists should be less dispersive and migratory than generalists, while other theories predict the opposite. We evaluated the cross-species relationship between the degree of habitat specialization and dispersal and migration status in 101 bird species breeding in North America and the United Kingdom, using empirical estimates of the degree of habitat specialization from breeding bird surveys and mean dispersal distance estimates from large-scale mark-recapture studies. We found that habitat specialists dispersed farther than habitat generalists, and full migrants had more specialized habitat than partial migrants or resident species. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ecy.2428DOI Listing
September 2018
2 Reads

Black swans in space: modeling spatiotemporal processes with extremes.

Ecology 2019 01 28;100(1):e02403. Epub 2018 Nov 28.

Conservation Biology Division, Northwest Fisheries Science Center, National Marine Fisheries Service, National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration, 2725 Montlake Blvd E, Seattle, Washington, 98112, USA.

In ecological systems, extremes can happen in time, such as population crashes, or in space, such as rapid range contractions. However, current methods for joint inference about temporal and spatial dynamics (e.g. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ecy.2403DOI Listing
January 2019
61 Reads

Interactions among predators and plant specificity protect herbivores from top predators.

Ecology 2018 07 11;99(7):1602-1609. Epub 2018 Jun 11.

Department of Botany and Zoology, Stellenbosch University, Matieland, 7602, South Africa.

The worldwide loss of top predators from natural and agricultural systems has heightened the need to understand how important they are in controlling herbivore abundance. The effect of top predators on herbivore species is likely to depend on (1) the importance of the consumption of intermediate predators by top predators (intra-guild predation; IGP), but also on (2) plant specificity by herbivores, because specialists may defend themselves better (enemy-free space; EFS). Insectivorous birds, as top predators, are generally known to effectively control herbivorous insects, despite also consuming intermediate predators such as spiders, but how this effect varies among herbivore species in relation to the cascading effects of IGP and EFS is not known. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ecy.2377DOI Listing
July 2018
2 Reads

A morphological database for 606 Colombian bird species.

Ecology 2018 07 28;99(7):1693. Epub 2018 Jun 28.

Instituto de Investigación de Recursos Biológicos Alexander von Humboldt, Avenida Paseo Bolívar 16-20, Bogotá, Colombia.

Colombia is the country with the highest bird diversity in the world. Despite active research in ornithology, compelling morphological information of most bird species is still sparse. However, morphological information is the baseline to understand how species respond to environmental variation and how ecosystems respond to species loss. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ecy.2368DOI Listing
July 2018
1 Read

Dispersal: a matter of scale.

Ecology 2018 04 6;99(4):938-946. Epub 2018 Mar 6.

Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation, School of Natural Resources and Environment, University of Florida, 110 Newins-Ziegler Hall, Gainesville, Florida, 32611, USA.

Population density around the natal site is often invoked as an explanation for variation in dispersal distance, with the expectation that competition for limiting resources, coupled with increased intra-specific aggression at high densities, should drive changes in dispersal distances. However, tests of the density-dependent dispersal hypothesis in long-lived vertebrates have yielded mixed results. Furthermore, conclusions from dispersal studies may depend on the spatial and temporal scales at which density and dispersal patterns are examined, yet multi-scale studies of dispersal are rare. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ecy.2172DOI Listing
April 2018
5 Reads

Threatened species richness along a Himalayan elevational gradient: quantifying the influences of human population density, range size, and geometric constraints.

BMC Ecol 2018 02 7;18(1). Epub 2018 Feb 7.

Division of Biological Sciences and Wildlife Biology Program, University of Montana, Missoula, MT, USA.

Background: A crucial step in conserving biodiversity is to identify the distributions of threatened species and the factors associated with species threat status. In the biodiversity hotspot of the Himalaya, very little is known about which locations harbour the highest diversity of threatened species and whether diversity of such species is related to area, mid-domain effects (MDE), range size, or human density. In this study, we assessed the drivers of variation in richness of threatened birds, mammals, reptiles, actinopterygii, and amphibians along an elevational gradient in Nepal Himalaya. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-018-0162-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5803900PMC
February 2018
13 Reads

MADA: Malagasy Animal trait Data Archive.

Ecology 2018 04;99(4):990

Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology, Harvard University, 22 Divinity Avenue, Cambridge, MA, 02138, USA.

Species are characterized by their behavioral, physiological, and ecological attributes, which determine their role in ecosystems. In turn, ecosystems and their functions are defined by the species that inhabit them. Thus, evaluating the functional diversity and distributions of species is of utmost importance to studies of biogeography, community ecology, macroevolution, and conservation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ecy.2167DOI Listing
April 2018
5 Reads

ATLANTIC BIRDS: a data set of bird species from the Brazilian Atlantic Forest.

Ecology 2018 02 22;99(2):497. Epub 2018 Jan 22.

Departamento de Ecologia, Instituto de Biociências, Universidade Estadual Paulista (UNESP), CP. 199, Rio Claro, São Paulo, 13506, Brazil.

South America holds 30% of the world's avifauna, with the Atlantic Forest representing one of the richest regions of the Neotropics. Here we have compiled a data set on Brazilian Atlantic Forest bird occurrence (150,423) and abundance samples (N = 832 bird species; 33,119 bird individuals) using multiple methods, including qualitative surveys, mist nets, point counts, and line transects). We used four main sources of data: museum collections, on-line databases, literature sources, and unpublished reports. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ecy.2119DOI Listing
February 2018
89 Reads

Identifiability in N-mixture models: a large-scale screening test with bird data.

Authors:
Marc Kéry

Ecology 2018 02 18;99(2):281-288. Epub 2018 Jan 18.

Swiss Ornithological Institute, 6204, Sempach, Switzerland.

Binomial N-mixture models have proven very useful in ecology, conservation, and monitoring: they allow estimation and modeling of abundance separately from detection probability using simple counts. Recently, doubts about parameter identifiability have been voiced. I conducted a large-scale screening test with 137 bird data sets from 2,037 sites. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/ecy.2093
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ecy.2093DOI Listing
February 2018
14 Reads

Wind conditions on migration influence the annual survival of a neotropical migrant, the western yellow-breasted chat (Icteria virens auricollis).

BMC Ecol 2017 08 10;17(1):29. Epub 2017 Aug 10.

Department of Biological Sciences, Center for Wildlife Ecology, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC, Canada.

Background: Long-distance migratory birds in North America have undergone precipitous declines over the past half-century. Although the trend is clear, for many migrating species underpinning the exact causes poses a challenge to conservation due to the numerous stressors that they encounter. Climate conditions during all phases of their annual cycle can have important consequences for their survival. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-017-0139-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5553749PMC
August 2017
21 Reads

Spatial and temporal drivers of avian population dynamics across the annual cycle.

Ecology 2017 Nov 7;98(11):2837-2850. Epub 2017 Sep 7.

Migratory Bird Center, Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute, National Zoological Park, Washington, District of Columbia, 20013, USA.

Untangling the spatial and temporal processes that influence population dynamics of migratory species is challenging, because changes in abundance are shaped by variation in vital rates across heterogeneous habitats and throughout the annual cycle. We developed a full-annual-cycle, integrated, population model and used demographic data collected between 2011 and 2014 in southern Indiana and Belize to estimate stage-specific vital rates of a declining migratory songbird, the Wood Thrush (Hylocichla mustelina). Our primary objective was to understand how spatial and temporal variation in demography contributes to local and regional population growth. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ecy.1967DOI Listing
November 2017
3 Reads

Cosmetic coloration in Egyptian vultures: Mud bathing as a tool for social communication?

Ecology 2017 Aug 8;98(8):2216-2218. Epub 2017 May 8.

Department of Conservation Biology, Estación Biológica de Doñana (CSIC), Américo Vespucio s/n, E-41092, Sevilla, Spain.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ecy.1840DOI Listing
August 2017
3 Reads

Age and years to death disparately influence reproductive allocation in a short-lived bird.

Ecology 2017 Sep 22;98(9):2248-2254. Epub 2017 Aug 22.

Department of Forest and Conservation Sciences, University of British Columbia Vancouver, 2424 Main Mall, Vancouver, British Columbia, V6T 1Z4, Canada.

Theory predicts that reproduction will change as individuals near the end of their lives by either increasing reproductive allocation (terminal allocation hypothesis) or decreasing allocation (senescence hypothesis) toward the end of life. Although senescence has received more support, few studies examine how both age and years to death influence late-life reproduction. We used a 37-yr study of Song Sparrows (Melospiza melodia) to ask how age and years to death influenced reproductive allocation late in life. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ecy.1851DOI Listing
September 2017
2 Reads

Circumpolar analysis of the Adélie Penguin reveals the importance of environmental variability in phenological mismatch.

Ecology 2017 Apr 20;98(4):940-951. Epub 2017 Mar 20.

Department of Ecology and Evolution, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York, 11790, USA.

Evidence of climate-change-driven shifts in plant and animal phenology have raised concerns that certain trophic interactions may be increasingly mismatched in time, resulting in declines in reproductive success. Given the constraints imposed by extreme seasonality at high latitudes and the rapid shifts in phenology seen in the Arctic, we would also expect Antarctic species to be highly vulnerable to climate-change-driven phenological mismatches with their environment. However, few studies have assessed the impacts of phenological change in Antarctica. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ecy.1749DOI Listing
April 2017
35 Reads

Tropical forest loss and its multitrophic effects on insect herbivory.

Ecology 2016 Dec;97(12):3315-3325

Applied Conservation Ecology Lab, Programa de Pós-graduação Ecologia e Conservação da Biodiversidade, Universidade Estadual de Santa Cruz, Rodovia Ilhéus-Itabuna, km 16, Salobrinho, 45662-000, Ilhéus, Bahia, Brazil.

Forest loss threatens biodiversity, but its potential effects on multitrophic ecological interactions are poorly understood. Insect herbivory depends on complex bottom-up (e.g. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ecy.1592DOI Listing
December 2016
26 Reads

A bird pollinator shows positive frequency dependence and constancy of species choice in natural plant communities.

Ecology 2016 11;97(11):3110-3118

Senckenberg Biodiversity and Climate Research Centre (BiK-F), Senckenberganlage 25, Frankfurt am Main, 60325, Germany.

Animal pollinators mediate reproduction of many plant species. Foraging theory suggests that animal pollinators exhibit preferences for common plant species in natural communities (positive frequency-dependent foraging) and temporary single-species specialization (flower constancy) during foraging bouts. Positive frequency dependence may favor common plant species; flower constancy may enhance conspecific pollen transfer particularly in rare plant species. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ecy.1565DOI Listing
November 2016
2 Reads

Global associations between birds and vane-dwelling feather mites.

Ecology 2016 Nov 4;97(11):3242. Epub 2016 Oct 4.

Department of Evolutionary Ecology, Estación Biológica de Doñana (CSIC), Avenida Americo Vespucio, s/n, Isla de la Cartuja, Sevilla, 41092, Spain.

Understanding host-symbiont networks is a major question in evolutionary ecology. Birds host a great diversity of endo- and ectosymbiotic organisms, with feather mites (Arachnida: Acariformes: Analgoidea, Pterolichoidea) being among the most diverse of avian symbionts. A global approach to the ecology and evolution of bird-feather-mite associations has been hampered because of the absence of a centralized data repository. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ecy.1528DOI Listing
November 2016
6 Reads

Forest restoration: a global dataset for biodiversity and vegetation structure.

Ecology 2016 Aug;97(8):2167

Group of Ecological Systems Design, Institute of Environmental Engineering, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zürich, Zürich, 8093, Switzerland.

Restoration initiatives are becoming increasingly applied around the world. Billions of dollars have been spent on ecological restoration research and initiatives, but restoration outcomes differ widely among these initiatives in part due to variable socioeconomic and ecological contexts. Here, we present the most comprehensive dataset gathered to date on forest restoration. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ecy.1474DOI Listing
August 2016
13 Reads

Generalist birds promote tropical forest regeneration and increase plant diversity via rare-biased seed dispersal.

Ecology 2016 Jul;97(7):1819-1831

Laboratorio Ecotono, INIBIOMA-CONICET, Universidad Nacional del Comahue, Quintral 1250, Bariloche, 8400, Argentina.

Regenerated forests now compose over half of the world's tropical forest cover and are increasingly important as providers of ecosystem services, freshwater, and biodiversity conservation. Much of the value and functionality of regenerating forests depends on the plant diversity they contain. Tropical forest diversity is strongly shaped by mutualistic interactions between plants and fruit-eating animals (frugivores) that disperse seeds. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1890/15-2147.1DOI Listing
July 2016
1 Read

An allometric approach to quantify the extinction vulnerability of birds and mammals.

Ecology 2016 Mar;97(3):615-26

Methods to quantify the vulnerability of species to extinction are typically limited by the availability of species-specific input data pertaining to life-history characteristics and population dynamics. This lack of data hampers global biodiversity assessments and conservation planning. Here, we developed a new framework that systematically quantifies extinction risk based on allometric relationships between various wildlife demographic parameters and body size. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1890/14-2019.1DOI Listing
March 2016
4 Reads

Rodent-avoidance, topography and forest structure shape territory selection of a forest bird.

BMC Ecol 2016 May 9;16:24. Epub 2016 May 9.

Division of Conservation Biology, Institute of Ecology and Evolution, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland.

Background: Understanding the factors underlying habitat selection is important in ecological and evolutionary contexts, and crucial for developing targeted conservation action in threatened species. However, the key factors associated to habitat selection often remain poorly known. We evaluated hypotheses related to abiotic and biotic factors thought to affect territory selection of the wood warbler Phylloscopus sibilatrix, a passerine living in an unpredictable environment owing to irregular rodent outbreaks and showing long-term declines particularly in Western Europe. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-016-0078-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4860761PMC
May 2016
8 Reads

Density-dependent productivity in a colonial vulture at two spatial scales.

Ecology 2016 Feb;97(2):406-16

Understanding how density dependence modifies demographic parameters in long-lived vertebrates is a challenge for ecologists. Two alternative hypotheses have been used to explain the mechanisms behind density-dependent effects on breeding output: habitat heterogeneity and individual adjustment (also known as interference competition). A number of studies have highlighted the importance of habitat heterogeneity in density dependence in territorial species, but less information exists on demographic processes in colonial species. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1890/15-0357.1DOI Listing
February 2016
3 Reads

Model averaging and muddled multimodel inferences.

Authors:
Brian S Cade

Ecology 2015 Sep;96(9):2370-82

Three flawed practices associated with model averaging coefficients for predictor variables in regression models commonly occur when making multimodel inferences in analyses of ecological data. Model-averaged regression coefficients based on Akaike information criterion (AIC) weights have been recommended for addressing model uncertainty but they are not valid, interpretable estimates of partial effects for individual predictors when there is multicollinearity among the predictor variables. Multicollinearity implies that the scaling of units in the denominators of the regression coefficients may change across models such that neither the parameters nor their estimates have common scales, therefore averaging them makes no sense. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1890/14-1639.1DOI Listing
September 2015
19 Reads

Over-invasion by functionally equivalent invasive species.

Ecology 2014 Aug;95(8):2268-76

Multiple invasive species have now established at most locations around the world, and the rate of new species invasions and records of new invasive species continue to grow. Multiple invasive species interact in complex and unpredictable ways, altering their invasion success and impacts on biodiversity. Incumbent invasive species can be replaced by functionally similar invading species through competitive processes; however the generalized circumstances leading to such competitive displacement have not been well investigated. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1890/13-1672.1DOI Listing
August 2014
20 Reads

Tropical forest fragmentation limits pollination of a keystone understory herb.

Ecology 2014 Aug;95(8):2202-12

Loss of native vegetation cover is thought to be a major driver of declines in pollination success worldwide. However, it is not well known whether reducing the fragmentation of remaining vegetation can ameliorate these negative effects. We tested the independent effects of composition vs. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1890/13-0929.1DOI Listing
August 2014
4 Reads

The roles of competition and habitat in the dynamics of populations and species distributions.

Ecology 2014 Feb;95(2):265-79

The role of competition in structuring biotic communities at fine spatial scales is well known from detailed process-based studies. Our understanding of competition's importance at broader scales is less resolved and mainly based on static species distribution maps. Here, we bridge this gap by examining the joint occupancy dynamics of an invading species (Barred Owl, Strix varia) and a resident species (Northern Spotted Owl, Strix occidentalis caurina) in a 1000-km study area over a 22-year period. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1890/13-0012.1DOI Listing
February 2014
20 Reads

Experimental support for food limitation of a short-distance migratory bird wintering in the temperate zone.

Ecology 2013 Dec;94(12):2803-16

Department of Biological Sciences, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061, USA.

The Winter Food Limitation Hypothesis (WFLH) states that winter food abundance is a dominant source of population limitation of migratory birds. Evidence is accumulating that long-distance migratory birds wintering in tropical climates have high overwinter survival probabilities and that winter food limitation mainly affects their fitness nonlethally by limiting energetic reserves necessary for successful reproduction. In contrast, the relative roles of direct mortality vs. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1890/13-0337.1DOI Listing
December 2013
3 Reads

Seasonal variation in density dependence in age-specific survival of a long-distance migrant.

Ecology 2013 Oct;94(10):2358-69

Animal Ecology Group, Centre for Ecological and Evolutionary Studies (CEES), University of Groningen, P.O. Box 11103, 9700 CC Groningen, The Netherlands.

Density dependence in vital rates is key to population regulation. Rather than being constant, the strength of density dependence may vary throughout the year, but empirical evidence is limited. Based on 22 years of data of color-banded birds from a recovering population of Eurasian Spoonbills Platalea leucorodia leucorodia, we show, for the first time, seasonal variation in density dependence in survival of a long-distance migrating bird. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1890/12-1914.1DOI Listing
October 2013
4 Reads

Dependent vs. independent juvenile survival: contrasting drivers of variation and the buffering effect of parental care.

Ecology 2013 Jul;94(7):1584-93

Department of Wildlife, Fish and Conservation Biology, University of California, One Shields Avenue, Davis, California 95616, USA.

Juvenile survival is often found to be more sensitive than adult survival to variation in environmental conditions, and variation in juvenile survival can have significant impacts on population growth rates and viability. Therefore, understanding the population-level effects of environmental changes requires understanding the effects on juvenile survival. We hypothesized that parental care will buffer the survival of dependent juveniles from variation in environmental conditions, while the survival of independent juveniles will respond more strongly to environmental variation and, in turn, drive the overall variation in annual juvenile survival. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1890/12-1443.1DOI Listing
July 2013
6 Reads

Extreme weather and experience influence reproduction in an endangered bird.

Ecology 2012 Dec;93(12):2580-9

University of Florida, Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation, Gainesville, FL 32611-0485, USA.

Extreme weather events, such as droughts and heat waves, are expected to become more severe and more frequent in the coming years, and understanding their impacts on demographic rates is of increasing interest to both evolutionary ecologists and conservation practitioners. An individual's breeding probability can be a sensitive indicator of the decision to initiate reproductive behavior under varying environmental conditions, has strong fitness consequences, and can be considered the first step in a life history trade-off between allocating resources for breeding activities or self-survival. Using a 14-year time series spanning large variation in climatic conditions and the entirety of a population's breeding range, we estimated the effects of extreme weather conditions (drought) on the state-specific probabilities of breeding and survival of an endangered bird, the Florida Snail Kite (Rostrhamus sociabilis plumbeus). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1890/12-0233.1DOI Listing
December 2012
3 Reads

Resource unpredictability promotes species diversity and coexistence in an avian scavenger guild: a field experiment.

Ecology 2012 Dec;93(12):2570-9

Department of Conservation Biology, Estación Biológica de Doñiana, CSIC, America Vespucio s/n, E-41092 Sevilla, Spain.

Chance per se plays a key role in ecology and evolution, e.g., genetic mutation, resource spatiotemporal unpredictability. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1890/12-0221.1DOI Listing
December 2012
4 Reads

Ecosystem assembly rules: the interplay of green and brown webs during salt marsh succession.

Ecology 2012 Nov;93(11):2353-64

Community and Conservation Ecology Group, Centre for Ecological and Evolutionary Studies (CEES), University of Groningen, P.O. Box 11103, 9700CC, Groningen, The Netherlands.

Current theories about vegetation succession and food web assembly are poorly compatible, as food webs are generally viewed to be static, and succession is usually analyzed without the inclusion of higher trophic levels. In this study we present results from a detailed analysis of ecosystem assembly rules over a chronosequence of 100 years of salt marsh succession. First, using 13 yearlong observations on vegetation and soil parameters in different successional stages, we show that the space-for-time substitution is valid for this chronosequence. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1890/11-1102.1DOI Listing
November 2012
5 Reads