8,776 results match your criteria Australian Veterinary Journal [Journal]


Complications following removal of oesophageal foreign bodies: a retrospective review of 349 cases.

Aust Vet J 2019 Apr;97(4):116-121

Veterinary Specialist Services, Underwood, Queensland, Australia.

Aim: To determine the incidence and types of complications associated with oesophageal foreign body (FB) removal in dogs, as well as to evaluate potential risk factors for the development of complications.

Methods: Clinical records were searched within Animal Emergency Service and Veterinary Specialist Services databases between July 2001 and March 2017. Data were collected regarding signalment, FB type, method of removal, medical management and complications. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/avj.12796DOI Listing
April 2019
1 Read

Reptarenaviruses in apparently healthy snakes in an Australian zoological collection.

Aust Vet J 2019 Apr;97(4):93-102

Perth Zoo, Department of Biodiversity, Conservation and Attractions, South Perth, WA, Australia.

Background: Inclusion body disease (IBD) is a disease of snakes with a global distribution and has recently been shown to be caused by reptarenaviruses. Testing for this group of viruses in asymptomatic snakes allows the association between infection and disease to be further elucidated.

Methods: A reptarenavirus was detected by RT-PCR in a reticulated python (Malayopython reticulatus) from an Australian zoological collection that was open-mouth breathing and had erythematous oral mucosa. Read More

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https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/avj.12792
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/avj.12792DOI Listing
April 2019
5 Reads

Causes of mortality and severe morbidity requiring euthanasia in captive Tasmanian devils (Sarcophilus harrisii) in Tasmania.

Aust Vet J 2019 Apr;97(4):89-92

Save the Tasmanian Devil Program, Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment, 200 Collins Street, Hobart, Tasmania, 7000, Australia.

Background: Devil facial tumour disease (DFTD) is a contagious cancer causing marked population declines in wild Tasmanian devils. In response to this threat, a captive insurance population has been established. This study investigated causes of death in captive Tasmanian devils. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/avj.12797DOI Listing
April 2019
1 Read

Prevalence, radiographic resolution and outcomes of slab fractures of the third and central tarsal bones in juvenile Thoroughbred horses.

Aust Vet J 2019 Apr;97(4):108-115

Equine Centre, Faculty of Veterinary and Agricultural Sciences, University of Melbourne, 250 Princes Hwy, Werribee, Victoria, 3030, Australia.

Background: Veterinarians are required to interpret the significance of radiographic findings for sale, soundness and future racing performance of weanling and yearling Thoroughbreds. We investigated the prevalence and radiographic appearance of slab fractures of the third (T3) and central tarsal (Tc) bones.

Methods: Weanling and yearling horses with complete or incomplete T3 or Tc fracture were identified by searching a database of radiographs. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/avj.12790DOI Listing
April 2019
1 Read

Antebrachiometacarpal arthrodesis in five dogs.

Aust Vet J 2019 Apr;97(4):122-127

BluePearl Veterinary Partners, Midvale, UT, USA.

Case Reports: Five dogs (4 with severe carpal contracture, 1 with a chronically infected carpal joint) underwent antebrachiometacarpal arthrodesis. Excision of all carpal bones, except the accessory carpal bone, was done, either because of persistent infection or to allow the manus to be arthrodesed in a functional position. All five dogs developed varying degrees of soft tissue swelling of the surgical site following surgery. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/avj.12795DOI Listing
April 2019
1 Read

Antimicrobial dosing for common equine drugs: a content review and practical advice for veterinarians in Australia.

Aust Vet J 2019 Apr;97(4):103-107

Asia-Pacific Centre for Animal Health, Faculty of Veterinary and Agricultural Science, University of Melbourne & National Centre for Antimicrobial Stewardship, Carlton, Victoria, Australia.

Background: Appropriate dosing with antimicrobial agents is critical for effective treatment and to prevent the development of antimicrobial resistance.

Methods: A review was undertaken of equine journal articles (Equine Veterinary Journal, Equine Veterinary Education, Australian Veterinary Journal, Australian Equine Veterinarian, Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine and Journal of Equine Veterinary Science) between January 2015 and August 2018. Those with dosing regimens for procaine penicillin G, gentamicin or trimethoprim-sulfonamide in adult horses were examined and evaluated. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/avj.12791DOI Listing
April 2019
1 Read

In vitro binding of cefovecin to plasma proteins in Australian marsupials and plasma concentrations of cefovecin following single subcutaneous administration to koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus).

Aust Vet J 2019 Mar;97(3):75-80

Sydney School of Veterinary Science, The University of Sydney, NSW, Australia.

Background: Cefovecin has a long duration of antibiotic activity in cats and dogs, somewhat attributable to its high plasma protein binding.

Aims: To determine the cefovecin binding to plasma proteins in vitro in selected Australian marsupials and to quantify the change in cetovecin concentration over time following subcutaneous injection in koalas.

Methods And Results: Various cefovecin concentrations were incubated with plasma and quantified using HPLC. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/avj.12785DOI Listing

Diagnosing feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) and feline leukaemia virus (FeLV) infection: an update for clinicians.

Aust Vet J 2019 Mar;97(3):47-55

Sydney School of Veterinary Science, The University of Sydney, NSW, Australia.

With the commercial release in Australia in 2004 of a vaccine against feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV; Fel-O-Vax FIV®), the landscape for FIV diagnostics shifted substantially. Point-of-care (PoC) antibody detection kits, which had been the mainstay for diagnosing FIV infection since the early 1990s, were no longer considered accurate to use in FIV-vaccinated cats, because of the production of vaccine-induced antibodies that were considered indistinguishable from those produced in natural FIV infections. Consequently, attention shifted to alternative diagnostic methods such as nucleic acid detection. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/avj.12781DOI Listing

Survey of trainers on the use of swimming exercise for Standardbred racehorses in Australia.

Aust Vet J 2019 Mar;97(3):61-67

Equine Centre, Faculty of Veterinary and Agricultural Sciences, University of Melbourne, 250 Princes Hwy, Werribee, Victoria 3030, Australia.

Objectives: To determine swimming training practices in Australian harness racing horses and potential targets for future research.

Methods: An online survey of Australian Standardbred trainers and telephone interviews with 20 leading trainers were conducted. Questions relating to swimming facility and protocol, perceived benefits and contraindications were included. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/avj.12786DOI Listing

Avian mycobacteriosis in captive brolgas (Antigone rubicunda).

Aust Vet J 2019 Mar 17;97(3):81-86. Epub 2019 Feb 17.

Faculty of Veterinary and Agricultural Sciences, The University of Melbourne, 250 Princes Highway, Werribee, Victoria 3030, Australia.

Case Series: Avian mycobacteriosis is a significant disease of a wide range of bird species worldwide. The most common causative agent, Mycobacterium avium, is reported to also infect a range of mammals, including humans. Of 11 brolgas (Antigone rubicunda) submitted to the University of Melbourne for postmortem examination over a 10-year period, 7 were diagnosed with mycobacteriosis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/avj.12784DOI Listing
March 2019
1 Read

Fragmentation of the dorsal distal aspect of the talus on weanling survey and pre-sale radiographs of juvenile Thoroughbreds: prevalence and 2- and 3-year-olds racing performance.

Aust Vet J 2019 Mar 17;97(3):68-74. Epub 2019 Feb 17.

Faculty of Veterinary and Agricultural Sciences, The University of Melbourne, 250 Princes Hwy, Werribee, Victoria 3030, Australia.

Background: Fragmentation of the dorsal aspect of the distal talus (FDDT), at the dorsolateral articular margin of the proximal intertarsal joint (PITJ) on pre-sale radiographs of yearling Thoroughbreds has not been previously described and data to support decisions made by veterinarians to predict future racing potential of horses with these lesions are lacking.

Methods: In this retrospective case-control study we aimed to determine the prevalence of FDDT in juvenile Thoroughbreds and to report their race records. From a database of survey and repository radiographic examinations of 5709 horses, 36 with FDDT were identified. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/avj.12787DOI Listing

Reactions to Gudair® vaccination identified in sheep used for biomedical research.

Aust Vet J 2019 Mar 13;97(3):56-60. Epub 2019 Feb 13.

Ear Sciences Centre, School of Medicine, the University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA, Australia.

Case Report: We report Gudair® vaccination (against ovine Johne's disease, Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis) site reactions in sheep used as a surgical model in biomedical research and discuss the actual and potential impact these lesions may have on surgical procedures, particularly in otology. Nine female Merino-cross sheep (Ovis aries) were enrolled in a project designed to investigate the healing capabilities of the malleus bone in the middle ear. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/avj.12788DOI Listing
March 2019
1 Read

Ultrasound evaluation of small intestinal thickness and a comparison to body weight in normal chickens (Gallus gallus domesticus).

Aust Vet J 2019 Jan;97(1-2):39-42

UQ Veterinary Medical Centre, School of Veterinary Science, University of Queensland, Gatton, Queensland, Australia.

Background: Ultrasound in avian patients is useful for identifying abnormalities within the coelomic cavity. A correlation between sonographic evaluation of jejunal thickness and body weight has been reported in mammals, but not the chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus). The purpose of this study was to prospectively assess the normal values of jejunal thickness in the chicken and compare this to body weight. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/avj.12777DOI Listing
January 2019

Lymphoma in Australian Border Collies: survey results and pedigree analyses.

Aust Vet J 2019 Jan;97(1-2):14-22

Sydney School of Veterinary Science and School of Life and Environmental Sciences, Faculty of Science, Evelyn Williams Building B10, The University of Sydney, New South Wales 2006, Australia.

Objectives: The aims of this study were to (1) describe the results of a survey on the clinical features of lymphoma in Australian Border Collies and (2) investigate familial clustering of lymphoma-affected dogs by means of pedigree analyses.

Methods: Clinical and pedigree information was collected from surveys completed by owners or breeders of Australian Border Collies. Relationships between dogs were derived from pedigree data and kinship was analysed by network and cluster-based algorithms. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/avj.12780DOI Listing
January 2019

Pilot study of Australian veterinarians and their perceptions and experiences related to online pet health information.

Aust Vet J 2019 Jan;97(1-2):10-13

School of Animal and Veterinary Science, University of Adelaide, South Australia, Australia.

Objective: Investigate Australian veterinarians' perceptions of clients' use of the internet to find pet health information.

Methods: An anonymous online survey was distributed using social media, e-newsletters and veterinary magazines.

Results: A total of 85 complete responses were obtained from Australian veterinarians. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/avj.12778DOI Listing
January 2019

Efficacy of meloxicam in a pain model in sheep.

Aust Vet J 2019 Jan;97(1-2):23-32

CSIRO FD McMaster Laboratory, Locked Bag 1, Delivery Centre, Armidale, New South Wales 2350, Australia.

Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, meloxicam, in alleviating pain and inflammation and on production-related variables in a model of sterile acute inflammation in sheep.

Methods: Groups of 12 mature Merino ewes received 0, 0.5, 1. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/avj.12779DOI Listing
January 2019

Chemical capture of wild swamp buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) in tropical northern Australia using thiafentanil, etorphine and azaperone combinations.

Aust Vet J 2019 Jan;97(1-2):33-38

Sydney Institute of Marine Science, Mosman, New South Wales, Australia.

Background: Studying wild animals in situ is fundamental to collecting baseline information, but generally they need to be immobilised for examination, sampling, marking and/or equipping with tracking apparatus. Capturing wild animals is inherently risky and there is a need for immobilisation methods that are safe for both the animals and researchers.

Methods: A total of 16 free-ranging swamp buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) were chemically captured by dart for the application of satellite tracking collars in tropical northern Australia; 7 animals were anesthetised with a thiafentanil-etorphine-azaperone (TEA) combination and 9 animals with a thiafentanil-azaperone (TA) combination. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/avj.12782DOI Listing
January 2019
2 Reads

Review of principles governing dog health education in remote Aboriginal communities.

Authors:
E M Willis K E Ross

Aust Vet J 2019 Jan;97(1-2):4-9

Flinders University - College of Science and Engineering, Adelaide, SA, Australia.

Background: Conducting effective and culturally sensitive dog health education programs in Aboriginal communities requires an understanding of appropriate adult education and community development principles. Finding relevant material can be difficult, given that many of the available resources are in the 'grey literature'.

Aims And Objectives: To critically review publications addressing the principles governing dog health education in remote Aboriginal communities. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/avj.12776DOI Listing
January 2019

Compensatory gastric stretching following subtotal gastric resection due to gastric adenocarcinoma in a diamond python (Morelia spilota spilota).

Aust Vet J 2018 Dec;96(12):481-486

Avian Reptile and Exotic Pet Hospital, School of Veterinary Science, University of Sydney, Camden, 2570, New South Wales, Australia.

Case Report: A 7-year-old male diamond python (Morelia spilota spilota) presented with a 2-month history of anorexia and a discrete intracoelomic mass, approximately 15 cm in length, located 90 cm from the head and approximately two-thirds of the snout to vent length. Physical examination determined the mass was likely to be stomach, testes or the right kidney. Radiographs showed a soft tissue opacity mass in the region of the stomach; fine needle aspirate demonstrated cellular debris admixed with bacteria and degenerate heterophils. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/avj.12764
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/avj.12764DOI Listing
December 2018
2 Reads

Postoperative healing and behaviour when surgical swabs are applied to calf dehorning wounds.

Aust Vet J 2018 Dec;96(12):508-515

School of Veterinary Science, University of Queensland, Gatton, QLD, Australia.

Objective: To assess the effect on healing and pain-associated behaviours of covering exposed sinuses after horn amputation under extensive production conditions in northern Australia.

Methods: Horned, weaned Brahman-cross heifers (n = 50) aged approximately 6 months were alternately allocated to have their dehorning wounds either patched with a dry, non-sterile gauze swab or left untreated. Adherence of swabs and growth rates, healing and pain-associated behaviour were monitored for 88 days post-surgery. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/avj.12771
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/avj.12771DOI Listing
December 2018
13 Reads

Animal welfare implications of treating wildlife in Australian veterinary practices.

Authors:
B Orr A Tribe

Aust Vet J 2018 Dec;96(12):475-480

Hidden Vale Wildlife Centre, The Gainsdale Group, Grandchester, QLD, Australia.

Objective: To evaluate the extent, costs, demands and expectations of Australian veterinary practices in the treatment of wildlife, to identify potential risks to animal welfare based on the current situation and to propose recommendations for improvements.

Methods: A survey was sent to all veterinary practices across Australia identified through the website Yellow Pages®. The survey was designed as a cross-sectional study. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/avj.12765DOI Listing
December 2018
1 Read

Metronidazole-induced neurotoxicity in 26 dogs.

Aust Vet J 2018 Dec;96(12):495-501

Fitzpatrick Referrals Godalming, Halfway Lane, Eashing, Godalming, Surrey, GU7 2QQ, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland.

Background: Metronidazole is an antibacterial, antiprotozoal and anthelmintic medication commonly used in veterinary medicine. We describe cases of neurotoxicity associated with the drug's administration.

Methods: Medical records between 2004 and 2017 from four veterinary referral hospitals were reviewed. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/avj.12772DOI Listing
December 2018
2 Reads

Demographic studies of owned dogs in the Northern Peninsula Area, Australia, to inform population and disease management strategies.

Aust Vet J 2018 Dec;96(12):487-494

Sydney School of Veterinary Science, The University of Sydney, 425 Werombi Road, Camden, NSW, 2570, Australia.

Objective: To generate domestic dog demographic information to aid population and disease management in the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities of the Northern Peninsula Area, Queensland, Australia.

Methods: Sight-resight surveys using standard and modified methods were conducted to estimate the free-roaming dog population size. A cross-sectional questionnaire of dog owners was used to gather dog demographic information and investigate owners' dog management behaviours. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/avj.12766DOI Listing
December 2018
1 Read

Lomustine chemotherapy for the treatment of presumptive haemophagocytic histiocytic sarcoma in Flat-coated Retrievers.

Authors:
J Elliott

Aust Vet J 2018 Dec;96(12):502-507

Willows Veterinary Centre and Referral Service, Solihull, UK.

Background: The Flat-coated Retriever (FCR) is a breed at-risk for histiocytic sarcoma (HS). A haemophagocytic form of HS (HPHS) occurs in the spleen ± other sites such as bone marrow, and is a CD11d+ disease of macrophage origin. Patients with HPHS typically present with regenerative anaemia. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/avj.12767DOI Listing
December 2018
4 Reads

High blood lead concentrations in captive Tasmanian devils (Sarcophilus harrisii): a threat to the conservation of the species?

Aust Vet J 2018 Nov;96(11):442-449

School of Life and Environmental Sciences, Faculty of Science, The University of Sydney, New South Wales, 2006, Australia.

Background: The Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii) is the world's largest extant marsupial carnivore. Since the emergence of devil facial tumour disease in 1996, the species has undergone a severe population decline. The insurance population (IP) was established in 2006 to build a disease-free captive population to maintain 95% of the wild Tasmanian devil genetic diversity for 50 years. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/avj.12753DOI Listing
November 2018
2 Reads

Magnetic resonance and radiographic imaging of a case of bilateral bipartite navicular bones in a horse.

Aust Vet J 2018 Nov;96(11):464-469

School of Veterinary Science, University of Queensland, Gatton, Queensland, Australia.

Case Report: We describe the radiographic and magnetic resonance imaging findings associated with a case of bilateral forelimb bipartite navicular disease in a 7-year-old Warmblood gelding used for eventing. In addition to the radiographically evident partitioned navicular bones, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) also detected other concurrent abnormalities occurring within the foot that have not been described before in other cases of navicular bone partition. MRI not only revealed soft tissue lesions of the podotrochlear apparatus, but also allowed for more detailed characterisation of the recently diagnosed osseous navicular bone pathology. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/avj.12760DOI Listing
November 2018
2 Reads

Combined transverse femoral ostectomy and tibial tuberosity distalisation for correction of medial patella luxation and patella alta in dogs.

Aust Vet J 2018 Nov;96(11):428-432

Small Animal Surgery, Murdoch, WA, Australia.

Background: Patella alta is the proximal displacement of the patella within the femoral trochlea. Previous studies have identified an association between patella alta and patella luxation. Distalisation of the tibial tuberosity has been recommended to establish proximodistal alignment of the stifle extensor mechanism with the underlying femur in dogs affected by patella alta. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/avj.12761DOI Listing
November 2018
3 Reads

Baseline morphometric, haematological and plasma biochemical parameters in free-ranging eastern water dragons (Intellagama lesueurii lesueurii).

Aust Vet J 2018 Nov;96(11):450-457

The University of Sydney, Camden, NSW, Australia.

Objective: The aim of this study was to determine baseline reference data for morphometric measurements and haematological and plasma biochemical parameters in clinically healthy eastern water dragons (Intellagama lesueurii lesueurii), accounting for the variables of season and sex. The clinical objective was to provide clinicians and researchers with baseline reference intervals (RIs) in order to assess accurately the health of a population or individual animals.

Methods: The study group comprised 39 free-ranging eastern water dragons. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/avj.12755
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/avj.12755DOI Listing
November 2018
12 Reads

STANDARDS OF CARE Anaesthesia guidelines for dogs and cats.

Aust Vet J 2018 Nov;96(11):413-427

Medical Affairs Veterinarian and Internal Medicine Consultant Australia and New Zealand, IDEXX Laboratories Pty Ltd, Rydalmere, New South Wales, Australia.

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/avj.12762
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/avj.12762DOI Listing
November 2018
6 Reads

Implications of shunt morphology for the surgical management of extrahepatic portosystemic shunts.

Aust Vet J 2018 Nov;96(11):433-441

Willows Referral Service, Solihull, West Midlands, UK.

Objective: To describe the implications of extrahepatic portosystemic shunt morphology for the chosen site of shunt closure in dogs and cats.

Methods: A retrospective review of a consecutive series of dogs and cats managed for congenital extrahepatic portosystemic shunts.

Results: In total, 54 dogs and 10 cats met the inclusion criteria, revealing five distinct shunt types: left gastrophrenic, right gastrocaval (types Ai, Aii and Aiii), splenocaval, colocaval and left gastro-azygos. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/avj.12756
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/avj.12756DOI Listing
November 2018
14 Reads

Evaluation of controlled-release devices for providing chromium sesquioxide and zinc in Huacaya alpacas at pasture.

Aust Vet J 2018 Nov 7;96(11):458-463. Epub 2018 Oct 7.

Fibre Quality Department, Victorian Institute of Animal Science, Department of Agriculture, Energy & Minerals, Attwood, VIC, Australia.

Objective: To assess the effectiveness of controlled-release devices (CRDs) for providing zinc and for estimating faecal output in alpacas and sheep at pasture.

Methods: The study groups of 10 alpacas and 10 sheep at pasture were paired within species and allocated at random to receive by mouth either one CRD containing chromium sesquioxide designed to function for at least 21 days or two CRDs, one containing chromium sesquioxide and the other zinc oxide designed to release over a nominal 60-day period. Faecal concentrations of chromium, zinc and ash, blood and plasma concentrations of zinc and plasma activity of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) were measured over a period of 117 days after treatment. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/avj.12759DOI Listing
November 2018
2 Reads

Hypernatraemia in 39 hospitalised foals: clinical findings, primary diagnosis and outcome.

Aust Vet J 2018 Oct;96(10):385-389

Clovelly Intensive Care Unit, Scone Equine Hospital, 106 Liverpool Street, Scone, New South Wales 2337, Australia.

Objective: To evaluate hypernatraemia in foals presenting as medical emergencies to an intensive care unit (ICU) to determine the prevalence, clinical findings, primary diagnosis and outcome.

Methods: Retrospective case study of records from Thoroughbred foals aged less than 3 months that presented to an ICU as medical emergencies in 2002-12. Data retrieved included signalment, clinical findings, laboratory results, primary diagnosis and outcome. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/avj.12749
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/avj.12749DOI Listing
October 2018
11 Reads

Hepatotoxicosis in cattle associated with consumption of Punica granatum (pomegranate).

Authors:
M H Hawes I J Gill

Aust Vet J 2018 Oct;96(10):408-410

Tatura Vet Clinic, Tatura, Victoria, Australia.

Case Report: Ingestion of pomegranates was associated with the deaths of 9 of 35 young cattle; 8 were found dead without any prior clinical signs being noted and 1 animal was observed to be weak with pale-pink mucous membranes. Gross pathological changes included widespread subcutaneous and serosal haemorrhages and the liver showed an enhanced acinar or 'nutmeg-like' pattern. The significant histopathological lesion was severe, acute periacinar to midzonal hepatocellular necrosis. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/avj.12745
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/avj.12745DOI Listing
October 2018
2 Reads

Re: Antimicrobial labelling.

Authors:
Nick Scott

Aust Vet J 2018 10;96(10):369

Bathurst, NSW.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/avj.12752DOI Listing
October 2018
1 Read

Agreement of point-of-care prothrombin and activated partial thromboplastin time in dogs with a reference laboratory.

Aust Vet J 2018 Oct;96(10):379-384

Anderson Moores Veterinary Specialists Ltd, Winchester, UK.

Objectives: To determine the agreement, sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of prothrombin (PT) and activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) using the point-of-care analyser SCA2000™ with IDEXX Coag Dx™ cartridges against a reference laboratory (STAGO Start 4®) in canine blood.

Methods: Citrated blood samples from 47 dogs were submitted for PT and aPTT measurements. The STAGO was taken as the gold standard and sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were calculated. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/avj.12746
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/avj.12746DOI Listing
October 2018
12 Reads

Tumour angiogenesis, anti-angiogenic therapy and chemotherapeutic resistance.

Aust Vet J 2018 Oct;96(10):371-378

Adelaide Medical School, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia.

In order for a tumour to continue to grow and disseminate, it must acquire a new blood supply. Neovascularisation can be enacted by a number of different mechanisms. This dependence of tumour progression on an augmented vascular supply has been exploited by the development of anti-angiogenic drugs, which are designed to inhibit new blood vessel formation or disrupt existing tumour-associated vasculature, both leading to ischaemic-hypoxic tumour cell death. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/avj.12747DOI Listing
October 2018
2 Reads

Relationship between the likelihood of footrot elimination from a flock and the virulence of the strain of Dichelobacter nodosus present.

Aust Vet J 2018 Oct;96(10):400-407

Fred Morley Centre and Graham Centre, School of Animal and Veterinary Sciences, Charles Sturt University, Wagga Wagga, NSW, Australia.

Objective: To assess ability to eliminate different strains of footrot in sheep using inspection and culling of affected sheep.

Methods: A flock of 1417 Polwarth sheep that had deliberately been infected with seven different strains of Dichelobacter nodosus and undergone different control measures prior to eradication, including zinc sulfate footbathing and vaccination, were subjected to visual foot inspection on a number of occasions. Sheep identified as infected or having any foot abnormalities were removed from the flock at each inspection. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/avj.12750
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/avj.12750DOI Listing
October 2018
3 Reads

Genotypic diversity of Pasteurella multocida isolates from pigs and poultry in Australia.

Aust Vet J 2018 Oct;96(10):390-394

Queensland Alliance for Agriculture and Food Innovation, The University of Queensland, EcoSciences Precinct, Dutton Park, Queensland, Australia.

Objective: To investigate the genotype and diversity of Pasteurella multocida present in pig herds and to determine the extent of overlap with isolates from poultry flocks in Australia.

Methods: A total of 43 isolates from pigs from different farms and regions of Australia were used in this study. A diverse collection of 41 poultry isolates, with 31 being previously characterised, was also used. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/avj.12748DOI Listing
October 2018
20 Reads

Comparison of footbathing and vaccination to control ovine footrot in an experimentally infected flock.

Aust Vet J 2018 Oct;96(10):395-399

Veterinary Clinical Sciences, University of Sydney, Camden, NSW, Australia.

Objective: Compare footbathing and vaccination for control of footrot during a transmission period in a sheep flock deliberately infected with multiple strains of Dichelobacter nodosus.

Methods: The strains included a known virulent strain, a benign strain and several intermediate strains. The resulting footrot was clinically intermediate. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/avj.12715DOI Listing
October 2018
1 Read

Randomised controlled trial of the effect of concentration of progesterone before artificial insemination on fertility in ovulatory and anovulatory Bos indicus cattle.

Aust Vet J 2018 Sep;96(9):346-355

The Statistical Consulting Centre, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia.

Objective: To investigate the effect of concentration of progesterone (P4) before artificial insemination (AI) on fertility in ovulatory or anovulatory Bos indicus cattle.

Design: Randomised control study METHODS: The study included 162 heifers and 96 lactating cows. On days -10 to -12, animals were examined using transrectal ultrasound, administered PG and examined for a corpus luteum (CL). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/avj.12728DOI Listing
September 2018
2 Reads

Low sensitivity of a test for anti-Mullerian hormone to assess presence of ovaries in prepubertal bitches.

Aust Vet J 2018 Sep;96(9):356-359

School of Biomedical Science, University of Queensland, St Lucia, QLD, Australia.

Background: Anti-Mullerian hormone (AMH) is currently used in several species as an indicator of the number of antral and pre-antral follicles within the ovaries. Currently, there is some uncertainty on the precision of a single AMH test for detecting the presence of ovarian tissue in prepubertal, pubertal and spayed bitches. The purpose of this study was to investigate the specificity of AMH levels determined using the Gen II AMH ELISA to detect the presence or absence of ovarian tissue in bitches of varying ages. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/avj.12735DOI Listing
September 2018
3 Reads

Effect of carcase decomposition on the inactivation of foot-and-mouth disease virus under northern Australian conditions.

Aust Vet J 2018 Sep;96(9):332-340

Department of Agriculture and Fisheries, Queensland, Australia.

Objective: The control of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) across northern Australia would likely result in animal carcases that will often be inaccessible for disposal. The aim of this preliminary study was to determine whether the natural pH and/or temperature changes that occur within the skeletal muscle and/or body cavities of a decomposing carcase shot and left in situ in this environment would be sufficient to inactivate FMDV.

Methods: Study pigs (n = 30), cattle (6), sheep (6) and goats (8) were shot in one of four locations in Queensland. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/avj.12731DOI Listing
September 2018
3 Reads