16 results match your criteria Australian Psychologist[Journal]

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Brief Online Training with Standardised Vignettes Reduces Inflated Supervisor Ratings of Trainee Practitioner Competencies.

Aust Psychol 2017 Apr 12;52(2):130-139. Epub 2016 Oct 12.

School of Psychology University of Wollongong.

Objective: Supervisor assessments of trainee competence are integral to ensuring that clinical psychology trainees reach competency benchmarks. The commonly used Clinical Psychology Practicum Competencies Rating Scale (C╬ĘPRS) has been shown to elicit inflated ratings of competency. Hence, the aim of this study is to examine whether brief supervisor training reduces ratings by providing objective criteria with which supervisors can assess trainee competency. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ap.12250DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6084334PMC

The Pursuit of Happiness and Its Relationship to the Meta-experience of Emotions and Culture.

Authors:
Stefan G Hofmann

Aust Psychol 2013 Apr;48(2):94-97

Boston University USA.

In this commentary, I provide a brief background of the meta-experience of emotions, the philosophical and psychological literature on happiness, and further discuss the influence of culture on happiness. The meta-experience of emotions implies that there are primary and secondary emotions (i.e. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ap.12004DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3685423PMC

Breaking the bad news: dilemmas in shared decision-making in medical practice.

Aust Psychol 1999 Mar;34(1):45-8

Department of Clinical Psychology, Austin and Repatriation Medical Centre, 1st floor, South Wing, Banksis Street, Heidelberg West VIC 3081, Autstralia.

In a review of the literature, very little empirically based research was uncovered to guide the practice of health professionals who need to tell their patients bad news and help them to decide on their preferred treatment option. Various practising styles and guidelines are presented, and ethical and crosscultural challenges discussed. An enormous amount of research still needs to be done to discover the least stressful ways of dealing with these issues in health care settings. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00050069908257424DOI Listing
March 1999
2 Reads

Confidentiality issues in psychological research.

Aust Psychol 1995 Nov;30(3):187-90

Department of Psychology, The University of Queensland, QLD 4072, Australia.

There has been increased attention in recent years to the importance of individual privacy and professional confidentiality both in Australia and overseas. At the same time, psychologists' growing research interests in areas such as AIDS, child sexual abuse, and domestic violence have led to new ethical dilemmas over the contract of confidentiality between researchers and their research participants. The present paper discusses a number of issues regarding the ethics of confidentiality in psychological research. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00050069508258931DOI Listing
November 1995
1 Read

Adolescents' attitudes toward confidentiality between the school counsellor and the adolescent client.

Aust Psychol 1995 Nov;30(3):179-82

Swinburn University of Technology, John Street, Hawthorn VIC 3122, Australia.

It is increasingly acknowledged that confidentiality is relative rather than absolute in any counselling relationship. This is particularly the case for minors receiving counselling at school, where third parties such as parents and teachers frequently have access to information about an adolescent client. The Australian Psychological Society's Code of Professional Conduct (1986) states that minors are unable to provide voluntary, informed consent in consulting relationships, although current research does not necessarily support this view. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00050069508258929DOI Listing
November 1995

Expectations and preferences regarding confidentiality in the psychologist-client relationship.

Aust Psychol 1995 Nov;30(3):175-8

Department of Psychology, Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn VIC 3122, Australia.

Two hundred and fifty-six members of the Australian public were surveyed regarding situations in which a psychologist might breach confidentiality and third parties to whom information might be disclosed. There was strong agreement between respondents' expectations about the way in which psychologists would act, and their preferences regarding how psychologists should act. While respondents supported confidentiality within the psychotherapeutic relationship, they clearly distinguished situations in which, and third parties to whom, disclosure could appropriately occur. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00050069508258928DOI Listing
November 1995

An analysis of the law of confidentiality with special reference to the counselling of minors.

Authors:
J Milne

Aust Psychol 1995 Nov;30(3):169-74

16 Yarabah Ave, Gordon NSW 2072, Australia.

Although professional counsellors would be aware of the need to maintain confidentiality in their work with clients, the basis and scope of this obligation is generally less well understood. This article examines the issue of counsellor-client confidentiality from a legal perspective, and considers the potential bases of legal liability which counsellors may have with respect to the maintenance of client confidentiality as well as the circumstances under which disclosure of this information will be required or may be permitted. It is contended that the general issue of counsellor-client confidentiality presently poses particular difficulties for counsellors who work primarily with children and adolescents, especially when clinical services are provided directly to adolescents. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1080/00050069508258927
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00050069508258927DOI Listing
November 1995
1 Read

Confidentiality in psychological practice: a decrepit concept?

Aust Psychol 1995 Nov;30(3):164-8

School of Law and Legal Studies, La Trobe University, Bundoora VIC 3083, Australia.

Although the principle of confidentiality in the relationship between psychologists and client has been vaunted, and is emphasised in the Australian Psychological Society's Code of Professional Conduct (the APS code; 1994), the confidentiality of this relationship is circumscribed by the absence of legal protections, the ethical beliefs of psychologists, institutional practices, and the provisions of the APS code itself. Lack of privilege in judicial proceedings, and statutory obligations to report certain types of behaviour, mandate breaches of confidentiality in some circumstances. Ethical beliefs of psychologists may support disclosure, especially where it is believed that there is danger of serious physical harm to the client or others. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00050069508258926DOI Listing
November 1995

Confidentiality in psychological practice.

Authors:
G P Koocher

Aust Psychol 1995 Nov;30(3):158-63

Department of Psychiatry, Children's Hospital, 300 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115, USA.

Confidentiality has long been a cornerstone of trust in the professional relationship between psychologists and their clients. Developments in computer technology, litigation, insurance reimbursement schemes, and changing lifestyles are forcing psychologists to reconsider and refine their approach to respecting this important ethical principle. This article review basic concepts on the matter, and discusses these in light of evolving issues in practice, technology, and the law. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00050069508258925DOI Listing
November 1995

The ethics of confidentiality: introduction.

Authors:
G Davidson

Aust Psychol 1995 Nov;30(3):153-7

Department of Social Sciences, Central Queensland University, Rockhampton MC QLD 4702, Australia.

This essay aims to briefly summarise the collection of articles on confidentiality issues in psychology, and to highlight apparently conflicting opinions about the confidentiality rule. Conflicts are then analysed in terms of competing systems of ethics. Finally, the role for ethics education in psychology education and training is considered. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00050069508258924DOI Listing
November 1995

Difference in scientists' discourse about scientific fraud and impropriety.

Authors:
I D John

Aust Psychol 1991 Jul;26(2):120-2

Department of Psychology, University of Adelaide, GPO Box 498, Adelaide SA 5001, Australia.

Fifty-one practising scientists made Q-sorts of 90 statements relating to scientific fraud and impropriety. Principal components analysis identified two major groups. Members of the first group (N=18) seemed to support the standard, or received, view about the nature of science and to interpret scientific fraud and impropriety in terms of the individual shortcomings of deviant scientists. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00050069108258848DOI Listing

Ethics, or issues in methodology?

Authors:
William Noble

Aust Psychol 1983 Mar;18(1):25-38

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00050068308256236DOI Listing
March 1983
1 Read

Psychologists and ethics: report of a Working Party.

Authors:
William G Noble

Aust Psychol 1980 Nov;15(3):393-411

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00050068008254398DOI Listing
November 1980

To know or not to know: the scientist's dilemma.

Authors:
Roger Russell

Aust Psychol 1976 Mar;11(1):9-24

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00050067608255652DOI Listing
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