728 results match your criteria Australian Journal Of Primary Health[Journal]


What should primary care look like after the COVID-19 pandemic?

Authors:
Stephen Duckett

Aust J Prim Health 2020 May 27. Epub 2020 May 27.

The response to COVID-19 transformed primary care: new telehealth items were added to the Medicare Benefits Schedule, and their use quickly escalated, general practices and community health centres developed new ways of working and patients embraced the changes. As new coronavirus infections plummet and governments contemplate lifting spatial distancing restrictions, attention should turn to the transition out of pandemic mode. Some good things happened during the pandemic, including the rapid introduction of the new telehealth items. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/PY20095DOI Listing

Postpartum maternal distress: a multidimensional illness requiring a multilevel, multidiscipline response.

Aust J Prim Health 2020 Apr 28. Epub 2020 Apr 28.

Australia's federal, state, territory and local governments all have responsibilities, often overlapping, for policy and delivery of primary mental health care to postpartum women. Identification and treatment of postpartum distress is carried out by a broad range of professionals from diverse disciplines. Although there is evidence to show that anxiety and stress are important aspects of postpartum distress, substantially greater emphasis has been given to identification and treatment of depression. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/PY19180DOI Listing

Incorporating an advance care planning screening tool into routine health assessments with older people.

Aust J Prim Health 2020 Apr 24. Epub 2020 Apr 24.

General practice is arguably the ideal setting to initiate advance care planning (ACP), but there are many barriers. This pilot study was designed to assess the feasibility, acceptability and perceived utility of a nurse-facilitated screening interview to initiate ACP with older patients in general practice. Patients were recruited from four general practices in Sydney, Australia. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/PY19195DOI Listing

GP services in Australia: presentation profiles during usual practice hours and after-hours periods.

Aust J Prim Health 2020 Apr;26(2):117-123

Sydney School of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine and Health, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia; and Menzies Centre for Health Policy, Sydney School of Public Health, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia; and Corresponding author. Email:

After-hours general practitioner (GP) services can reduce emergency department demand, which is currently increasing in Australia. Understanding GP after-hours care may assist in service planning. From April 2014 to March 2015, 986 GPs recorded 38275 consultations with start and finish times in the Bettering the Evaluation and Care of Health (BEACH) study, a national, cross-sectional, representative study of GP activity. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/PY19169DOI Listing

OPEN ARCH: integrated care at the primary-secondary interface for the community-dwelling older person with complex needs.

Aust J Prim Health 2020 Apr;26(2):104-108

Cairns and Hinterland Hospital and Health Service, PO Box 902, Cairns, Qld 4870, Australia; and College of Public Health, Medicine and Veterinary Sciences, James Cook University, PO Box 6811, Cairns, Qld 4870, Australia.

Optimal care of community-dwelling older Australians with complex needs is a national imperative. Suboptimal care that is reactive, episodic and fragmented, is costly to the health system, can be life threatening to the older person and produces unsustainable carer demands. Health outcomes would be improved if services (health and social) are aligned towards community-based, comprehensive and preventative care. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/PY19184DOI Listing

'I had to tell my GP I had lung cancer': patient perspectives of hospital- and community-based lung cancer care.

Aust J Prim Health 2020 Apr;26(2):147-152

Cancer and Palliative Care Research and Evaluation Unit, Medical School, University of Western Australia, Nedlands, WA 6009, Australia.

Lung cancer care spans both hospital- and community-based healthcare settings, and suboptimal communication between healthcare providers impacts on continuity and quality of care. Patients' experiences regarding: (1) communication between healthcare providers; and (2) the role of their GP during cancer treatment was explored in interviews with 47 Western Australian lung cancer patients. Thematic analysis using a phenomenological approach was undertaken to derive key themes regarding participant experiences. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/PY19191DOI Listing

Universal access to oral health care for Australian children: comparison of travel times to public dental services at consecutive census dates as an indicator of progressive realisation.

Aust J Prim Health 2020 Apr;26(2):109-116

International Research Collaborative - Oral Health and Equity, School of Human Sciences, The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, WA 6009, Australia.

Progressive realisation of equitable access to health services is a fundamental measure of a state's resolve to achieve universal health coverage. The World Health Organization has reprioritised the importance of oral health services as an integral element of the roadmap towards health equity. This study sought to determine whether there is an indication of progressive realisation of equitable spatial access to public dental services for Australians <18 years of age through a comparison of travel times to the nearest public dental clinic at successive census dates. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/PY19148DOI Listing

Corrigendum to: Whānau Māori explain how the Harti Hauora Tool assists with better access to health services.

Aust J Prim Health 2019 Nov;25(5):515

In this paper, whānau Māori highlight how a Kaupapa Māori-centred intervention (the Harti Hauora Tamariki tool, hereafter Harti tool) has improved interactions with health services. The Harti tool is undergoing a randomised control trial (RCT) at Waikato Hospital in New Zealand. As part of the RCT, the authors engaged in a series of qualitative interviews with whānau members of tamariki Māori (children aged 0-5 years) admitted to Waikato Hospital's paediatric ward. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/PY19025_CODOI Listing
November 2019

He aha te mea nui o te ao? He tāngata! (What is the most important thing in the world? It is people!).

Aust J Prim Health 2019 Nov;25(5):435-442

Waikato District Health Board, Private Bag 3200, Hamilton 3240, New Zealand.

This paper highlights the importance of people as a central factor in improving health for Māori (Indigenous people of New Zealand). How whānau (family) relationships, connections, values and inspiration are integral to achieving Indigenous health goals is explained. Descriptions of how community researchers, healthcare staff, consumers and academics worked together to design interventions for two health services (in the Waikato and Bay of Plenty regions) is included. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/PY19027DOI Listing
November 2019

Shifting the balance.

Aust J Prim Health 2019 Nov;25(5)

School of Medicine Fremantle, University of Notre Dame, 47 Henry Street, Fremantle, WA 6959, Australia.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/PYv25n5_EDDOI Listing
November 2019

Identifying inequities in an urban Latin American population: a cross-sectional study in Australian primary health care.

Aust J Prim Health 2020 Apr;26(2):140-146

Queensland University of Technology, Faculty of Health, Victoria Park Road, Kelvin Grove, Brisbane, Queensland, Qld 4001, Australia; and Corresponding author. Email:

In Australia, people from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds often face inequitable health outcomes and access to health care. An important, but under-researched, population is people of Latin American descent. A cross-sectional study obtained clinical data on Latin American Spanish-speaking patients from Brisbane's south-west. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/PY19049DOI Listing

Appropriateness of the Asylum Seeker Resource Centre-adapted Refugee Health Assessment Tool.

Aust J Prim Health 2020 Apr;26(2):132-139

Centre for Health Policy, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, The University of Melbourne, 207 Bouverie Street, Carlton, Vic. 3010, Australia; and Corresponding author. Email

People seeking asylum (PSA) are recommended to undertake a comprehensive risk-based health assessment within 1 month of arrival in Australia. The Asylum Seeker Resource Centre (ASRC) offers health services to PSA in Victoria, through the ASRC nurse-led clinic. A healthcare assessment is conducted by nurses using a Refugee Health Assessment (RHA) tool. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/PY19059DOI Listing

Recommended methodologies to determine Australian Indigenous community members' perceptions of their health needs: a literature review.

Aust J Prim Health 2020 Apr;26(2):95-103

College of Medicine and Dentistry, James Cook University, Townsville, Qld 4811, Australia; and School of Health, Medical and Applied Sciences, Central Queensland University, Townsville, Qld 4811, Australia.

When addressing disparities in health status of Indigenous Australians, it is necessary to consult with Indigenous people to explore their health needs. The process of improving health outcomes is complex; it requires acknowledgement of underlying cultural and social determinants of health and active engagement of Indigenous people to define the issues and identify solutions. The aim of this study is to explore the most appropriate research methodologies to determine Australian Indigenous community members' perceptions of their health needs. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/PY19078DOI Listing

Preventative and early intervention diabetes-related foot care practices in primary care.

Aust J Prim Health 2020 Apr;26(2):161-172

Deakin University School of Nursing and Midwifery, 221 Burwood Highway, Burwood, Vic. 3125, Australia; and Centre for Quality and Patient Safety, Deakin University, 221 Burwood Highway, Burwood, Vic. 3125, Australia; and Western Health Partnership, 176 Furlong Road, St Albans, Burwood, Vic. 3021, Australia.

The aim of this study was to identify current preventative and early intervention diabetes-related foot care practices among Australian primary care healthcare professionals. A survey was developed to obtain information about preventative and early intervention foot care actions, priorities of care, access and referral to expert multidisciplinary foot care teams and adherence to best-practice diabetes-related foot care recommendations. The survey was distributed to GPs and Credentialled Diabetes Educators (CDEs). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/PY19183DOI Listing

Provision of palliative and end-of-life care in New Zealand residential aged care facilities: general practitioners' perspectives.

Aust J Prim Health 2020 Apr;26(2):124-131

School of Nursing, The University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland 1142, New Zealand; and Freemasons' Department of Geriatric Medicine, The University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland 1142, New Zealand.

This exploratory study examined general practitioners' (GPs) perspectives on delivering end-of-life care in the New Zealand residential aged care context. A general inductive approach to the data collected from semi-structured interviews with 17 GPs from 15 different New Zealand general practices was taken. Findings examine: (1) GPs' life experience; (2) the GP relationship with the facilities and provision of end-of-life care; (3) the GP interaction with families of dying residents; and (4) GP relationship with hospice. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/PY19081DOI Listing
April 2020
1.219 Impact Factor

Understanding the preferences of Australian men for accessing health information.

Aust J Prim Health 2020 Apr;26(2):153-160

Healthy Male, Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Melbourne, Vic. 3004, Australia; and Centre for Endocrinology and Metabolism, Hudson Institute of Medical Research, Clayton, Vic. 3168, Australia; and Department of Medicine, Monash University, Clayton, Vic. 3168, Australia; and Corresponding author. Email:

With men currently reporting an increased desire to manage their own health, this mixed-methods study aimed to identify the preferred communication channels to support their access to information. Adult cisgender men (n=410) completed an anonymous survey that assessed current methods, preferences and barriers to accessing health information for general, minor, serious and private health concerns. Seven focus groups, attended by 69 men, further explored health-seeking behaviour. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/PY19142DOI Listing

Closer supervision in Australian general practice training: planning major system change.

Aust J Prim Health 2020 Apr;26(2):184-190

Murray City Country Coast GP Training, Level 2, 369 Royal Parade, Parkville, Vic. 3052, Australia.

Major system change involving closer supervision of trainee GP registrars in Australia is warranted. Change management guidelines recommend involving stakeholders in developing change. The views of those involved in general practice training about current and potential supervisory practice were explored. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/PY19156DOI Listing

Building quality chronic illness care: implementation of a web-based care plan.

Aust J Prim Health 2020 Apr;26(2):173-177

Department of General Practice, Monash University, 1/270 Ferntree Gully Road, Notting Hill, Vic. 3168, Australia.

Structured, multidisciplinary approaches to chronic disease management (CDM) in primary care, supported by eHealth tools, show improved clinical outcomes, yet the uptake of eHealth tools remains low. The adoption of cdmNet, an eHealth tool for chronic disease management, in general practice settings, was explored. This was a qualitative case study in three general practice clinics in Melbourne, Australia. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/PY19039DOI Listing

Syphilis testing performance in Aboriginal primary health care: exploring impact of continuous quality improvement over time.

Aust J Prim Health 2020 Apr;26(2):178-183

Nulungu Research Institute, University of Notre Dame, 88 Guy Street, Broome, WA 6725, Australia.

Data from 110 primary healthcare clinics participating in two or more continuous quality improvement (CQI) cycles in preventive care, which included syphilis testing performance (STP) for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged between 15 and 54 years, were used to examine whether the number of audit cycles including syphilis testing was associated over time with STP improvement at clinic level in this specific measure of public health importance. The number of cycles per clinic ranged from two to nine (mode 3). As shown by medical record audit at entry to CQI, only 42 (38%) clinics had tested or approached 50% or more of their eligible clients for syphilis in the prior 24 months. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/PY19070DOI Listing

Building capacity in primary health care to respond to the needs of asylum seekers and refugees in Melbourne, Australia: the 'GP Engagement.

Aust J Prim Health 2020 Feb 3. Epub 2020 Feb 3.

Asylum seekers and refugees experience poorer health than the broader Australian population. Universal primary healthcare services play an integral role in supporting and optimising the health and wellbeing of these communities. However, clinical-level issues frequently compromise the quality of care provided to these groups. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/PY18190DOI Listing
February 2020

A uniform data set for determining outcomes in allied health primary contact services in Australia.

Aust J Prim Health 2020 Jan 20. Epub 2020 Jan 20.

The project aim was to develop and implement a set of metrics to capture and demonstrate the performance of newly established allied health primary contact services. Selection of the metrics and performance indicators was guided by an existing state-wide data collection system and from a review of the published literature. The metrics were refined after consultation with a working group of health service managers and clinicians. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/PY18104DOI Listing
January 2020

Developmental vulnerability of Australian school-entry children with hearing loss.

Aust J Prim Health 2020 Jan 20. Epub 2020 Jan 20.

National data from the Australian Early Development Census (AEDC) was used to describe the sociodemographic and developmental characteristics of a cohort of Australian children entering their first year of primary school in 2012. Results, together with sociodemographic variables were reported for two groups: children with and without reported hearing loss. Data on 285232 children were analysed, with just over 1% of these children identified with hearing loss. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/PY18162DOI Listing
January 2020

Updating and validating quality prescribing indicators for use in Australian general practice.

Aust J Prim Health 2019 Dec 23. Epub 2019 Dec 23.

This study aims to update and validate quality prescribing indicators (QPIs) for Australian general practice. The study comprised two phases: (1) developing preliminary potential QPIs based on the 2006 National Prescribing Service (NPS) MedicineWise indicators, published literature, international indicators and guidelines, and through qualitative focus group discussions; and (2) validating the proposed QPIs through a two-round online survey using the Delphi technique. The Delphi panel included four GPs, four pharmacists and two clinical pharmacologists. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/PY19060DOI Listing
December 2019

Prevalence, perceived barriers and sociodemographic correlates of advance care planning in a sample of outpatients.

Aust J Prim Health 2019 Dec 23. Epub 2019 Dec 23.

This study aimed to examine the prevalence and perceived barriers to uptake of advance care planning (ACP), including appointment of an enduring guardian (EG) and completion of an advance care directive (ACD) among Australian adults attending hospital outpatient clinics. Sociodemographic correlates of not completing ACP were also assessed. A cross-sectional survey exploring the uptake of ACP was conducted with outpatients and their accompanying persons aged >18 years (n=191) at one regional hospital in New South Wales, Australia. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/PY19096DOI Listing
December 2019

Barriers and enablers to implementation of antenatal smoking cessation guidelines in general practice.

Aust J Prim Health 2019 Dec 13. Epub 2019 Dec 13.

Smoking is a major preventable cause of adverse outcomes in pregnancy. Despite the existence of smoking cessation support guidelines, many pregnant smokers do not receive support in quitting. The aim of this study was to identify and understand the facilitators and barriers experienced by GPs in implementing the 5As of smoking cessation support with pregnant women. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/PY18195DOI Listing
December 2019

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men and parenting: a scoping review.

Aust J Prim Health 2019 Dec 11. Epub 2019 Dec 11.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men rarely rate a mention within discussions of parenting unless framed in the negative, or as the cause of dysfunctional family life. Consequently, the roles and responsibilities of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men within parenting have largely been neglected or ignored. This scoping review aimed to identify and describe Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander parenting programs that focused on male parents. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/PY19106DOI Listing
December 2019

Development and psychometric testing of a patient-reported inventory to measure patient-centred care in dietetic practice.

Aust J Prim Health 2019 Jan;25(6):547-554

School of Nursing and Midwifery, Griffith University, 1 Parklands Drive, Southport, Qld 4222, Australia.

To develop and psychometrically test a conceptually grounded patient-reported inventory to measure patient-centred care (PCC) in dietetics. Development of the inventory involved conducting a literature search and selecting previously validated scales to reflect the conceptual model of PCC that was developed by the research team. Next, a cross-sectional survey of patients attending individual consultations with Accredited Practicing Dietitians working in primary care was undertaken. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/PY19055DOI Listing
January 2019

Identifying hotspots of type 2 diabetes risk using general practice data and geospatial analysis: an approach to inform policy and practice.

Aust J Prim Health 2019 Nov 22. Epub 2019 Nov 22.

The prevalence of type 2 diabetes (T2D) is increasing worldwide and there is a need to identify communities with a high-risk profile and to develop appropriate primary care interventions. This study aimed to predict future T2D risk and identify community-level geographic variations using general practices data. The Australian T2D risk assessment (AUSDRISK) tool was used to calculate the individual T2D risk scores using 55693 clinical records from 16 general practices in west Adelaide, South Australia, Australia. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/PY19043DOI Listing
November 2019

Predicting general practitioner utilisation at a small area level across Western Australia.

Aust J Prim Health 2019 Jan;25(6):570-576

School of Public Health, Curtin University, Bentley Campus, Perth, WA 6102, Australia.

Equitable delivery of GP services is a key goal in universal healthcare systems. In Australia, information to evaluate equitable delivery is limited, especially at finer geographic scales, leaving an information void that needs to be filled to inform, prioritise and target interventions. To fill this void, GP utilisation was estimated by combining responses on GP utilisation from a national survey differentiated by demographic and area-based socioeconomic and remoteness characteristics with similar characteristics represented geographically at a fine scale. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/PY19084DOI Listing
January 2019

The advance care planning nurse facilitator: describing the role and identifying factors associated with successful implementation.

Aust J Prim Health 2019 Jan;25(6):564-569

Rural Clinical School of Western Australia (Albany), University of Western Australia (Albany Centre), Stirling Terrace, Albany, WA 6330, Australia; and Corresponding author. Email:

Advance care planning (ACP) has been shown to improve end-of-life care, yet uptake remains limited. Interventions aimed at increasing ACP uptake have often used a 'specialist ACP facilitator' model. The present qualitative study appraised the components of an ACP facilitator intervention comprising nurse-led patient screening and ACP discussions, as well as factors associated with the successful implementation of this model in primary care and acute hospital settings across rural and metropolitan Western Australia. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/PY19010DOI Listing
January 2019

Education of the medical profession to facilitate delivery of transgender health care in an Australian health district.

Aust J Prim Health 2019 Nov 19. Epub 2019 Nov 19.

Transgender individuals who desire medical transition need to access care through their local healthcare system. This is the first study to explore the perceptions of the community and attitudes of healthcare providers towards the delivery of transgender health care in an Australian context. An anonymous survey was conducted of trans and gender-diverse community members; and physicians and trainees in the Hunter New England Local Health District of New South Wales, Australia. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/PY19102DOI Listing
November 2019

Developing professional education for primary healthcare providers about nutrition.

Aust J Prim Health 2019 Jan;25(6):534-538

School of Medicine, University of Wollongong, Northfields Avenue, Wollongong, NSW 2522, Australia.

Nutrition care is an important component of primary health care as a way to promote positive lifestyle behaviours and reduce risks of chronic disease. Despite this, it appears that primary healthcare settings, including antenatal care, miss opportunities to deliver nutrition care. Time constraints, lack of nutrition knowledge and lack of confidence have been identified as barriers for primary healthcare providers in delivering nutrition care. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/PY19075DOI Listing
January 2019

Childhood infection, antibiotic exposure and subsequent metabolic risk in adolescent and young adult Aboriginal Australians: practical implications.

Aust J Prim Health 2019 Jan;25(6):555-563

Centre for Chronic Disease Prevention, James Cook University, McGregor Road, Smithfield, Qld 4870, Australia.

There is now evidence linking antibiotic burden in infancy and subsequent risk factors for cardiometabolic disease. In this study we assessed the metabolic health of a community-based cohort of Aboriginal Australians aged 15-25 years and retrospectively examined their early childhood antibiotic burden to identify a possible link between the two. Metabolic health data were extracted from electronic files of 433 participants in prior Young Persons Checks between 2013 and 2016. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/PY18110DOI Listing
January 2019

Home medicines reviews: a qualitative study of GPs.

Aust J Prim Health 2019 Nov 18. Epub 2019 Nov 18.

This qualitative study explored GPs' experiences with pharmacist-led home medicines reviews (HMRs) and the barriers and facilitators to GPs using HMRs to optimise medicines for older people. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 32 GPs Australia-wide. Purposeful sampling was undertaken to obtain a representative group in terms of age, gender and location. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/PY19072DOI Listing
November 2019

Primary healthcare providers.

Aust J Prim Health 2019 Nov 18. Epub 2019 Nov 18.

Health behaviour during midlife is linked to health outcomes in older age. Primary healthcare providers (PHCPs) are ideally placed to provide health-promoting information opportunistically to women in midlife. The aim of this study was to explore PHCPs views about the menopause-related care needs of migrant women from low- and middle-income countries and what they perceive as barriers and enablers for providing this. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/PY19132DOI Listing
November 2019

Implications for GP endorsement of a diabetes app with patients from culturally diverse backgrounds: a qualitative study.

Aust J Prim Health 2019 Nov 13. Epub 2019 Nov 13.

Although many diabetes self-management apps exist, these are not tailored for people from culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) backgrounds. This study aimed to explore GP perceptions of how diabetes app features could help GPs better support their patients from CALD backgrounds. Twenty-five semi-structured interviews with GPs in Western Sydney explored attitudes towards a proposed app's suitability for CALD patients. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/PY19062DOI Listing
November 2019

Barriers and enablers to delivering preventative and early intervention footcare to people with diabetes: a scoping review of healthcare professionals' perceptions.

Aust J Prim Health 2019 Jan;25(6):517-525

School of Nursing and Midwifery, Deakin University, 1 Gheringhap Street, Geelong, Vic. 3220, Australia; and Centre for Quality and Patient Safety Research - Western Health Partnership, Sunshine Hospital, 176 Furlong Road, St Albans, Vic. 3021, Australia.

The aim of this study is to examine barriers and enablers to delivering preventative and early intervention footcare to people with diabetes, from the perspective of healthcare professionals within primary care. MEDLINE, CINAHL and Scopus databases, as well as Google Scholar, were searched in September 2018. Inclusion criteria included: English language, qualitative and quantitative studies, since 1998, reporting on barriers or enablers, as reported by primary care health professionals, to delivering preventative or early intervention footcare to people with diabetes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/PY19115DOI Listing
January 2019

Association of health literacy and diabetes self-management: a systematic review.

Aust J Prim Health 2019 Jan;25(6):526-533

School of Health and Society, University of Wollongong, Northfields Avenue, Wollongong, NSW 2522, Australia; and Corresponding author. Email:

The purpose of this review is to summarise the existing evidence about the association of health literacy (HL) with type 2 diabetes mellitus self-management. The PubMed, Medline, CINHAL, Scopus and Web of Science databases were searched for randomised control trials of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) self-management and HL published between 2009 and 2018. Fourteen randomised control trials were included in this review. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/PY19007DOI Listing
January 2019

Feasibility of the PHYZ X 2U program: a mobile and cloud-based outreach service to improve chronic disease outcomes in underserviced rural communities.

Aust J Prim Health 2019 Jan;25(6):539-546

Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Sydney, 75 East Street, Lidcombe, NSW 2141, Australia; and South Western Sydney Local Health District, Locked Bag 7279, Liverpool, BC 1871, Australia; and Ingham Institute of Applied Medical Research, 1 Campbell Street, Liverpool, NSW 2170, Australia.

Chronic disease is prevalent in rural communities, but access to health care is limited. Allied health intervention, incorporating behaviour change and exercise, may improve health outcomes. PHYZ X 2U is a new service delivery model incorporating face-to-face consultations via a mobile clinic and remote health coaching, delivered by physiotherapy and exercise physiology clinicians and university students on clinical placement, to provide exercise programs to people living with chronic disease in rural New South Wales, Australia. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/PY19090DOI Listing
January 2019

Complex diabetes screening guidelines for high-risk adolescent Aboriginal Australians: a barrier to implementation in primary health care.

Aust J Prim Health 2019 Nov;25(5):501-508

The Rural Clinical School of Western Australia, The University of Western Australia, PO Box 1377, Broome, WA 6725, Australia.

The aim of this study is to ascertain whether a simplified screening algorithm incorporating glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) tests increases type 2 diabetes (T2D) screening in 10- to 14-year-old Aboriginal Australians presenting to primary healthcare (PHC) services. The study involved a 6-month pilot of a locally developed evidence-based screening algorithm in a remote Western Australian Kimberley town. A retrospective audit of electronic health records for the pilot period (27 June-26 December 2016) and a 6-month period before the screening algorithm was introduced (1 October 2015-31 March 2016) was conducted. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/PY19030DOI Listing
November 2019

He Korowai Manaaki: mapping assets to inform a strengths-based, Indigenous-led wrap-around maternity pathway.

Aust J Prim Health 2019 Nov;25(5):509-514

Katoa Ltd, PO Box 105611, Auckland City, Auckland 1143, New Zealand.

A research partnership between Iwi (tribal group) Ngāti Pāhauwera and a university-based research centre specialising in Kaupapa Māori (by Māori, for Māori) research was formed in response to an invitation from Ngāti Pāhauwera. The initial partnership goal was to address health inequities experienced by Māori women and infants in Te Wairoa (the home place of the Iwi), a predominantly Māori, rural region in Aotearoa (New Zealand). The research developed by the partnership is an example of a culturally responsive research methodology. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/PY19029DOI Listing
November 2019

Beyond the pipeline: a critique of the discourse surrounding the development of an Indigenous primary healthcare workforce in Australia.

Aust J Prim Health 2019 Nov;25(5):389-394

The University of Queensland Poche Centre for Indigenous Health, Brisbane, Qld 4072, Australia.

A central strategy in addressing health disparities experienced by Indigenous people has been based on a concern with workforce improvement. In this paper, the Indigenous Australian healthcare workforce literature since 1977 is reviewed and its scope of concern, as being often limited to questions of 'supply', is critiqued. The pipeline metaphor, whether used explicitly or implied, regularly focuses attention on closing the gap on Indigenous representation within the health workforce. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/PY19044DOI Listing
November 2019

Building a regional health ecosystem: a case study of the Institute for Urban Indigenous Health and its System of Care.

Aust J Prim Health 2019 Nov;25(5):424-429

The Institute for Urban Indigenous Health Ltd, 22 Cox Road, Windsor, Qld 4030, Australia.

Efforts to address Indigenous health disadvantage require a refocus on urban settings, where a rapidly increasing majority (79%) of Indigenous Australians live. Proximity to mainstream primary care has not translated into health equity, with the majority of the Indigenous burden of disease (73%) remaining in urban areas and urban Indigenous people continuing to face significant barriers in accessing comprehensive and culturally appropriate care. This paper presents a case study of how the Institute for Urban Indigenous Health (IUIH) has strategically responded to these challenges in South East Queensland - home to Australia's largest and equal fastest growing Indigenous population. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/PY19038DOI Listing
November 2019

'I still remember your post about buying smokes': a case study of a remote Aboriginal community-controlled health service using Facebook for tobacco control.

Aust J Prim Health 2019 Nov;25(5):443-448

Menzies School of Health Research, PO Box 41096, Casuarina, NT 0811, Australia.

Many Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services (ACCHS) embrace Facebook as an organisational tool to share positive stories, which counter the negative narrative surrounding Aboriginal issues. However, the Facebook algorithm prioritises posts on personal pages over organisations. To take advantage of the algorithm, this project paid three Yolŋu employees of a north-east Arnhem Land ACCHS to share quit smoking messages on their personal Facebook pages. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/PY19008DOI Listing
November 2019

Ngu-ng-gi-la-nha (to exchange) knowledge. How is Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people's empowerment being upheld and reported in smoking cessation interventions during pregnancy: a systematic review.

Aust J Prim Health 2019 Nov;25(5):395-401

The University of Newcastle, University Drive, Callaghan, NSW 2308, Australia.

Smoking during pregnancy is a national priority to improve Aboriginal health. Empowerment approaches underpin the priorities set by the government to improve Aboriginal health and wellbeing; however, empowerment is seldom evaluated within interventions for Aboriginal people. Literature was searched to April 2018 and data was extracted using an assessment tool with domains of individual and community empowerment in smoking cessation during pregnancy studies with Aboriginal women. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/PY18186DOI Listing
November 2019
1 Read
1.219 Impact Factor

Understanding lived experiences of Aboriginal people with type 2 diabetes living in remote Kimberley communities: diabetes, it don't come and go, it stays!

Aust J Prim Health 2019 Nov;25(5):486-494

Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services Ltd, PO Box 1377, Broome, WA 6725, Australia; and The Rural Clinical School of Western Australia, The University of Western Australia, PO Box 1377, Broome, WA 6725, Australia.

This study aimed to explore the lived experiences of Kimberley Aboriginal people with type 2 diabetes managed by remote Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services using phenomenological analysis. Semi-structured interviews formulated by Aboriginal Health Workers, researchers and other clinicians were used to obtain qualitative data from 13 adult Aboriginal patients with type 2 diabetes managed in two remote communities in the Kimberley. Together with expert opinion from local Aboriginal Health Workers and clinicians, the information was used to develop strategies to improve diabetes management. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/PY19021DOI Listing
November 2019
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Engaging with Aboriginal Shire Councils in remote Cape York communities to address smoke-free environments.

Aust J Prim Health 2019 Nov;25(5):419-423

Menzies School of Health Research, PO Box 41096, Casuarina, NT 0811, Australia.

The high prevalence and health effect of tobacco smoking and secondhand smoke exposure among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people is well known. Due to its significance, the responsibility of tackling smoking among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people should not remain solely with health service providers. The creation of supportive environments and collaboration beyond the health sector are critical elements of comprehensive primary health care practised by Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/PY19023DOI Listing
November 2019

Piloting a culturally appropriate, localised diabetes prevention program for young Aboriginal people in a remote town.

Aust J Prim Health 2019 Nov;25(5):495-500

The Rural Clinical School of Western Australia, The University of Western Australia, 12 Napier Terrace (PO Box 1377), Broome, WA 6725, Australia; and Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services, 12 Napier Terrace (PO Box 1377), Broome, WA 6725, Australia.

Lifestyle changes are central to preventing type 2 diabetes. Embarking upon and sustaining change is challenging, and translation of prevention approaches into a wider range of real-world settings is needed. In this study, a locally adapted community-led diabetes prevention program with local young Aboriginal facilitators was created and trialled through the Derby Aboriginal Health Service (DAHS). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/PY19024DOI Listing
November 2019
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Addressing disparities in oral disease in Aboriginal people in Victoria: where to focus preventive programs.

Aust J Prim Health 2019 Oct;25(4):317-324

Worksafe Victoria, 1 Malop Street, Geelong, Vic. 3220, Australia; and School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, 553 St Kilda Road, Melbourne, Vic. 3004, Australia.

The aim of this study is to determine where Aboriginal people living in Victoria attend public oral health services; whether they access Aboriginal-specific or mainstream services; and the gap between dental caries (tooth decay) experience in Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal people. Analysis was undertaken on routinely collected clinical data for Aboriginal patients attending Victorian public oral health services and the distribution of Aboriginal population across Victoria. Approximately 27% of Aboriginal people attended public oral health services in Victoria across a 2-year period, with approximately one in five of those accessing care at Aboriginal-specific clinics. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/PY18100DOI Listing
October 2019

Understanding the knowledge, attitudes and practices of providing and receiving nutrition care for prediabetes: an integrative review.

Aust J Prim Health 2019 Oct;25(4):289-302

Menzies Health Institute Queensland, Griffith University, Gold Coast Campus, Parklands Drive Southport, Qld 4215, Australia; and Corresponding author. Email:

To synthesise the literature on nutrition care for prediabetes from both the perspective of healthcare providers and patients, six databases (CINAHL, MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO, Scopus and ProQuest) were searched to identify qualitative or quantitative studies that focussed on nutrition care and prediabetes in primary care practice. Studies examining the perspectives of patients with prediabetes and healthcare providers were included. Outcomes of interest included knowledge of nutrition care for prediabetes, attitudes around providing or receiving nutrition care and actual nutrition care practices for prediabetes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/PY19082DOI Listing
October 2019
1.219 Impact Factor