1,309 results match your criteria Australian Journal Of Physiotherapy[Journal]


Global Rating of Change scales.

Authors:
Steve Kamper

Aust J Physiother 2009 ;55(4):289

The George Institute, NSW, Australia.

View Article and Full-Text PDF
February 2010

Cincinnati Orthopaedic Disability Index in canines.

Aust J Physiother 2009 ;55(4):288

The University of Queensland, QLD, Australia.

View Article and Full-Text PDF
February 2010

Airway clearance physiotherapy improves quality of life in people with bronchiectasis.

Authors:
Ruth Dentice

Aust J Physiother 2009 ;55(4):285

Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Sydney, NSW, Australia.

View Article and Full-Text PDF
February 2010

Proprioceptive training reduces the risk of ankle sprain recurrence in athletes.

Authors:
Christine Lin

Aust J Physiother 2009 ;55(4):283

The George Institute for International Health, Sydney, NSW, Australia.

View Article and Full-Text PDF
February 2010

Ability to negotiate stairs predicts free-living physical activity in community-dwelling people with stroke: an observational study.

Aust J Physiother 2009 ;55(4):277-81

Physiotherapy, The University of Sydney, Lidcombe, NSW 1825, Australia.

Question: Which clinical measures of walking performance best predict free-living physical activity in community-dwelling people with stroke?

Design: Cross-sectional observational study.

Participants: 42 community-dwelling stroke survivors.

Outcome Measures: Predictors were four clinical measures of walking performance (speed, automaticity, capacity, and stairs ability). Read More

View Article and Full-Text PDF
February 2010

People with low back pain who have externalised beliefs need to see greater improvements in symptoms to consider exercises worthwhile: an observational study.

Aust J Physiother 2009 ;55(4):271-5

Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Brazil.

Question: Does health locus of control predict the smallest worthwhile effect of motor control exercise or spinal manipulative therapy when adjusted for severity of pain?

Design: Cross-sectional observational study.

Participants: 86 people with non-specific low back pain who had not yet commenced physiotherapy intervention.

Outcome Measures: Predictors were severity of pain measured over the last 7 days using an 11-point scale from 0 to 10, and external and internal health loci of control measured using Form C of the Multidimensional Health Locus of Control scale. Read More

View Article and Full-Text PDF
February 2010

Measures of activity limitation on admission to rehabilitation after stroke predict walking speed at discharge: an observational study.

Aust J Physiother 2009 ;55(4):265-8

Physiotherapy, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Woolloongabba, Queensland 4102, Australia.

Question: Which measures of activity limitation on admission to rehabilitation after stroke best predict walking speed at discharge?

Design: Prospective observational study.

Participants: 120 people with stroke undergoing inpatient rehabilitation.

Outcome Measures: Predictors were admission walking speed, Timed Up and Go, Motor Assessment Scale, Modified Elderly Mobility Scale, and Functional Independence Measure scores measured on admission to rehabilitation. Read More

View Article and Full-Text PDF
February 2010

During computing tasks symptomatic female office workers demonstrate a trend towards higher cervical postural muscle load than asymptomatic office workers: an experimental study.

Aust J Physiother 2009 ;55(4):257-62

Rehabilitation Sciences, The Hong Kong Polytech University, Hung Hom, Kowloon, Hong Kong.

Questions: Do symptomatic female office workers perform computing tasks with higher cervical postural muscle loads (in terms of higher amplitudes and less muscular rest) and more discomfort compared with asymptomatic individuals? Are these differences in postural muscle loads consistent across bilateral (typing) and unilateral (mousing) conditions?

Design: an experimental case-control study.

Participants: 18 symptomatic female office workers and 21 asymptomatic female office workers.

Intervention: Three conditions (typing, mousing, and type-and-mouse) were performed in random order. Read More

View Article and Full-Text PDF
February 2010

Hyperinflation using pressure support ventilation improves secretion clearance and respiratory mechanics in ventilated patients with pulmonary infection: a randomised crossover trial.

Aust J Physiother 2009 ;55(4):249-54

Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janiero, Brazil.

Question: Is ventilator-induced hyperinflation in sidelying more effective than sidelying alone in removing secretions and improving respiratory mechanics in ventilated patients with pulmonary infection?

Design: Randomised crossover trial with concealed allocation and intention-to-treat analysis.

Participants: 30 mechanically ventilated patients with pulmonary infection in an adult intensive care unit.

Intervention: The experimental intervention was 30 minutes of ventilator-induced hyperinflation using pressure support ventilation in sidelying; the control intervention was 30 minutes of sidelying. Read More

View Article and Full-Text PDF
February 2010

Progressive resistance exercise improves glycaemic control in people with type 2 diabetes mellitus: a systematic review.

Aust J Physiother 2009 ;55(4):237-46

Physiotherapy, Peter James Centre, Eastern Health, Melbourne, Victoria 3131, Australia.

Question: Is progressive resistance exercise a safe and effective form of exercise to improve glycaemic control in people with type 2 diabetes?

Design: Systematic review with meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials.

Participants: People with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

Intervention: Progressive resistance exercise. Read More

View Article and Full-Text PDF
February 2010

The Assessment of Quality of Life (AQoL).

Aust J Physiother 2009 ;55(3):212

The George Institute of International Health, The University of Sydney, Australia.

View Article and Full-Text PDF
October 2009

Is there sufficient evidence?

Aust J Physiother 2009 ;55(3):223; author reply 223

View Article and Full-Text PDF
October 2009

Did authors draw the right conclusion?

Aust J Physiother 2009 ;55(3):220; author reply 221

View Article and Full-Text PDF
October 2009

Diabetes predicts decreased quality of life among community-dwelling seniors undertaking progressive resistance exercise: an observational study.

Authors:
Kotaro Tamari

Aust J Physiother 2009 ;55(3):201-5

School of Health Science, Kibi International University, Japan.

Question: What baseline characteristics predict good or poor quality of life among community-dwelling seniors undertaking a three-month progressive resistance exercise program?

Design: A prospective cohort observational study.

Participants: 63 Japanese men and women over 65 years with mild disability.

Outcome Measures: Health-related quality of life was measured using the Short Form 36. Read More

View Article and Full-Text PDF
October 2009

Duration of anaesthesia, type of surgery, respiratory co-morbidity, predicted VO2max and smoking predict postoperative pulmonary complications after upper abdominal surgery: an observational study.

Aust J Physiother 2009 ;55(3):191-8

Department of Physiotherapy, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, Monash University, Australia.

Question: Can the risk of developing postoperative pulmonary complications be predicted after upper abdominal surgery?

Design: Prospective observational study.

Participants: 268 consecutive patients undergoing elective upper abdominal surgery who received standardised pre- and postoperative prophylactic respiratory physiotherapy.

Outcome Measures: Predictors were 17 preoperative and intraoperative risk factors. Read More

View Article and Full-Text PDF
October 2009