580 results match your criteria Australian Journal Of Advanced Nursing[Journal]


The role of specialist nurses in improving treatment adherence in children with a chronic illness.

Aust J Adv Nurs 2004 Jun-Aug;21(4):41-5

Sydney Children's Hospital, Randwick, New South Wales, Australia.

Adherence to medical treatment is an ongoing challenge for families and young people with chronic medical conditions. One factor that is likely to influence treatment success is the quality of professional relationships both within the health care team and between the family, child and professionals. This paper explores the topic of professional relationships and adherence and provides an example of how a multidisciplinary team can improve the health and quality of life of paediatric patients. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
August 2008
5 Reads

Urinary tract infection in clients with spinal cord injury who use intermittent clean self catheterisation.

Aust J Adv Nurs 2004 Jun-Aug;21(4):35-40

Spinal Outreach Team, Queensland Spinal Cord Injury Service, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Queensland, Australia.

Urinary tract infection (UTI) was identified as a significant issue for people with spinal cord injury (SCI) performing intermittent clean self-catheterisation (ICSC) in the community. A review of the literature was undertaken to establish the major risk factors of UTI and how these risks could be reduced in practice. The majority of authors recommended the use of a clean catheterisation technique in the community. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
August 2008
3 Reads

The courage to care: nurses facing the moral extreme.

Authors:
Ellen Ben Sefer

Aust J Adv Nurs 2004 Jun-Aug;21(4):28-34

Faculty of Nursing, University of Technology, Sydney, Australia.

Many European nurses were caught up in the horror of what happened to Jewish people during the Second World War, trapped in ghettoes and concentration camps. The advanced age of the nurses, however, decreases the number of firsthand accounts available. This paper reports on the experience of nurses in one camp, Westerbork, in the Netherlands, highlighting their work and relating their stories. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source

Inappropriate restraint practices in Australian teaching hospitals.

Authors:
Kate Irving

Aust J Adv Nurs 2004 Jun-Aug;21(4):23-7

Curtin University of Technology, Perth, Western Australia.

The use of restraints in contemporary healthcare represents an ethical problem to nurses and nursing. This paper describes a point prevalence study undertaken to examine the patterns of restraint use in an Australian teaching hospital. The objectives were: to clearly define restraint; establish its prevalence; the reasons for its use; and, to describe staffing levels in relation to restraint rates. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
August 2008
2 Reads

The effectiveness of a training program for emergency department nurses in managing violent situations.

Authors:
Cecil Deans

Aust J Adv Nurs 2004 Jun-Aug;21(4):17-22

University of Ballarat and Ballarat Health Services, Australia.

An Australian Institute of Criminology report (1999) highlighted the health industry as the most violent industry in Australia with registered nurses recording the second highest number of violence-related workers compensation claims, ranking higher than prison and police officers. Workplace violence has become such a common phenomenon that many nurses accept it as a part of nursing. Nurses employed in emergency departments (EDs) are considered to be especially vulnerable to workplace violence. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source

Determinants of job satisfaction among nurses in Kuwait.

Aust J Adv Nurs 2004 Jun-Aug;21(4):10-6

Department of Health Information Administration, Kuwait University, Kuwait.

Objective: Job satisfaction among nurses working in five general hospitals in Kuwait was analysed using a global scale based on the McClosky Mueller Satisfaction Scale (MMSS) in relation to selected background characteristics (eg age, gender, nationality, educational qualification, monthly salary and the departments in which they worked.

Design: The questionnaire was distributed to 500 nurses using a stratified random sample. The response rate was 87. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
August 2008
2 Reads

Extensive need, extended practice.

Aust J Adv Nurs 2004 Jun-Aug;21(4):7-9

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
August 2008
4 Reads

The impact of surgical ward nurses practising respiratory assessment on positive patient outcomes.

Aust J Adv Nurs 2007 Jun-Aug;24(4):52-6

Queensland University of Technology, Nurse Educator Surgical Services, Nambour General Hospital, Sunshine Coast, Australia.

Objective: A literature review to examine the incorporation of respiratory assessment into everyday surgical nursing practice; possible barriers to this; and the relationship to patient outcomes.

Primary Argument: Escalating demands on intensive care beds have led to highly dependent patients being cared for in general surgical ward areas. This change in patient demographics has meant the knowledge and skills required of registered nurses in these areas has expanded exponentially. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
August 2007
18 Reads

The importance of language for nursing: does it convey commonality of meaning and is it important to do so.

Aust J Adv Nurs 2007 Jun-Aug;24(4):47-51

School of Nursing and Midwifery, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, Gippsland Campus, Monash University, Victoria, Australia.

Objective: Language is the medium by which communication is both conveyed and received. To understand and communicate meaning it is necessary to examine the theoretical basis of word conceptualisation. The determinants of understanding language however are somewhat elusive and idiosyncratic by nature. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
August 2007
16 Reads

The impact of hospital structure and restructuring on the nursing workforce.

Aust J Adv Nurs 2007 Jun-Aug;24(4):42-6

Centre for Health Services Management, University of Technology, Sydney, Australia.

Objective: Health systems throughout much of the world have been subject to 'reform' in recent years as countries have attempted to contain the rapidly rising costs of health care. Changes to hospital structures (restructuring) have been an important part of these reforms. A significant impact of current approaches to restructuring is the loss of, or changes to, nursing management roles and functions. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
August 2007
25 Reads

Nurses' attitudes toward elderly people and knowledge of gerontic care in a mult-purpose health service (MPHS).

Aust J Adv Nurs 2007 Jun-Aug;24(4):37-41

Age Concern Pty Ltd, Ormond, Victoria, Australia.

Objective: The purpose of this study was to explore the attitudes of nurses working in a multi-purpose health service (MPHS) toward elderly people and their understanding of gerontic care. As there are no previous studies in this area of nursing it is anticipated that this study will provide the basis for further exploration.

Design: A descriptive, non- experimental quantitative research design using a self-report questionnaire was used for this study. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
August 2007
9 Reads

Patient advocacy and advance care planning in the acute hospital setting.

Authors:
Marion Seal

Aust J Adv Nurs 2007 Jun-Aug;24(4):29-36

The Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia.

Objective: The aim of this study was to explain the role of patient advocacy in the Advance Care Planning (ACP-ing) process. Nurses rate prolonging the dying process with inappropriate measures as their most disturbing ethical issue and protecting patients' rights to be of great concern (Johnston et al 2002). Paradoxically ethical codes assume nurses have the autonomy to uphold patients' health-care choices. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
August 2007
36 Reads

A comparative study of patient perceived quality of life pre and post coronary artery bypass graft surgery.

Aust J Adv Nurs 2007 Jun-Aug;24(4):24-8

Ward 3D Cardiothoracic ward, Alfred Hospital, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.

Objective: Traditionally, evaluation of outcome post cardiac surgery has focused on objective measures of cardiovascular status. The emphasis has shifted to examining an individual's quality of life (QoL). However a gap in Australian prospective research assessing QoL from a pre-operative period to the early stage of six weeks post-operatively exists. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
August 2007
3 Reads

Women's perspectives of pain following day surgery in Australia.

Aust J Adv Nurs 2007 Jun-Aug;24(4):19-23

Department of Health and Community Services, Northern Territory, Australia.

Objective: To investigate the incidence of pain following discharge from reproductive day surgery.

Design: Cross-sectional descriptive study.

Setting: A public hospital for women in Melbourne. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
August 2007
8 Reads
3 Citations
0.240 Impact Factor

'I don't want to hate him forever': understanding daughter's experiences of father absence.

Aust J Adv Nurs 2007 Jun-Aug;24(4):14-8

School of Nursing, Family and Community Health, College of Social and Health Sciences, University of Western Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.

Objective: Father absence is associated with negative child and adolescent outcomes, including early sexual activity, teenage pregnancy, behavioural difficulties and life adversity. However there is a lack of literature that explores the lived experiences of daughters who grew up in father absent environments. This study aimed to generate insights into the lived experience of being a girl-child growing up in a father absent environment through the perspectives of daughters who experienced father absence during their childhood and/or adolescent years. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
August 2007
5 Reads

The development of a tool to assess levels of stress and burnout.

Aust J Adv Nurs 2007 Jun-Aug;24(4):8-13

Northern Sydney Central Coast Health, New South Wales, Australia.

Objective: To pilot test the reliability and validity of a newly developed tool measuring nursing and midwifery staff stress and burnout.

Design: Descriptive survey.

Setting: Public hospital, aged care facility and university. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
August 2007
6 Reads

Development and validation of a Vein Assessment Tool (VAT).

Aust J Adv Nurs 2007 Jun-Aug;24(4):5-7

Research Centre for Clinical Research, Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital, Queensland, Australia.

Objective: To assess the face validity and the inter-rater reliability of the Vein Assessment Tool (VAT) for classifying veins according to their level of intravenous insertion difficulty.

Design: Prospective observational study.

Participants: Eight nurses and two radiographers from the Medical Imaging Department and five nurses from the Haematology Day Patient Unit of a large tertiary hospital. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
August 2007
8 Reads

The professional self-concept of nurses: a review of the literature from 1992-2006.

Aust J Adv Nurs 2007 Mar-May;24(3):60-4

Alice Lee Centre for Nursing Studies, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore.

Objective: This paper will discuss some recent concerns about research in the area of the professional self-concept of nurses, and trace the development of the literature on professional self-concept of nurses over the last 14 years.

Primary Argument: Professional self-concept or how nurses feel about themselves as nurses is vital in examining current and future nursing practice and education, as it affects patient care.

Conclusion: The essence of the paper is the identification of three streams of literature: (1) which has 'emerged from the development of the Professional Self-Concept of Nurses instrument'; (2) literature which fails to consider recent or current research in the area; and (3) 'well-conducted work in the topic area'. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
June 2007
1 Read

The use of the term vulnerability in acute care: why does it differ and what does it mean?

Aust J Adv Nurs 2007 Mar-May;24(3):54-9

La Trobe University/Austin Health Clinical School of Nursing, Faculty of Health Sciences, Clinical Nurse Specialist Neurosurgery/Vascular surgery, Victoria, Australia.

Objective: Throughout health care literature, vulnerability is widely accepted as a potential issue for all patients yet the consensus on the meaning of and practical strategies to reduce or manage these 'harmful agents' in the clinical context are rarely offered. Three main themes emerge from the related literature which can be further refined into general terms of; social vulnerability--a person's basic statistical data in relation to their potential for illness; psychological vulnerability--the actual or potential harm to the identity of self and/or other emotional effects such as anxiety or stress caused by the ailment or treatment; and physical vulnerability--which refers to the actual physiological state where an individual is susceptible to further morbidity or mortality.

Setting: Acute care facilities. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source

Adolescent appropriate care in an adult hospital: the use of a youth care plan.

Aust J Adv Nurs 2007 Mar-May;24(3):49-53

Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.

Objective: This paper explores the development of a specific youth care plan which provides a framework for adolescent appropriate care in an adult acute care facility.

Setting: The Sydney South Western Area Health Service (SSWAHS) Youth Consultancy, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital (RPAH), Camperdown, Sydney, Australia.

Subjects: Young people aged 12- 24 years who were admitted to the acute hospital setting at RPAH. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source

Burnout in nursing.

Aust J Adv Nurs 2007 Mar-May;24(3):43-8

School of Social Sciences and Humanities, Charles Sturt University, Wagga Wagga, New South Wales, Australia.

Objective: Previous research has suggested that organisational change can contribute to stress-related outcomes for workers. Burnout, one such stress-related outcome, has been conceptualised as a multidimensional construct consisting of emotional exhaustion, depersonalisation and reduced personal accomplishment. Many health care organisations have undergone substantial organisational change over the last decade. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source

Enrolled nurse skill extension: metropolitan myth or rural reality?

Aust J Adv Nurs 2007 Mar-May;24(3):38-42

Acute Care Nursing Professorial Unit, St. George Hospital, Sydney, Australia.

Objective: The objective of this study was to examine whether the position of 'after hours clinical support enrolled nurse' is embracing clinical skill extension in the acute surgical area.

Design: Experienced enrolled nurses employed in a supernumerary capacity documented all activities with which they were engaged over a six-month period.

Setting: Six surgical wards within a tertiary referral hospital, Sydney, Australia. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
June 2007
5 Reads

The educational needs of nurses working in Australian general practices.

Aust J Adv Nurs 2007 Mar-May;24(3):33-7

Royal College of Nursing Australia, Canberra, Australia.

Objective: To describe the educational needs of nurses working in general medical practice in Australia.

Design: Survey research combining qualitative and quantitative data collected via telephone interview.

Subjects: 222 enrolled (RN Division 2 in Victoria) and registered nurses (RN Division 1 in Victoria) working in general practice in rural and urban areas of Australia. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
June 2007
1 Read

Educational intervention for patients with automatic implantable cardioverter defibrillators.

Aust J Adv Nurs 2007 Mar-May;24(3):26-32

Health Psychology Unit, University of Technology, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.

Objective: The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate the feasibility of a brief educational intervention administered two weeks after Automatic Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator (AICD) implantation on subsequent levels of anxiety, depression, stress and hostility.

Design: A randomised controlled design was used.

Subjects And Setting: Twenty-two patients hospitalised for implantation of an AICD were recruited for the study. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
June 2007
1 Read

Critical care nurses' knowledge in preventing nosocomial pneumonia.

Aust J Adv Nurs 2007 Mar-May;24(3):19-25

University Putra Malaysia, Malaysia.

Objective: The purpose of this study was to identify knowledge deficits concerning nosocomial pneumonia (NP) prevention among critical care nurses. The study also determined whether NP knowledge was associated with nurse characteristics.

Design: A survey design using a mailed self-administered questionnaire. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
June 2007
7 Reads

Acceptability of antenatal screening for depression in routine antenatal care.

Aust J Adv Nurs 2007 Mar-May;24(3):14-8

Parent-Infant Research Institute, Department of Clinical and Health Psychology, Austin Health, Victoria, Australia.

Objective: The Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) is generally recognised as a valid, reliable, cost-effective and simple tool to implement within routine care, however there is controversy regarding the acceptability of screening for depression. This paper aims to examine how acceptable women find (1) completing a battery of questionnaires, including the EPDS and (2) receiving feedback from midwives regarding the significance of their EPDS score when being screened for depression as part of routine antenatal care.

Design: Telephone interviews with women following completion of the questionnaire battery and receiving feedback from midwives. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
June 2007
2 Reads

Screening for chlamydia trachomatis: barriers for homeless young people.

Aust J Adv Nurs 2007 Mar-May;24(3):8-13

Young People's Health Service, Centre for Adolescent Health, Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne, Australia.

Objective: The study explored homeless young people's knowledge and attitudes of Chlamydia trachomatis (Chlamydia) and its screening.

Design: Semi-structured interviews using focus groups.

Setting: An inner city clinic for homeless young people. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
June 2007
2 Reads

What are we waiting for?

Aust J Adv Nurs 2007 Mar-May;24(3):5-7

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source

The clinical nurse specialist and nurse practitioner roles: room for both or take your pick?

Aust J Adv Nurs 2006 Dec-2007 Feb;24(2):56-9

Centre for Psychiatric Nursing Research and Practice, School of Nursing, University of Melbourne, Carlton, Victoria, Australia.

Objective: The aim of this paper is to contribute to pertinent discussions regarding advanced practice nursing roles. In particular discussion will focus on the potential implications for the developing nurse ractitioner (NP) role on the existing clinical nurse specialist (CNS) roles.

Setting: The literature presented originates primarily from the United States of America (USA), United Kingdom and Australia. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source

Effect of local refrigeration prior to venipuncture on pain related responses in school age children.

Aust J Adv Nurs 2006 Dec-2007 Feb;24(2):51-5

Department of Paediatric Nursing, Nursing and Allied Health College, Semnan University of Medical Sciences, Semnan, Iran.

Introduction: Painful medical procedures are the major sources of distress among children; and for those with chronic diseases, the procedure-related pain can be worse than that of the illness itself.

Objective: The purpose of the study was to determine the effect of local refrigeration prior to venipuncture on pain-related responses in school-age children.

Design: Quasi-experimental study. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://www.ajan.com.au/Vol24/Vol24.2-8.pdf
Web Search
March 2007
3 Reads

Utilization of King's interacting systems framework and theory of goal attainment with new multidisciplinary model: clinical pathway.

Authors:
Khurshid Khowaja

Aust J Adv Nurs 2006 Dec-2007 Feb;24(2):44-50

Nursing Services (AKUH), Karachi, Pakistan.

Background: The critical role of research in nursing practice is the application of nursing theories to discover new knowledge. This study uses King's interacting systems framework and theory of goal attainment to investigate the effectiveness of implementing clinical pathways for patients undergoing transurethral resection of prostate (TURP) at Aga Khan University Hospital (AKUH), Pakistan.

Objective: To assess the impact of the implementation of a clinical pathway for the surgical procedure of TURP on clinical quality, cost, and patient and staff satisfaction. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
March 2007
169 Reads

Recognising and reconciling differences: mental health nurses and nursing students' perceptions of the preceptorship relationship.

Aust J Adv Nurs 2006 Dec-2007 Feb;24(2):38-43

Centre for Psychiatric Nursing Research and Practice, School of Nursing, The University of Melbourne, Carlton, Victoria, Australia.

Objective: The main purpose of this study was to examine the preceptorship relationship between students' and mental health nurses' in the mental health setting.

Design: This study used a qualitative research design: grounded theory. This type of research method was deemed appropriate due to the limited knowledge of preceptorship in mental health. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source

Tobacco smoking habits among a cross-section of rural Japanese nurses.

Aust J Adv Nurs 2006 Dec-2007 Feb;24(2):33-7

International Center for Research Promotion and Informatics, National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health, Kawasaki, Japan.

Background: Despite a high community smoking rate, few investigations of tobacco usage among Japanese nurses have been conducted in rural areas, particularly those in the southern islands.

Aim: The aim of this research was to investigate the epidemiology of tobacco smoking among a previously understudied group of rural Japanese nurses.

Design: A self-reporting questionnaire was adapted from previous investigations and distributed to a complete cross-section of 1162 nurses from a large teaching hospital in southern Japan (response rate: 74. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
March 2007
2 Reads

Where do all the undergraduate and new graduate nurses go and why? A search for empirical research evidence.

Aust J Adv Nurs 2006 Dec-2007 Feb;24(2):26-32

School of Nursing, University of Queensland, Australia.

Objective: To review the published scientific literature for studies quantifying or examining factors associated with the attrition of undergraduate nursing students in pre-registration programs and the retention of graduate nurses in the workforce.

Methods: The following selection criteria were used to systematically search the literature: target populations were either students in pre-registration nursing programs or registered nurses in their graduate year; the studies were to be primary observational or analytical (cross-sectional, case-control or prospective cohort studies) in design; and outcome measures were attrition in undergraduate programs and/or retention of graduates within the workforce. Three authors guided by a standardised procedure performed data extraction and quality assessment independently. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
March 2007
2 Reads

Dying for attention: palliative care in the acute setting.

Aust J Adv Nurs 2006 Dec-2007 Feb;24(2):21-5

Nursing and Patient Services, Repatriation General Hospital, Daw Park, South Australia.

Background: Palliative care has emerged as a specialist discipline in the past 25 years. However in relation to acute hospitals, a sense exists that patients who are receiving end of life care may not experience support which fully reflects appropriate palliative care management.

Objective: This study aimed to analyse the end of life care received by patients in the acute wards of a busy teaching hospital. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
March 2007
12 Reads

Stakeholders' views in relation to curriculum development approaches for Australian clinical educators.

Aust J Adv Nurs 2006 Dec-2007 Feb;24(2):16-20

Research Centre for Clinical Practice Innovation, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Griffith University, Nathan, Queensland, Australia.

Objective: Clinical educators in nursing perform a crucial role in facilitating effective learning for students of nursing. They have the potential to act as a catalysing agent for learning--motivating students to make links between theory and practice, moving students safely from the known to the unknown, developing clinical skills and reflective practice. Whilst their role is extremely important, clinical educators in Australia are undervalued and under-supported. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
March 2007
6 Reads

Competence in providing mental health care: a grounded theory analysis of nurses' experiences.

Aust J Adv Nurs 2006 Dec-2007 Feb;24(2):9-15

St. Vincent's Mental Health Service, Fitzroy, Victoria, Australia.

Objective: In view of the evidence that general nurses have difficulty in caring for patients experiencing mental health problems, the aim of this study was to explore and describe the subjective experience of nurses in providing care for this client group.

Design: A grounded theory approach was used. The data were collected via semi-structured individual interviews and analysed using the constant comparative method. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source

New perspectives on old debates: re-engineering the theory practice gap.

Authors:
Glenn Gardner

Aust J Adv Nurs 2006 Dec-2007 Feb;24(2):7-8

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
March 2007
2 Reads

Nursing sans frontières: a three year case study of multi-state registration to support nursing practice using information technology.

Aust J Adv Nurs 2006 Sep-Nov;24(1):39-45

Department of Epidemiology and Preventative Medicine, Monash University, Victoria, Australia.

Objective: To highlight the registration issues for nurses who wish to practice nationally, particularly those practicing within the telehealth sector.

Design: As part of a national clinical research study, applications were made to every state and territory for mutual recognition of nursing registration and fee waiver for telenursing cross border practice for a period of three years. These processes are described using a case study approach. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
November 2006
1 Read

Assessment and management of chronic pain in the older person living in the community.

Authors:
Anne Dewar

Aust J Adv Nurs 2006 Sep-Nov;24(1):33-8

School of Nursing, Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, Canada.

Aim: This paper reviews the nursing research literature on chronic pain in the older person living in the community and suggests areas for future research.

Background: Chronic pain is a pervasive and complex problem that is difficult to treat appropriately. Nurses managing chronic pain in older people in domiciliary/home/community nursing settings face many challenges. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
November 2006
2 Reads

Improving access to clinical information in after hours community palliative care.

Aust J Adv Nurs 2006 Sep-Nov;24(1):27-32

Gandarra Palliative Care Unit Ballarat Health Services, Ballarat Hospice Care Inc, Victoria, Australia.

Objective: To improve access to clinical information for nurses and doctors providing after hours community palliative care in a regional Australian setting.

Design: This was an action research project designed to improve collation and distribution of succinct, pertinent and timely information about unstable palliative care patients to nurses and general practitioners (GPs) involved in after hours care. Each week day, each patient's purpose-designed single-page information sheet was updated on the community palliative care service computers. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
November 2006
3 Reads

Cardiac rehabilitation for women: one size does not fit all.

Aust J Adv Nurs 2006 Sep-Nov;24(1):21-6

School of Nursing, Universal College of Learning, Palmerston North, New Zealand.

Aim: To investigate women's perceptions of the contribution of cardiac rehabilitation to their recovery from a myocardial infarction.

Background And Purpose: Cardiac rehabilitation programs have been based on research with almost exclusively male participants. It was unclear if cardiac rehabilitation programs meet the needs of women. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
November 2006
1 Read

Culturaly diverse family members and their hospitalised relatives in acute care wards: a qualitative study.

Authors:
Jane Cioffi

Aust J Adv Nurs 2006 Sep-Nov;24(1):15-20

School of Nursing, University of Western Sydney, Australia.

Objective: To describe the experiences of culturally diverse family members who make the decision to stay with their relatives in acute care wards.

Design: A qualitative descriptive study.

Setting: Medical and surgical wards in an acute care hospital with a 70% non-English speaking background patient population. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
November 2006

Competency and capability: imperative for nurse practitioner education.

Aust J Adv Nurs 2006 Sep-Nov;24(1):8-14

Queensland University of Technology, Kelvin Grove, Australia.

Objective: The objective of this study was to conduct research to inform the development of standards for nurse practitioner education in Australia and New Zealand and to contribute to the international debate on nurse practitioner practice.

Setting: The research was conducted in all states of Australia where the nurse practitioner is authorised and in New Zealand.

Subjects: The research was informed by multiple data sources including nurse practitioner program curricula documents from all relevant universities in Australia and New Zealand, interviews with academic convenors of these programs and interviews with nurse practitioners. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
November 2006
3 Reads

Working together for better outcomes.

Authors:
Kathryn Zeitz

Aust J Adv Nurs 2006 Sep-Nov;24(1):6-7

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
November 2006
3 Reads

Developing the future nurse leaders of Fiji.

Aust J Adv Nurs 2006 Jun-Aug;23(4):47-51

School of Nursing Sciences, James Cook University, Townsville, Australia.

Background: Nurse leaders in Fiji are currently involved in meeting the challenges of being at the forefront of an AusAID supported Health Sector Improvement process. Fiji is experiencing the same shortages of health professionals (including nurses) as is occurring internationally, while simultaneously striving to improve the quality of its health services.

Primary Argument: This paper provides information about the current situation in relation to health services in Fiji, and describes strategies being undertaken by the nurse leaders of Fiji to meet the challenge of leading an exciting reform process. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
August 2006
1 Read

Trialing collaborative nursing Models of Care: the impact of change.

Aust J Adv Nurs 2006 Jun-Aug;23(4):40-6

St Vincent's Hospital, Darlinghurst Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.

Objective: The aim of the project was to develop and trial a nursing Model of Care (MoC) and devise a framework to investigate the impact of nursing staff mix on patient outcomes and job satisfaction (nurses).

Setting And Subjects: In 2001-2002 a pilot project was undertaken to explore issues related to the delivery of patient care by nurses on two medical inpatient wards, one acute and one subacute, at a referral teaching hospital in New South Wales (NSW), Australia. The framework employed was an adaptation of, and based on, the Clinical Practice Improvement (CPI) model developed by NSW Health. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source

Hospital in the home (HITH) care following autologous stem cell transplantation for lymphoma and multiple myeloma.

Aust J Adv Nurs 2006 Jun-Aug;23(4):34-9

Mater Acute Care Community Service, Newcastle Mater Hospital, New South Wales, Australia.

Background: Advances in outpatient and supportive care and increased pressure on hospital bed usage has led to the investigation of hospital in the home (HITH) management following autologous haematologous stem cell transplantation (AutoHSCT) for patients with multiple myeloma or lymphoma.

Design: The Newcastle Mater Hospital Haematology Unit together with the Mater Acute Care Community Service (MACCS) developed a protocol for HITH care following AutoHSCT.

Outcomes: Clinical outcomes of the protocol were audited: 40% (13) of patients were suitable candidates for HITH care post transplantation. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
August 2006
3 Reads

The effectiveness of a 15 minute weekly massage in reducing physical and psychological stress in nurses.

Aust J Adv Nurs 2006 Jun-Aug;23(4):28-33

Griffith University Research Centre for Clinical Practice Innovation, Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia.

Objective: To investigate the effectiveness of massage therapy in reducing physiological and psychological indicators of stress in nurses employed in an acute care hospital.

Design: Randomised controlled trial.

Setting: Acute care hospital in Queensland. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
August 2006
7 Reads

The attitudes and practices of neonatal nurses in the use of kangaroo care.

Aust J Adv Nurs 2006 Jun-Aug;23(4):20-7

School of Health Sciences, Nanyang Polytechnic, Singapore.

Objectives: To survey the attitudes and practices of Australian neonatal nurses in the use of kangaroo care (KC) and identify possible concerns with promoting KC in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU).

Design: A two-phase research approach was used that included a descriptive survey followed by in-depth interviews with a subset of survey respondents.

Sample: Thirty four nurses working in the NICU of a large public hospital in Melbourne completed a survey questionnaire. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
August 2006
3 Reads