2,728 results match your criteria Australian Health Review[Journal]


It.

Aust Health Rev 2020 Jun 30. Epub 2020 Jun 30.

Building a new healthcare facility is complex and poses challenges in delivering a facility that is fit for purpose and designed to minimise latent environmental and process errors. This article summarises what the disciplines of Human Factors/Ergonomics and Simulation can offer to the design and testing of new hospital builds. It argues the incorporation of both disciplines throughout the planning, design, commissioning and operations phases of the building project can minimise latent safety risks to promote patient safety and staff well-being across the building lifecycle. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/AH19114DOI Listing

Scoping review of Australian evaluations of healthcare delivery models: are we making the most of the evidence?

Aust Health Rev 2020 Jun 30. Epub 2020 Jun 30.

Healthcare delivery models describe the organisation of healthcare practitioners and other resources to provide health care for a defined patient population. The organisation of health care has a predominant effect on the receipt of timely and appropriate health care. Efforts to improve healthcare delivery should be evidence informed, and large numbers of evaluations of healthcare delivery models have been undertaken. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/AH19188DOI Listing

Assessing the support of health leadership for increased Indigenous participation in the health workforce.

Aust Health Rev 2020 Jun 30. Epub 2020 Jun 30.

The aim of this study was to assess the strength of leadership statements in Australian state and territory policy documents supporting increased representation of Indigenous people in the health workforce.Document analysis of leadership statements, prefacing state and territory Indigenous health workforce plans, from a relevant Minister or Head of Department was undertaken to detect the presence and level of 'dependency messaging': did the leadership statement clearly state that an Indigenous health workforce was needed to improve Indigenous health outcomes?Australian health leaders do not routinely use dependency messaging in state and territory Indigenous health workforce plans.Greater alignment of state and territory Indigenous health workforce plans with contemporary diversity management knowledge could improve recruitment and retention of Indigenous peoples and, ultimately, Indigenous health outcomes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/AH19262DOI Listing

Service use of young people with Type 1 diabetes after transition from paediatric to adult-based diabetes health care.

Aust Health Rev 2020 Jun 30. Epub 2020 Jun 30.

The aim of this study was to determine, in the first 2 years after the last planned appointment with paediatric diabetes services for young people with Type 1 diabetes (T1D): (1) the number of planned and unplanned healthcare contacts and HbA1c measurements made; (2) factors linked to diabetes-related service use; and (3) factors predictive of the number of planned and unplanned service contacts, and of meeting the minimum number of planned service contacts.Healthcare records of a major public healthcare provider in Australia were audited for preventive and acute service use by young people with T1D transferring from paediatric to adult public healthcare services. Statistical analyses included use of t-tests and logistic regression modelling. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/AH19117DOI Listing

Efficiency gains from a standardised approach to older people presenting to the emergency department after a fall.

Aust Health Rev 2020 Jun 30. Epub 2020 Jun 30.

Falls are a major cause of hospital-related costs in people aged ≥65 years. Despite this, falls are often seen as trivial and given low priority in an emergency department (ED), especially in the absence of overt major injury. ED systems that care for falls patients are often inefficient. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/AH19187DOI Listing

Characterising the number and type of presentations to a tertiary emergency department by young people affected by drugs and alcohol.

Aust Health Rev 2020 Jun 19. Epub 2020 Jun 19.

The aim of this study was to investigate the frequency and type of emergency department (ED) presentations involving drugs and/or alcohol (DA) among young people.A retrospective chart review was conducted of patients aged 14-25 years who presented to the ED at a tertiary hospital between 7 October and 25 November 2013. Data were collected on standardised data sheets, including whether DA was a factor in the patient's presentation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/AH18247DOI Listing

Evolving experience of operating theatre staff with the implementation of robotic-assisted surgery in the public sector.

Aust Health Rev 2020 Jun 19. Epub 2020 Jun 19.

The use of robotic-assisted surgery (RAS) remains predominantly in the private sector. In the public sector, the effect of the implementation of RAS on theatre staff is unknown. The aim of this study was to examine the knowledge and attitudes of theatre staff before and after implementation of RAS in the public sector. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/AH19106DOI Listing

Responsibility for evidence-based policy in cardiovascular disease in rural communities: implications for persistent rural health inequalities.

Aust Health Rev 2020 Jun 5. Epub 2020 Jun 5.

The aim of this study was to understand, from the perspective of policy makers, who holds the responsibility for driving evidence-based policy to reduce the high burden of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in rural Australia.Qualitative interviews were conducted with policy makers at the local, state and federal government levels in Australia (n=21). Analysis was conducted using the Conceptual Framework for Understanding Rural and Remote Health to understand perceptions of policy makers around who holds the key responsibility in driving evidence-based policy. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/AH19189DOI Listing

Corrigendum to: Cost-benefit analysis of enhancing the uptake of long-acting reversible contraception in Australia.

Aust Health Rev 2020 Jun;44(3):501

Long-acting reversible contraception (LARC) is the most effective form of reversible contraception, but its use in Australia is low compared with other countries. The aim of this study was to evaluate the economic effect of an increase in LARC uptake to international rates.An economic model was designed to assess two scenarios, namely increasing the current rate of LARC uptake of 12. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/AH18190_CODOI Listing

Sustainability of antimicrobial stewardship programs in Australian rural hospitals: a qualitative study.

Aust Health Rev 2020 Jun;44(3):415-420

National Centre for Antimicrobial Stewardship, Peter Doherty Research Institute for Infection and Immunity, Level 5, 792 Elizabeth Street, Melbourne, Vic. 3000, Australia. Email: and Department of Medicine - Royal Melbourne Hospital, Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences, The University of Melbourne, Royal Parade, Melbourne, Vic. 3050, Australia; and Victorian Infectious Diseases Service, Royal Melbourne Hospital, 300 Grattan Street, Melbourne, Vic. 3050, Australia.

Objective The aim of this study was to explore the features of sustainable antimicrobial stewardship (AMS) programs in Australian rural hospitals and develop recommendations on incorporating these features into rural hospitals' AMS programs. Methods Lead AMS clinicians with knowledge of at least one AMS program sustained for >2 years in a health service in rural Australia were recruited to the study. A series of interviews was conducted and the transcripts analysed thematically using a framework method. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/AH19097DOI Listing

Do disasters predict international pharmacy legislation?

Aust Health Rev 2020 Jun;44(3):392-398

School of Clinical Sciences, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Qld 4000, Australia. Email: and Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Qld 4059, Australia.

Objective The aim of this study was to explore whether a relationship exists between the number of disasters a jurisdiction has experienced and the presence of disaster-specific pharmacy legislation. Methods Pharmacy legislation specific to disasters was reviewed for five countries: Australia, Canada, UK, US and New Zealand. A binary logistic regression test using a generalised estimating equation was used to examine the association between the number of disasters experienced by a state, province, territory or country and whether they had disaster-specific pharmacy legislation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/AH19093DOI Listing

The 'Australia Model': how industry and government collaboration is showing us how MedTech can lead the way to a world class advanced manufacturing capability.

Authors:
Ian Burgess

Aust Health Rev 2020 06;44(3):336

Medical Technology Association of Australia, Level 12, 54 Miller Street, North Sydney, NSW 2060, Australia. Email:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/AHv44n3_ED2DOI Listing

Governance lessons from COVID-19.

Authors:
Stephen Duckett

Aust Health Rev 2020 06;44(3):335

Grattan Institute, 8 Malvina Place, Carlton Vic. 3053, Australia. Email:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/AHv44n3_ED1DOI Listing

Health today versus health tomorrow: does Australia really care less about its future health than other countries do?

Aust Health Rev 2020 Jun;44(3):337-339

Centre for Applied Health Economics, Menzies Health Institute Queensland, Griffith University, G40_8.83, Gold Coast Campus, Southport, Qld 4222, Australia. Email:

Economic evaluation provides important evidence on value for money in health care and is routinely used in health technology assessment processes. The relevant costs and benefits of health care that are considered may arise now and/or in the future, and the relative importance placed on costs and benefits in the future is reflected in the discount rate applied to them. In this paper we note that Australia appears to apply one of the highest discount rates in the world to the assessment of future healthcare benefits. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/AH20057DOI Listing

Gap in funding for specialist hospitals treating patients with traumatic spinal cord injury under an activity-based funding model in New South Wales, Australia.

Aust Health Rev 2020 Jun;44(3):365-376

John Walsh Centre for Rehabilitation Research, Kolling Institute, Sydney Medical School - Northern, Faculty of Medicine and Health, The University of Sydney, St Leonards, Sydney, NSW 2065, Australia. Email:

Objective The aim of this study was to estimate the difference between treatment costs in acute care settings and the level of funding public hospitals would receive under the activity-based funding model. Methods Patients aged ≥16 years who had sustained an incident traumatic spinal cord injury (TSCI) between June 2013 and June 2016 in New South Wales were included in the study. Patients were identified from record-linked health data. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/AH19083DOI Listing

Frequent general practitioner visits are protective against statin discontinuation after a Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme copayment increase.

Aust Health Rev 2020 Jun;44(3):377-384

Center of Health Services Research, School of Population and Global Health, M431, 35 Stirling Highway, University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA 6009, Australia. Email:

Objective This study assessed the effect of the frequency of general practitioner (GP) visitation in the 12 months before a 21% consumer copayment increase in the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS; January 2005) on the reduction or discontinuation of statin dispensing for tertiary prevention. Methods The study used routinely collected, whole-population linked PBS, Medicare, mortality and hospital data from Western Australia. From 2004 to 2005, individuals were classified as having discontinued, reduced or continued their use of statins in the first six months of 2005 following the 21% consumer copayment increase on 1 January 2005. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/AH19069DOI Listing
June 2020
1.000 Impact Factor

Trends in opioid prescribing in Australia: a systematic review.

Aust Health Rev 2020 Apr;44(2):277-287

The University of Queensland Faculty of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, 288 Herston Road, Herston, Qld 4066, Australia. Email: and The Wesley Hospital, 451 Coronation Drive, Auchenflower, Brisbane, Qld 4066, Australia. Email:

Objective This review systematically identified studies that estimated the prevalence of prescription opioid use in Australia, assessed the prevalence estimates for bias and identified areas for future research. Methods Literature published after 2000 containing a potentially representative estimate of prescription opioid use in adults, in the community setting, in Australia was included in this review. Studies that solely assessed opioid replacement, illicit opioid usage or acute hospital in-patient use were excluded. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/AH18245DOI Listing

Priorities for improved management of acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease: analysis of cross-sectional continuous quality improvement data in Aboriginal primary healthcare centres in Australia.

Aust Health Rev 2020 Apr;44(2):212-221

University Centre for Rural Health, University of Sydney, 61 Uralba Street, Lismore, NSW 2480, Australia. Email:

Objective This study investigated the delivery of guideline-recommended services for the management of acute rheumatic fever (ARF) and rheumatic heart disease (RHD) in Australian primary healthcare centres participating in the Audit and Best Practice for Chronic Disease (ABCD) National Research Partnership project. Methods ARF and RHD clinical audit data were collected from 63 Aboriginal centres in four Australian jurisdictions using the ABCD ARF/RHD audit tool. Records of up to 30 patients treated for ARF and/or RHD were analysed per centre from the most recent audit conducted between 2009 and 2014. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/AH19132DOI Listing
April 2020
1.000 Impact Factor

International Year of the Nurse and the Midwife.

Authors:
Sue Matthews

Aust Health Rev 2020 Apr;44(2):170-171

The Royal Women's Hospital, Locked Bag 300, Grattan Street and Flemington Road, Parkville, Vic. 3052, Australia. Email:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/AHv44n2_ED2DOI Listing

Realising the value of nursing and midwifery.

Aust Health Rev 2020 Apr;44(2):169

Australian Government Department of Health, GPO Box 9848, Canberra, ACT 2601, Australia. Email:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/AHv44n2_ED1DOI Listing

Cultural safety in hospitals: validating an empirical measurement tool to capture the Aboriginal patient experience.

Aust Health Rev 2020 Apr;44(2):205-211

Hunter Medical Research Institute, Lot 1, Kookaburra Circuit, New Lambton Heights, NSW 2305, Australia. Email:

Objective The aim of the present study was to develop a scale to measure cultural safety in hospitals from an Aboriginal patient perspective. Methods The Cultural Safety Survey was designed to measure five key characteristics of cultural safety that contribute to positive hospital experiences among Aboriginal hospital patients. Investigators developed a range of different methods to assess the validity and reliability of the scale using a sample of 316 participants who had attended a New South Wales hospital in the past 12 months. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/AH19227DOI Listing

Integrating a pharmacist into the perioperative setting.

Aust Health Rev 2020 Mar 20. Epub 2020 Mar 20.

This paper describes the integration of a pharmacist into a perioperative environment and the ensuing quality and economic benefits. Deficiencies were identified in medication management in operating theatres (OT) at a large tertiary hospital. A perioperative pharmacist was employed for a 6-month pilot period, with permanent funding dependent on demonstration of agreed economic benefits. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/AH19126DOI Listing

Culturally safe and sustainable solution for Closing the Gap-registered patients discharging from a tertiary public hospital.

Aust Health Rev 2020 Apr;44(2):200-204

Princess Alexandra Hospital, Queensland Health, 199 Ipswich Road, Woolloongabba, Qld 4102, Australia. Email: and Faculty of Medicine, The University of Queensland, 199 Ipswich Road, Woolloongabba, Qld 4102, Australia. Email:

This case study describes the development, implementation and review of a sustainable and culturally sensitive procedure for a hospital-funded discharge medicine subsidy for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients registered with the Closing the Gap (CTG) program discharging from a public hospital. A 7-day fully subsidised medication supply was approved to be offered to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients admitted under cardiac care teams, including cardiology and cardiothoracic surgery patients. Patients were offered the option of a 7-day supply free of cost to them or a full Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS) supply if preferred. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/AH18160DOI Listing

Emotional exhaustion among regional doctors in training and the application of international guidelines on sustainable employability management for organisations.

Aust Health Rev 2020 Mar 18. Epub 2020 Mar 18.

The first objective of this study was to assess the associations between individual, community and hospital factors with emotional exhaustion (EE) among rural Australian doctors in training (DITs); the second objective was to apply criteria from an international standard that measures sustainable employability in organisations.A cross-sectional study of 70 DITs was conducted. Odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of EE across individual, community and organisational factors were calculated. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/AH19121DOI Listing

Characteristics and clinical outcomes of index versus non-index hospital readmissions in Australian hospitals: a cohort study.

Aust Health Rev 2020 Feb;44(1):153-159

Discipline of Medicine, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA 5005, Australia. Email:

Objective Risk factors and clinical outcomes of non-index hospital readmissions (readmissions to a hospital different from the previous admission) have not been studied in Australia. The present study compared characteristics and clinical outcomes between index and non-index hospital readmissions in the Australian healthcare setting. Methods This retrospective cohort study included medical admissions from 2012 to 2016 across all major public hospitals in South Australia. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/AH18040DOI Listing
February 2020

Value-based healthcare - meeting the evolving needs of our population.

Authors:
Sally Lewis

Aust Health Rev 2019 Oct;43(5):485

NHS Wales, Crown Building, Cardiff CF10 3NQ, UK.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/AHv43n5_EDDOI Listing
October 2019

Corrigendum to: Preventable hospitalisations in regional Queensland: potential for primary health?

Aust Health Rev 2019 Aug;43(4):483

The aims of this study were to: (1) use local health data to examine potentially preventable hospitalisations (PPHs) as a proportion of total hospital separations and estimated costs to a large regional hospital in northern Queensland, including differences associated with Indigenous status; and (2) identify priority conditions and discuss issues related to strategic local primary health intervention. A cross-sectional analysis was conducted using Queensland Hospital Admitted Patient Data Collection data (July 2012-June 2014) restricted to 51087 separations generated by 29485 local residents. PPHs were identified from the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems 10th Revision Australian Modification (ICD-10-AM) and procedure codes using National Healthcare Agreement definitions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/AH18033_CODOI Listing

Time for structural reform in mental health: who is up for the challenge?

Authors:
Ian Hickie

Aust Health Rev 2019 Aug;43(4):361-362

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/AHv43n4_EDDOI Listing

Corrigendum to: Widening participation of Māori and Pasifika students in health careers: evaluation of two health science academies.

Aust Health Rev 2019 Jul;43(3):360

The aim of the present study was to evaluate the short-term outcomes of two health science academies established by a district health board in South Auckland, New Zealand, to create a health workforce pipeline for local Māori and Pasifika students. A mixed-methods approach was used, involving background discussions with key informants to generate an initial logic model of how the academies work, followed by secondary analysis of students' records relating to retention and academic achievement, a survey of senior academy students' interest in particular health careers and face-to-face interviews and focus groups with students, families and teachers. Academy students are collectively achieving better academic results than their contemporaries, although selection decisions are likely to contribute to these results. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/AH17170_CODOI Listing

Differentiating between average and high-performing public healthcare managers: implications for public sector talent management.

Aust Health Rev 2020 Jun;44(3):434-442

Department of Public Health, La Trobe University, Bundoora, Vic. 3086, Australia. Email:

Objective Ensuring sufficient qualified and experienced managers is difficult for public sector healthcare organisations in Australia, with a limited labour market and competition with the private sector for talented staff. Although both competency-based management and talent management have received empirical support in association with individual and organisational performance, there have been few studies exploring these concepts in the public healthcare sector. This study addresses this gap by exploring the perceived differences in demonstration of core competencies between average and higher-performing managers in public sector healthcare organisations. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/AH19087DOI Listing

Management and outcomes of health practitioner complaints in Australia: a comparison of the national and New South Wales systems.

Aust Health Rev 2020 Apr;44(2):180-189

Sydney Law School, University of Sydney, New Law School Building (F10), Camperdown, NSW 2006, Australia. Email:

Objective: The aim of this study was to summarise the process and outcomes of complaints from five regulated health professions in Australia, and to compare these between the national and New South Wales (NSW) systems.

Methods: This is a retrospective cohort study of all complaints lodged from 1 July 2012 to 31 December 2013 for medicine, nursing and midwifery, dentistry, psychology and pharmacy registered practitioners. Data were extracted from the Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency, the NSW Health Professional Councils' Authority and the NSW Health Care Complaints Commission databases. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/AH18262DOI Listing

Strengthening care for children: pilot of an integrated general practitioner-paediatrician model of primary care in Victoria, Australia.

Aust Health Rev 2020 Feb 12. Epub 2020 Feb 12.

The aim of this study was to assess the acceptability of a novel, integrated general practitioner (GP)-paediatrician model of care, aiming to reduce referrals to hospitals and improve primary care quality.A pre-post study was conducted with five general practice clinics in north-west Melbourne. Over 12 months, 49 GPs and 896 families participated in the intervention that included weekly to fortnightly paediatrician-GP co-consultation sessions at the general practice, monthly case discussions and telephone or email clinical support for GPs. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/AH19177DOI Listing
February 2020

Maximising the value of clinical registry information through integration with a health service clinical governance framework: a case study.

Aust Health Rev 2020 Jun;44(3):421-426

Alfred Health, 55 Commercial Road, Melbourne, Vic. 3004, Australia. Email:

This initiative sought to identify unit participation in clinical registries within a large metropolitan health service and to develop approaches to integration of registry reporting within the organisational clinical governance framework to maximise potential quality improvement benefits. The initiative, led by the Medical Services Department at Alfred Health, initially involved identifying health service participation in clinical registries via a range of mechanisms, including one-on-one meetings with clinical registry investigators. In conjunction with the Clinical Governance Unit, tools to summarise and track clinical registry information at Alfred Health over time were developed and piloted. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/AH19004DOI Listing

Emergency department after-hours primary contact physiotherapy service reduces analgesia and orthopaedic referrals while improving treatment times.

Aust Health Rev 2020 Jun;44(3):485-492

Emergency Department, John Hunter Hospital, Lookout Road, New Lambton Heights, NSW 2305, Australia. Email:

Objective The aims of this study were to identify: (1) whether an after-hours emergency department (ED) collaborative care service using primary contact physiotherapists (PCPs) improves treatment times for musculoskeletal and simple orthopaedic presentations; and (2) differences in orthopaedic referral rates and analgesia prescription for patients managed by PCPs compared with secondary contact physiotherapists. Methods A prospective observational study was conducted of diagnosed, matched patients seen in a 4-day week after-hours ED primary contact physiotherapy service in a tertiary referral ED. Patients presenting with a musculoskeletal or simple orthopaedic diagnosis reviewed by a physiotherapist as either the primary or secondary physiotherapy contact between 1630 and 2030 hours from Saturday to Tuesday were included in the analysis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/AH18259DOI Listing

Sociodemographic and health risk profile associated with participation in a private health insurance weight loss maintenance and chronic disease management program.

Aust Health Rev 2020 Jan 29. Epub 2020 Jan 29.

Identifying who participates in chronic disease management programs yields insights into program reach and appeal. This study investigated sustained participation in a remotely delivered weight loss maintenance program offered to Australian private health insurance members.All participants completing an initial 18-week weight loss program were eligible for a maintenance phase. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/AH19046DOI Listing
January 2020

'…If I don't have that sort of money again, what happens?': adapting a qualitative model to conceptualise the consequences of out-of-pocket expenses for cancer patients in mixed health systems.

Aust Health Rev 2020 Jun;44(3):355-364

UWA Medical School, The University of Western Australia, M507, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, WA 6009, Australia. Email: and Corresponding author. Email:

Objective The aim of this study was to explore Western Australian cancer patients' experiences of out-of-pocket expenses (OOPE) during diagnosis and cancer treatment using a phenomenological approach. Methods Semi-structured interviews were conducted with a purposive convenience sample of 40 Western Australian cancer patients diagnosed with breast, lung, prostate or colorectal cancer. Participants were asked about the impact of their diagnosis, the associated costs and their experience within the health system. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/AH18250DOI Listing

Cancer patients' use of and attitudes towards medicinal cannabis.

Aust Health Rev 2020 Jan 21. Epub 2020 Jan 21.

Access to medicinal cannabis is a timely and important issue in cancer care. Recent legislative changes in Australia have increased access to medicinal cannabis, but the views of people with cancer on this topic are poorly understood. The aim of this study was to explore the prevalence of the use of and attitudes towards medicinal cannabis among people with cancer. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/AH19066DOI Listing
January 2020

Smoke-free hospital grounds.

Aust Health Rev 2020 Jun;44(3):405-409

St Vincent's Hospital Sydney, 390 Victoria Street, Darlinghurst, NSW 2010, Australia. Email:

This study investigated whether the implementation of a multicomponent intervention project could improve compliance with the New South Wales (NSW) Health smoke-free healthcare policy. Environmental interventions were implemented on the hospital grounds for a 12-week period. Compliance was measured by a pre- and postintervention observational count of smokers on the hospital grounds. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/AH19125DOI Listing

Role of Aboriginal Health Workers and Liaison Officers in quality care in the Australian acute care setting: a systematic review.

Aust Health Rev 2020 Jun;44(3):427-433

Southgate Institute for Health, Society and Equity, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, SA 5001, Australia. Email:

Objective The aim of this study was to identify the contribution of Aboriginal Health Workers and Liaison Officers (AHWLOs) to quality of care in the acute health care setting in Australia. Methods A systematic review of peer-reviewed literature focused on the role of AHWLOs and quality processed and quality outcomes. Authors undertook study selection based on inclusion criteria and performed quality assessment using critical appraisal tools from the Joanna Briggs Institute. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/AH19101DOI Listing

Heart Failure Integrated Care Project: overcoming barriers encountered by primary health care providers in heart failure management.

Aust Health Rev 2020 Jun;44(3):451-458

Central and Eastern Sydney Primary Health Network, Level 3, 15 Kensington Street, Kogarah, NSW 2217, Australia. Email:

Objective Heart failure (HF) is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. A significant proportion of HF patients will have repeated hospital presentations. Effective integration between general practice and existing HF management programs may address some of the challenges in optimising care for this complex patient population. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/AH18251DOI Listing

eMental health service use among Australian youth: a cross-sectional survey framed by Andersen.

Aust Health Rev 2019 Dec 16. Epub 2019 Dec 16.

Young adults aged 18-24 years often delay or avoid seeking help for their mental health concerns. eMental health, the use of the Internet to deliver mental health information, services and care, offers a low-cost, easy-access option. However the factors that influence online help-seeking among this cohort remain unclear. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/AH19095DOI Listing
December 2019

Development of a physiotherapy-led bronchoscopy service: a regional hospital perspective.

Aust Health Rev 2019 Dec 12. Epub 2019 Dec 12.

Extended scope of practice (ESoP) and advanced scope of practice (ASoP) physiotherapy roles have been in place in the UK for over 20 years. However, interest in these types of services appears to be only just evolving within Australia. Although ESoP and/or ASoP cardiorespiratory roles in intensive care units (ICU) may be perceived to be more achievable in large metropolitan teaching hospitals, at least 67% of Australian ICUs provide physiotherapy services. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/AH19144DOI Listing
December 2019

Liability and collaborative arrangements for nurse practitioner practice in Australia.

Aust Health Rev 2020 Apr;44(2):172-177

The Susan Wakil School of Nursing and Midwifery, Faculty of Medicine and Health, The University of Sydney, 88 Mallett Street, Camperdown, NSW 2050, Australia. Email: and Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Missenden Road, Camperdown, NSW 2050, Australia. Email:

The purpose of this paper is to clarify the relationship between medical practitioners (MPs) and nurse practitioners (NPs) in general, and privately practising NPs (PPNPs) in particular, in relation to collaboration, control and supervision in Australia, as well as to explore the difficulties reported by PPNPs in establishing mandated collaborative arrangements with MPs in Australia. In order for the PPNPs to have access to the Medicare Benefit Schedule (MBS) and Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS) in Australia, they are required, by law, to establish a collaborative arrangement with an MP or an entity that employs MPs. This paper begins by describing the history of and requirements for collaborative arrangements, then outlines the nature of successful collaboration and the reported difficulties. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/AH19072DOI Listing

Strengthening teamwork capability in allied health: implementation of a team development program in a metropolitan health service.

Aust Health Rev 2020 Jun;44(3):443-450

Princess Alexandra Hospital, Metro South Hospital and Health Service, 199 Ipswich Road, Woolloongabba, Brisbane, Qld 4102, Australia. Email: and Centre for Functioning and Health Research, Metro South Hospital and Health Service, PO Box 6053, Buranda, Brisbane, Qld 4102, Australia. Email:

Objective Collaborative practice is critical to optimising patient outcomes in contemporary healthcare settings. Evidence suggests interprofessional learning is an effective way to develop teamwork capabilities, yet these skills are traditionally developed in professional silos, or not at all. This study evaluated the implementation of a team development program, the Team Management Systems (TMS) program, for allied health staff within a large metropolitan health service. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/AH19055DOI Listing

Evidence-based law making on voluntary assisted dying.

Aust Health Rev 2019 Nov 29. Epub 2019 Nov 29.

Voluntary assisted dying is a major social policy issue with significant implications for the health system, health and medical professionals and the wider community. Voluntary assisted dying is now lawful in Victoria in limited circumstances, and other states are likely to follow Victoria and legalise the practice. In the same way that we expect the making of health policy and the provision of health care to be evidence based, so too should we should expect evidence-based law making from our parliamentarians on this important topic. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/AH19201DOI Listing
November 2019

Accuracy checking of dispensed medications by a pharmacy technician: a hospital case study.

Aust Health Rev 2020 Jun;44(3):410-414

Pharmacy Department, Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital, Herston, Qld 4029, Australia. Email: and School of Pharmacy, Pharmacy Australia Centre of Excellence, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Qld 4102, Australia; and School of Clinical Sciences, Faculty of Health, Queensland University of Technology, Kelvin Grove, Qld 4059, Australia. Email:

Medication order accuracy checking is an integral and time-consuming component of the current Australian pharmacist's role. However, the pharmacy profession internationally has moved towards separating the checking task into two parts: a clinical check performed by the registered pharmacist and a technical accuracy check delegated to an appropriately trained pharmacy technician. This case study demonstrates that in an Australian hospital pharmacy context, appropriately trained pharmacy technicians have the potential to be more proficient and time efficient than pharmacists when undertaking accuracy checking of dispensed medications. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/AH18267DOI Listing

Safeguarding injured Victorians: development and implementation of an evidence-informed system to manage therapeutic uncertainty and decision making in a compensable environment.

Aust Health Rev 2020 Jun;44(3):493-496

Health Strategy, WorkSafe Victoria, Level 9, 567 Collins Street, Melbourne, Vic. 3000, Australia. Email: and La Trobe Sports and Exercise Medicine Research Centre, La Trobe University, Bundoora, Vic. 3086, Australia. Email:

WorkSafe Victoria and the Transport Accident Commission are two Victorian government agencies that determine the policies that guide decisions to fund treatments and services provided to Victorians injured in transport or workplace accidents. These agencies identified that an internal system was required to manage requests for funding of new or emerging treatments. In particular, the agencies recognised a system that supported consistency in decision making in the context of therapeutic uncertainty and ensured the safety of injured Victorians was needed. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/AH19155DOI Listing

'This is uncharted water for all of us': challenges anticipated by hospital clinicians when voluntary assisted dying becomes legal in Victoria.

Aust Health Rev 2020 Jun;44(3):399-404

Department of Palliative Care, Austin Health, 145 Studley Road, Heidelberg, Vic. 3084, Australia. Email: and Department of Quality and Patient Safety, Austin Health, 145 Studley Road, Heidelberg, Vic. 3084, Australia.

Objective The aim of this study was to identify the challenges anticipated by clinical staff in two Melbourne health services in relation to the legalisation of voluntary assisted dying in Victoria, Australia. Methods A qualitative approach was used to investigate perceived challenges for clinicians. Data were collected after the law had passed but before the start date for voluntary assisted dying in Victoria. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/AH19108DOI Listing
June 2020
1.000 Impact Factor