13 results match your criteria Australian Geographer[Journal]

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Immigration and slow-growth economies: the experience of South Australia and Tasmania.

Authors:
A Beer

Aust Geogr 1998 ;29(2):223-40

"This paper examines national immigration processes and demographic change in South Australia and Tasmania over the last four decades. Particular attention is paid to the inter-censal period 1986-1991.. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00049189808703216DOI Listing

Population questions for Australian cities: reframing our narratives.

Authors:
R Fincher

Aust Geogr 1998 Mar;29(1):31-47

"I focus on urban environments and on immigration as that segment of population growth often viewed as having certain effects on cities. The paper argues for a reframing of narratives linking population and urban environments, so that both immigrant-led population growth and the condition of urban environments in Australia can be understood as the product of the political and economic interpretations being made of the nation's internationalisation, which in turn has consequences for diversity amongst places and peoples." Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00049189808703202DOI Listing

Measuring short-term population mobility among indigenous Australians: options and implications.

Authors:
J Taylor

Aust Geogr 1998 Mar;29(1):125-37

"Despite the fact that indigenous Australians are known to be frequently mobile over the short term, statistical information regarding this population movement is grossly deficient... Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00049189808703207DOI Listing

Migration, well-being and development in coastal New South Wales 1976-91.

Authors:
I Burnley

Aust Geogr 1996 May;27(1):53-75

"The study seeks first to ascertain whether the age profile of net migration [in coastal New South Wales, Australia] varied during the period 1976-91... Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00049189608703157DOI Listing

Australia and international treaties: population.

Authors:
G Hugo

Aust Geogr 1995 May;26(1):53-60

"The separation of environmental and population issues globally is reflected in the fact that the setting of international agendas to tackle them was for all intents and purposes undertaken at separate international meetings--the Earth Summit in Rio de Janeiro in 1992 and the International Population Conference in Cairo in 1994. This paper presents an overview of Australia's international involvement in population issues and suggests that until recently Australia had played a minor political role in international population initiatives primarily, and perhaps ironically, because it has been a world leader in demographic research and teaching for several decades." Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00049189508703130DOI Listing

The turnaround in Australia: some first observations from the 1991 census.

Authors:
G Hugo

Aust Geogr 1994 May;25(1):1-17

"The aim of this paper is to utilise recently released census results to examine patterns of population change in non-metropolitan Australia during the 1986-91 period, focusing particularly upon the net migration component of that change. The paper presents an overview of recent trends in population change in non-metropolitan areas and then moves to an analysis of net migration patterns in non-metropolitan local government areas during the late 1980s using a Life Table Survival Ratio technique to estimate net migration. It appears that the trends observed in the early 1980s have continued into the late 1980s and early 1990s, and that overall the 'turnaround' is slowing down and becoming more diversified, more complex, and much less predictable in the 1990s. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00049189408703094DOI Listing

Far beyond the Gulf: the implications of warfare for Asian labour migration.

Authors:
J Connell

Aust Geogr 1992 May;23(1):44-50

The implications of the Gulf War are assessed for the countries in Asia that send labor migrants to the Middle East. "This paper seeks to examine the effects of.. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00049189208703052DOI Listing

The end of an affair? Geography and fertility in late post-transitional societies.

Authors:
M G Wilson

Aust Geogr 1990 May;21(1):53-67

A common theme in the writings of population geographers with a fertility interest has been a concern with the convergence of interregional fertility differentials. It is now clear, however, that the widespread achievement in western societies of below-replacement fertility has resulted in a dramatic diminution of most forms of differential fertility, whether sectoral or spatial. The question of "what remains for the spatial analyst working in the traditional ecological mode?" must therefore be asked. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00049189008702999DOI Listing

Estimating proximate populations for an extensive set of locations in Australia.

Aust Geogr 1985 Nov;16(4):295-300

"The paper reports the use of Australian Resources Information System to calculate two proximate populations (people living within (i) 150 and (ii) 500 km) for the centroids of each of 3,000 half by half degree geodetic grid cells covering Australia. The use of proximate population data is exemplified by computing a map of the eighteen regions collectively containing a maximum fraction of the Australian population." The data used are from the 1981 census. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00049188508702887DOI Listing
November 1985

Disaggregating the elderly.

Authors:
Mccracken Kwj

Aust Geogr 1985 ;16:218-24

"In much geographical research on the elderly the older population is treated as a single age bloc. Data from Sydney [Australia] are used to illustrate how this collective approach can bury significant spatially varying characteristics of age subgroups within the elderly population. Analysis of these subgroup variations is essential for effective targeting of services and programmes for the aged. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00049188508702875DOI Listing
October 1985

An ecological analysis of demographic variation in rural New South Wales.

Aust Geogr 1981 ;15:27-38

"Despite an outpouring of ecological work by geographers and others over the past fifteen years, interest in the ecologies of rural areas has been low and firm generalizations about, for example, variations in social and demographic characteristics within rural regions have been slow to emerge. The objective of this paper is to discern the extent to which variations in demographic structures and processes within rural areas are patterned according to the nature of the agricultural economy. Some significant associations between age-sex structure and measures of agricultural intensity and type of farming are discerned for the New South Wales case, but the patterning is complex and owes much to differentiating forces not examined here. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00049188108702793DOI Listing
December 1983

Recent urban growth in Papua New Guinea.

Authors:
R Skeldon

Aust Geogr 1980 ;14(5):267-77

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00049188008702773DOI Listing
December 1982
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