829 results match your criteria Australian Critical Care [Journal]


A call for better doctor-nurse collaboration: A qualitative study of the experiences of junior doctors and nurses in escalating care for deteriorating ward patients.

Aust Crit Care 2019 Feb 13. Epub 2019 Feb 13.

Alice Lee Centre for Nursing Studies, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Clinical Research Centre, Block MD11, Level 2,10 Medical Drive, Singapore 117597.

Background: Despite the widespread implementation of medical emergency teams (METs) in hospitals to provide immediate interventions to deteriorating ward patients, little is known about how junior doctors and nurses escalate care for deteriorating ward patients in hospitals with established MET services.

Objectives: The objective of this research study was to explore the experiences of junior doctors and nurses in escalating care for clinically deteriorating patients in general wards.

Methods: Twenty-four individual interviews were conducted with 10 junior doctors and 14 registered nurses of a 1000-bed acute general hospital with the most established MET service in Singapore. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.aucc.2019.01.006DOI Listing
February 2019

An audit of propofol administration in the intensive care unit: Infusion pump-recorded versus electronically documented amounts.

Aust Crit Care 2019 Feb 12. Epub 2019 Feb 12.

Departments of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, Western Health, Melbourne, Australia; Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia. Electronic address:

Background: Although propofol is widely used for sedation in intensive care units around Australia, evaluation of bedside nursing practices of the administration of propofol have been limited. We investigated whether there was a discrepancy between the amount of propofol delivered by the infusion pump and that recorded electronically and consequently patient exposure to avoidable harms.

Aims: The aim of this research was to compare the total amount of propofol administered to intensive care patients via a programmable infusion pump with that documented in the electronic medical record (EMR). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.aucc.2018.12.005DOI Listing
February 2019

Gut function in the intensive care unit - What is 'normal'?

Aust Crit Care 2019 Feb 7. Epub 2019 Feb 7.

Intensive Care Service, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Missenden Road, Camperdown, NSW 2050, Australia; Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Missenden Road, Camperdown, NSW 2050, Australia. Electronic address:

Background: Management of gut function in the intensive care unit (ICU) is often protocol-driven. Protocols for enteral feeding or bowel management are based on assumptions about what is 'normal' gastrointestinal motility during critical illness or in the early postoperative period, although 'normal' has not been well described in this group.

Objectives: This study aimed to describe aspects of gut function based on an audit of current ICU patients. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.aucc.2018.12.007DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Intensive care nurses' well-being: A systematic review.

Aust Crit Care 2019 Jan 21. Epub 2019 Jan 21.

School of Clinical Sciences, Auckland University of Technology (AUT), North Shore Campus, 90 Akoranga Drive, Northcote, Auckland 0627, New Zealand. Electronic address:

Background And Purpose: Unique work challenges of intensive care nurses can cause both stress and distress to nurses, evident in prevailing literature regarding burnout, compassion fatigue, and moral distress. Identifying factors contributing to intensive care nurses' well-being would complement this focus on nurse ill-being, supporting the development of workplace well-being initiatives. The review seeks to balance the existing negatively skewed evidence base by investigating intensive care nurses' well-being rather than ill-being. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.aucc.2018.11.068DOI Listing
January 2019

Improving quality and safety during intrahospital transport of critically ill patients: A critical incident study.

Aust Crit Care 2019 Jan 21. Epub 2019 Jan 21.

Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, PO Box 457, SE-405 30, Gothenburg, Sweden; Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care, Kungälvs Hospital, SE-442 83, Kungälv, Sweden. Electronic address:

Background: Intrahospital transport is a high-risk procedure for critically ill patients, yet there is little known about how the transport team manages critical incidents that occur.

Objectives: The aim of this study was to explore critical care nurses' and physicians' experiences and practices associated with critical incidents during the transfer process in critically ill patients.

Methods: As a part of an ethnographic study, semistructured interviews were performed using the critical incident technique. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.aucc.2018.12.003DOI Listing
January 2019

An observational study on the practice of noninvasive ventilation at a tertiary level Australian intensive care unit.

Aust Crit Care 2019 Jan 19. Epub 2019 Jan 19.

Division of Critical Care, Christian Medical College, Vellore, India.

Background: Failure of Non-Invasive Ventilation (NIV) is associated with increased morbidity and mortality among critically ill patients. Although there is evidence of association between disease related factors and NIV failure, it is unclear whether factors related to NIV application contribute to NIV failure.

Objectives: To evaluate NIV failure rate and factors associated with NIV failure. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.aucc.2018.11.067DOI Listing
January 2019
2 Reads

Memory making in end-of-life care in the adult intensive care unit: A scoping review of the research literature.

Aust Crit Care 2019 Jan 17. Epub 2019 Jan 17.

Sydney Nursing School, University of Sydney, Camperdown, NSW, Australia.

Objective: The objective of this review is to describe the practice of memory making as part of end-of-life care within an adult intensive care setting and determine reported outcomes.

Methods: A scoping review of the literature was performed. Data were collected from sources such as ProQuest, CINAHL, Medline, Embase, PsycINFO, and PubMed using combinations of the keywords: including adult, critical care, intensive care, ICU, death, dying, grief, bereavement, end?of?life, memento*, memor*, keepsak*, and transitional object. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.aucc.2018.12.002DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Cardiovascular risk assessment tools: A scoping review.

Aust Crit Care 2019 Jan 17. Epub 2019 Jan 17.

University School of Nursing Nuestra Señora de Candelaria, University of La Laguna, Hospital Universitario Ntra. Sra. De Candelaria, Ctra. del Rosario, 145, 38010, Santa Cruz de Tenerife, Spain. Electronic address:

Objectives: The objective of this review was to describe cardiovascular risk (CVR) assessment methods and to identify evidence-based practice recommendations when dealing with population at risk of developing cardiovascular diseases.

Review Methods And Data Sources: A literature review following the Arksey and O'Malley scoping review methodology was conducted. By using appropriate key terms, literature searches were conducted in PubMed, SciELO, Cochrane Library, Dialnet, ENFISPO, Medigraphic, ScienceDirect, Cuiden, and Lilacs databases. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S10367314183000
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.aucc.2018.09.008DOI Listing
January 2019
3 Reads

Safety culture in two metropolitan Australian tertiary hospital intensive care units: A cross-sectional survey.

Aust Crit Care 2019 Jan 16. Epub 2019 Jan 16.

School of Nursing, Queensland University of Technology and Intensive Care Services, Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital, Metro North Health Service District, Queensland, Australia; Institute for Skin Integrity and Infection Prevention, University of Huddersfield, United Kingdom. Electronic address:

Background: Safety culture is significant in the complex intensive care environment, where the consequences of human error can be catastrophic. Research within Australian intensive care units has been limited and little is understood about the safety culture of intensive care units in Queensland.

Aim: The aim was to evaluate and compare safety culture in the intensive care units of two metropolitan tertiary hospitals in Queensland. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.aucc.2018.11.069DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

The impact of removing gastric residual volume monitoring and enteral nutrition rate titration in adults receiving mechanical ventilation.

Aust Crit Care 2019 Jan 14. Epub 2019 Jan 14.

QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, 300 Herston Road, Herston 4006, QLD, Australia.

Background: Monitoring gastric residual volume (GRV) and titrating enteral nutrition (EN) towards goal rate are common practices in the intensive care unit (ICU) despite limited supportive evidence. We investigated the effect of removal of GRV monitoring and commencing EN at goal rate had on EN provision in mechanically ventilated ICU patients.

Methods: We conducted a single-centre, pre-post implementation study, in a 10-bed ICU comprising 181 patients with ventilation ≥48 h and given EN within 24 h of intubation. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S10367314183018
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.aucc.2018.12.001DOI Listing
January 2019
7 Reads

Lessons learnt from the implementation of same-day discharge after percutaneous coronary intervention.

Aust Crit Care 2019 Jan 9. Epub 2019 Jan 9.

Menzies Health Institute, Queensland, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Griffith University, Australia.

Background: Change in healthcare organisations is constant and requires adequate resources for effective implementation. Same-day discharge after percutaneous coronary intervention has been found to be no different from the patients who stayed overnight after procedure; however, its uptake remains low.

Objectives: The aim of the study was to identify what factors helped or hindered the implementation of same-day discharge. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.aucc.2018.11.066DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read
1.265 Impact Factor

Measurement of stress in stable neonates during ambulance transportation: A feasibility study.

Aust Crit Care 2019 Jan 4;32(1):28-33. Epub 2018 Jul 4.

Institute of Higher Education and Research in Healthcare - IUFRS, University of Lausanne and Lausanne University Hospital, Lausanne, Switzerland; Department Woman-Mother-Child, Lausanne University Hospital, Lausanne, Switzerland. Electronic address:

Background: Stress during ambulance transportation has been described in adult healthy volunteers where indicators of stress such as heart rate, blood pressure, and cortisol increased significantly. In neonates, a few studies have described stress in ambulance with behavioural scales. However, there is no study in neonates assessing both behavioural and physiological indicators of stress simultaneously during ambulance transportation. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S10367314183004
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.aucc.2018.06.006DOI Listing
January 2019
2 Reads

Science in paediatric and neonatal intensive care nursing: International forces providing evidence to change clinical practice.

Authors:
F J Gill J M Latour

Aust Crit Care 2019 Jan;32(1):1-3

School of Nursing, Midwifery and Paramedicine, Faculty Health Sciences, Curtin University, Kent St, Bentley, WA 6102, Australia; School of Nursing and Midwifery, Faculty of Health and Human Sciences, University of Plymouth, 8-11 Kirkby Place, Room 205, Drake Circus, Plymouth PL4 8AA, United Kingdom. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S1036-7314(18)30385-0DOI Listing
January 2019
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A nurse-led critical care outreach program to reduce readmission to the intensive care unit: A quasi-experimental study with a historical control group.

Aust Crit Care 2018 Dec 27. Epub 2018 Dec 27.

The Nethersole School of Nursing, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, New Territories, Hong Kong SAR, China. Electronic address:

Introduction: Various critical care outreach services have been developed and evaluated worldwide; however, the conflicting findings indicate the need to strengthen the outreach service research. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of a nurse-led critical care follow-up program on intensive care unit (ICU) readmission and hospital mortality in patients with respiratory problems discharged from the ICU in Hong Kong.

Methods: A quasi-experimental study design, with a historical control and a prospective intervention for 13 months, was used. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.aucc.2018.11.005DOI Listing
December 2018
2 Reads

Level of satisfaction of critical care patients regarding the nursing care received: Correlation with sociodemographic and clinical variables.

Aust Crit Care 2018 Dec 24. Epub 2018 Dec 24.

Fundamental Care and Medical-Surgical Nursing Department, School of Nursing, University of Barcelona, Pavelló de Govern, 3° pl. 08907 L'Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona, Spain; IDIBELL, Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute, Avinguda de la Granvia, 199. 08908 L'Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona, Spain.

Background: The satisfaction of critical care patients regarding the nursing care received is a key indicator of the quality of hospital care. It is, therefore, essential to identify the factors associated with the level of satisfaction of critical care patients.

Objectives: To analyse the level of satisfaction of critical care patients in relation to the nursing care received and to determine the relationship between the level of satisfaction and the sociodemographic and clinical variables. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.aucc.2018.11.002DOI Listing
December 2018
1 Read

Are point-of-care measurements of glycated haemoglobin accurate in the critically ill?

Aust Crit Care 2018 Dec 24. Epub 2018 Dec 24.

Discipline of Acute Care Medicine, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, Australia; Intensive Care Unit, Royal Melbourne Hospital, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia. Electronic address:

Introduction: Critically ill patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and chronic hyperglycaemia may benefit from a more liberal approach to glucose control than patients with previously normal glucose tolerance. It may therefore be useful to rapidly determine HbA1c concentrations. Point-of-care (POC) analysers offer rapid results but may be less accurate than laboratory analysis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.aucc.2018.11.064DOI Listing
December 2018
2 Reads

Nurses' perceived barriers and educational needs for early mobilisation of critical ill patients.

Aust Crit Care 2018 Dec 24. Epub 2018 Dec 24.

Mo-Im Kim Nursing Research Institute, College of Nursing, Yonsei University, Seoul, Republic of Korea. Electronic address:

Background: Early mobilisation (EM) of critically ill patients is an evidence-based intervention designed to improve treatment outcomes and enhance the quality of life after intensive care. However, several barriers exist to its establishment in clinical practice. Thus, the objective of the present study was to identify barriers perceived by critical care nurses, corresponding educational needs, and provide useful information for program implementation in Korea. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.aucc.2018.11.065DOI Listing
December 2018
19 Reads

Chlorhexidine-impregnated gel dressing compared with transparent polyurethane dressing in the prevention of catheter-related infections in critically ill adult patients: A pilot randomised controlled trial.

Aust Crit Care 2018 Dec 14. Epub 2018 Dec 14.

General and Specialized Nursing Department, Ribeirão Preto College of Nursing, University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, São Paulo, Brazil. Electronic address:

Background: In patients with short-term percutaneous central venous catheter (CVC), it is recommended that a dressing be applied to the catheter insertion site to prevent catheter-related infections.

Objectives: The objective of this study was to assess the feasibility of a randomised controlled trial to compare the efficacy of chlorhexidine-impregnated dressing with that of polyurethane dressing in the prevention of catheter-related infections in critically ill adult patients with short-term percutaneous CVC.

Methods: One hundred fifteen patients with a CVC were randomised to chlorhexidine-impregnated gel dressing (chlorhexidine gel group) or transparent polyurethane dressing (polyurethane group) between April and December 2014. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.aucc.2018.11.001DOI Listing
December 2018
2 Reads

Ventilator-associated events in children: A review of literature.

Aust Crit Care 2019 Jan 13;32(1):55-62. Epub 2018 Dec 13.

School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work, The University of Queensland, Australia; University of the Sunshine Coast, Sippy Downs, Australia.

Background: The complexity and variation in ventilator associated pneumonia (VAP) definitions in paediatrics may pose threats to the reliable identification of VAP. The revision of the surveillance definition to ventilator-associated event (VAE) has been mandated in adult populations, to overcome these issues. However, the evidence for application of the definition is unknown in children. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.aucc.2018.11.063DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Effects of family-centred care interventions on preterm infants and parents in neonatal intensive care units: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials.

Aust Crit Care 2019 Jan 13;32(1):63-75. Epub 2018 Dec 13.

Department of Nursing, Hunan Children's Hospital, Changsha, Hunan Province, People's Republic of China; School of Nursing and Midwifery, Faculty of Health and Human Sciences, University of Plymouth, Plymouth, UK. Electronic address:

Objective: The objective of this study was to review English and Chinese randomised controlled trials (RCTs) to determine the effects of family-centred care (FCC) interventions on preterm infants' and parental outcomes in the neonatal intensive care units and to conduct a meta-analysis.

Review Method Used: Systematic review and meta-analysis.

Data Sources: Medline, CINAHL, Embase, PsycINFO, BNI, and AMED and the Chinese databases CNKI and Wanfang Data were searched in April 2017 and updated in August 2018. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.aucc.2018.10.007DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read
1.265 Impact Factor

Differences in the characteristics, treatment, and outcomes of patient groups reviewed by intensive care liaison nurses in Australia: A multicentre prospective study.

Aust Crit Care 2018 Dec 10. Epub 2018 Dec 10.

Intensive Care Unit, Austin Health, 145 Studley Road, Heidelberg, Victoria, 3084, Australia.

Background: There is a lack of knowledge about tasks intensive care unit liaison nurses (ICU LNs) perform during patient review, despite this role operating in at least 31 acute care hospitals in Australia.

Objectives: To evaluate the tasks that ICU LNs perform during patient review in the following referral subcategories: review after ICU discharge, rapid response team (RRT) review, and ward referral.

Methods: A 2-month prospective observational study using standardised case report forms to collect data on patients reviewed by ICU LNs in 20 Australian hospitals was conducted. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.aucc.2018.11.004DOI Listing
December 2018
2 Reads

Structures, processes and outcomes of specialist critical care nurse education: An integrative review.

Aust Crit Care 2018 Dec 5. Epub 2018 Dec 5.

Perth Children's Hospital, Child and Adolescent Health Service, Hospital Avenue, Nedlands, Perth, 6009 Australia; School of Nursing, Midwifery & Paramedicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Curtin University, Kent St, Bentley, WA, 6845, Australia. Electronic address:

Objectives: The objective of this study was to review and synthesise international literature to reveal the contemporary structures, processes, and outcomes of critical care nurse (CCN) education.

Method: An integrative review on specialist critical care education was guided by Whittemore and Knafl's integrative review steps: problem identification; literature search; and data evaluation, analysis, and presentation. Donabedian's Quality Framework (Structure-Process-Outcome) provided a useful analytical lens and structure for the reporting of findings. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.aucc.2018.09.007DOI Listing
December 2018
1 Read
1.265 Impact Factor

Quality of life in family caregivers of patients in the intensive care unit: A longitudinal study.

Aust Crit Care 2018 Nov 29. Epub 2018 Nov 29.

Department of Research and Development, Division of Emergencies and Critical Care, Oslo University Hospital Norway, P. O. Box 4950 Nydalen N-0424 Oslo, Norway; Department of Nursing Science, Institute of Health and Society, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, P.O.Box 1078 Blindern NO-0316 Oslo, Norway. Electronic address:

Background: Family caregivers of patients in the intensive care unit (ICU) experience impairments in the quality of life. Previous studies report that psychological quality of life improves over time, but there has been limited longitudinal research, and measurement points have differed. Factors such as age, gender, and posttraumatic stress symptoms have been found to be associated with the quality of life, but level of hope and its associations with the quality of life have not been investigated. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.aucc.2018.09.005DOI Listing
November 2018
2 Reads

Magnesium sulphate replacement therapy in cardiac surgery patients: A systematic review.

Aust Crit Care 2018 Nov 27. Epub 2018 Nov 27.

Centre for Quality and Patient Safety Research - Monash Health Partnership, 246 Clayton Road, Clayton, Victoria, 3168, Australia; Deakin University, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Geelong, 221 Burwood Highway, Burwood, Victoria, 3125, Australia. Electronic address:

Objective: The objective of this review was to identify evidence to inform clinical practice guidelines for magnesium sulphate (MgSO) replacement therapy for postoperative cardiac surgery patients.

Data Sources: Three databases were systematically searched: CINAHL Complete, MEDLINE Complete, and EmBase.

Review Method Used: A systematic literature review method was used to locate, appraise, and synthesise available evidence for each step of the medication management cycle (indication, prescription, preparation, administration, and monitoring) for MgSO replacement therapy. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.aucc.2018.09.004DOI Listing
November 2018
2 Reads

A patient-centred care and engagement program in intensive care reduces adverse events and improves patient and care partner satisfaction.

Authors:
Elizabeth Manias

Aust Crit Care 2018 Nov 21. Epub 2018 Nov 21.

Deakin University, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Centre for Quality and Patient Safety Research, 221 Burwood Highway, Burwood, 3125, Victoria, Australia. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.aucc.2018.10.001DOI Listing
November 2018
1 Read

Clinical supervision and ward orientation predict new graduate nurses' intention to work in critical care: Findings from a prospective observational study.

Aust Crit Care 2018 Nov 21. Epub 2018 Nov 21.

Western Sydney University, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Centre for Applied Nursing Research (CANR), Ingham Institute for Applied Medical Research, Locked Bag 1797, Penrith NSW 2751, Australia. Electronic address:

Introduction: Clinical supervision and transitional support programs are important in supporting the successful transition and retention of new graduate nurses and their intention to work in specialty settings. However, little is known about which elements of support programs influence this intention. This study aimed to examine new graduate nurses' perceptions of clinical supervision and the practice environment, and how these influenced their intention to stay in critical and non-critical care areas following their transitional support program. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.aucc.2018.09.003DOI Listing
November 2018
14 Reads

Prevalence of pressure injury in adults presenting to the emergency department by ambulance.

Aust Crit Care 2018 Nov 20. Epub 2018 Nov 20.

School of Nursing, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia; Intensive Care Services, Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital, Brisbane, Australia; Institute for Skin Integrity and Infection Prevention, University of Huddersfield, UK. Electronic address:

Introduction: Pressure injuries are harmful, painful, and potentially preventable. Although hospital-acquired pressure injury prevalence is decreasing, it is unclear if some pressure injuries develop before hospital admission. The objective of this study was to investigate the prevalence of pressure injury in adults on arrival by ambulance to the emergency department (ED). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.aucc.2018.10.002DOI Listing
November 2018
9 Reads

Nurses' recognition and response to clinical deterioration in the cardiac catheterisation laboratory.

Aust Crit Care 2018 Nov 20. Epub 2018 Nov 20.

School of Nursing and Midwifery, Deakin University, Geelong, Australia; Centre for Quality and Patient Safety Research, Deakin University, Geelong, Australia.

Background: Patients presenting to the cardiac catheter laboratory for treatment of unstable acute coronary syndromes (ACS) experience a mismatch in myocardial oxygen supply and demand, causing vital sign abnormalities prior to neurological, cardiac and respiratory deterioration. Delays in detecting clinical deterioration and escalating care increases risk of adverse events, unplanned intensive care (ICU) admission, cardiac arrest, and in-hospital mortality.

Objectives: The objective of the study was to explore how nurses in the cardiac catheter laboratory (CCL) recognise and respond to clinical deterioration in patients with unstable ACS undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.aucc.2018.09.006DOI Listing
November 2018
9 Reads

Violence and aggression in the intensive care unit: What is the impact of Australian National Emergency Access Target?

Aust Crit Care 2018 Nov 19. Epub 2018 Nov 19.

Centre for Quality and Patient Safety Research, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Deakin University, Geelong, Victoria, Australia. Electronic address:

Introduction: Violence in healthcare settings is a concern for healthcare professionals and patients. Media reports, and debate within the healthcare profession, and the academic literature infer that workplaces such as intensive care units are becoming exposed to increasing violence. Increases in the incidence of violent behaviour are sometimes attributed to the increased pressure on emergency departments to accelerate the throughput of patients to meet targets. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.aucc.2018.10.003DOI Listing
November 2018
7 Reads

A comparison of the opinions of intensive care unit staff and family members of the treatment intensity received by patients admitted to an intensive care unit: A multicentre survey.

Aust Crit Care 2018 Nov 13. Epub 2018 Nov 13.

The Canberra Hospital, Australia; Australian National University Medical School, Australia.

Background: Achieving shared decision-making in the intensive care unit (ICU) is challenging because of limited patient capacity, leading to a reliance on surrogate decision-makers. Prior research shows that ICU staff members often perceive that patients receive inappropriate or futile treatments while some surrogate decision-makers of patients admitted to the ICU report inadequate communication with physicians. Therefore, understanding the perceptions of both ICU staff and surrogate decision-makers around wishes for ICU treatments is an essential component to improve these situations. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S10367314183007
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.aucc.2018.08.008DOI Listing
November 2018
11 Reads

The association between unexplained falls and cardiac arrhythmias: A scoping literature review.

Aust Crit Care 2018 Nov 9. Epub 2018 Nov 9.

Sydney Nursing School, University of Sydney, NSW, Australia. Electronic address:

Background: Falls in older adults are common. Age is a risk factor for falls and with an ageing population, presentation to the emergency department (ED) resulting from falls is rising. Reasons for falls in older adults are numerous and include cardiac arrhythmias. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S10367314173040
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.aucc.2018.08.003DOI Listing
November 2018
11 Reads

Critically ill haematological cancer patients: How far the severity index score can determine the outcome and duration of aggressive support?

Aust Crit Care 2018 Nov 4;31(6):337-338. Epub 2018 Jul 4.

Department of Anaesthesiology and Critical Care, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Raipur, India. Electronic address:

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S10367314183013
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.aucc.2018.06.002DOI Listing
November 2018
2 Reads

Caring: not just for patients and families.

Aust Crit Care 2018 Nov;31(6):335-336

Australian Critical Care.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S1036-7314(18)30257-1DOI Listing
November 2018
1 Read

Characteristics of patient communication and prevalence of communication difficulty in the intensive care unit: An observational study.

Aust Crit Care 2018 Oct 19. Epub 2018 Oct 19.

Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Australia; Centre for Education & Workforce Development, Sydney Local Health District, Australia.

Purpose: To summarise the patient communication status in an intensive care unit (ICU), including methods of communication used and the frequency, degree and nature of communication breakdown.

Materials And Methods: A multidisciplinary daily ward audit was conducted on ten consecutive weekdays in a 30-bed general ICU of a tertiary Australian hospital. Data included patient demographics, patients' mode of communication and the level of difficulty in communicating. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S10367314183010
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.aucc.2018.09.002DOI Listing
October 2018
21 Reads

Opinions and practices of blood glucose control in critically ill patients with pre-existing type 2 diabetes in Australian and New Zealand intensive care units.

Aust Crit Care 2018 Oct 19. Epub 2018 Oct 19.

Department of Intensive Care, Austin Hospital, Australia.

Background: Approximately 9000 patients with type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) are admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU) in Australia and New Zealand annually. For these patients, recent exploratory data suggest that targeting a more liberal blood glucose range during ICU admission may be safe and potentially beneficial. However, the current approach to blood glucose management of patients with T2DM in Australia and New Zealand ICUs is not well described, and there is uncertainty about clinician equipoise for trials of liberal glycaemic control in these patients. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.aucc.2018.09.001DOI Listing
October 2018
2 Reads

Implementation of the Critical Care Pain Observation Tool increases the frequency of pain assessment for noncommunicative ICU patients.

Aust Crit Care 2018 Oct 9. Epub 2018 Oct 9.

Australian and New Zealand Intensive Care Research Centre (ANZIC-RC), Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Level 3, 553 St Kilda Road, Melbourne VIC 3004, Australia. Electronic address:

Background: Pain is a common stressor for ICU patients, necessitating routine assessment. For patients who are unable to communicate, self-report tools are unsuitable, and the use of an observational tool is required to assess pain appropriately. The Critical Care Pain Observation Tool (CPOT) is the most reliable tool currently available to assess pain in these patients. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S10367314173050
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.aucc.2018.08.007DOI Listing
October 2018
3 Reads

Perceived control and quality of life among recipients of implantable cardioverter defibrillator.

Aust Crit Care 2018 Oct 3. Epub 2018 Oct 3.

College of Nursing, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, USA.

Background: Perceived control is strongly associated with health-related quality of life (HRQOL) among patients with chronic conditions, and it is possible to increase perceived control with appropriate intervention. Little is known about the relationship between perceived control and HRQOL in implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) recipients.

Objectives: To determine the relationship of perceived control with quality of life in ICD recipients and to determine predictors of perceived control in this population. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S10367314183005
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.aucc.2018.08.005DOI Listing
October 2018
2 Reads

Eight-hour versus 12-h shifts in an ICU: Comparison of nursing responses and patient outcomes.

Aust Crit Care 2018 Sep 24. Epub 2018 Sep 24.

Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital, Herston, QLD 4006, Australia. Electronic address:

Introduction: Controversy remains about the impact of 12-h shift patterns on staff satisfaction and health and on patient outcomes. Consequently, the objective of the study was to investigate the effect on nurses and patients of 8-h rostering compared with 12-h rostering.

Methods: We conducted a two-phase survey. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S10367314183005
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.aucc.2018.08.004DOI Listing
September 2018
28 Reads

Culturally sensitive communication at the end-of-life in the intensive care unit: A systematic review.

Aust Crit Care 2018 Sep 17. Epub 2018 Sep 17.

School of Nursing and Midwifery, Deakin University, 1 Gheringhap Street, Geelong, 3220 VIC, Australia; Centre for Quality and Patient Safety Research, Deakin University, 221 Burwood Highway, Burwood, 3125 VIC, Australia.

Objectives: The objectives of this systematic review were the following: (i) to describe whether culturally sensitive communication is used by clinicians (nurses and physicians) when communicating with patients and families at the end-of-life in the intensive care unit and (ii) to evaluate the impact of culturally sensitive communication at the end-of-life. The systematic review question was how is culturally sensitive communication used by clinicians when communicating with patients and families at the end-of-life in the intensive care unit?

Data Sources: A search of CINAHL, MEDLINE, Embase, and PsycINFO databases identified all peer-reviewed research evidence published in English between January 1994 and November 2017. Two authors independently assessed articles for inclusion. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.aucc.2018.07.003DOI Listing
September 2018
2 Reads

Systematic reviews, 'systematic reviews' and more: When variation leads to confusion.

Aust Crit Care 2018 Sep;31(5):255-256

Australian Critical Care.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S1036-7314(18)30199-1DOI Listing
September 2018
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Prehospital clinical presentation in patients with acute coronary syndrome complicated by cardiogenic shock: A single center study.

Aust Crit Care 2018 Sep 10. Epub 2018 Sep 10.

Intensive Cardiac Therapy Clinic, Medical University of Lodz, Poland.

Background: The development of cardiogenic shock remains the most important factor affecting the prognosis of patients with acute coronary syndrome. Despite significant advances in treatment, achieved in the last two decades, the mortality rate is still very high. The development of knowledge about the pathophysiology of cardiogenic shock, necessitates a thorough and comprehensive assessment of its progress at all stages of medical care. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.aucc.2018.08.002DOI Listing
September 2018
14 Reads

Development of a position statement for Australian critical care nurse education.

Aust Crit Care 2018 Sep 6. Epub 2018 Sep 6.

Sydney Nursing School, University of Sydney, MO2, 88 Mallett Street, Camperdown, NSW 2050, Australia. Electronic address:

Position statements are used by large organisations such as the Australian College of Critical Care Nurses to publically present an official philosophy or beliefs and to propose recommendations. Position statements are increasingly used by health departments and healthcare facilities to allocate resources and to guide and audit nursing practice, yet there are limited resources on the process of their development. A position statement should help readers better understand the issue, communicate solutions to problems, and inform decision-making. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S10367314183012
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.aucc.2018.08.001DOI Listing
September 2018
14 Reads
1.265 Impact Factor

The perceived and experienced role of the nurse unit manager in supporting the wellbeing of intensive care unit nurses: An integrative literature review.

Aust Crit Care 2018 Aug 30. Epub 2018 Aug 30.

Flinders University College of Nursing and Health Sciences, SA, Australia.

Introduction: The number of patients requiring admission into intensive care units (ICUs) is increasing worldwide. Concurrently, recruitment and retention of the ICU nursing workforce is becoming a major challenge due to the high intensity environment, heavy workloads, and decreasing nurse wellbeing. Nurse unit managers play a vital role in promoting and supporting ICU nurse wellbeing, yet little is known about perceptions and experiences of this role. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.aucc.2018.06.003DOI Listing
August 2018
3 Reads

Impact of an education program on the performance of nurses in providing oral care for mechanically ventilated children.

Aust Crit Care 2018 Aug 17. Epub 2018 Aug 17.

MS in Pediatric Nursing, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; Dept. of Biostatistics, School of Management and Information Technology, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

Background: Mechanically ventilated children are prone to pneumonia due to immobilization and lack of laryngeal (cough) reflex and swallowing. Nurses are directly responsible for many clinical approaches used to prevent ventilator-associated pneumonia.

Objective: The research objective is to determine the effectiveness of the nurse education program on the performance of nurses in providing oral care for mechanically ventilated children. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.aucc.2018.06.007DOI Listing
August 2018
3 Reads

Nurses' and physicians' approaches to delirium management in the intensive care unit: A focus group investigation.

Aust Crit Care 2018 Aug 16. Epub 2018 Aug 16.

Department of Intensive Care 4131, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Blegdamsvej 9, 2100 Copenhagen OE, Denmark; Centre for Research in Intensive Care, Tagensvej 22, 2200 Copenhagen N, Denmark; University of Copenhagen, Health and Medical Sciences, Blegdamsvej 3, 2200 Copenhagen N, Denmark. Electronic address:

Background: Delirium in the intensive care unit (ICU) is common, but reliable evidence-based recommendations are still limited.

Objectives: The aim of our study was to explore nurses' and physicians' experiences and approaches to ICU delirium management.

Method: Our study had a qualitative multicentre design using interdisciplinary focus groups and framework analysis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.aucc.2018.07.001DOI Listing
August 2018
3 Reads

Facilitating the relocation of an intensive care unit from shared room to single room setting: Staff perceptions on the effectiveness of a multicomponent intervention.

Aust Crit Care 2018 Aug 4. Epub 2018 Aug 4.

School of Nursing and Midwifery, Griffith University, Australia; National Centre of Research Excellence in Nursing Interventions for Hospitalised Patients (NCREN), Menzies Health Institute Queensland, Griffith University, Australia; Intensive Care Unit, Gold Coast University Hospital, Gold Coast Health, Southport, Queensland, Australia.

Background: Current strategies for new and redesigned intensive care units (ICUs) involve incorporation of single occupancy rooms. These changes have largely been made for infection control and patient privacy reasons. However, there is limited literature available on how to manage the transition of an ICU from shared room to a single room environment. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.aucc.2018.06.008DOI Listing
August 2018
6 Reads
1.265 Impact Factor

Clinical deterioration of ward patients in the presence of antecedents: A systematic review and narrative synthesis.

Aust Crit Care 2018 Jul 16. Epub 2018 Jul 16.

Australian Catholic University, Australia.

Aim: The aim of this review was to identify and synthesise published accounts of recognising and responding to patient deterioration in the presence of deterioration antecedents.

Design: The systematic review canvassed four electronic databases/search engines for studies of adult ward patients who had altered physiological parameters before developing major adverse events.

Synthesis Methods: The findings were synthesised using a narrative approach. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.aucc.2018.06.004DOI Listing
July 2018
4 Reads

Inspiratory muscle training for intensive care patients: A multidisciplinary practical guide for clinicians.

Aust Crit Care 2018 Jul 11. Epub 2018 Jul 11.

Intensive Care Unit, Canberra Hospital, Canberra, Australia; School of Medicine, Australian National University, Canberra, Australia; Faculty of Health, University of Canberra, Canberra, Australia.

Objectives: To describe a multidisciplinary approach to inspiratory muscle training (IMT) for patients in the intensive care unit (ICU).

Background: Inspiratory muscle weakness is a known consequence of prolonged mechanical ventilation, and there is emerging evidence that specific IMT can ameliorate this weakness. However, IMT is not yet standard practice in many ICUs, possibly because of the wide variety of methods reported and a lack of published practical guidelines. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.aucc.2018.06.001DOI Listing
July 2018
5 Reads

The impact of the addition of nurse practitioners to surgical intensive care units: A retrospective cohort study.

Aust Crit Care 2018 Jul 10. Epub 2018 Jul 10.

Centre for Health Practice Innovation, Menzies Health Institute Queensland, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Griffith University, Gold Coast Campus, Parklands Drive, QLD, 4222, Australia. Electronic address:

Background: Demand for surgical critical care is increasing, but work-hour restrictions on residents have affected many hospitals. Recently, the use of nurse practitioners (NPs) as providers in the intensive care unit (ICU) has expanded rapidly, although the impacts on quality of care have not been evaluated.

Objectives: To compare the outcomes of critically ill surgical patients before and after the addition of NPs to the ICU team. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.aucc.2018.05.004DOI Listing
July 2018
7 Reads