2,729 results match your criteria Australasian Psychiatry[Journal]


Risk perception research informing recommendations for COVID-19 preventative health measures and public messaging.

Australas Psychiatry 2022 Aug 8:10398562221117060. Epub 2022 Aug 8.

Academic Unit of Psychiatry and Addiction Medicine, 104822The Australian National University Medical School, Canberra, ACT, Australia.

Objective: To provide a commentary on evidence-based recommendations for COVID-19 pandemic risk communication for more effective public health measures.

Method: We apply the principles of risk communication to address key issues in the COVID-19 pandemic.

Results: Risk perception and communication research usefully informs preventative health education and public messaging during disease outbreaks such as the current COVID-19 pandemic, especially for those with severe mental illness. Read More

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Safety over privacy: Family violence, information sharing and mental health care.

Australas Psychiatry 2022 Aug 6:10398562221115621. Epub 2022 Aug 6.

Early in Life Mental Health Service, 2538Monash Health, Clayton, VIC, Australia.

Objective: This article aims to provide an update on information sharing practices in mental health services, in light of recent inter-sectoral family violence reforms in Victoria. We hope that this article will help increase familiarity with this contemporary best practice and improve clinician confidence in its application.

Method: We use three case scenarios to illustrate the application of these relatively new family violence frameworks in mental health services, with a focus on approaches to information sharing. Read More

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Why Australia should move towards nationally consistent mental health legislation?

Australas Psychiatry 2022 Aug 4:10398562221116290. Epub 2022 Aug 4.

97581University of Notre Dame Australia, Sydney, NSW, Australia.

Objective: Mental Health Acts (MHAs) are important pieces of legislation which include essential definitions of mental illness and mental disorder and are used to guide decision-making regarding treatment, including involuntary admissions. In Australia, responsibility for reviewing this legislation falls under the jurisdiction of State and Territory Governments, resulting in interstate variations of legislative definitions and care requirements. In this paper, we outline some of the main differences between MHAs, and argue that it is time for Australia to enact nationally consistent Mental Health Legislation. Read More

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Young people don't tend to ask for help more than once: Child and adolescent psychiatrists' views on ailing mental health services for young New Zealanders.

Australas Psychiatry 2022 Aug 2:10398562221115624. Epub 2022 Aug 2.

Tu Te Akaaka Roa, New Zealand National Committee, 170472Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists, Melbourne, VIC, Australia; and.

Objectives: To explore the views of New Zealand doctors working in child and adolescent psychiatry regarding the state of public mental health services.

Methods: All practicing child and adolescent psychiatrists/advanced trainees were electronically surveyed in August 2021. Quantitative and qualitative analysis of feedback was undertaken. Read More

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Metabolic and clinical profiles of young people with mood or psychotic disorders who are prescribed metformin in an inpatient setting.

Australas Psychiatry 2022 Jul 19:10398562221115607. Epub 2022 Jul 19.

Brain and Mind Centre, 90098University of Sydney, Camperdown, NSW, Australia.

Objective: Youth with early-onset mood or psychotic disorders are occasionally prescribed metformin to manage cardiometabolic risk. This retrospective study explores the demographic, clinical and metabolic factors associated with metformin prescription youth with mood or psychotic disorders.

Method: Participants included 72 youth with mood or psychotic disorders from a young adult mental health inpatient unit, of which 18 (33%) were newly prescribed metformin, and 54 (66%) were not prescribed metformin. Read More

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Shaping Mental Health Reform - Key Tasks for an Incoming Government.

Australas Psychiatry 2022 Jul 19:10398562221115637. Epub 2022 Jul 19.

Brain & Mind Centre, 4334University of Sydney, Camperdown, NSW, Australia.

Objective: To describe a recent process by which mental health service sector leaders identified key elements of strategic, systemic and structural mental health reform. These elements could guide an incoming Federal government.

Method: The paper describes the process undertaken by the Sydney Mental Health Policy Forum between 2019 and 2022. Read More

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Disneyland's castle: A psychiatric history with relevance for modern practice?

Australas Psychiatry 2022 Jul 11:10398562221113467. Epub 2022 Jul 11.

Bern, Switzerland.

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"A service we know was missing": bridging the gap between referral to admission for women with moderate-severe perinatal mental health disorders at an Australian psychiatric mother-baby unit.

Australas Psychiatry 2022 Jul 4:10398562221112851. Epub 2022 Jul 4.

Helen Mayo House, Perinatal and Infant Mental Health Services, 37234Women's and Children's Health Network, Adelaide, SA, Australia; and Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA, Australia.

Objectives: Service demand at Australian psychiatric mother-baby units is high. This project aimed to test a model of care providing step up/step down support to women with moderate-severe perinatal mental health disorders awaiting hospital admission.

Method: A multi-disciplinary team was convened to provide pre-admission assessment and support to women waiting for admission, as well as post-discharge support as needed. Read More

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Mental health services need action on organisational culture and justice.

Australas Psychiatry 2022 Jun 28:10398562221111945. Epub 2022 Jun 28.

Consortium of Australian-Academic Psychiatrists for Independent Policy and Research Analysis (CAPIPRA), Canberra, ACT, Australia; School of Medicine, 1974The University of Queensland, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane, QLD, Australia; and Departments of Psychiatry, Community Health and Epidemiology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, Canada.

Objective: A commentary on the usefulness of the concepts of organisational culture, organisational climate and justice on the quality and safety of mental health services and how conditions may be improved.

Conclusions: Organisational culture, organisational climate and justice impact upon the quality and safety of care, as well as well-being of staff, in mental health services. Psychiatrists and trainees, should consider, act and advocate for improved organisational culture, climate and justice. Read More

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Penumbra of the pandemic workplace for psychiatrists and trainees in Australia.

Australas Psychiatry 2022 Jun 24:10398562221109742. Epub 2022 Jun 24.

Consortium of Australian-Academic Psychiatrists for Independent Policy and Research Analysis (CAPIPRA), Canberra, ACT, Australia; College of Medicine and Public Health, Flinders University, Adelaide, SA, Australia.

Objective: A commentary on the workforce, infrastructure and health of psychiatrists and trainees providing psychiatric care during the COVID-19 pandemic in Australia.

Conclusions: The wide-ranging workplace, health system and societal changes necessitated by the SARS-CoV-2 virus have altered the practice and working lives of psychiatrists, trainees and other healthcare workers, as well as the general population. There have been workplace innovations, recalibrations and losses. Read More

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Clinical psychology referral for individuals with auditory verbal hallucinations and schizophrenia: Therapy engagement, hallucination severity and distress.

Australas Psychiatry 2022 Jun 22:10398562221108815. Epub 2022 Jun 22.

Medical School, University of Western Australia, Perth, WA, Australia.

Objective: Test an intervention for people with schizophrenia and auditory verbal hallucinations at an acute inpatient unit (AIU) to engage with community therapy and reduce hallucination severity and associated distress. The trial cohort consisted of patients who after assessment by an AIU psychiatrist were not selected for an appointment with an AIU clinical psychologist and an opportunity for referral to a post-discharge community psychologist. An intervention providing the appointment and referral opportunity was compared to Treatment As Usual (TAU). Read More

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Improving quantification of anticholinergic burden using the Anticholinergic Effect on Cognition Scale - a healthcare improvement study in a geriatric ward setting.

Australas Psychiatry 2022 Jun 21:10398562221103117. Epub 2022 Jun 21.

Department of Gastroenterology, 26674Changi General Hospital, Singapore.

Objective: Anticholinergic burden refers to the cumulative effects of taking multiple medications with anticholinergic effects. This study was carried out in a public hospital in Singapore, aimed to improve and achieve a 100% comprehensive identification and review of measured, anticholinergic burden in a geriatric psychiatry liaison service to geriatric wards. We evaluated changes in pre-to post-assessment anticholinergic burden scores and trainee feedback. Read More

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Screening for obstructive sleep apnoea in patients with serious mental illness.

Australas Psychiatry 2022 Jun 17:10398562221108632. Epub 2022 Jun 17.

Sleep Disorders Centre, 67567The Prince Charles Hospital, Brisbane, QLD, Australia.

Objective: Patients with serious mental illness (SMI) are at increased risk of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). Despite this, OSA is frequently under-recognised in the psychiatric population. This study describes the results of OSA screening in SMI patients. Read More

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early intervention for psychosis in Australia: Is it still a 'best buy'?

Australas Psychiatry 2022 Jun 16:10398562221108917. Epub 2022 Jun 16.

Academic Unit of Psychiatry and Addiction Medicine, 104822Australian National University Medical School, Canberra Hospital, Canberra, ACT, Australia; and Consortium of Australian-Academic Psychiatrists for Independent Policy Research and Analysis (CAPIPRA), Canberra, ACT, Australia.

Objectives: Australia is piloting a stand-alone early intervention programme for psychosis, based on the Early Psychosis Prevention and Intervention Centre (EPPIC) model that was developed within mainstream Victorian State Government psychiatric services. The Australian early intervention programme is located in primary care, and badged as ' Early Psychosis Youth Services'. There are currently six metropolitan early intervention services with two further services planned for the 2023 Financial Year. Read More

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Falling into an identity crisis: Integrating identity into the assessment and management of falls in older adults.

Australas Psychiatry 2022 Jun 9:10398562221106687. Epub 2022 Jun 9.

Specialty of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine and Health, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia; Discipline of Psychiatry and Mental Health, Faculty of Medicine and Health, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, Australia; Jara Unit, Older People's Mental Health, 170496Concord Centre for Mental Health, Concord Hospital, Concord, NSW, Australia.

Objectives: This article examines the psychological effects of falls for older adults through the lens of identity and suggests these may be integrated in the assessment and management of older patients within acute care and rehabilitation settings post-fall. An illustrative vignette is described to demonstrate this approach.

Conclusion: Falls in older adults are complex phenomena which can lead to an identity threat, sometimes manifest as psychological symptoms and poor engagement in post-fall rehabilitation. Read More

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From the President.

Authors:

Australas Psychiatry 2022 06;30(3):413

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- An Interview with Sonja Cabarkapa: 'Think Globally, Act Locally'.

Authors:
Oliver Robertson

Australas Psychiatry 2022 06;30(3):289

Trainee Editor, Australasian Psychiatry.

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National Mental Health Performance Framework: Descriptive analysis of state and national data for 2019-2020.

Australas Psychiatry 2022 Jun 2:10398562221103807. Epub 2022 Jun 2.

College of Medicine and Public Health, Flinders University, Adelaide, SA, Australia; and Department of Psychiatry, Monash University, Clayton, VIC, Australia; and Consortium of Australian-Academic Psychiatrists for Independent Policy and Research Analysis (CAPIPRA), Canberra, ACT, Australia.

Objective: To compare key performance indicators for public state and territory specialist mental health services in Australia.

Methods: A descriptive analysis of the publicly-available National Mental Health Performance Framework key performance indicators (KPI), hosted by the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare for 2019-2020, at the national level and for states and territories.

Results: The real-world performance of public mental health services varied across the eight states and territories of Australia. Read More

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Medicare-subsidised mental health services from the beginning of Better Access in 2006-2007 to 2019-2020: Descriptive analysis by state, profession and consultation profile.

Australas Psychiatry 2022 May 30:10398562221104638. Epub 2022 May 30.

College of Medicine and Public Health, Flinders University, Adelaide, SA, Australia; and Department of Psychiatry, 2541Monash University, Clayton, VIC, Australia; and Consortium of Australian-Academic Psychiatrists for Independent Policy and Research Analysis (CAPIPRA), Canberra, ACT, Australia.

Objective: Since 2006, the Australian Federal Government has aimed at expanding mental healthcare through the 'Better Access' programme of Medicare-subsidised services by private practitioners. We comment on population access to subsidised mental health treatment via health professionals in Australia.

Methods: We descriptively analysed Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW) data. Read More

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Hitting balls in the dark or taking air swings in the light? Response to Suetani and Parker.

Authors:
William Lugg

Australas Psychiatry 2022 May 25:10398562221100981. Epub 2022 May 25.

7799Sydney, NSW.

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Ask depressed patients about brain fog to ensure melancholia is not mist.

Authors:
Gordon Parker

Australas Psychiatry 2022 May 23:10398562221104402. Epub 2022 May 23.

Discipline of Psychiatry and Mental Health, School of Clinical Medicine, 7800University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia.

Objective: This study aims to highlight cognitive 'brain fog' as a key depression sub-typing symptom, being weighted to melancholic (as against non-melancholic) depression and note its common persistence after episode remission.

Method: This paper weights clinical observation but considers several salient overview papers and research findings.

Results: While 'brain fog' is intrinsically non-specific in that it has multiple causes, when assessed as a second-order depressive sub-typing symptom, it has seemingly distinctive specificity to the melancholic sub-type, with many patients with melancholia resonating with such a descriptor question. Read More

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Grasping the nettle of danger: a commentary on how people perceive their health risks, impacting on their health behaviours.

Australas Psychiatry 2022 May 21:10398562221104001. Epub 2022 May 21.

Academic Unit of Psychiatry and Addiction Medicine, 104822The Australian National University Medical School, Canberra Hospital, Canberra, ACT, Australia, and Consortium of Australian-Academic Psychiatrists for Independent Policy and Research Analysis (CAPIPRA), Canberra, ACT, Australia.

Objective: To provide a commentary review, for psychiatrists and trainees, on the clinical relevance of risk perception for health behaviours and outcomes.

Conclusions: The core dimensions of risk perception are how a person perceives the and of an adverse outcome in the face of a threat. The two fundamental modes of how a threat is perceived are a rapid, intuitive, affective response followed by a slower, deliberate, cognitive appraisal. Read More

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Exploring the possible mental health and wellbeing benefits of video games for adult players: A cross-sectional study.

Australas Psychiatry 2022 May 22:10398562221103081. Epub 2022 May 22.

8494University of Otago, Wellington, New Zealand.

Objective: There is mixed evidence on the psychological effects of video games. While excessive use can be harmful, moderate use can have emotional, psychological and social benefits, with games successfully used in treating anxiety and depression. More data are required to understand how and for whom these benefits occur. Read More

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Improving the mental health of Australians: A renewed call for primary care psychiatry.

Australas Psychiatry 2022 May 20:10398562221104418. Epub 2022 May 20.

Health Research Institute, University of Canberra, Canberra, ACT, Australia; and Gold Coast Hospital and Health Service, Gold Coast, QLD, Australia.

Objective: To describe different ways to improve liaison between psychiatrists and general practitioners in Australia.

Conclusion: Strengthening the links between psychiatry and GPs in primary care is an effective approach to improve the mental health of Australians. Read More

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Specialised psychiatric beds and 24-hour residential care in Australia 2018-2019 - Comparative analysis and commentary according to international benchmarking.

Australas Psychiatry 2022 May 19:10398562221103121. Epub 2022 May 19.

Consortium of Australian-Academic Psychiatrists for Independent Policy and Research Analysis (CAPIPRA), Canberra, ACT, Australia; and College of Medicine and Public Health, 1065Flinders University, Adelaide, SA, Australia; and Department of Psychiatry, 2541Monash University, Wellington Road, Clayton, VIC, Australia.

Objective: A commentary on Australian specialised private and public psychiatric acute and non-acute inpatient care, and 24-hour-staffed community residential care with regard to international benchmarks.

Method: Descriptive analysis of specialised psychiatric beds from the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW) with the WHO Mental Health Atlas 2020, and an international Delphi consensus on optimal and minimal psychiatric beds per capita.

Results: Australian private sector beds have shown a 3. Read More

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