2,300 results match your criteria Australasian Psychiatry [Journal]


Life, liberty and the therapeutic relationship: examining the place of compulsory treatment in modern psychiatry.

Australas Psychiatry 2020 May 22:1039856220924319. Epub 2020 May 22.

Peninsula Health, Australia.

Objectives: Compulsory treatment in psychiatry is controversial and its use has been increasingly critiqued following the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities in 2006. This essay seeks to explore whether the restriction of personal liberty and autonomy that compulsory treatment requires can be justified on ethical or medical grounds.

Conclusions: Compulsory treatment is not without potential harms to the doctor-patient therapeutic relationship and patient engagement with mental health services. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1039856220924319DOI Listing

Student evaluations of teaching (SET): implications for medical education in psychiatry and an approach to evaluating SET and student performance.

Australas Psychiatry 2020 May 22:1039856220924327. Epub 2020 May 22.

Academic Unit of Psychiatry and Addiction Medicine, Australian National University Medical School, Canberra Hospital, Canberra, ACT, Australia.

Objective: We present reflections on student evaluation of teaching (SET) in the context of recent higher educational research that assesses SET, as well as concurrent and/or subsequent student performance.

Conclusions: In a sense, there is in-built cynicism in SET, with more favourable SET for easier assessment. There is emerging evidence that SET is inversely proportional to the performance of students in subsequent courses, i. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1039856220924327DOI Listing

The mental health of culturally and linguistically diverse offenders - what do we know?

Australas Psychiatry 2020 May 22:1039856220924315. Epub 2020 May 22.

Centre for Forensic Behavioural Science, Swinburne University of Technology, Australia.

Objective: A key challenge facing justice health service providers is addressing and treating the high rates of mental illness among offenders. It is well documented that rates of mental illness are substantially higher within prison populations compared to the general population. As such, the need to provide ongoing treatment to prisoners experiencing mental health issues is of fundamental importance. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1039856220924315DOI Listing

The case for greater mental health teaching in the pre-clinical medical school curriculum.

Authors:
Thomas P Nguyen

Australas Psychiatry 2020 May 22:1039856220924317. Epub 2020 May 22.

School of Medicine, Western Sydney University, Sydney, NSW.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1039856220924317DOI Listing

Corrigendum.

Authors:

Australas Psychiatry 2020 May 22:1039856220931327. Epub 2020 May 22.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1039856220931327DOI Listing

B·RIGHT: usability and satisfaction with a mobile app for self-managing emotional crises in patients with borderline personality disorder.

Australas Psychiatry 2020 May 22:1039856220924321. Epub 2020 May 22.

Consorci Sanitari del Maresme, Department of Psychiatry, Hospital of Mataró, Spain.

Objective: Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is a severe mental disorder characterized by emotional crises. To date, crisis interventions for BPD have been conducted via telephone calls and emergency units, which are associated with an extra amount of resources. The aim of this research was to test the usability and satisfaction with a psychotherapeutic mobile app for self-managing crises in BPD. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1039856220924321DOI Listing

Why do psychiatrists doubt the value of early intervention? The power of illusion.

Australas Psychiatry 2020 May 21:1039856220924323. Epub 2020 May 21.

Orygen, Australia; and Center for Youth Mental Health, The University of Melbourne, Australia.

Objective: Face validity and the best available evidence strongly support the value of early intervention (EI) for psychotic disorders, and increasingly for other mental illnesses. Yet its value continues to be intensely criticised by some academics and doubted by many psychiatrists. This disconnect is examined through the lens of the 'clinician's illusion'. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1039856220924323DOI Listing

A six-step brief intervention to reduce distress and increase treatment readiness in problem gamblers.

Australas Psychiatry 2020 May 19:1039856220901471. Epub 2020 May 19.

Monash Addiction Research Centre, Eastern Health Clinical School, Monash University, Australia.

Objective: The majority of people with gambling problems contact helplines when they are in crisis, hampering their capacity to explore suitable treatment options. To date, there has been limited research identifying the best way to support individuals to reduce distress and maximise further treatment-seeking. In this paper, we describe the development and piloting of the resulting six-step brief intervention. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1039856220901471DOI Listing

A case of right unilateral ultra-brief ECT in refractory mania with in situ cranial metallic object.

Australas Psychiatry 2020 May 12:1039856220927929. Epub 2020 May 12.

Sydney, NSW.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1039856220927929DOI Listing

The fentanyls: a 'future threat' for Australia?

Australas Psychiatry 2020 May 11:1039856220917074. Epub 2020 May 11.

The University of Melbourne, Australia.

Objective: The fentanyls have emerged as a significant public health threat in North America but much less so in Australia. We sought to identify reasons for this discrepancy and highlight harm reduction approaches that may mitigate a future Australian fentanyl epidemic.

Conclusions: Differences in drug use 'culture' and a supply of cheap high-quality methamphetamine in Australia may be reasons for the observed difference in fentanyl-related harm. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1039856220917074DOI Listing

The fentanyls: pharmacological and clinical aspects relevant to Australia.

Australas Psychiatry 2020 May 11:1039856220917317. Epub 2020 May 11.

The University of Melbourne, Australia.

Objective: North American and other jurisdictions have seen an alarming rise in the abuse of the fentanyls, with related overdose deaths. We sought to review this group of drugs to alert Australian psychiatrists and drug and alcohol clinicians to their clinical effects and potential harms.

Conclusions: The extreme potency of the fentanyls underlie their lethality. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1039856220917317DOI Listing

Obesity, physical activity and sleep quality in patients admitted to a posttraumatic stress inpatient ward.

Australas Psychiatry 2020 May 11:1039856220917075. Epub 2020 May 11.

School of Psychiatry, University of New South Wales, Australia; and St. John of God Health Care, Australia.

Objective: The aim of this paper was to cross-sectionally examine the association between physical health indicators and PTSD symptomatology.

Method: A cross-sectional study was conducted among inpatients of a service related trauma-focused ward. Physical and mental health indicators including sleep quality, fitness, physical activity, body mass index and PTSD symptomatology were assessed. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1039856220917075DOI Listing

Reflection of a 2-year journey since the introduction of psychiatric behaviour of concern (Psy-BOC) call, a medical emergency team (MET) call equivalent for the deteriorating mental health of patients.

Australas Psychiatry 2020 May 11:1039856220917077. Epub 2020 May 11.

Department of Mental & Addiction Health, Alfred Health, Australia.

Objective: To reflect on the challenges encountered and the resultant cultural changes that occurred during the implementation of psychiatric behaviour of concern (Psy-BOC), a medical emergency team (MET) equivalent for the deteriorating mental health of patients within an adult psychiatric inpatient unit.

Conclusions: Implementing Psy-BOC on an adult psychiatric inpatient unit has been challenging, but it has successfully embedded a systematic approach to early escalation and capacity building to prevent and manage harmful behaviours. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1039856220917077DOI Listing

Monash Gender Clinic: an overview of the current model of care.

Authors:
Jaco Erasmus

Australas Psychiatry 2020 May 11:1039856220917079. Epub 2020 May 11.

Monash Health, Australia.

Objective: This paper provides an update on recent developments at the largest state-funded gender clinic for adults in Australia. It focuses on the current staffing profile, the role of the mental health professional and the evolution of the clinic as a provider of specialist care supporting primary care providers who offer an informed consent model of care in accessing gender-affirming treatments.

Conclusions: While significant improvements have been made at the clinic to provide comprehensive care in a framework that is viewed more favourably by clients, gaps in clinical service provision persist and are in need of urgent attention. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1039856220917079DOI Listing

High-dose antipsychotic therapy and reflective prescribing: development of an online tool for rapid, easy calculation of antipsychotic total daily dose.

Australas Psychiatry 2020 May 11:1039856220917080. Epub 2020 May 11.

Metro South Addiction and Mental Health Services, Australia.

Objective: Safe and effective antipsychotic prescribing is a fundamental skill in psychiatric practice; however, antipsychotic medications are not without risk. These risks are increased when antipsychotics are prescribed in high doses, with or without polypharmacy. Decision-making regarding antipsychotic prescribing can be hampered by a lack of readily available or easily approachable tools for calculating and interpreting total daily doses, especially when antipsychotic polypharmacy is involved. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1039856220917080DOI Listing

Naturalistic outcomes of continuation right unilateral ultrabrief ECT in major depression: a retrospective chart review.

Australas Psychiatry 2020 May 11:1039856220917070. Epub 2020 May 11.

Cumberland Hospital, Australia.

Objective: Continuation treatment of major depression following an acute course of electroconvulsive treatment (ECT) may be often required to prevent relapse. Data on continuation phase of right unilateral ultrabrief ECT are sparse and there are doubts if it is inherently capable of relapse prevention.

Methods: All consecutive adult patients with major depression who received the first 'run' of continuation phase of right unilateral ultrabrief ECT over a 10-year period were routinely followed up. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1039856220917070DOI Listing

Supporting partners of mothers with severe mental illness through text - a feasibility study.

Australas Psychiatry 2020 May 7:1039856220917073. Epub 2020 May 7.

Queensland Centre for Perinatal and Infant Mental Health, Australia.

Objective: During the perinatal period, partners of mothers with severe mental illness (SMI) play an important role in managing the new baby and supporting the mothers' wellbeing. Providing information via mobile phone on infant care, partner support and self-care may assist partners in their support role.

Method: Partners (n = 23) of mothers with SMI were enrolled in a partner-focused SMS service sending brief texts 14 times per month for a maximum of 10 months. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1039856220917073DOI Listing

Reducing seclusion and restraint in a child and adolescent inpatient area: implementation of a collaborative problem-solving approach.

Australas Psychiatry 2020 May 7:1039856220917081. Epub 2020 May 7.

The Princess Margaret Hospital, New Zealand.

Objective: The aim of this study was to determine whether implementation of a collaborative problem-solving approach would be associated with a decrease in seclusion and restraint in a child and adolescent inpatient unit.

Method: A collaborative problem-solving (CPS) approach was implemented. Seclusion and restraint, length of treatment, clinician- and patient/parent-rated outcomes and staff utility and acceptability were surveyed pre and post implementation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1039856220917081DOI Listing

From the President.

Authors:
John Allan

Australas Psychiatry 2020 Apr;28(2):240

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1039856220913407DOI Listing

A change in practice after the introduction of a state-wide service plan: standardisation of the provision of care to patients with an eating disorder in a regional hospital including support from a new Eating Disorders Outreach Service.

Australas Psychiatry 2020 Apr;28(2):213-219

School of Psychiatry, UNSW, Australia.

Objective: A state-wide service plan was introduced to guide local practice of the inpatient management of patients with an eating disorder. There was significant change in our management of such patients in our regional hospital. Our aim is to describe the changes and characterise our current practice. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1039856220908177DOI Listing

A new era in service provision for people with eating disorders in Australia: 2019 Medicare Benefit Schedule items and the role of psychiatrists.

Authors:
Phillipa Hay

Australas Psychiatry 2020 Apr;28(2):125-127

Translational Health Research Institute, School of Medicine, Western Sydney University, Australia; and Camden and Campbelltown Hospitals, SWSLHD, Australia.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1039856220903119DOI Listing

Eating disorders - An interview with Prof Phillipa Hay.

Authors:
Andrew Amos

Australas Psychiatry 2020 Apr;28(2):127

Deputy Editor, Australasian Psychiatry.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1039856220903119aDOI Listing

Upcoming RANZCP conferences.

Authors:

Australas Psychiatry 2020 Apr;28(2):242

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1039856220913407cDOI Listing

Neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio - a simple, accessible measure of inflammation, morbidity and prognosis in psychiatric disorders?

Australas Psychiatry 2020 Mar 15:1039856220908172. Epub 2020 Mar 15.

Northern Adelaide Local Health Network, Australia.

Objective: A narrative review to describe the utility of the neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) as an inflammatory marker in psychiatric and non-psychiatric disorders and to discuss the potential role of NLR in psychiatric research.

Conclusions: NLR is inexpensive and readily available using division of two measures obtained on routine blood testing. NLR is elevated in a number of psychiatric disorders. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1039856220908172DOI Listing

Impact of cognitive reserve on clinical and neuropsychological measures in patients with mild cognitive impairment.

Australas Psychiatry 2020 Mar 15:1039856220908171. Epub 2020 Mar 15.

Department of Psychiatry, University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universität Dresden, Germany.

Objective: Cognitive reserve influences age of onset, speed of progression, and clinical manifestations of Alzheimer's disease. We investigated whether cognitive reserve interacts with clinical and neuropsychological parameters in mild cognitive impairment (MCI).

Methods: In this cross-sectional study, we recruited 273 people (70. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1039856220908171DOI Listing

Same proof, different pudding: comparative views of New Zealand child psychiatrists, child psychologists and child psychotherapists regarding a proposed national child and adolescent research network.

Australas Psychiatry 2020 Mar 15:1039856220908178. Epub 2020 Mar 15.

Child and Family Specialty Service, New Zealand.

Objectives: This study was undertaken to evaluate the views of New Zealand clinicians regarding a proposed national child and adolescent mental health research network.

Methods: Child psychiatrists, child psychologists and child psychotherapists were invited to participate in an electronic survey describing their previous experience of research, current interest in research, barriers to undertaking research and interest in a national research network.

Results: Responses were received from child psychiatrists ( = 33), child psychologists ( = 58) and child psychotherapists ( = 8), many of whom were clinicians and few of whom were researchers. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1039856220908178DOI Listing

The facts on psychiatric euthanasia in the Netherlands.

Australas Psychiatry 2020 04 11;28(2):238-239. Epub 2020 Mar 11.

Herentals, Belgium.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1039856220908179DOI Listing

Pseudo-melancholia.

Authors:
Gordon Parker

Australas Psychiatry 2020 Mar 11:1039856220908167. Epub 2020 Mar 11.

School of Psychiatry, University of New South Wales, Australia.

Objective: An incorrect false positive diagnosis of melancholia can lead to inappropriate treatment and illness prolongation. This paper therefore seeks to introduce the concept of 'pseudo-melancholia' to capture such instances and provide clinical examples of contributing at-risk scenarios.

Methods: The author draws on clinical experience to provide exemplars of circumstances most risking a false positive diagnosis of melancholia. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1039856220908167DOI Listing

Through the looking-glass: private and public practice psychiatry in the RANZCP.

Australas Psychiatry 2020 Mar 11:1039856220908165. Epub 2020 Mar 11.

Bi-National Committee, Section of Private Practice Psychiatry (SPPP), Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists, Australia.

Objective: To provide reflections on the representation of and engagement with private practice psychiatrists by the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists (RANZCP).

Conclusion: We consider some of the reasons for private psychiatrist disengagement with the RANZCP. We suggest approaches to better engage private psychiatrists in the RANZCP, including: involvement in mental health policy, improved committee representation, specific private practice and business training for Fellowship, broader private practice peer support networks (welfare, clinical research, leadership), tailored professional development, branch-based networks of public and private psychiatrists, and collaboration with specialist medical colleges and the Australian Medical Association. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1039856220908165DOI Listing

The state of play - the first national survey of consultation-liaison psychiatry services in New Zealand.

Australas Psychiatry 2020 Mar 11:1039856220908174. Epub 2020 Mar 11.

Department of Psychological Medicine, University of Auckland, New Zealand.

Objective: The aim of this study was to conduct the first national survey of consultation-liaison psychiatry (CLP) services in New Zealand.

Method: An online survey based on the Multidimensional Matrix for Consultation-Liaison Psychiatry (mMAX-LP) was circulated to a psychiatrist at each of 12 identified CLP services nationally during April-May 2018. Existing data for Middlemore Hospital (where the lead author is based) were added later for completion. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1039856220908174DOI Listing

Understanding the tests that we order: screening for anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis in first episode psychosis.

Australas Psychiatry 2020 Apr 27;28(2):199-201. Epub 2020 Feb 27.

Centre for Healthy Brain Ageing, University of New South Wales, Australia.

Objective: The current guidelines recommend screening all patients with first episode psychosis (FEP) for anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis. This paper explores the pitfalls of this strategy.

Conclusion: Screening for anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis in patients with FEP when the pre-test probability based on the clinical presentation is low creates a risk of false positive results. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1039856220905299DOI Listing

Simulation-based medical education can be used to improve the mental health competency of emergency physicians.

Australas Psychiatry 2020 Feb 24:1039856220901480. Epub 2020 Feb 24.

Department of Psychiatry, Westmead Hospital, Australia; and Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Australia.

Objective: We explored the feasibility of developing, running and evaluating a simulation-based medical education (SBME) workshop to improve the knowledge, skills and attitudes of emergency department (ED) doctors when called on to assess patients in psychiatric crisis.

Method: We designed a four-hour workshop incorporating SBME and a blend of pre-reading, short didactic elements and multiple-choice questions (MCQs). Emergency department nurses (operating as SBME faculty) used prepared scripts to portray patients presenting in psychiatric crisis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1039856220901480DOI Listing
February 2020

Stimulant prescribing for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD): what guides clinicians in their choice of an upper limit for dose titration?

Australas Psychiatry 2020 Feb 24:1039856220905298. Epub 2020 Feb 24.

Private Practice, Australia.

Objective: There is little evidence to support the current stimulant dose upper limit restrictions in the treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Within Australasia, there is inconsistency in dose maxima in different jurisdictions. Clinician experience in this area may be worth gauging when trying to improve the understanding of optimal maximal dosing. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1039856220905298DOI Listing
February 2020

W(h)ither psychiatry? Contemporary challenges in Australian mental health workforce design.

Australas Psychiatry 2020 Feb 24:1039856220905300. Epub 2020 Feb 24.

Health and Policy, Brain and Mind Centre, University of Sydney, Australia.

Objective: To consider the changing profile of Australia's mental health workforce and the implications, particularly for specialist psychiatry services.

Method: We analyse data from a national collection that describes changes in the workforce over a decade, to 2017-2018.

Results: While single practitioner-based psychological services flourish, other areas of more complex and team-based care are struggling to remain relevant. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1039856220905300DOI Listing
February 2020

Human rights implications of introducing a new mental health act - principles, challenges and opportunities.

Australas Psychiatry 2020 Apr 24;28(2):167-170. Epub 2020 Feb 24.

Illawarra Institute of Mental Health, University of Wollongong, Australia.

Objective: The United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD), 2006 has influenced the evolution of mental health legislation to protect and promote human rights of individuals with mental illness. This review introduces how the human rights agenda can be systematised into mental health services. Exploration is made of how some principles of CRPD have been incorporated into Queensland's . Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1039856220901483DOI Listing

Using accelerometer as a diagnostic tool to detect drug-induced parkinsonism (DIP) secondary to first-generation anti-psychotic medications.

Australas Psychiatry 2020 Feb 24:1039856220901467. Epub 2020 Feb 24.

Monash Alfred Psychiatry Research Centre (MAPrc), Australia.

Objective: The objective of this study is to examine the effectiveness of an accelerometer-based compact system in detecting and quantifying drug-induced parkinsonism (DIP) in patients with schizophrenia.

Method: A pilot study controlled clinical trial comprising 6 people with schizophrenia and 11 control subjects was conducted at Alfred Health, Melbourne. Participants had their movements assessed using Barnes Akathisia Rating Scale (BARS), Simpson Angus Scale (SAS) and Movement Disorder Society Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale Part III (MDS-UPDRS III) followed by an assessment of gait using three triaxial accelerometers. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1039856220901467DOI Listing
February 2020
0.556 Impact Factor

Clinical- and cost-effectiveness of intensive short-term dynamic psychotherapy for chronic pain in a tertiary psychotherapy service.

Australas Psychiatry 2020 Feb 24:1039856220901478. Epub 2020 Feb 24.

Centre for Emotions and Health, Dalhousie University, Canada.

Objective: The objective of this study is to assess the clinical- and cost-effectiveness of intensive short-term dynamic psychotherapy (ISTDP) for patients with chronic pain.

Method: A sample of 228 pain patients was drawn from a larger naturalistic study of ISTDP. They received an average of 6. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1039856220901478DOI Listing
February 2020

Consumer experiences of a healthier drinks initiative at a secure residential rehabilitation facility - a cross-sectional study.

Australas Psychiatry 2020 Feb 17:1039856220905297. Epub 2020 Feb 17.

School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences, The University of Queensland, Australia.

Objective: The objective of this study was to investigate whether consumers living with severe mental illness (SMI) receiving treatment in a secure residential rehabilitation facility considered their physical health and if limiting sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB) at facility outlets influenced dietary behaviours and knowledge.

Method: Consumers were consulted pre-implementation and outlets (vending machines and kiosks) audited pre- and post-limiting SSB. Surveys were administered six months post-implementation with 26 surveys included in analysis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1039856220905297DOI Listing
February 2020

Keeping military in mind: The Royal Australian & New Zealand College of Psychiatrists' Military and Veterans' Mental Health Network.

Australas Psychiatry 2020 Feb 12:1039856219895199. Epub 2020 Feb 12.

Forensic Mental Health Group, Queensland Centre for Mental Health Research, Australia.

Objective: The objective of this study is to introduce The Royal Australian & New Zealand College of Psychiatrists (RANZCP) Military and Veterans' Mental Health Network (The Network) and profile its inaugural members.

Methods: We implemented an online survey of demographic, professional and practice characteristics of network members; self-rated knowledge of military and veterans' mental health; reasons for joining The Network; and suggestions as to how The Network could best support members' needs. Quantitative survey responses were analysed descriptively. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1039856219895199DOI Listing
February 2020

Showtime's : the Rashomon effect, eyewitness testimony, and lack of reliability in homicide.

Australas Psychiatry 2020 Feb 4:1039856220901468. Epub 2020 Feb 4.

Case Western Reserve University, USA.

Objective: The Rashomon effect explores point of view in storytelling, and the subjectivity of even honest narratives is based on point of view. In 1950, was the first film to explore this. Currently, explores the differences in story based on point of view. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1039856220901468DOI Listing
February 2020

Characteristics, diagnoses and risk profiles of inpatients readmitted within 28 days of discharge to an Australian private psychiatric hospital.

Australas Psychiatry 2020 Feb 4:1039856220901469. Epub 2020 Feb 4.

Delmont Private Hospital, Australia.

Objective: The objective of this study was to perform a clinical and risk audit of private hospital inpatients who had been readmitted within 28 days of a preceding admission.

Method: Of 118 readmissions within 28 days in 2017 (7% of all admissions), 50 were randomly selected for audit. Characteristics, illness severity and clinical risk profiles were ascertained at discharge from the index admission and at readmission. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1039856220901469DOI Listing
February 2020

Australian military and veteran's mental health care part 1: an introduction to cultural essentials for clinicians.

Australas Psychiatry 2020 Feb 4:1039856220901470. Epub 2020 Feb 4.

Australian Defence Force Centre for Mental Health, HMAS Penguin, Australia; and School of Psychiatry, University of NSW, Australia.

Objective: This article aims to define the cultural specificity of Australian military and veterans, and introduce some of the essential clinician knowledge, skills and attitudes required for effective cultural competence in the management of mental health (MH) conditions in this population.

Conclusion: Military culture has the defining characteristics of the military as an organisation with a formal structure, as a cultural group governed by norms and shared values, and as a social group that provides people with identities. Key requirements for cultural competence introduced here are basic knowledge of the military structure, norms and identity; clinical skills including basic assessment and awareness of the commonly occurring MH disorders; and an exploration of attitudes of both the clinician and the military or veteran patient. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1039856220901470DOI Listing
February 2020

Non-consensual recommendations for managing bipolar II disorder.

Authors:
Gordon Parker

Australas Psychiatry 2020 Feb 4:1039856220901473. Epub 2020 Feb 4.

School of Psychiatry, University of NSW, Australia.

Objective: The objective of this study is to report on the degree of consensus in experts' recommendations for managing bipolar II disorder.

Methods: Eighteen international clinician researchers with expertise in managing bipolar disorders were provided with 14 questions addressing nuances in managing those with a bipolar II disorder.

Results: To all questions, the independently derived recommended strategies demonstrated distinct divergence. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1039856220901473DOI Listing
February 2020

Treating the untreatable? The biopsychosocial treatment of delusional disorder: a case study.

Australas Psychiatry 2020 Feb 4:1039856220901463. Epub 2020 Feb 4.

Queensland Fixated Threat Assessment Centre (QFTAC), Australia.

Objective: Delusional disorder (DD) is well recognised, but its treatment is controversial. This article presents a case study that highlights the therapeutic benefits associated with assertive biopsychosocial treatment of DD.

Method: The literature on pharmacological and psychological treatments for DD is briefly reviewed, and a case example from the Queensland Fixated Threat Assessment Centre is given to illustrate a comprehensive biopsychosocial treatment framework. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1039856220901463DOI Listing
February 2020