4 results match your criteria Auk[Journal]

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Peripheral androgen action helps modulate vocal production in a suboscine passerine.

Auk 2014 Jul;131(3):327-334

Department of Integrative Biology and Physiology, University of California, Los Angeles, California, USA ; Laboratory of Neuroendocrinology, Brain Research Institute, University of California, Los Angeles, California, USA ; Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of California, Los Angeles, California, USA.

Androgenic activation of intracellular androgen receptors (AR) influences avian vocal production, though this has largely been investigated at the level of the brain. We investigated the influence of predominantly peripheral AR on vocal output in wild Golden-collared Manakins (). In this suboscine species, males court females by performing acrobatic displays and by producing relatively simple vocalizations. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1642/AUK-13-252.1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4359617PMC

COMPLEX EVOLUTION OF BILE SALTS IN BIRDS.

Auk 2010 Oct;127(4):820-831

Department of Medicine, University of California at San Diego, San Diego, California, 92093, USA.

Bile salts are the major end-metabolites of cholesterol and are important in lipid digestion and shaping of the gut microflora. There have been limited studies of bile-salt variation in birds. The purpose of our study was to determine bile-salt variation among birds and relate this variation to current avian phylogenies and hypotheses on the evolution of bile salt pathways. Read More

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http://www.bioone.org/doi/abs/10.1525/auk.2010.09155
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1525/auk.2010.09155DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2990222PMC
October 2010
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VOCALIZATIONS AND ASSOCIATED BEHAVIORS OF THE SOMBRE HUMMINGBIRD (APHANTOCHROA CIRRHOCHLORIS) AND THE RUFOUS-BREASTED HERMIT (GLAUCIS HIRSUTUS).

Auk 2006 Oct;123(4):1129-1148

Department of Neurobiology, Duke University Medical Center, Box 3209, Durham, North Carolina 27710, USA.

Vocal behavior in tropical hummingbirds is a new area of study. Here, we present findings on the vocalizations and associated behaviors of two species: Sombre Hummingbird (Aphantochroa cirrhochloris) and Rufous-breasted Hermit (Glaucis hirsutus). These are the only hummingbirds in which the brain areas activated by singing have been demonstrated. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2542898PMC
October 2006
4 Reads

RESPONSES OF MALE TROPICAL MOCKINGBIRDS TO VARIATION IN WITHIN-SONG AND BETWEEN-SONG VERSATILITY.

Auk 2007 Jan;124(1):185-196

Lab of Ornithology and Department of Neurobiology and Behavior, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14850.

Despite their large vocal repertoires and otherwise highly versatile singing style, male mockingbirds sometimes sing in a highly repetitive fashion. We conducted a playback experiment to determine the possible signal value of different syllable presentation patterns during simulated male intrusions in the Tropical Mockingbird (Mimus gilvus) testing the hypothesis that more repetitive singing represents a stronger threat and generates a stronger aggressive response. Responses were measured in terms of approach and singing behavior and were analyzed using McGregor's (1992) multivariate method. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1642/0004-8038(2007)124[185:ROMTMM]2.0.CO;2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2396498PMC
January 2007
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