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    17 results match your criteria Atrophia Maculosa Varioliformis Cutis

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    Familial atrophia maculosa varioliformis cutis: first case report from the Indian subcontinent with pedigree analysis.
    Indian J Dermatol Venereol Leprol 2012 Mar-Apr;78(2):182-5
    Department of Dermatology, Venereology and Leprology, Muzaffarnagar Medical College, Muzaffarnagar, India.
    Familial atrophia maculosa varioliformis cutis is a very rare disorder with less than 28 cases being reported in the literature worldwide and remains a mystery both as far as genetics and the virtue of its pathogenesis is concerned. We present a case of mother and son, both having this disorder with presentations unique in terms of sites involved and try to draw a five generations pedigree chart for the same. We further support its inheritance pattern as autosomal dominant. Read More

    A Case of Atrophia Maculosa Varioliformis Cutis.
    Ann Dermatol 2008 Dec 31;20(4):247-9. Epub 2008 Dec 31.
    Department of Dermatology, College of Medicine, Pochon CHA University, Seongnam, Korea.
    Atrophia maculosa varioliformis cutis is a rare disease that was first described by Heidingsfeld in 1918. It is characterized by an idiopathic, non-inflammatory macular atrophy that typically occurs on the face in young individuals. Despite its association with some diseases, the etiopathogenesis of this entity remains unknown. Read More

    A Case of Atrophia Maculosa Varioliformis Cutis.
    Ann Dermatol 2008 Dec 31;20(4):244-6. Epub 2008 Dec 31.
    Department of Dermatology, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon, Korea.
    Atrophia maculosa varioliformis cutis (AMVC) is a type of idiopathic noninflammatory macular atrophy that occurs in young individuals. It is clinically characterized by shallow, sharply demaracated depressions of various shapes. Considering that atrophia maculosa varioliformis cutis can be mistaken as scarring and artifact dermatitis, it is important for physicians to distinguish this condition and to diagnose it correctly. Read More

    Atrophia maculosa varioliformis cutis.
    Int J Dermatol 2005 Oct;44(10):864-6
    Dermatology and Pediatrics, New Jersey Medical School, Newark, NJ 07103-2714, USA.
    Atrophia maculosa varioliformis cutis is a rare disease characterized by spontaneously formed facial scars in young adults. Its etiology is unknown; there may be an underlying defect of dermal elastin. We discuss a patient with this unusual disorder and review its literature. Read More

    Familial atrophia maculosa varioliformis cutis: case report and pedigree analysis.
    Br J Dermatol 2005 Oct;153(4):821-4
    Department of Dermatology, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Science, Beijing 100730, China.
    Atrophia maculosa varioliformis cutis (AVMC) was first described in 1918, as a rarely reported form of idiopathic macular atrophy on the cheeks. Nineteen patients have been reported in the past 86 years. Recently we diagnosed a 25-year-old woman as AMVC and investigated her family history. Read More

    Familial atrophia maculosa varioliformis cutis.
    Int J Dermatol 2003 Jul;42(7):530-2
    Departments of Dermatology and Pathology, Cerrahpaşa Medical Faculty, Istanbul University, Istanbul, Turkey.
    Atrophia maculosa varioliformis cutis (AVMC) was first described by Heidingsfeld in 1918, as a rarely reported form of idiopathic macular atrophy on the cheek (1). It is characterized, clinically, by shallow, sharply demarcated depressions in various shapes. Extrahepatic biliary atresia (2) and pachydermodactyly (3) have been the only conditions associated with AMVC reported in the past 80 years. Read More

    Atrophia maculosa varioliformis cutis: a pediatric case.
    Pediatr Dermatol 2001 Nov-Dec;18(6):478-80
    VII Division of Pediatric Dermatology, Istituto Dermopatico dell'Immacolata, IRCCS, Rome, Italy.
    Atrophia maculosa varioliformis cutis was described in 1918 by Heidingsfeld as a type of idiopathic noninflammatory macular atrophy typically occurring in young individuals. Only 13 cases have been reported since the first description. Considering that atrophia maculosa varioliformis cutis can be mistaken for a scarring and artifact dermatitis, it is important for physicians to distinguish this condition. Read More

    Familial atrophia maculosa varioliformis cutis: an ultrastructural study.
    Pediatr Dermatol 2001 May-Jun;18(3):230-3
    Dermatology Clinic, University of Catania, Catania, Italy.
    Atrophia maculosa varioliformis cutis is a rare and distinctive form of idiopathic facial macular noninflammatory atrophy that may rarely be observed in members of the same family. We describe two brothers, ages 14 and 16 years, with spontaneously appearing, asymptomatic, varioliform and linear atrophic lesions. Their past medical history was positive for varicella occurring in childhood without residual facial scarring. Read More

    Pachydermodactyly and atrophia maculosa varioliformis cutis.
    Dermatology 1995 ;190(1):56-8
    Department of Dermatology, Hôpital Henri-Mondor, Créteil, France.
    Pachydermodactyly is a rare form of superficial digital fibromatosis characterized by progressive asymptomatic thickening of the back and sides of the proximal interphalangeal joints of the fingers. Atrophia maculosa varioliformis cutis is an acquired dermal atrophy, localized on the cheeks. Only a few cases of each pathology have been published. Read More

    Atrophia maculosa varioliformis cutis. Report of two cases and review of the literature.
    J Am Acad Dermatol 1994 May;30(5 Pt 2):837-40
    Department of Dermatology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06510.
    Atrophia maculosa varioliformis cutis was initially described in 1918 as an entity in which both linear and punctate scars appeared spontaneously on normal facial skin. To the best of our knowledge, only five additional cases have been described. We describe two patients, 14 and 20 years of age, whose histories and clinical lesions fit the description of atrophia maculosa varioliformis cutis. Read More

    Atrophia maculosa varioliformis cutis.
    Br J Dermatol 1986 Jul;115(1):105-9
    We describe a case of atrophia maculosa varioliformis cutis (AMVC), a rare form of idiopathic facial macular atrophy. A biopsy revealed only a depression in the epidermis, probably caused by loss of dermal collagen. Because AMVC may be confused with scarring, and factitial disease may be suggested, it is important that this condition be recognized by the physician. Read More

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