15 results match your criteria Atmosphere[Journal]

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Fine-Scale Modeling of Individual Exposures to Ambient PM, EC, NO, CO for the Coronary Artery Disease and Environmental Exposure (CADEE) Study.

Atmosphere (Basel) 2020 Jan;11(1):1-65

Center for Public Health and Environmental Assessment, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Chapel Hill, NC 27514, USA.

Air pollution epidemiological studies often use outdoor concentrations from central-site monitors as exposure surrogates, which can induce measurement error. The goal of this study was to improve exposure assessments of ambient fine particulate matter (PM), elemental carbon (EC), nitrogen oxides (NO), and carbon monoxide (CO) for a repeated measurements study with 15 individuals with coronary artery disease in central North Carolina called the Coronary Artery Disease and Environmental Exposure (CADEE) Study. We developed a fine-scale exposure modeling approach to determine five tiers of individual-level exposure metrics for PM, EC, NO, CO using outdoor concentrations, on-road vehicle emissions, weather, home building characteristics, time-locations, and time-activities. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/atmos11010065DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7252567PMC
January 2020

The establishment of the Household Air Pollution Consortium (HAPCO).

Atmosphere (Basel) 2019 Jul 23;10(7). Epub 2019 Jul 23.

Occupational and Environmental Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda MD 20892-7240.

Household air pollution (HAP) is of public health concern with ~3 billion people worldwide (including >15 million in the US) exposed. HAP from coal use is a human lung carcinogen, yet the epidemiological evidence on carcinogenicity of HAP from biomass use, primarily wood, is not conclusive. To robustly assess biomass's carcinogenic potential, prospective studies of individuals experiencing a variety of HAP exposures are needed. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/atmos10070422DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7021252PMC

Mapping Modeled Exposure of Wildland Fire Smoke for Human Health Studies in California.

Atmosphere (Basel) 2019 Jun 4;10(6). Epub 2019 Jun 4.

Michigan Tech Research Institute, Michigan Technological University, Ann Arbor, MI, 48105 USA.

Wildland fire smoke exposure affects a broad proportion of the U.S. population and is increasing due to climate change, settlement patterns and fire seclusion. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/atmos10060308DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6892473PMC

Combining Dispersion Modeling and Monitoring Data for Community-Scale Air Quality Characterization.

Atmosphere (Basel) 2019 ;10(10):1-610

Institute for the Environment, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27517, USA.

Spatially and temporally resolved air quality characterization is critical for community-scale exposure studies and for developing future air quality mitigation strategies. Monitoring-based assessments can characterize local air quality when enough monitors are deployed. However, modeling plays a vital role in furthering the understanding of the relative contributions of emissions sources impacting the community. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/atmos10100610DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6859648PMC
January 2019

Volatile Organic Compound Emissions from Prescribed Burning in Tallgrass Prairie Ecosystems.

Atmosphere (Basel) 2019 ;10(8):1-464

Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709, USA.

Prescribed pasture burning plays a critical role in ecosystem maintenance in tallgrass prairie ecosystems and may contribute to agricultural productivity but can also have negative impacts on air quality. Volatile organic compound (VOC) concentrations were measured immediately downwind of prescribed tallgrass prairie fires in the Flint Hills region of Kansas, United States. The VOC mixture is dominated by alkenes and oxygenated VOCs, which are highly reactive and can drive photochemical production of ozone downwind of the fires. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/atmos10080464DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6781241PMC
January 2019

Ambient Mercury Observations near a Coal-Fired Power Plant in a Western U.S. Urban Area.

Atmosphere (Basel) 2019 ;10(4):176

Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment, Air Pollution Control Division, Glendale, CO 80246, USA.

We report on the continuous ambient measurements of total gaseous mercury (TGM) and several ancillary air quality parameters that were collected in Colorado Springs, CO. This urban area, which is located adjacent to the Front Range of the Rocky Mountains, is the second largest metropolitan area in Colorado and has a centrally located coal-fired power plant that installed mercury (Hg) emission controls the year prior to our study. There are few other Hg point sources within the city. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/atmos10040176DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6711202PMC
January 2019

Impact of snow-darkening by deposition of light-absorbing aerosols on snow cover in the Himalaya-Tibetan-Plateau and influence on the Asian Summer monsoon: A possible mechanism for the Blanford Hypothesis.

Atmosphere (Basel) 2018 Nov 12;9(11):438. Epub 2018 Nov 12.

Climate and Radiation Laboratory, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center.

The impact of snow darkening by deposition of light absorbing aerosols (LAAs) on snow cover over the Himalaya-Tibetan-Plateau (HTP) and influence on the Asian summer monsoon are investigated using the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System Model Version 5 (GEOS-5). We find that during April-May-June, deposition of LAAs on snow leads to a reduction in surface albedo, initiating a sequence of feedback processes, starting with increased net surface solar radiation, rapid snowmelt in HTP and warming of the surface and upper troposphere, followed by enhanced low-level southwesterlies and increased dust loading over the Himalayas-Indo-Gangetic Plain. The warming is amplified by increased dust aerosol heating, and subsequently amplified by latent heating from enhanced precipitation over the Himalaya foothills and northern India, via the Elevated Heat Pump (EHP) effect during June-July-August. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/atmos9110438DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7243248PMC
November 2018

The Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP) Monthly Analysis (New Version 2.3) and a Review of 2017 Global Precipitation.

Atmosphere (Basel) 2018 7;9(4). Epub 2018 Apr 7.

Yonsei University, Seoul, South Korea.

The new Version 2.3 of the GPCP Monthly analysis is described in terms of changes made to improve the homogeneity of the product, especially after 2002. These changes include corrections to cross calibration of satellite data inputs and updates to the gauge analysis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/atmos9040138DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6043897PMC
April 2018
2 Reads

Interpreting Mobile and Handheld Air Sensor Readings in Relation to Air Quality Standards and Health Effect Reference Values: Tackling the Challenges.

Atmosphere (Basel) 2017 21;8(10):182. Epub 2017 Sep 21.

Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711, USA.

The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and other federal agencies face a number of challenges in interpreting and reconciling short-duration (seconds to minutes) readings from mobile and handheld air sensors with the longer duration averages (hours to days) associated with the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for the criteria pollutants-particulate matter (PM), ozone, carbon monoxide, lead, nitrogen oxides, and sulfur oxides. Similar issues are equally relevant to the hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) where chemical-specific health effect reference values are the best indicators of exposure limits; values which are often based on a lifetime of continuous exposure. A multi-agency, staff-level Air Sensors Health Group (ASHG) was convened in 2013. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/atmos8100182DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5662140PMC
September 2017
68 Reads
1 Citation
1.050 Impact Factor

Comparison of Five Modeling Approaches to Quantify and Estimate the Effect of Clouds on the Radiation Amplification Factor (RAF) for Solar Ultraviolet Radiation.

Authors:
Eric S Hall

Atmosphere (Basel) 2017 ;8(8):153

National Exposure Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Development, US Environmental Protection Agency, Mail Drop E205-03, 109 T. W. Alexander Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711, USA.

A generally accepted value for the Radiation Amplification Factor (RAF), with respect to the erythemal action spectrum for sunburn of human skin, is -1.1, indicating that a 1.0% increase in stratospheric ozone leads to a 1. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/atmos8080153DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6260946PMC
January 2017
1 Read

Frequency and Character of Extreme Aerosol Events in the Southwestern United States: A Case Study Analysis in Arizona.

Atmosphere (Basel) 2016 Jan 23;7(1). Epub 2015 Dec 23.

Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721, USA; Department of Hydrology and Atmospheric Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721, USA.

This study uses more than a decade's worth of data across Arizona to characterize the spatiotemporal distribution, frequency, and source of extreme aerosol events, defined as when the concentration of a species on a particular day exceeds that of the average plus two standard deviations for that given month. Depending on which of eight sites studied, between 5% and 7% of the total days exhibited an extreme aerosol event due to either extreme levels of PM, PM, and/or fine soil. Grand Canyon exhibited the most extreme event days (120, , 7% of its total days). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/atmos7010001DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4830501PMC
January 2016
3 Reads

Windblown Dust Deposition Forecasting and Spread of Contamination around Mine Tailings.

Atmosphere (Basel) 2016 Feb 28;7(2). Epub 2016 Jan 28.

Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721, USA.

Wind erosion, transport and deposition of windblown dust from anthropogenic sources, such as mine tailings impoundments, can have significant effects on the surrounding environment. The lack of vegetation and the vertical protrusion of the mine tailings above the neighboring terrain make the tailings susceptible to wind erosion. Modeling the erosion, transport and deposition of particulate matter from mine tailings is a challenge for many reasons, including heterogeneity of the soil surface, vegetative canopy coverage, dynamic meteorological conditions and topographic influences. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/atmos7020016DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5658141PMC
February 2016
4 Reads

Decreasing Aerosol Loading in the North American Monsoon Region.

Atmosphere (Basel) 2016 Feb 5;7(2). Epub 2016 Feb 5.

Department of Hydrology and Atmospheric Sciences, Tucson, AZ 85721, USA.

We examine the spatio-temporal variability of aerosol loading in the recent decade (2005-2014) over the North American Monsoon (NAM) region. Emerging patterns are characterized using aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrievals from the NASA Terra/Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument along with a suite of satellite retrievals of atmospheric and land-surface properties. We selected 20 aerosol hotspots and classified them into fire, anthropogenic, dust, and NAM alley clusters based on the dominant driver influencing aerosol variability. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/atmos7020024DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5422029PMC
February 2016
4 Reads

A Multi-Year Aerosol Characterization for the Greater Tehran Area Using Satellite, Surface, and Modeling Data.

Atmosphere (Basel) 2014 Apr;5(2):178-197

Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697, USA.

This study reports a multi-year (2000-2009) aerosol characterization for metropolitan Tehran and surrounding areas using multiple datasets (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), Multi-angle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR), Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS), Goddard Ozone Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport (GOCART), and surface and upper air data from local stations). Monthly trends in aerosol characteristics are examined in the context of the local meteorology, regional and local emission sources, and air mass back-trajectory data. Dust strongly affects the region during the late spring and summer months (May-August) when aerosol optical depth (AOD) is at its peak and precipitation accumulation is at a minimum. Read More

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http://www.mdpi.com/2073-4433/5/2/178
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/atmos5020178DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4114406PMC
April 2014
23 Reads

Effects of Floor Level and Building Type on Residential Levels of Outdoor and Indoor Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons, Black Carbon, and Particulate Matter in New York City.

Atmosphere (Basel) 2011 May;2(2):96-109

Division of Pulmonary, Allergy and Critical Care of Medicine, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, PH8E, 630 W. 168 St. New York, NY 10032, USA.

Consideration of the relationship between residential floor level and concentration of traffic-related airborne pollutants may predict individual residential exposure among inner city dwellers more accurately. Our objective was to characterize the vertical gradient of residential levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH; dichotomized into Σ(8)PAH(semivolatile) (MW 178-206), and Σ(8)PAH(nonvolatile) (MW 228-278), black carbon (BC), PM(2.5) (particulate matter) by floor level (FL), season and building type. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/atmos2020096DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3163303PMC
May 2011
25 Reads
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