11 results match your criteria Asian Population Studies[Journal]

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Decomposing the crude divorce rate in five countries: Singapore, Taiwan, South Korea, the UK, and Australia.

Asian Popul Stud 2018 10;14(2):137-152. Epub 2018 Apr 10.

Department of Social Work and Social Administration, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR.

Over the past few decades, the level of divorce, measured by the crude divorce rate (CDR), has increased dramatically in both the East and the West, but has recently appeared to fall or level off in some countries. To investigate whether the recent decline or stabilisation of the CDRs reflects the real trends in divorce risk, a decomposition analysis was conducted on the changes in the CDRs over the past 20 years on two western and three East Asian countries, namely, the UK, Australia, Taiwan, South Korea, and Singapore. The following is observed: the decline in the CDRs of the UK and Australia in the 1990s, and of Taiwan and Korea in the 2000s, was mainly due to shrinkage in the proportion of the married population rather than any reduction in divorce risk; only Australia experienced a genuine reduction in divorce risk between 2001 and 2011; and the continuous increase of Singapore's divorce level between 1990 and 2010 may be is an unintentional effect of the government's marriage promotion policies. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/17441730.2018.1452380DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5991100PMC
April 2018
1 Read

Hopes, Dreams and Anxieties: India's One-Child Families.

Asian Popul Stud 2016;12(1):4-27. Epub 2016 Mar 24.

Department of Sociology, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742-1315, USA.

While rapid fertility decline in India in the last two decades has received considerable attention, much of the discourse has focused on a decline in high parity births. However, this paper finds that, almost hidden from the public gaze, a small but significant segment of the Indian population has begun the transition to extremely low fertility. Among the urban, upper income, educated, middle classes, it is no longer unusual to find families stopping at one child, even when this child is a girl. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/17441730.2016.1144354DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4869707PMC
March 2016
2 Reads

Education Fever and the East Asian Fertility Puzzle: A case study of low fertility in South Korea.

Asian Popul Stud 2013 May;9(2):196-215

Population Studies Center, University of Pennsylvania, 3718 Locust Walk, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA.

Fertility throughout East Asia has fallen rapidly over the last five decades and is now below the replacement rate of 2.1 in every country in the region. Using South Korea as a case study, we argue that East Asia's ultra-low fertility rates can be partially explained by the steadfast parental drive to have competitive and successful children. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/17441730.2013.797293DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4038909PMC
May 2013
7 Reads

Child and Adolescent Obesity and Employment Sector in Urban China.

Asian Popul Stud 2013 Jan;9(3)

Department of Sociology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA.

Despite its importance as a part of the economic reform in China, sectoral employment has been overlooked as a potential determinant of child and adolescent obesity (CAO). Using large-scale longitudinal data from surveys conducted from 1989 to 2006, this paper examines the relationship between the sector in which a parent is employed and CAO, with the sector being based on ownership and categorised as either state or non-state. Analyses of over 1,700 children and adolescents show that children and adolescents whose parents work in the state sector are less likely to be obese. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/17441730.2013.807597DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3843518PMC
January 2013
1 Read

Migration and Remittances: Evidence from a Poor Province in China

Asian Popul Stud 2013;9(2):124-141

Division of Social Sciences, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology.

This paper examines patterns of remittances among migrants from Guizhou province of China. Our research is motivated by three lines of theoretical arguments, namely the new economics of migration, a translocal perspective linking remittances and development, and the culture of remittances. Taking individual, household, and village-level characteristics into account, we estimated multilevel logistic models of the decision to remit and multilevel models of the amount of remittances. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/17441730.2013.785721DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4486665PMC
January 2013
2 Reads

Coital Experience Among Adolescents in Three Social-Educational Groups in Urban Chiang Mai, Thailand.

Asian Popul Stud 2012 Mar 7;8(1):39-63. Epub 2012 Feb 7.

This article compares coital experience of Chiang Mai 17-20-year-olds who were: (1) out-of-school; (2) studying at vocational schools; and (3) studying at general schools or university. Four-fifths, two-thirds and one-third, respectively, of males in these groups had had intercourse, compared to 53, 62 and 15 per cent of females. The gender difference for general school/university students, but not vocational school students, probably reflects HIV/AIDS refocusing male sexual initiation away from commercial sex workers. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/17441730.2012.646837DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3380584PMC
March 2012
6 Reads

Effect of Living Arrangement on the Health Status of Elderly in India: Findings from a national cross sectional survey.

Authors:
Sutapa Agrawal

Asian Popul Stud 2012 Mar 7;8(1):87-101. Epub 2012 Feb 7.

South Asia Network for Chronic Disease, Public Health Foundation of India, C1/52, First floor, SDA, New Delhi -110016.

Epidemiological studies show strong association between lack/inadequate family support with increased mortality and poor health among the elderly. This study examined the effect of living arrangement on elderly health status by analysing the data of 39,694 persons aged 60 and above included in India's second National Family Health Survey conducted in 1998-1999. Results indicate that elderly who are living alone are likely to suffer more from both chronic illnesses, such as asthma and tuberculosis, and acute illnesses, such as malaria and jaundice, than those elderly who are living with their family, even after controlling for the effects of a number of socio-economic, demographic, environmental and behavioural confounders. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/17441730.2012.646842DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5575814PMC
March 2012
2 Reads

Tradition and Change in Marriage Payments in Vietnam, 1963-2000.

Asian Popul Stud 2012 ;8(2):151-172

School of Social Sciences, Singapore Management University, 90 Stamford Road, Singapore 178903, Tel: 65-6828-0664, ,

Trends and determinants of marriage payments have rarely been examined at the population level despite their plausible implications for the welfare of family and the distribution of wealth across families and generations. In this study, we analyze population-based data from the Vietnam Study of Family Change to document prevalence and directions of marriage payments in Vietnam from 1963 to 2000. We investigate the extent to which structural and policy transformations (particularly market reform and the socialist policy that banned brideprice) influenced the practice of marriage payments as well as estimate how societal changes indirectly impacted payments via their effects on population characteristics. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/17441730.2012.675677DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3702189PMC
January 2012
3 Reads

THE HEALTH OF OLDER WOMEN AFTER HIGH PARITY IN TAFT, IRAN.

Asian Popul Stud 2011 Nov;7(3):263-274

Professor, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health,

High parity has been hypothesised to lead to a shorter and less healthy life. Using the 2007 Taft Ageing Health and Fertility Survey consisting of 696 women aged 50-79, this paper examines the extent to which women's health in middle and older ages is affected by their childbearing histories. The results show that high parity (> 8) is associated with a reduction of GP-rated health by 0. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/17441730.2011.608986DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4161232PMC
November 2011
13 Reads

AGE-STRUCTURAL TRANSITION IN INDONESIA: A comparison of macro- and micro-level evidence.

Asian Popul Stud 2010 Mar 25;6(1):25-45. Epub 2010 Mar 25.

Centre for Research on Ageing, Southampton University, Southampton, UK.

This paper responds to recent calls for empirical study of the impact of age-structural transition. It begins by reviewing evidence of cohort oscillations in twentieth-century Indonesia, which indicates that current older generations are likely to have smaller numbers of children on whom they may rely than generations before and after them. However, to assess whether the imbalances implied by this situation are actually influencing people's lives, attention to further factors shaping the availability and reliability of younger generations, notably differences in socio-economic status and in patterns of inter-generational support flows, is required. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/17441731003603397DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4855027PMC

Demographic Disequilibrium in Early Twentieth Century Thailand: Falling Mortality, Rising Fertility, or Both?

Asian Popul Stud 2008 Jul;4(2):161-176

National Centre for Epidemiology and Population Health Australian National University.

Estimates of Thai crude birth and death rates date from 1920 when the former was around 20 per thousand higher than the latter, implying natural increase of 2 percent per annum. Such disequilibrium cannot have been the norm over the long term historical past, when population growth must have been comparatively slow. This paper explores the bases for likely past relative equilibrium between Siamese birth and death rates, then seeks to explain the disequilibrium apparent by 1920. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/17441730802247265DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3182556PMC
July 2008
2 Reads
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