3 results match your criteria Asian Journal Of Social Psychology[Journal]

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Individualism and sociocultural adaptation: Discrimination and social capital as moderators among rural-to-urban migrants in China.

Asian J Soc Psychol 2015 Jun;18(2):176-181

Institute of Developmental Psychology, Beijing Normal University, China.

This study examined the associations of sociocultural adaptation with individualism and collectivism and the moderating roles of discrimination and social capital in the associations among rural-to-urban migrants ( = 641) in Beijing, China. Results indicated that individualism was associated with poorer adaptation for migrants reporting low perceived discrimination or low social capital. However, migrants reporting high perceived discrimination showed poorer adaptation, regardless of individualism; and migrants reporting high social capital showed better adaptation, regardless of individualism. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/ajsp.12085
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ajsp.12085DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4414335PMC
June 2015
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The contribution of self-deceptive enhancement to display rules in the United States and Japan.

Authors:
Joanne M Chung

Asian J Soc Psychol 2012 Mar;15(1):69-75

Department of Psychology, University of California, Davis, California, USA.

Socially desirable responding was tested as a mediator of American and Japanese college student differences in display rules. Americans endorsed the expression of anger, contempt, disgust, fear, happiness, and surprise more than the Japanese. Americans also exhibited more self-deceptive enhancement than the Japanese, and self-deceptive enhancement partially mediated country differences on the endorsement of anger, disgust, happiness, and surprise, but not contempt and fear. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-839X.2011.01358.xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4231487PMC
March 2012
3 Reads

Cultural Neuroscience.

Asian J Soc Psychol 2010 Jun;13(2):72-82

Department of Psychology, Princeton University, Princeton New Jersey, USA.

Cultural neuroscience issues from the apparently incompatible combination of neuroscience and cultural psychology. A brief literature sampling suggests, instead, several preliminary topics that demonstrate proof of possibilities: cultural differences in both lower-level processes (e.g. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/j.1467-839X.2010.01301.x
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-839X.2010.01301.xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3714113PMC
June 2010
4 Reads
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