42 results match your criteria Asian American Journal Of Psychology[Journal]

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Cultural Adaptations of Psychotherapy: Therapists' Applications of Conceptual Models with Asians and Asian Americans.

Asian Am J Psychol 2019 Mar 12;10(1):68-78. Epub 2018 Jul 12.

Western Oregon University.

Although conceptual models of cultural adaptations of psychotherapy have been developed, little is known about how therapists apply these models in clinical practice. The purpose of the current study was to examine, using a directed content analysis, how therapists culturally adapt cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), one of the most widely used evidence-based approaches, for application with clients of Asian ancestry. The study also examined if there were major differences in adaptation strategies between therapists who practice in the United States ( = 9), a predominantly individualistic society as opposed to those who practice in Japan ( = 6), a predominantly collectivistic society. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/aap0000122DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6402600PMC

Measurement Equivalence of English Versus Native Language Versions of the Kessler 6 (K6) Scale: An Examination in Three Asian American Groups.

Asian Am J Psychol 2018 Sep 2;9(3):211-216. Epub 2018 Apr 2.

Department of Child and Family Studies, University of South Florida.

The use of languages other than English in population-based surveys is necessitated by the linguistic diversities in the United States. However, inclusion of multiple languages in survey data collection raises concerns about whether an instrument administered in different languages functions equivalently across groups. Using the Kessler Psychological Distress Scale 6 (K6), the present study examined differential item functioning (DIF) between surveys conducted either in English or the native language of the groups of Chinese Americans (n = 622), Korean Americans (n = 471), and Vietnamese Americans (n = 513). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/aap0000110DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6383564PMC
September 2018

Bilinear and Multidimensional Cultural Orientations and Indigenous Family Process among Korean Immigrant Mothers and Fathers.

Asian Am J Psychol 2018 Jun 18;9(2):127-139. Epub 2018 Jan 18.

Human Development and Family Sciences, School of Human Ecology, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX.

This study examined how parental cultural orientations and family process are related among Korean immigrant parents (272 mothers, and 164 fathers, =436) and how the relationship varies across fathers and mothers. Multiple scales were used to assess bilinear, multidimensional cultural orientation towards both the culture of origin and mainstream culture. The dimensions of language, identity, and cultural participation as well as the number of years living in U. Read More

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http://doi.apa.org/getdoi.cfm?doi=10.1037/aap0000097
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/aap0000097DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6193501PMC
June 2018
17 Reads

Latent Profiles of Acculturation and Their Implications for Health: A Study With Asian Americans in Central Texas.

Asian Am J Psychol 2017 Sep;8(3):200-208

The University of Texas at Austin.

The present study identified profiles of acculturation in Asian Americans and explored their implications for health. Pointing out the upward selection bias of Asian Americans in English-only surveys, the study calls attention to the importance of obtaining Asian American samples that reflect the group's cultural and linguistic diversities. Data were drawn from 2,602 participants (age range = 18-98) in the 2015 Asian American Quality of Life (AAQoL) Survey, conducted in central Texas. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/aap0000080DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5968821PMC
September 2017
5 Reads

Parent-Adolescent Relationships among Chinese Immigrant Families: An Indigenous Concept of .

Asian Am J Psychol 2017 Dec;8(4):323-338

University of California at Riverside.

This study investigated cultural meanings of positive Chinese parent-child relationships through exploration of an indigenous concept, , as experienced by Chinese American adolescents of immigrant parents. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 15, first- and second-generation Chinese American high school students of immigrant parents, focusing on adolescents' descriptions of the meaning of and parental behaviors that foster this quality. According to the Chinese American adolescents who were interviewed, being with parents was characterized as closeness to parents and a general sense of togetherness and harmony; showing parents their love through respect, obedience, academic effort, and appreciation; and open communication with the parents particularly about school. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/aap0000092DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5793938PMC
December 2017

Self-reported discrimination and mental health among Asian Indians: Cultural beliefs and coping style as moderators.

Asian Am J Psychol 2016 Sep 23;7(3):185-194. Epub 2016 Jun 23.

University of California at San Francisco; The Division of General Internal Medicine.

The South Asian (SA) population has been underrepresented in research linking discrimination with health indicators; studies that focus on the unique cultural and psychosocial experiences of different SA subgroups are needed. The purpose of this study was to examine associations between self-reported discrimination and mental health among Asian Indians (AIs), and whether traditional cultural beliefs (believing that South Asian cultural traditions should be practiced in the US), coping style, and social support moderated these relationships. Asian Indians ( = 733) had been recruited from community-based sampling frames for the Mediators of Atherosclerosis in South Asians Living in America (MASALA) study were included in this analysis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/aap0000037DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5030840PMC
September 2016
14 Reads

Measurement Invariance Testing of a Three-Factor Model of Parental Warmth, Psychological Control, and Knowledge across European and Asian/Pacific Islander American Youth.

Asian Am J Psychol 2016 Jun 10;7(2):97-107. Epub 2016 Mar 10.

University of Washington; Seattle Children's Research Institute.

While the interpretation and effects of parenting on developmental outcomes may be different across European and Asian/Pacific Islander (API) American youth, measurement invariance of parenting constructs has rarely been examined. Utilizing multiple-group confirmatory factor analysis, we examined whether the latent structure of parenting measures are equivalent or different across European and API American youth. Perceived parental warmth, psychological control, and knowledge were reported by a community sample of 325 adolescents (242 Europeans and 83 APIs). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/aap0000040DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4916971PMC
June 2016
5 Reads

Annual Review of Asian American Psychology, 2014.

Asian Am J Psychol 2015 Dec 28;6(4):291-332. Epub 2015 Sep 28.

University of Texas at Austin, Department of Human Development and Family Sciences, 108 East Dean Keeton Street, Stop A2702, Austin, TX 78712, , (512) 289-8136.

This 2014 review of Asian American psychology is the sixth review in the series. It includes 316 articles that met the inclusion criteria established by the past five annual reviews. Featured articles were derived from three sources: 137 were generated via the search term "Asian American" in PyscINFO, 111 were generated via a search for specific Asian American ethnic groups, and 32 were generated via author searches of articles that met the inclusion criteria. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/aap0000031DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4765738PMC
December 2015

The Sociocultural Context of Caregiving Experiences for Vietnamese Dementia Family Caregivers.

Asian Am J Psychol 2015 Sep 15;6(3):263-272. Epub 2015 Jun 15.

Latino Aging Research Resource Center (UC Davis RCMAR), Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of California, Davis School of Medicine.

The goal of this qualitative study was to describe the beliefs and experiences of Vietnamese caregivers caring for a family member with dementia and to elicit their ideas about promising interventions. We recruited 10 caregivers from support groups, the Alzheimer's Association, and local community-based organizations in Northern California. We conducted semi-structured in-depth interviews with all caregivers, as well as a focus group to obtain ideas about supportive strategies. Read More

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https://www.apa.org/pubs/journals/features/aap-0000024.pdf
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http://doi.apa.org/getdoi.cfm?doi=10.1037/aap0000024
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/aap0000024DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4659380PMC
September 2015
4 Reads

Development and Validation of a Racial Discrimination Measure for Cambodian American Adolescents.

Asian Am J Psychol 2015 Mar;6(1):56-65

Arizona State University.

To date, the majority of studies examining experiences of racial discrimination among youth use measures initially developed for African American and Latino adults or college students. Few studies have attended to the ways in which discrimination experiences may be unique for Asian American youth, particularly subgroups such as Southeast Asians. The purpose of this study was twofold: (a) to describe the development of a racial discrimination measure using community-based participatory research with Cambodian American adolescents and (b) to psychometrically test the measure with respect to validity and reliability. Read More

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http://doi.apa.org/getdoi.cfm?doi=10.1037/a0036706
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0036706DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4570621PMC
March 2015
15 Reads

Differences in Substance Use and Substance Use Risk Factors by Asian Subgroups.

Asian Am J Psychol 2015 Mar;6(1):38-46

RAND Corporation.

The present study examined differences in lifetime use and initiation of substance use and associated risk factors for alcohol, cigarettes, and marijuana among seven subgroups of Asian American (AA) adolescents: Chinese, Filipino, Indian, Japanese, Korean, Vietnamese, and Mixed heritage Asian. Sixth and 7th grade AA adolescents in Southern California were surveyed five times over three academic years. We examined subgroup differences in (1) lifetime alcohol, cigarette, and marijuana use assessed at baseline, (2) initiation of each substance over three years, and (3) baseline individual (positive and negative expectancies about substances, resistance self-efficacy, and intentions to use), family (closest adult and older sibling substance use), and school factors (perceived peer use). Read More

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http://doi.apa.org/getdoi.cfm?doi=10.1037/a0036251
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0036251DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4574640PMC
March 2015
19 Reads

Ethnic Identity as a Moderator against Discrimination for Transracially and Transnationally Adopted Korean American Adolescents.

Asian Am J Psychol 2015 Jun;6(2):154-163

University of Minnesota, Twin Cities.

Despite the growing practice of international adoption over the past 60 years, the racial and ethnic experiences of adopted youth are not well known. This study examined the moderating role of ethnic identity in the association between racial/ethnic discrimination and adjustment among transracially, transnationally adopted Korean American adolescents ( = 136). Building on self-categorization theory and past empirical research on Asian Americans, it was hypothesized that ethnic identity would exacerbate negative outcomes associated with discrimination. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0038360DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4530545PMC
June 2015
4 Reads

Chinese American Parents' Acculturation and Enculturation, Bicultural Management Difficulty, Depressive Symptoms, and Parenting.

Asian Am J Psychol 2014 Dec;5(4):298-306

University of Texas at Austin.

This study examined whether Chinese American parents' acculturation and enculturation were related to parenting practices (punitive parenting, democratic child participation, and inductive reasoning) indirectly through the mediation of parents' bicultural management difficulty and parental depressed mood. Data came from a two-wave study of Chinese American families in Northern California. Mothers and fathers were assessed when their children were in early adolescence and then again in middle adolescence (407 mothers and 381 fathers at Wave 1; 308 mothers and 281 fathers at Wave 2). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0035929DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4321805PMC
December 2014
2 Reads

Preventing Filipino Mental Health Disparities: Perspectives from Adolescents, Caregivers, Providers, and Advocates.

Asian Am J Psychol 2014 Dec;5(4):316-324

University of Southern California, School of Social Work.

Filipino Americans are the second largest immigrant population and second largest Asian ethnic group in the U.S. Disparities in youth behavioral health problems and the receipt of mental health services among Filipino youth have been documented previously. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0036479DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4319658PMC
December 2014
3 Reads

Lifetime Prevalence of Mental Disorders among Asian Americans: Nativity, Gender, and Sociodemographic Correlates.

Asian Am J Psychol 2014 Dec;5(4):353-363

University of Washington, Department of Biomedical Informatics and Medical Education.

This study examines lifetime prevalence estimates of mental disorders among Asian Americans with a focus on differences by nativity, gender, and other relevant sociodemographic correlates. We analyze cross-sectional data from the National Latino and Asian American Study (NLAAS), the first national epidemiological survey of Asian Americans which used a probability sample of household resident adults in the United States (N=2,095). US-born Asian Americans are more likely to experience lifetime mood disorders, substance use disorders, and any mental disorders compared to immigrants. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0035680DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4299873PMC
December 2014
2 Reads

Therapist Ethnicity and Treatment Orientation Differences in Multicultural Counseling Competencies.

Asian Am J Psychol 2014 Mar;5(1):53-65

Asian American Center on Disparities Research, Claremont McKenna College.

This study examined the relationship between therapist characteristics, therapeutic orientations, person-level and agency-level practices with cultural competency among 221 Los Angeles County community mental health clinicians. Results from an online survey indicated that compared to White therapists, ethnic minority therapists were more personally involved in communities of color, more likely to use a cultural framework in clinical practice, and perceived their agencies to be more culturally sensitive. Ethnic minority therapists also reported greater multicultural (MC) awareness and better MC counseling relationships with their clients than White therapists. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4286210PMC

Assessing Acculturation Over Time: A Four-year Prospective Study of Asian American Young Adults.

Asian Am J Psychol 2014 Sep;5(3):252-261

VA San Diego Healthcare System, University of California San Diego.

Acculturation is commonly defined as a dynamic and multidimensional process in which individuals and groups change over time when coming into contact with another culture. Despite the emphasis on acculturation as a process of change over time, few researchers have directly assessed this hypothesis. The current study first identifies and then examines "stable" and "dynamic" dimensions of acculturation within a 4-year prospective study of 433 first- and second-generation Chinese- and Korean-American college students. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0034908DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4280080PMC
September 2014
2 Reads

Self-Construal as a Predictor of Korean American Women's Intention to Vaccinate Daughters against Human Papillomavirus.

Asian Am J Psychol 2014 Jan;5(2):96-105

Institute of Health Promotion & Disease Prevention Research, Division of Behavioral Research, Department of Preventive Medicine and Sociology, Keck School of Medicine of USC, And Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90033.

Korean Americans represent one of the fastest growing Asian subpopulations in the United States. Despite a dramatic reduction in incidence nationwide, cervical cancer remains a major threat for Korean American women. By preventing the strains of the Human Papillomavirus (HPV) known to cause cervical cancer, the HPV vaccines appear to be a promising solution to reduce the persistent disparities in cervical cancer among not only Korean Americans, but also other racial and ethnic minorities more generally. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0036097DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4278380PMC
January 2014
2 Reads

Mediation effects of a culturally generic substance use prevention program for Asian American adolescents.

Asian Am J Psychol 2014 Jun;5(2):116-125

Columbia University School of Social Work, 1255 Amsterdam Avenue, New York, NY 10027, USA.

In this paper, we examined the mediation effects of a family-based substance use prevention program on a sample of Asian American families. These families were randomized into an intervention arm or a non-intervention control arm. Using path models, we assessed the effect of the intervention on adolescent girls' substance use outcomes at 2-year follow-up through family relationships and adolescent self-efficacy pathways. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0035928DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4258522PMC

Applying Public Health Frameworks to Advance the Promotion of Mental Health Among Asian American Children.

Asian Am J Psychol 2014 Jun;5(2):145-152

Department of Population Health New York University School of Medicine.

Asian American (ASA) children experience high rates of mental health problems. Although there is a pressing need to utilize population approaches, emerging frameworks from the fields of public and population health have not been applied to ASA children. This paper addresses this gap by first discussing applications of the National Prevention Strategy (NPS), a population strategy developed from the Social Determinants of Health perspective, to guide ASA prevention work. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0036185DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4258409PMC
June 2014
9 Reads

Language Brokering and Adjustment among Chinese and Korean American Adolescents: A Moderated Mediation Model of Perceived Maternal Sacrifice, Respect for the Mother, and Mother-Child Open Communication.

Asian Am J Psychol 2014 Jun;5(2):86-95

Department of Psychology, University of California at Riverside.

Asian American adolescents often language broker for their immigrant parents. Using a two-wave sample of Chinese American ( = 237; average age at W1 = 14.65, = . Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0035203DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4239135PMC

The Role of Ethnic and National Identifications in Perceived Discrimination for Asian Americans: Toward a Better Understanding of the Buffering Effect of Group Identifications on Psychological Distress.

Asian Am J Psychol 2014 Sep;5(3):161-171

Department of Psychology, San Diego State University.

A robust relationship between perceived racial discrimination and psychological distress has been established. Yet, mixed evidence exists regarding the extent to which ethnic identification moderates this relationship, and scarce attention has been paid to the moderating role of national identification. We propose that the role of group identifications in the perceived discrimination-psychological distress relationship is best understood by simultaneously and interactively considering ethnic and national identifications. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0031601DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4171723PMC
September 2014
7 Reads

The Impact of Acculturation on Depressive Symptoms: A Comparison of Older Korean Americans in Two Areas.

Asian Am J Psychol 2014 Sep;5(3):200-205

University of South Florida.

This study examined how the impact of acculturation on depressive symptoms varied between two samples of older Korean Americans. One sample was from west central Florida (low Korean density area; = 672), and the other from the New York City metropolitan area (high Korean density area; = 420). The average level of acculturation was lower among older Korean Americans in New York, compared to those living in Florida. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0032591DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5968823PMC
September 2014

Preservation and Modification of Culture in Family Socialization: Development of Parenting Measures for Korean Immigrant Families.

Asian Am J Psychol 2013 Jun;4(2):143-154

School of Social Work, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI.

This study aims to describe the family socialization beliefs and practices of Korean immigrant parents through testing psychometric properties of several newly developed items and scales to assess the major components of the Korean traditional concept of family socialization, . These new measures were examined for validity and reliability. The findings show that Korean immigrant parents largely preserve their traditional and core parenting values, while also showing meaningful, yet not very dramatic, signs of adopting new cultural traits. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0028772DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3995022PMC

Quality of Life Among Asian American Youth.

Asian Am J Psychol 2014 Mar;5(1):13-21

Division of General Pediatrics, Children's Hospital Boston, Department of Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School, and RAND Corporation.

The aims of the present study were to examine whether Asian American youth experience disparities in quality of life (QL) compared with Hispanic, African American, and white youth in the general population and to what extent socioeconomic status (SES) mediates any disparities among these racial/ethnic groups. Data were obtained from the Healthy Passages study, in which 4,972 Asian American (148; 3%), Hispanic (1,813; 36%), African American (1,755; 35%), and white (1,256; 25%) fifth-graders were enrolled in a population-based, cross-sectional survey conducted in three U.S. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0029822DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4831066PMC
March 2014
17 Reads

Patterns of Utilization and Outcomes of Inpatient Psychiatric Treatment in Asian Americans.

Asian Am J Psychol 2014 Mar;5(1):35-43

McLean Hospital and Harvard Medical School.

Most of the knowledge of racial/ethnic disparities in mental health treatment utilization comes from studies examining outpatient services, and less is known about these disparities in inpatient services. This empirical gap may limit our understanding of these disparities since inpatient treatment is the most intensive form of specialty mental health care for patients with psychological disorders. We conducted a systematic chart review of 129 Asian American and 198 White American psychiatric inpatients to examine patterns of inpatient psychiatric treatment utilization. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0034439DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4430852PMC
March 2014
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Is Asian American Parenting Controlling and Harsh? Empirical Testing of Relationships between Korean American and Western Parenting Measures.

Asian Am J Psychol 2013 Mar;4(1):19-29

School of Social Service Administration, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL.

Asian American parenting is often portrayed as highly controlling and even harsh. This study empirically tested the associations between a set of recently developed Korean measures and several commonly used Western parenting measures to accurately describe Asian American family processes, specifically those of Korean Americans. The results show a much nuanced and detailed picture of Korean American parenting as a blend of Western authoritative and authoritarian styles with positive and-although very limited-negative parenting. Read More

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http://doi.apa.org/getdoi.cfm?doi=10.1037/a0031220
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0031220DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3746991PMC
March 2013
4 Reads

Understanding "Tiger Parenting" Through the Perceptions of Chinese Immigrant Mothers: Can Chinese and U.S. Parenting Coexist?

Asian Am J Psychol 2013 Mar;4(1):30-40

Department of Psychology, University of Maryland, Baltimore County.

How Chinese immigrant mothers perceive "Chinese" and "U.S." parenting and changes in their parenting postmigration remains unclear, despite recent interest in Chinese parenting particularly in response to A. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0031217DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3729394PMC
March 2013
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Does "Tiger Parenting" Exist? Parenting Profiles of Chinese Americans and Adolescent Developmental Outcomes.

Asian Am J Psychol 2013 Mar;4(1):7-18

University of Texas at Austin.

"Tiger parenting," as described by Chua (2011), has put parenting in Asian American families in the spotlight. The current study identified parenting profiles in Chinese American families and explored their effects on adolescent adjustment. In a three-wave longitudinal design spanning eight years, from early adolescence to emerging adulthood, adolescents (54% female), fathers and mothers from 444 Chinese American families reported on eight parenting dimensions (e. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0030612DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3641860PMC

Culturally Sensitive Depression Assessment for Chinese American Immigrants: Development of a Comprehensive Measure and a Screening Scale Using an Item Response Approach.

Asian Am J Psychol 2012 Dec 22;3(4):230-253. Epub 2011 Aug 22.

School of Social Welfare, University of California, Berkeley.

The present mixed methods study developed a comprehensive measure and a screening scale of depression for Chinese American immigrants by combining an emic approach with item response analysis. Clinical participants were immigrants diagnosed by licensed clinicians who worked in the community. Qualitative interviews with clinicians and clinical participants (N = 63) supported the definition of the construct of depression-which guided scale development-and a 47-item pilot scale. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0025628DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3595566PMC
December 2012
2 Reads

U.S. Mental Health Policy: Addressing the Neglect of Asian Americans.

Asian Am J Psychol 2012 Sep;3(3):181-193

Department of Psychology, University of Oregon.

Although Asian Americans are proportionally the fastest-growing ethnic group in the United States, federal mental health policies have neglected their special needs. U.S. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0029950DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3905325PMC
September 2012
3 Reads

The Implementation of a Telephone-Delivered Intervention for Asian American Disordered Gamblers: A Pilot Study.

Asian Am J Psychol 2012 Sep;3(3)

Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences and University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) Gambling Studies Program, UCLA.

This report will discuss the implementation and preliminary results of a community-based telephone-delivered gambling treatment program specifically designed for Asian Americans. The intervention was implemented by the NICOS Chinese Health Coalition, a nonprofit community organization based in Northern California, overseen by the UCLA (University of California, Los Angeles) Gambling Studies Program and the California Office of Problem Gambling, and launched in December 2010. It consisted of six 1-hr long telephone-delivered sessions conducted by a mental health provider using a translated version of the Freedom from Problem Gambling Self-Help Workbook. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0029799DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3860053PMC
September 2012
4 Reads

Cultural Norms Shaping Research Group Interviews with Chinese American Immigrants.

Asian Am J Psychol 2011 Jun;2(2):115-127

University of California, San Francisco.

Practical knowledge on how to tailor research methods for Asian Americans is relatively scarce despite the rapid population growth of this ethnic group and the ongoing calls for greater cultural competence among researchers. Based on a 4-year qualitative study of family and cultural issues in diabetes management among Chinese American immigrants, this article presents data-based analyses of culturally nuanced group interview processes, and recommendations for conducting culturally appropriate group interviews. Group interview processes were prominently shaped by 4 cultural norms: sensitivity to social hierarchy, monitoring public display of strong emotions, face concerns, and emphasis on group harmony. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0024184DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3134226PMC
June 2011
3 Reads

Neighborhood Effects on Physical and Mental Health: A Study of Korean American Older Adults.

Asian Am J Psychol 2011 Jun;2(2):91-100

Department of Aging and Mental Health Disparities, University of South Florida.

This study explored how the physical and mental health of Korean American older adults were influenced by neighborhood characteristics (i.e., proportion of individuals living below the poverty level, proportion of individuals 65 years of age and older, and proportion of racial/ethnic minorities in the census block groups where each respondent lived). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0023656DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5978730PMC

Behavioral Enculturation and Acculturation, Psychological Functioning, and Help-Seeking Attitudes Among Asian American Adolescents.

Asian Am J Psychol 2010 Sep;1(3):175-185

Department of Psychology, University of Hawaii at Hilo.

The study examined behavioral enculturation to Asian culture and behavioral acculturation to the dominant European American culture and their possible relations to positive psychological functioning among Asian American adolescents. Positive psychological functioning was operationalized using measures of general self-efficacy, cognitive flexibility, collective self-esteem, and attitudes toward seeking help. Based on data from 112 Asian American high school students in Hawaii, the results did not support the hypothesis that both high behavioral enculturation and acculturation would be related to positive psychological functioning. Read More

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http://doi.apa.org/getdoi.cfm?doi=10.1037/a0021125
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0021125DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3092711PMC
September 2010
3 Reads

Substance use among Asian American adolescents: Influence of race, ethnicity, and acculturation in the context of key risk and protective factors.

Asian Am J Psychol 2010 Dec;1(4):261-274

Department of Psychiatry, Division of Prevention & Community Research, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut, USA.

This study examines the relative influence of race/ethnicity, acculturation, peer substance use, and academic achievement on adolescent substance use among different Asian American ethnic groups and U.S. racial/ethnic groups. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0021703DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4192727PMC
December 2010
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Perceived Discrimination in Older Korean Americans.

Asian Am J Psychol 2010 Jun;1(2):129-135

Department of Aging and Mental Health Disparities, University of South Florida.

This study explored a potential pathway by which perceived discrimination may affect levels of depressive symptoms in a sample of 472 Korean American older adults (M (age)= 69.9, SD = 7.04). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0019967DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2947839PMC
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