7,206 results match your criteria Arthroscopy[Journal]


Diagnostic Value of Clinical Tests for Infraspinatus Tendon Tears.

Arthroscopy 2019 Feb 12. Epub 2019 Feb 12.

Department for Orthopaedic Surgery, Universitäts- und Rehabilitationskliniken Ulm, University of Ulm, Ulm, Germany.

Purpose: To analyze and compare the diagnostic value and interpretation of 6 established clinical tests for infraspinatus tendon tears; to assess their ability to distinguish between partial- and full-thickness tears of the infraspinatus tendon; and to investigate whether conducting multiple tests increases the precision of diagnosis.

Methods: A total of 91 patients scheduled for shoulder arthroscopy from March 2015 to April 2017 were included in the present study. To assess the sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, accuracy, diagnostic odds ratio, positive and negative likelihood ratios, and the area under the curve (AUC), intraoperative findings were compared with the results of 6 established clinical infraspinatus tests: the hornblower's test, the drop sign, the Patte sign, the external rotation lag sign (ERLS), the resisted external rotation test (RERT), and the infraspinatus scapular retraction test. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arthro.2018.12.003DOI Listing
February 2019

Influence of Sutures on Cartilage Integrity: Do Meniscus Sutures Harm Cartilage? An Experimental Animal Study.

Arthroscopy 2019 Feb 4. Epub 2019 Feb 4.

Department of Sports Orthopaedics, Technical University of Munich, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich, Germany; Department of Sports Orthopaedics, Hessing Stiftung Augsburg, Augsburg, Germany. Electronic address:

Purpose: To evaluate whether different suture materials in meniscal repair may harm cartilage.

Methods: A preloaded linear friction testing setup including porcine knees with porcine cartilage, porcine meniscus, and different suture materials (braided nonabsorbable, absorbable monofilament) was used. Five groups with different tribological pairs were tested: cartilage on meniscus (control), cartilage on cartilage (control No. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arthro.2018.11.040DOI Listing
February 2019

Prognosis Following Hip Arthroscopy Varies in Professional Athletes Based on Sport.

Arthroscopy 2019 Feb 5. Epub 2019 Feb 5.

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois, U.S.A.

Purpose: To evaluate return to play (RTP) and performance-based outcomes in professional athletes across 4 major North American team sports following hip arthroscopy.

Methods: Professional athletes of the National Football League, Major League Baseball (MLB), National Basketball Association, and National Hockey League (NHL) who underwent hip arthroscopy were identified using an established protocol of public reports. Sport-specific statistics were collected before and after hip arthroscopy for each athlete, leading to a performance score. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arthro.2018.10.113DOI Listing
February 2019

Supplemental Fixation of Inner Graft Limbs in All-Inside, Quadrupled, Single-Tendon Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Graft Construct Yields Improved Biomechanical Properties.

Arthroscopy 2019 Feb 5. Epub 2019 Feb 5.

University of Miami Sports Medicine Institute, Miller School of Medicine, University of Miami, Miami, Florida, U.S.A.. Electronic address:

Purpose: To compare the time-zero load to failure of a quadrupled, single-tendon, all-inside anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction graft construct with (supplemented) and without the incorporation of inner-limb whipstitch sutures (control) into a tibial suspensory fixation button.

Methods: Eight matched pairs of peroneus longus tendons were prepared according to a quadrupled, all-inside ACL soft-tissue graft technique with 1 side serving as a control and the contralateral side supplemented. The constructs were biomechanically tested for strain in the inner and outer limbs during a preconditioning protocol, single-cycle load to failure, and elongation of the whole construct. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arthro.2018.10.130DOI Listing
February 2019

Outcomes of Hip Arthroscopy With Concomitant Periacetabular Osteotomy. Minimum Five-Year Follow-Up.

Arthroscopy 2019 Feb 4. Epub 2019 Feb 4.

American Hip Institute, Westmont, Illinois, U.S.A.; Hinsdale Orthopaedics, Westmont, Illinois, U.S.A.. Electronic address:

Purpose: To report minimum 5-year follow-up results of concomitant hip arthroscopy followed by periacetabular osteotomy (PAO) to treat acetabular dysplasia and intra-articular pathology, such as femoroacetabular impingement syndrome and labral tears.

Methods: Data were prospectively collected from October 2010 to December 2012. Patients were included in this study if they underwent concomitant hip arthroscopy and PAO and if they had preoperative scores documented for the following measures: modified Harris Hip Score (mHHS), Nonarthritic Hip Score (NAHS), Hip Outcome Score-Sports-Specific Subscale (HOS-SSS), and pain on a visual analog scale (VAS). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arthro.2018.10.143DOI Listing
February 2019

Automated 3-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Allows for Accurate Evaluation of Glenoid Bone Loss Compared With 3-Dimensional Computed Tomography.

Arthroscopy 2019 Feb 4. Epub 2019 Feb 4.

Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois, U.S.A.

Purpose: To evaluate clinical measurements of glenoid bone loss based on 3-dimensional (3D) computed tomography (CT) and automatically segmented 3D reconstructions from Dixon fat-water magnetic resonance (MR) imaging.

Methods: Available CT and MR studies from 16 patients with recurrent anterior shoulder instability were retrospectively reviewed. Three-dimensional reconstructions were formed independently by 2 observers using freely available software and a simple threshold-based segmentation (3D Slicer, version 4. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arthro.2018.10.119DOI Listing
February 2019

Early Outcomes After Arthroscopic Hip Capsular Reconstruction Using Iliotibial Band Allograft Versus Dermal Allograft.

Arthroscopy 2019 Feb 4. Epub 2019 Feb 4.

Steadman Clinic, Vail, Colorado, U.S.A.; Steadman Philippon Research Institute, Vail, Colorado, U.S.A.. Electronic address:

Purpose: To compare the clinical outcomes between 2 groups of patients who underwent arthroscopic hip capsular reconstruction with the same surgical technique with an iliotibial band (ITB) allograft versus dermal allograft tissue.

Methods: From March 2013 to October 2015, patients who were 18 years of age or older and who underwent revision arthroscopic hip surgery with capsular reconstruction by the senior author were identified. Patients who were younger than 18 years old, had a lateral center-edge angle <20° or Tonnis osteoarthritis grade 2 or 3, or refused to participate were excluded. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S07498063183097
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arthro.2018.10.110DOI Listing
February 2019
2 Reads

Combined Lateral Osseolabral Coverage Is Normal in Hips With Acetabular Dysplasia.

Arthroscopy 2019 Feb 4. Epub 2019 Feb 4.

Southern California Hip Institute, North Hollywood, California, U.S.A.

Purpose: To compare the lateral osseolabral coverage between groups of patients with different degrees of acetabular bony coverage using a magnetic resonance imaging parameter known as the combined lateral center-edge angle (cLCEA).

Methods: The cLCEA was measured among a consecutive series of patients presenting to a dedicated hip preservation surgeon with a magnetic resonance imaging scan. The cLCEA was measured using a coronal T1 or proton density image and was defined as the angle subtended by (1) a line through the center of the femoral head and orthogonal to the transverse line passing through the teardrops of both hips and (2) an oblique line drawn from the center of the femoral head to the free edge of the lateral acetabular labrum. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arthro.2018.10.133DOI Listing
February 2019

Single- Versus Double-Row Repair of Hip Abductor Tears: A Biomechanical Matched Cadaver Study.

Arthroscopy 2019 Feb 4. Epub 2019 Feb 4.

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, New York, U.S.A.; Department of Biomechanics, Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, New York, U.S.A.

Purpose: The purposes of this study were (1) to evaluate the percentage of gluteus medius and minimus tendon footprint restoration that can be achieved with fixation using single-row repair versus double-row repair and (2) to evaluate the yield load of a repair of the gluteus medius and minimus tendon using single-row versus double-row repair techniques.

Methods: Twelve human fresh-frozen cadaveric hip specimens (6 matched pairs, 4 female, mean age 47.5 ± 14. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arthro.2018.10.146DOI Listing
February 2019

A Biomechanical Comparison of Single-, Double-, and Triple-Bundle Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstructions Using a Hamstring Tendon Graft.

Arthroscopy 2019 Feb 4. Epub 2019 Feb 4.

Department of Orthopedic Surgery, School of Medicine, Sapporo Medical University, Sapporo, Japan.

Purpose: The first objective of our cadaveric study was to perform a biomechanical comparison of single-bundle (SB), double-bundle (DB), and triple-bundle (TB) anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstructions using a hamstring tendon graft to determine the laxity match pre-tension (LMP) value, which is the tension within the graft required to re-create the same anterior laxity as the ACL-intact knee. The second objective was to determine the anterior laxity and force distribution during the application of both an anterior force and a simulated pivot-shift test.

Methods: Eleven fresh-frozen cadaveric knees were tested using a robotic/universal force-moment sensor system in the intact state, TB-reconstructed knee, DB-reconstructed knee, and SB-reconstructed knee. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arthro.2018.10.124DOI Listing
February 2019

Preoperative Shoulder Injections Are Associated With Increased Risk of Revision Rotator Cuff Repair.

Arthroscopy 2019 Feb 4. Epub 2019 Feb 4.

Department of Orthopaedics, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina, U.S.A.

Purpose: The goal of this study was to determine whether the timing of preoperative shoulder injections is associated with an increased risk of revision rotator cuff repair following primary rotator cuff repair (RCR).

Methods: A retrospective analysis of claims data of privately insured subjects from the MarketScan database for the years 2010 to 2014 was conducted. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to compare the odds of reoperation between groups. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arthro.2018.10.107DOI Listing
February 2019

Body Mass Index as a Risk Factor for 30-Day Postoperative Complications in Knee, Hip, and Shoulder Arthroscopy.

Arthroscopy 2019 Feb 4. Epub 2019 Feb 4.

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois, U.S.A.

Purpose: To use the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database to determine whether body mass index (BMI) is associated with 30-day postoperative complications following arthroscopic surgery.

Methods: Cases of elective knee, hip, and shoulder arthroscopy were identified. A retrospective comparative analysis was conducted, and the overall rates of morbidity, mortality, readmission, reoperation, and venothromboembolism (VTE) were compared using univariate analyses and binary logistic regressions to ascertain the adjusted effect of BMI, with and without diabetes, on morbidity, readmission, reoperation, and VTE. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arthro.2018.10.108DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Risk Factors for Cerebral Desaturation Events During Shoulder Surgery in the Beach Chair Position.

Arthroscopy 2019 Feb 4. Epub 2019 Feb 4.

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S.A.

Purpose: The goals of this study were 2-fold: (1) to determine the risk factors for cerebral desaturation events (CDEs) after implementation of a comprehensive surgical and anesthetic protocol consisting of patient risk stratification, maintenance of normotensive anesthesia, and patient positioning in a staged fashion, and (2) to assess for subclinical neurologic decline associated with intraoperative ischemic events through cognitive testing.

Methods: One hundred patients undergoing shoulder surgery in the beach chair position were stratified for risk of CDE based on Framingham stroke criteria, body mass index (BMI), and history of cerebrovascular accidents. Cerebral oxygen saturation was monitored with near-infrared spectroscopy. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arthro.2018.10.123DOI Listing
February 2019
2 Reads

Management of Concomitant Preoperative Rotator Cuff Pathology and Adhesive Capsulitis: A Systematic Review of Indications, Treatment Approaches, and Outcomes.

Arthroscopy 2019 Feb 4. Epub 2019 Feb 4.

UPMC Lemieux Sports Complex, Cranberry, Pennsylvania, U.S.A.

Purpose: Concomitant preoperative adhesive capsulitis (AC) and rotator cuff (RC) pathology pose therapeutic challenges in light of contrasting interventional and rehabilitative goals. The purposes of this systematic review were to assess the literature regarding the management and rehabilitation of patients with concomitant RC tears and preoperative AC and to compare overall clinical outcomes between strategies for this common scenario.

Methods: In accordance with PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) guidelines, 3 databases (MEDLINE, Embase, and PubMed) were searched and screened in duplicate using predetermined criteria for studies on the aforementioned patient population. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arthro.2018.10.126DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Location and Correlation of Acetabular Labral Tears and Paralabral Cysts Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging or Magnetic Resonance Arthrography in Patients With Femoroacetabular Impingement.

Arthroscopy 2019 Feb 4. Epub 2019 Feb 4.

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Chung-Ang University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea. Electronic address:

Purpose: To evaluate the prevalence and location of paralabral cysts and the correlation between the type of femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) and acetabular labral tears, as well as the location of the paralabral cysts.

Methods: Patients who received a diagnosis of FAI syndrome using plain radiography, magnetic resonance imaging or magnetic resonance arthrography, or computed tomographic arthrography from 2010 to 2015 were included in this study. The exclusion criteria were patients with arthritis (Tönnis grade 2 or greater) or dysplasia. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arthro.2018.10.141DOI Listing
February 2019
3.206 Impact Factor

The Utility of Oral Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs Compared With Standard Opioids Following Arthroscopic Meniscectomy: A Prospective Observational Study.

Arthroscopy 2019 Feb 4. Epub 2019 Feb 4.

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, NYU Langone Medical Center, Hospital for Joint Diseases, New York, New York, U.S.A.. Electronic address:

Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of oral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) as the primary postoperative pain medication compared with standard oral opioids following arthroscopic partial meniscectomy.

Methods: This was a single-center, prospective, nonrandomized, comparative observational study. Patients ages 18 to 65 years who were indicated for arthroscopic meniscectomy were included. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arthro.2018.09.018DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

The Presence of the Arthroscopic "Floating Meniscus" Sign as an Indicator for Surgical Intervention in Patients With Combined Anterior Cruciate Ligament and Grade II Medial Collateral Ligament Injury.

Arthroscopy 2019 Feb 4. Epub 2019 Feb 4.

Centro de Traumatologia do Esporte do Departamento de Ortopedia e Traumatologia, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, Escola Paulista de Medicina, São Paulo, Brazil.

Purpose: To compare the outcomes of patients with an arthroscopic floating meniscus sign at 24-month follow-up when treated with and without medial compartment reconstruction surgery. Another aim of the present study was to compare magnetic resonance imaging and arthroscopic findings directly related to the characterization and localization medial collateral ligament (MCL) injuries.

Methods: A total of 112 patients diagnosed with combined anterior cruciate ligament (ACL)-MCL grade II injuries to be treated with ACL reconstruction surgery were included in the study. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arthro.2018.10.114DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

The Impact of Transphyseal ACL Reconstruction on Lower Extremity Growth and Alignment.

Arthroscopy 2019 Feb 4. Epub 2019 Feb 4.

Department of Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine, Seattle Children's Hospital, Seattle, Washington, U.S.A.. Electronic address:

Purpose: To evaluate the effect of transphyseal anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction on lower extremity radiographic growth and alignment.

Methods: We retrospectively reviewed patients who underwent transphyseal ACL reconstruction and were followed to skeletal maturity or at least 2 years, with the nonoperative limb used as an internal control. Changes in coronal plane alignments and tibial slope of the operative limb were compared with a Wilcoxon test. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S07498063183101
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arthro.2018.10.132DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Knee Osteoarthritis After Single-Bundle Versus Double-Bundle Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: A Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials.

Arthroscopy 2019 Feb 4. Epub 2019 Feb 4.

Department of Orthopedics, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado, U.S.A.

Purpose: To systematically review high-quality studies in the literature to compare the postoperative radiographic incidence of knee osteoarthritis (OA) after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) with a single-bundle (SB) versus double-bundle (DB) graft.

Methods: A systematic review was performed by searching PubMed, the Cochrane Library, and Embase to locate randomized controlled trials that compared the postoperative progression of knee OA in SB versus DB ACLR patients. The search terms used were "anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction," "single-bundle," "double-bundle," "randomized," and "osteoarthritis. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S07498063183101
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arthro.2018.10.127DOI Listing
February 2019
2 Reads

The Role of Platelet-Rich Plasma in Cartilage Pathology: An Updated Systematic Review of the Basic Science Evidence.

Arthroscopy 2019 Feb 4. Epub 2019 Feb 4.

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, New York, U.S.A.

Purpose: To review the basic science studies on platelet-rich plasma (PRP) for cartilage and determine whether there has been an improvement in methodology and outcome reporting that would allow for a more meaningful analysis regarding the mechanism of action and efficacy of PRP for cartilage pathology.

Methods: The PubMed/MEDLINE and EMBASE databases were screened in May 2017 with publication dates of January 2011 through May 2017 using the following key words: "platelet-rich plasma OR PRP OR autologous conditioned plasma (ACP) OR ACP AND cartilage OR chondrocytes OR chondrogenesis OR osteoarthritis OR arthritis." Two authors independently performed the search, determined study inclusion, and extracted data. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arthro.2018.10.125DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Adductor Canal Nerve Versus Femoral Nerve Blockade for Pain Control and Quadriceps Function Following ACL Reconstruction With Patellar Tendon Autograft: A Prospective Randomized Trial.

Arthroscopy 2019 Feb 4. Epub 2019 Feb 4.

Department of Orthopedic Surgery, The University of Texas at Houston, Houston, Texas, U.S.A.

Purpose: To compare femoral nerve blockade (FNB) versus adductor canal nerve blockade (ACB) for postoperative pain control and quadriceps muscle function in patients undergoing anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction with patellar tendon autograft.

Methods: A randomized therapeutic trial of 90 patients undergoing ACL reconstruction with patellar tendon autograft was conducted comparing ACB versus FNB at 24 hours, 2 and 4 weeks, and 6 months postsurgery. Early outcome measures included average pain score and morphine equivalent units (milligrams) consumed, quadriceps surface electromyography, straight leg raise, and ability to ambulate without assistive devices. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arthro.2018.10.149DOI Listing
February 2019

Injections Prior to Rotator Cuff Repair Are Associated With Increased Rotator Cuff Revision Rates.

Arthroscopy 2019 Feb 4. Epub 2019 Feb 4.

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California, U.S.A.

Purpose: To determine whether shoulder injections prior to rotator cuff repair (RCR) are associated with deleterious surgical outcomes.

Methods: Two large national insurance databases were used to identify a total of 22,156 patients who received ipsilateral shoulder injections prior to RCR. They were age, sex, obesity, smoking status, and comorbidity matched to a control group of patients who underwent RCR without prior injections. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arthro.2018.10.116DOI Listing
February 2019

Validation of a Virtual Reality-Based Hip Arthroscopy Simulator.

Arthroscopy 2019 Feb 4. Epub 2019 Feb 4.

Department of Orthopaedics, Balgrist University Hospital, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland.

Purpose: To assess construct and face validity of a novel virtual reality-based hip arthroscopy simulator using the previously validated Arthroscopic Surgery Skills Evaluation Tool (ASSET), metric parameters, and a questionnaire.

Methods: Metric parameters including task completion time, camera path, and grasper path were recorded, and the ASSET score was used to assess construct validity. Face validity was evaluated using a questionnaire. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arthro.2018.10.131DOI Listing
February 2019

Erratum.

Authors:

Arthroscopy 2019 Feb;35(2):691

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arthro.2018.11.018DOI Listing
February 2019

Editorial Commentary: Anatomy of the Anterolateral Ligament of the Knee-The Science of Looking for Bigfoot.

Arthroscopy 2019 Feb;35(2):682-683

The anterolateral ligament of the knee continues to create a spirited debate within orthopaedics. This can be traced as far back as 1879, when Segond initially described a "pearly, resistant, fibrous band" of the anterolateral aspect of the knee. More recently, much orthopaedic research has been aimed at not only the clinical significance-but defining its very existence. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arthro.2018.11.031DOI Listing
February 2019

Editorial Commentary: Meniscal Allograft Success-How Do We Get There?

Authors:
Mark G Siegel

Arthroscopy 2019 Feb;35(2):668-669

Patients undergoing meniscal allograft transplantation show improvement at 10 years and even 15 years of follow-up. However, it is unclear what factors influence the results, including but not limited to bone plug versus all-suture repair, fresh versus cryopreserved grafts, proper sizing, and rehabilitation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arthro.2018.11.027DOI Listing
February 2019

Long-Term Survival Analysis and Outcomes of Meniscal Allograft Transplantation With Minimum 10-Year Follow-Up: A Systematic Review.

Arthroscopy 2019 Feb;35(2):659-667

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, U.S.A.. Electronic address:

Purpose: To investigate the long-term survivorship rates and functional outcomes of meniscal allograft transplantation (MAT) in patients with minimum 10-year postoperative follow-up.

Methods: Two reviewers independently searched EMBASE, MEDLINE, and PubMed from database inception for literature related to MAT according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) checklist. Data are reported in a narrative summary fashion with descriptive statistics. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arthro.2018.08.031DOI Listing
February 2019
2 Reads

Editorial Commentary: Hip Arthroscopy-The Tissue-Friendly Evolution.

Authors:
Niraj V Kalore

Arthroscopy 2019 Feb;35(2):657-658

The field of hip arthroscopy is saturated with low-level studies. A systematic review of these low-level studies provides low-level evidence favoring tissue-friendly restorative techniques such as labral repair and capsular repair over nonrestorative techniques such as labral debridement and capsulotomy. Iatrogenic complications such as nerve injuries and heterotopic ossification remain the most common complications of hip arthroscopy. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arthro.2018.11.048DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Systematic Review of Hip Arthroscopy for Femoroacetabular Impingement: The Importance of Labral Repair and Capsular Closure.

Arthroscopy 2019 Feb;35(2):646-656.e3

Section of Young Adult Hip Surgery, Division of Sports Medicine, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois, U.S.A.. Electronic address:

Purpose: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of hip arthroscopy for femoroacetabular impingement syndrome by assessing complications, comprehensive procedure survivorship, and the influence of labral and capsular management on procedure survivorship.

Methods: A systematic review of multiple medical databases was performed using the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines and checklist. All clinical outcome studies that reported on the presence or absence of reoperation after hip arthroscopy for femoroacetabular impingement syndrome were eligible for inclusion. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arthro.2018.09.005DOI Listing
February 2019
2 Reads

Editorial Commentary: The Child of 2 Mothers: Hip Preservation and Hip Arthroplasty.

Arthroscopy 2019 Feb;35(2):644-645

Chicago, Illinois.

Two orthopaedic disciplines see the same hip joint from a different angle. The arthroplasty specialist corrects the hip joint osteoarthritis by replacing the hip, while the arthroscopy specialist preserves the joint by correcting the mechanical aberrations. Although both of these approaches are well documented in the literature, some patients who undergo hip preservation surgery will have a subsequent hip replacement. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arthro.2018.11.052DOI Listing
February 2019
4 Reads

Editorial Commentary: Remplissage for All: Hammer and a Nail or the Necessary Adjunct to Arthroscopic Bankart Repair?

Authors:
Patrick J Denard

Arthroscopy 2019 Feb;35(2):629-630

Despite advancement in arthroscopic techniques and greater characterization of bone loss, recurrence persists following isolated arthroscopic Bankart repair. Remplissage was developed to prevent engagement of a Hill-Sachs lesion and has decreased recurrence rates compared with isolated Bankart repair. However, the procedure may result in partial loss of external rotation, and long-term studies on the impact of this range of motion loss are needed. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arthro.2018.11.020DOI Listing
February 2019

Editorial Commentary: Yet Another Arrow in the Quiver for Surgical Treatment of the Rotator Cuff-Deficient Shoulder: Will It Fly Fast and Far or Fall Short Like Other Options Have?

Authors:
S Joshua Szabo

Arthroscopy 2019 Feb;35(2):615-616

Rotator cuff tears are common. When indicated, surgical repair is a highly successful procedure. There are circumstances when there is not enough tendon to perform an anatomic repair because of tear size, retraction, and/or atrophy. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arthro.2018.10.111DOI Listing
February 2019

Editorial Commentary: Inexpensive Training Tools Can Facilitate Basic Arthroscopy Education.

Arthroscopy 2019 Feb;35(2):605-606

Los Angeles, California.

Bench-top arthroscopy training requires some form of camera visualization. Use of clinical arthroscopy equipment in a virtual reality simulation lab may be cost prohibitive for some training programs. There are creative ways to build homemade, inexpensive camera setups for basic arthroscopy skills training. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arthro.2018.11.005DOI Listing
February 2019

Editorial Commentary: The Use of Allogenic Cells in Regenerative Medicine: Are Amniotic, Umbilical, and Other Allogenic Cell Sources Safe?

Authors:
Jason L Dragoo

Arthroscopy 2019 Feb;35(2):594-595

Stanford University.

There are abundant data to suggest that the autologous transplantation of human progenitor cells is safe. However, the use of allogenic cells for human use has not been adequately researched and should not be considered safe at this time. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arthro.2018.11.019DOI Listing
February 2019

Editorial Commentary: Scoping Knees With Osteoarthritis and Opioid Dependence? Brace Yourself for Postop Pain.

Arthroscopy 2019 Feb;35(2):581-582

University of Iowa.

Recent data suggest there are 2 factors associated with prolonged opioid use following arthroscopic meniscus surgery: opioid use prior to surgery and the presence of osteoarthritis. With heightened awareness and large-scale efforts to reduce perioperative opioid use, cessation prior to surgical interventions should be given strong consideration because this may result in meaningful reductions in postoperative prescriptions. In addition, counseling patients about opioid-induced hyperalgesia (where opioid medications can make pain worse and not better) in the preoperative period could be used in this population. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arthro.2018.11.025DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Editorial Commentary: Morton Forks a Knee: Magnetic Resonance Imaging Versus Needles Arthroscopy for Knee Meniscus Tears.

Authors:
Timothy S Crall

Arthroscopy 2019 Feb;35(2):563-565

Recent literature tells us that knee arthroscopy in the setting of osteoarthritis is no better than placebo, but arthroscopy for isolated, nondegenerative meniscus tears is both helpful to patients and cost-effective. Since most patients with osteoarthritis have meniscus pathology, we need an accurate way to rule out degenerative disease in patients who are otherwise good candidates for arthroscopic partial meniscectomy. Magnetic resonance imaging can be misleading. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S07498063183109
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arthro.2018.11.021DOI Listing
February 2019
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Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Needle Arthroscopy Versus Magnetic Resonance Imaging in the Diagnosis and Treatment of Meniscal Tears of the Knee.

Arthroscopy 2019 Feb;35(2):554-562.e13

Medical Device Consultants of Ridgewood, Ridgewood, New Jersey, U.S.A.. Electronic address:

Purpose: To determine whether needle arthroscopy (NA) compared with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the diagnosis and treatment of meniscal tears is cost-effective when evaluated over a 2-year period via patient-reported outcomes. The hypothesis is that improved diagnostic accuracy with NA would lead to less costly care and similar outcomes.

Methods: A Markov model/decision tree analysis was performed using TreeAge Pro 2017 software. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arthro.2018.09.030DOI Listing
February 2019
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Editorial Commentary: Déjà Vu: Double-Bundle Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Revisited.

Arthroscopy 2019 Feb;35(2):552-553

Houston, Texas.

Regardless of the technique utilized, tunnel expansion following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction remains a mystery and a clinical challenge. No procedure seems to be immune to this, even anatomic double-bundle reconstruction. This technique was introduced more than 20 years ago and showed great promise while also contributing significantly to our current knowledge of anterior cruciate ligament anatomy and biomechanics. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arthro.2018.10.112DOI Listing
February 2019

Comparison of Tunnel Enlargement and Clinical Outcome Between Bioabsorbable Interference Screws and Cortical Button-Post Fixation in Arthroscopic Double-Bundle Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: A Prospective, Randomized Study With a Minimum Follow-Up of 2 Years.

Arthroscopy 2019 Feb;35(2):544-551

Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan; School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan.

Purpose: To investigate the tunnel enlargement rate and clinical function by comparing double-bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) using different fixation devices.

Methods: Patients receiving primary arthroscopic double-bundle ACLR were screened and divided into 2 groups on the basis of the method of graft fixation: bioabsorbable interference screw (BS) group and cortical button (CB) group. Bone tunnel size was assessed digitally using magnetic resonance imaging, which was performed a minimum of 2 years postoperatively. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arthro.2018.08.039DOI Listing
February 2019
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Editorial Commentary: Built to Last or Just a Trend? Hybrid Graft for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

Arthroscopy 2019 Feb;35(2):535-536

Paterson, New Jersey.

The use of a hybrid autograft-allograft for primary anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) has gained significant attention in the orthopaedic sports medicine community in recent years. A hybrid graft is most often used to supplement a hamstring autograft with a small diameter, based on evidence that a graft size under a certain diameter (most often 8 mm) increases the risk for graft failure in younger patients. Multiple studies have been published comparing clinical outcomes of ACLR using a hybrid graft versus a hamstring autograft, with conflicting results. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arthro.2018.09.011DOI Listing
February 2019

Editorial Commentary: The Anterolateral Ligament Really Exists, Now Show Me How to Find It.

Authors:
David A Pula

Arthroscopy 2019 Feb;35(2):528-529

The anterior lateral complex is commonly associated with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. This has been evident since the description of the Segond fracture and by the use of lateral extra-articular tenodesis for ACL injury. Although lateral extra-articular tenodesis has been mostly given up owing to a preference for anatomic ACL reconstructions, it is gaining interest as an adjunct to ACL reconstruction. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arthro.2018.11.004DOI Listing
February 2019
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Editorial Commentary: Why Should the Contralateral Side Be Examined in Patients With Symptomatic Discoid Lateral Meniscus?

Authors:
Sang Hak Lee

Arthroscopy 2019 Feb;35(2):507-510

Recent reports have found the rate of bilateral discoid lateral meniscus (DLM) to be high (79%-97%) in patients with unilaterally symptomatic DLM; the associated torn meniscus incidence is also high at 33%. The present study results indicated that older, symptomatic DLM patients with more degenerative changes may be at risk for a similar condition in the contralateral knee. Long-term follow-up with magnetic resonance imaging screening for asymptomatic contralateral knees is necessary to determine the fate of the contralateral knee. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arthro.2018.11.067DOI Listing
February 2019
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Editorial Commentary: Hip Arthroscopy Capsular Management-Cut Your Cloth to Measure!

Authors:
Brian M Devitt

Arthroscopy 2019 Feb;35(2):478-479

Richmond, Australia.

Microinstability of the hip is a relatively recent concept but one that is gaining increased acceptance. As our understanding of the factors that contribute to microinstability has increased, so too has our ability to identify "at-risk" patients, in whom a capsular repair should be considered after hip arthroscopy to achieve optimal results and avoid iatrogenic instability (dislocation or microinstability). However, each of our patients is different, and as such, we must be able to tailor our capsulotomies and repairs accordingly based on the bony morphology, capsular volume, and properties of the tissue. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arthro.2018.11.034DOI Listing
February 2019
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Editorial Commentary: Does Orthopedic Disease Lead to Sleep Disturbance, and How Can We Improve Sleep Quality Following Surgery?

Authors:
Luke Austin

Arthroscopy 2019 Feb;35(2):470

Sidney Kimmel Medical College, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital.

There is a growing body of evidence indicating that orthopedic diseases lead to sleep disturbance. Surgery can improve sleep quality but recovery is not seen till six to twelve weeks postoperatively. Further research is needed to find interventions that improve patient's sleep following surgery. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arthro.2018.11.001DOI Listing
February 2019

Editorial Commentary: The Hip-Spine Connection in Patients Undergoing Hip Arthroscopy: Should We Learn From Total Hip Replacement and Counsel Patients Differently If They Have Had Previous Back Surgery?

Arthroscopy 2019 Feb;35(2):451-452

St. Louis, Missouri.

Disorders of the adult hip and spine are common, and there is evidence that there is a hip-spine connection in patients with hip femoroacetabular impingement (FAI). Many reports have shown that patients undergoing lumbar fusion and subsequent total hip arthroplasty have a higher risk of complications and worse outcomes following total hip arthroplasty. However, there has been a paucity of research on the effect of a history of lumbar spine surgery in patients undergoing hip arthroscopy for the treatment of FAI. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arthro.2018.11.003DOI Listing
February 2019

Editorial Commentary: Cartilage Damage in the Hip: Can We Predict Outcome?

Authors:
Marc J Philippon

Arthroscopy 2019 Feb;35(2):432-433

Vail, Colorado.

Cartilage damage is frequently seen during hip arthroscopy for femoroacetabular impingement or trauma. Currently, microfracture is the most common procedure for treating severe chondral defects. Studies have suggested that the presence of acetabular cartilage lesions can cause poor outcomes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arthro.2018.11.024DOI Listing
February 2019

Editorial Commentary: Outcomes After Hip Arthroscopy-Am I Better, Improved, or Who Knows?

Authors:
Karen K Briggs

Arthroscopy 2019 Feb;35(2):417-418

Vail, Colorado.

Patient-reported outcomes are critical in the evaluation of the success of hip arthroscopy. Many different outcome scores are currently being used; however, that is a totally different subject. Most scores range from 0 to 100 or use some type of scale. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arthro.2018.11.026DOI Listing
February 2019

Editorial Commentary: Tönnis Classification-Beauty (or Hip Arthritis) Is Truly in the Eye of the Beholder.

Authors:
Derek Ochiai

Arthroscopy 2019 Feb;35(2):409-410

Arlington, Virginia.

The radiography-based Tönnis classification and magnetic resonance imaging-based International Cartilage Repair Society classification are frequently used to predict articular damage to the hip joint before hip arthroscopy. Despite the ubiquity of these modalities, they both have significant limitations. In particular, the intraobserver reliability and interobserver reliability are less than good. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arthro.2018.10.104DOI Listing
February 2019

Editorial Commentary: Treating Irreparable Rotator Cuff Tears With a Patch or Balloon: Is It All a Bunch of Hot Air?

Arthroscopy 2019 Feb;35(2):390-391

Both superior capsular reconstruction and a biodegradable balloon spacer function to limit proximal migration and restore glenohumeral joint forces similar to the intact rotator cuff in a cadaveric rotator cuff-deficient model. Although both the superior capsular reconstruction and biodegradable balloon spacer represent promising alternatives, additional clinical outcome data are needed to determine their role in the treatment of the massive, irreparable rotator cuff tear. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arthro.2018.11.030DOI Listing
February 2019