7,325 results match your criteria Arthroscopy[Journal]


Age of 40 Years or Older Does Not Affect Meniscal Repair Failure Risk at 5 Years.

Arthroscopy 2019 Apr 15. Epub 2019 Apr 15.

Department of Orthopaedics, Wexner Medical Center, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, U.S.A.; OSU Sports Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, U.S.A.. Electronic address:

Purpose: To compare meniscal repair failure rates in patients aged 40 years or older versus patients younger than 40 years.

Methods: A total of 276 patients underwent meniscal repair surgery by a single sports medicine fellowship-trained surgeon between 2006 and 2012 and were eligible for study inclusion. Patients were followed up for meniscal repair failure, defined as meniscectomy, repeated meniscal repair, or total knee arthroplasty. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S07498063183114
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arthro.2018.11.061DOI Listing
April 2019
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Is There a Relation Between Lateral Epicondylitis and Total Cholesterol Levels?

Arthroscopy 2019 Apr 15. Epub 2019 Apr 15.

Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea.

Purpose: To investigate whether high total cholesterol (TC) levels are associated with lateral epicondylitis (LE).

Methods: We retrospectively reviewed all patients with LE who presented to our institution between 2011 and 2015. The inclusion criteria were a diagnosis of LE based on clinical history and physical examination findings and age between 40 and 55 years. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arthro.2019.01.048DOI Listing

Nonoperative Treatment of Rotator Cuff Disease With Platelet-Rich Plasma: A Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials.

Arthroscopy 2019 Apr 15. Epub 2019 Apr 15.

Sports Surgery Clinic, Dublin, Ireland.

Purpose: To perform a systematic review of randomized controlled trials on the use of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) for nonoperative treatment of rotator cuff disease.

Methods: Using Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines, 2 reviewers independently screened the MEDLINE, Embase, and Cochrane Library databases for prospective, randomized controlled trials comparing PRP with a control in the nonoperative treatment of chronic rotator cuff disease for inclusion. Clinical data were extracted and evaluated. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arthro.2018.10.115DOI Listing

The Patient Acceptable Symptomatic State of the 12-Item International Hip Outcome Tool at 1-Year Follow-Up of Hip-Preservation Surgery.

Arthroscopy 2019 Apr 15. Epub 2019 Apr 15.

Peachtree Orthopedics, Atlanta, Georgia, U.S.A.

Purpose: To determine the patient acceptable symptomatic state (PASS) cutoff score for the 12-item International Hip Outcome Tool (iHOT-12) for patients after hip-preservation surgery.

Methods: A multicenter hip arthroscopy registry containing deidentified patient data was analyzed to discriminate patients who achieved satisfactory results from patients who did not. Patients eligible for inclusion in the study were between 18 and 75 years of age, consented to undergo elective hip arthroscopy, and completed preoperative patient-reported outcome questionnaires. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arthro.2018.11.072DOI Listing
April 2019
2 Reads

Systematic Review of Medial Patellofemoral Ligament Reconstruction Techniques: Comparison of Patellar Bone Socket and Cortical Surface Fixation Techniques.

Arthroscopy 2019 Apr 15. Epub 2019 Apr 15.

Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, U.S.A.. Electronic address:

Purpose: To compare patellar bone socket and cortical surface fixation techniques for isolated medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) reconstruction and determine whether there was a difference in (1) complication rates, including fracture of the patella; (2) redislocation rates; or (3) patient-reported outcomes.

Methods: A literature search was conducted following Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. We included patients who underwent isolated MPFL reconstruction for recurrent patellar instability. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S07498063183106
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arthro.2018.10.150DOI Listing
April 2019
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Midterm Outcomes of Iliopsoas Fractional Lengthening for Internal Snapping as a Part of Hip Arthroscopy for Femoroacetabular Impingement and Labral Tear: A Matched Control Study.

Arthroscopy 2019 Apr 15. Epub 2019 Apr 15.

American Hip Institute, Westmont, Illinois, U.S.A.. Electronic address:

Purpose: To report minimum 5-year outcomes and rate of painful snapping resolution for patients who underwent iliopsoas fractional lengthening (IFL) as a part of hip arthroscopy for femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) and labral tear. In addition, to match this group to a group of patients who underwent hip arthroscopy for FAI and labral tear without internal snapping.

Methods: Patients were eligible for inclusion if they underwent hip arthroscopy for treatment of FAI and labral tear with concomitant IFL for painful snapping and had preoperative baseline scores for modified Harris Hip Score, Nonarthritic Hip Score, Hip Outcome Score-Sports Subscale, and visual analog scale for pain. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arthro.2018.11.050DOI Listing

Identification of Normal and Injured Anterolateral Ligaments of the Knee: A Systematic Review of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Studies.

Arthroscopy 2019 Apr 15. Epub 2019 Apr 15.

Clínica do Dragão, Espregueira-Mendes Sports Centre-FIFA Medical Centre of Excellence, Porto, Portugal; Dom Henrique Research Centre, Porto, Portugal; Orthopaedics Department of Minho University, Minho, Portugal; 3B's Research Group-Biomaterials, Biodegradables and Biomimetics, University of Minho, Headquarters of the European Institute of Excellence on Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine, AvePark, Parque de Ciência e Tecnologia, Zona Industrial da Gandra, Barco, Portugal; ICVS/3B's-PT Government Associate Laboratory, Braga, Portugal. Electronic address:

Purpose: To identify the normal and injured magnetic resonance imaging appearance of the anterolateral ligament (ALL).

Methods: A systematic review was performed using PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) guidelines. The PubMed and Cochrane Library electronic databases were used to search for studies that reported the imaging outcomes of the appearance of the ALL. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S07498063183100
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arthro.2018.10.120DOI Listing
April 2019
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Arthroscopic Acetabular Labral Repair in Patients Over the Age of 60 Years: A Matched Case-Control Study.

Arthroscopy 2019 Apr 15. Epub 2019 Apr 15.

Nashville Sports Medicine Foundation, Nashville, Tennessee, U.S.A.

Purpose: To report the results of labral repair in a population of patients older than 60 years and compare these with a matched population of younger adults.

Methods: We compared 21 consecutive patients older than 60 years undergoing labral repair with minimum 1-year follow-up with a contemporaneous group of 21 patients aged 18 to 55 years matched for sex, degree of chondral damage, and associated femoroacetabular impingement or dysplasia.

Results: Follow-up averaged 18. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arthro.2018.11.015DOI Listing
April 2019
2 Reads

Proximity of the Neurovascular Bundle During Posterior-Lateral Meniscal Repair: A Comparison of the Transpatellar, Anteromedial, and Anterolateral Portals.

Arthroscopy 2019 Apr 15. Epub 2019 Apr 15.

Department of Orthopaedics, Louisiana State University Health - Shreveport, U.S.A.

Purpose: To compare the neurovascular proximity of the transpatellar portal with that of the medial and lateral portals and to determine the safe penetration depth for an all-inside device for use on the posterior horn lateral meniscus.

Methods: Dissection of the popliteal fossa was performed in 10 cadaveric knees to identify all structures. Arthroscopy was performed using penetration depths of 10, 12, 14, and 16 mm with the all-inside system through the anteromedial, anterolateral, and transpatellar portals. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S07498063183117
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arthro.2018.12.004DOI Listing
April 2019
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Biomechanical Analysis of Medial-Row All-Suture Suture Anchor Fixation for Rotator Cuff Repair in a Pair-Matched Cadaveric Model.

Arthroscopy 2019 Apr 15. Epub 2019 Apr 15.

Section of Sports Medicine, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois, U.S.A.

Purpose: To compare the biomechanical properties of all-suture suture anchors (ASSAs) with conventional suture anchors (CSAs) for double-row rotator cuff repair (RCR).

Methods: Fourteen fresh-frozen human cadaveric shoulders were randomized into 2 RCR treatment groups: ASSA and CSA. All constructs received a double-row repair, with the lateral-row implants consisting of two 5. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arthro.2019.01.023DOI Listing

Factors Associated With Clinically Significant Patient-Reported Outcomes After Primary Arthroscopic Partial Meniscectomy.

Arthroscopy 2019 Apr 15. Epub 2019 Apr 15.

Department of Orthopedics, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois, U.S.A.. Electronic address:

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to establish minimal clinically important difference (MCID), substantial clinical benefit (SCB), and patient-acceptable symptom state (PASS) after meniscectomy and factors associated with achieving these goals.

Methods: A prospectively maintained institutional registry was retrospectively reviewed for all patients undergoing isolated arthroscopic partial meniscectomy from 2014 through 2017. MCID, SCB, and PASS were calculated for the International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) and Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) subscores by using the anchor-based methodology and nonparametric receiver operating characteristic curves. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arthro.2018.12.014DOI Listing
April 2019
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Impact of Remplissage on Global Shoulder Outcome: A Long-Term Comparative Study.

Arthroscopy 2019 Apr 12. Epub 2019 Apr 12.

Groupe Maussins, Clinique de l'épaule, Clinique Maussins Nollet, Groupe Ramsay Générale de Santé, Paris, France. Electronic address:

Purpose: To evaluate the global function of patients treated by arthroscopic shoulder stabilization with or without remplissage at a minimum of 10 years of follow-up.

Materials: The inclusion criteria were existence of a recurrent anterior shoulder dislocation, with or without a Hill-Sachs lesion. The exclusion criteria were prior shoulder stabilization surgery and patients with a glenoid lesion that had been stabilized using the Latarjet procedure. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S07498063193004
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arthro.2019.01.013DOI Listing
April 2019
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A Biomechanical Comparison of Alternative Graft Preparations for All-Inside Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

Arthroscopy 2019 Apr 12. Epub 2019 Apr 12.

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Stony Brook University Hospital, Stony Brook, New York, U.S.A.

Purpose: To biomechanically compare alternative graft constructs for all-inside anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction in the event that the semitendinosus harvested is too narrow or too short to make a graft larger than 8 mm.

Methods: Bovine extensor tendons were used to make 6 different 9-mm-diameter grafts: traditional 4-strand, anastomosis 4-strand, 6-strand, 3-strand, button-fixation 4-strand, and loop-and-tack 4-strand grafts. The grafts were then subjected to cyclic biomechanical testing followed by failure loading. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arthro.2018.11.065DOI Listing

Low-Dose Computed Tomography Reduces Radiation Exposure by 90% Compared With Traditional Computed Tomography Among Patients Undergoing Hip-Preservation Surgery.

Arthroscopy 2019 Apr 12. Epub 2019 Apr 12.

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Washington University in St Louis, St Louis, Missouri, U.S.A.. Electronic address:

Purpose: To compare the delivered radiation dose between a low-dose hip computed tomography (CT) scan protocol and traditional hip CT scan protocols (i.e., "traditional CT"). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arthro.2018.11.013DOI Listing

Comparison of Clinical Outcomes and CT Analysis for Tunnel Diameter After Arthroscopic Bankart Repair With the All-Suture Anchor and the Biodegradable Suture Anchor.

Arthroscopy 2019 Apr 12. Epub 2019 Apr 12.

Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Ewha Womans University, School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. Electronic address:

Purpose: To compare the clinical outcomes and radiological findings at the anchor site after arthroscopic Bankart repair with all-suture anchors and biodegradable suture anchors in patients with recurrent anterior shoulder dislocation.

Methods: The patients who underwent arthroscopic Bankart repair were divided into 2 groups depending on the type of the suture anchor used in different periods. Power analysis was designed based on the postoperative Rowe score. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arthro.2018.12.011DOI Listing
April 2019
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Increased Prevalence of Femoroacetabular Impingement in Patients With Proximal Hamstring Tendon Injuries.

Arthroscopy 2019 Apr 12. Epub 2019 Apr 12.

Department of Orthopedics, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado, U.S.A.. Electronic address:

Purpose: To determine the prevalence of clinically diagnosed femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) in a consecutive series of patients presenting with proximal hamstring tendon injury and to correlate this with pelvic anatomic factors.

Methods: The prevalence of clinically symptomatic cam-, pincer-, and mixed-type and overall FAI was calculated among a consecutive series of patients presenting to a hip preservation clinic with a confirmed clinical and radiographic diagnosis of proximal hamstring tendon injury between 2012 and 2017. The presence of a cam lesion was determined by an alpha angle > 50° on radiographs and computed tomography radial sequences of the head-neck junction and a femoral head-neck offset ratio < 0. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arthro.2018.11.037DOI Listing
April 2019
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Trends in Hip Arthroscopic Labral Repair: An American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery Database Study.

Arthroscopy 2019 Apr 9. Epub 2019 Apr 9.

Cleveland Clinic, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Garfield Heights, OH, U.S.A.

Purpose: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the trends in labral repair in American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery Part II candidates performing hip arthroscopy.

Methods: Candidates who performed arthroscopic hip surgery between 2011 and 2015 during their American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery Part II board collection period were identified using Current Procedural Terminology codes (29860, 29861, 29862, 29863, 29914, 29915, 29916). The proportion of hip arthroscopy cases including labral repair (Current Procedural Terminology code 29916) were calculated for each year and analyzed by fellowship training experience. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arthro.2018.11.016DOI Listing

Biomechanical Properties of Posterior Meniscal Root Repairs: A Systematic Review.

Arthroscopy 2019 Apr 9. Epub 2019 Apr 9.

Department of Orthopaedics, Wexner Medical Center, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, U.S.A.. Electronic address:

Purpose: To systematically review the literature regarding the biomechanical properties of various meniscal root repair techniques.

Methods: A systematic review of multiple databases was performed. The inclusion criteria included English language, studies relevant to meniscal root repairs, studies comparing 2 or more different discrete techniques, posterior root repairs, controlled laboratory studies, and human cadaveric or animal studies. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arthro.2019.01.018DOI Listing

Effect of Autologous Platelet-Rich Plasma and Gelatin Sponge for Tendon-to-Bone Healing After Rabbit Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

Arthroscopy 2019 Apr 9. Epub 2019 Apr 9.

Sports Medicine Center, Hong Hui Hospital, Xi'an Jiaotong University Health Science Center, Xi'an, China. Electronic address:

Purpose: To investigate platelet-rich plasma (PRP) combined with gelatin sponge (GS) to improve tendon-bone interface healing and structure formation.

Methods: Characterization of the GS scaffold was performed with a scanning electron microscope, and the release curve after loading with PRP was evaluated. A real-time reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay was performed to test the levels of tendon-to-bone healing-related gene expression. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arthro.2018.11.014DOI Listing

Performance and Return to Sport After Hip Arthroscopy for Femoroacetabular Impingement in Professional Athletes Differs Between Sports.

Arthroscopy 2019 Apr 9. Epub 2019 Apr 9.

Houston Methodist Orthopedic and Sports Medicine, Houston, Texas, U.S.A.. Electronic address:

Purpose: To determine (1) return-to-sport rates for National Football League, Major League Baseball, National Basketball Association, and National Hockey League (NHL) athletes after hip arthroscopy for femoroacetabular impingement syndrome, (2) postoperative return-to-sport rate differences between sports, (3) differences in postoperative career length and games per season, (4) differences in preoperative and postoperative performance, and (5) postoperative performance compared with that of matched control players.

Methods: Professional athletes who underwent hip arthroscopy for femoroacetabular impingement syndrome were identified. Matched control players were identified by position, age, experience, and performance. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arthro.2018.10.153DOI Listing

Systematic Review of the Anatomic Descriptions of the Glenohumeral Ligaments: A Call for Further Quantitative Studies.

Arthroscopy 2019 Apr 9. Epub 2019 Apr 9.

The Steadman Clinic, Vail, Colorado, U.S.A.. Electronic address:

Purpose: To perform a systematic review of the glenohumeral ligament anatomic attachments on the glenoid and humeral neck.

Methods: A systematic review was performed according to Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines using the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, PubMed, MEDLINE, and Embase from 1980 to present. The inclusion criteria were as follows: cadaveric or clinical anatomic studies that qualitatively or quantitatively described the glenoid and humeral attachments of the glenohumeral ligaments in the English-language literature. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arthro.2018.11.062DOI Listing

Insulin Dependence Is Associated With Increased Medical Complications and Mortality After Shoulder Arthroscopy.

Arthroscopy 2019 Apr 9. Epub 2019 Apr 9.

Department of Orthopaedics, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina, U.S.A.

Purpose: To compare complications after shoulder arthroscopy in patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM), patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM), and nondiabetic patients.

Methods: A retrospective analysis of the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database for the years 2005 to 2016 was conducted. Logistic regression analyses were used to assess the relation between diabetic status (nondiabetic patients, n = 50,626; NIDDM patients, n = 5,332; and IDDM patients, n = 2,484) and outcomes. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S07498063183114
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arthro.2018.11.059DOI Listing
April 2019
3 Reads

Bilateral Hip Arthroscopy: Can Results From Initial Arthroscopy for Femoral Acetabular Impingement Predict Future Contralateral Results?

Arthroscopy 2019 Apr 9. Epub 2019 Apr 9.

Department of Orthopedics, Sports Medicine, Mayo Clinic Arizona, Phoenix, Arizona, U.S.A.. Electronic address:

Purpose: To determine the degree of correlation of radiographic measurements, degree of correlation of intraoperative pathology, and difference in outcomes between sides of patients requiring staged bilateral hip arthroscopy.

Methods: Two high-volume hip preservation centers retrospectively reviewed hip preservation databases for staged bilateral hip arthroscopies conducted between 2008 and 2015. Patients were separated into those who presented with bilateral hip pain and those that presented with unilateral pain and developed contralateral pain >2 years later. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arthro.2018.12.033DOI Listing

Midterm Outcomes of Arthroscopic Reduction and Internal Fixation of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Tibial Eminence Avulsion Fractures With K-Wire Fixation.

Arthroscopy 2019 Apr 9. Epub 2019 Apr 9.

North Sydney Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine Centre, Mater Clinic, Sydney, Australia; School of Medicine, University of Notre Dame, Sydney, Australia.

Purpose: To determine the clinical and radiological outcomes of patients who underwent arthroscopic reduction and internal fixation of a tibial eminence avulsion fracture with Kirshner wires (K-wires) at a mean of 8 years following surgery.

Methods: This was a retrospective study with prospectively collected data. Inclusion criteria consisted of patients who underwent arthroscopic reduction and internal fixation of tibial eminence fracture with K-wires between 1989 and 2015 at a minimum of 18 months follow-up. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arthro.2018.11.066DOI Listing
April 2019
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Effect of Femoral Tunnel Position on Stability and Clinical Outcomes After Single-Bundle Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Using the Outside-In Technique.

Arthroscopy 2019 Apr 9. Epub 2019 Apr 9.

Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Inje University Busan Paik Hospital, Busan, Republic of Korea.

Purpose: To evaluate the effects of the femoral tunnel location in the femoral footprint of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) on postoperative knee stability and clinical outcomes after ACL reconstruction (ACLR) using the outside-in technique.

Methods: From December 2012 to August 2014, ACLR was performed using the outside-in technique in 137 patients. Among these patients, those who had a follow-up period of over 2 years were retrospectively reviewed. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arthro.2018.11.055DOI Listing
April 2019
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Open Meniscal Allograft Transplantation With Transosseous Suture Fixation of the Meniscal Body Significantly Decreases Meniscal Extrusion Rate Compared With Arthroscopic Technique.

Arthroscopy 2019 Apr 9. Epub 2019 Apr 9.

Cartilage Repair Center, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, U.S.A.; Orthopedic Surgery, Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, New York, U.S.A.. Electronic address:

Purpose: To assess and compare meniscal extrusion rates after lateral "bridge-in-slot" meniscal allograft transplantation (MAT) with arthroscopic versus open insertion.

Methods: In this review of prospectively collected data, we analyzed data from patients who underwent arthroscopic or open lateral MAT. Patients who underwent concomitant distal femoral osteotomy, for whom 1-year postoperative magnetic resonance imaging was unavailable, or who underwent open lateral MAT without the use of transosseous sutures were excluded. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arthro.2018.11.063DOI Listing

Cyclic and Load-to-Failure Properties of All-Suture Anchors in Human Cadaveric Shoulder Glenoid Bone.

Arthroscopy 2019 Apr 3. Epub 2019 Apr 3.

OrthoCarolina Sports Medicine Center (J.E.F.), Charlotte, North Carolina. Electronic address:

Purpose: To evaluate the cyclic displacement and ultimate load to failure of 4 all-suture anchors in human cadaveric shoulder glenoid bone.

Methods: Four all-suture anchors indicated for glenoid labral repair were tested in 14 matched pairs of human cadaveric fresh-frozen glenoids. Anchors were inserted at 4 different locations for a total of 112 tests (12-, 3-, 6-, and 9-o'clock positions for right glenoids). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arthro.2019.01.022DOI Listing

Knee Flexion Angle During Graft Fixation for Medial Patellofemoral Ligament Reconstruction: A Systematic Review of Outcomes and Complications.

Arthroscopy 2019 Apr 3. Epub 2019 Apr 3.

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, U.S.A.. Electronic address:

Purpose: To determine the effect of knee flexion angle during graft fixation on outcomes and complications following medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) reconstruction.

Methods: Three databases (PubMed, EMBASE, and MEDLINE) were searched from database inception to January 2018. After screening based on inclusion and exclusion criteria, patient demographics, fixation technique, graft selection, outcomes, and complications were extracted from the included studies. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arthro.2018.11.071DOI Listing
April 2019
1 Read

Erratum.

Authors:

Arthroscopy 2019 Apr;35(4):1296

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arthro.2019.02.027DOI Listing

Editorial Commentary: What is the Real Story Behind "What Makes Suture Anchor Use Safe in Hip Arthroscopy?"

Authors:
Thomas G Sampson

Arthroscopy 2019 Apr;35(4):1294-1295

San Francisco, California.

Reproducibly safe hip suture anchor placement requires clear visualization of the acetabular rim and acetabular articular cartilage and a correct trajectory when the anchor sites and position are selected and when depth stop drilling is done. I favor the lateral decubitus approach over the supine approach and do an extensive capsulotomy for global access to the central and peripheral compartments, thus requiring fewer distraction forces and minimal time spent in the central compartment. My views of the acetabular rim are obtained from the periphery most of the time, and as such, suture anchor drilling and placement are always visualized during simultaneous viewing of both the bony acetabular rim and articular cartilage; thus, the trajectory is targeted with clear visualization of the drill hole from the time of creation to anchor placement. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arthro.2018.12.032DOI Listing
April 2019
1 Read

Editorial Commentary: Shoulder Superior Capsular Reconstruction: When a Systematic Review of a Procedure Can Be Misleading.

Authors:
Felix H Savoie

Arthroscopy 2019 Apr;35(4):1278-1279

Tulane University School of Medicine.

Shoulder superior capsular reconstruction as described by Mihata et al. achieves excellent results using 6 to 8 mm thick autologous fascia lata. Superior capsular reconstruction using 3-mm-thick dermal allograft is not equivalent and may yield results no better than technically well performed rotator cuff repairs, partial repairs, or tendon transfers. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arthro.2019.01.036DOI Listing

Editorial Commentary: Unsolved Problems in Shoulder Instability-The Dilemma of Bone Loss!

Arthroscopy 2019 Apr;35(4):1267-1268

Campus Bio-Medico University.

Bone loss in the setting of shoulder instability is an unsolved problem. Procedures restoring bone stock on the glenoid side vary from minimally invasive arthroscopic techniques of arthroscopic bone block procedures to traditional transposition of the coracoid or bone transplant. These techniques are evolving, and several tips and tricks have been optimized to improve outcomes and to reduce the risk of complications, even though the most terrible complication of transposition of the coracoid remains osteoarthritis in the young adult. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arthro.2019.02.002DOI Listing
April 2019
4 Reads

Remplissage With Bankart Repair in Anterior Shoulder Instability: A Systematic Review of the Clinical and Cadaveric Literature.

Arthroscopy 2019 Apr;35(4):1257-1266

Shoulder and Elbow Unit, Joint Research, OLVG, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

Purpose: To compare the clinical and biomechanical results of an arthroscopic Bankart repair alone with an arthroscopic Bankart repair combined with remplissage.

Methods: A literature search was performed on May 1, 2018, in PubMed and Embase for studies comparing an isolated arthroscopic Bankart repair and an arthroscopic Bankart repair with remplissage. The quality of the studies was assessed using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) approach and the Cochrane Risk of Bias in Non-randomized Studies of Interventions (ROBINS-I) checklist. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arthro.2018.10.117DOI Listing
April 2019
1 Read

Editorial Commentary: SCR: Substantial Confusion Remains.

Arthroscopy 2019 Apr;35(4):1254-1256

Superior capsular reconstruction is gaining acceptance as a procedure to treat massive and irreparable superior and posterosuperior rotator cuff tears. With a paucity of clinical and no long-term data, early results suggest that superior capsular reconstruction may offer improvements in pain, range of motion, function, and validated outcome measurements. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arthro.2019.02.003DOI Listing

Editorial Commentary: Meniscal Root Repairs: Let the Biology Help You!

Authors:
Jorge Chahla

Arthroscopy 2019 Apr;35(4):1240-1242

Meniscal root tears are increasingly being recognized as important entities by the orthopaedic community. This is probably due to the catastrophic consequences of not identifying or addressing a root tear in a timely fashion, leading to the need for a total meniscectomy. The majority of the studies on root tears have been focused on natural history, diagnosis, biomechanical consequences, and fixation techniques. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arthro.2018.12.026DOI Listing

Editorial Commentary: All-Inside Meniscal Repair Devices: Should We Cease and De-Cyst?

Authors:
Kenneth M Oates

Arthroscopy 2019 Apr;35(4):1230-1231

All-inside meniscal repair devices have the potential to simplify a technically difficult procedure, reduce the need for a skilled surgical assistant, reduce surgical times, improve cosmetic results, and decrease postoperative pain for the patient. On the other hand, the devices are more expensive than sutures, have technical issues of their own, and may have complications that are not associated with suture repair techniques. It remains up to the surgeon to choose and practice techniques that maximize patient benefit and minimize risk. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arthro.2018.12.024DOI Listing

Editorial Commentary: Second-Generation Microfracture-We Are Only As Strong As Our Weakest Link.

Arthroscopy 2019 Apr;35(4):1219-1221

Santa Monica, California.

Injuries to the articular cartilage of the knee are increasingly common, especially in athletes. The operative management of these focal chondral lesions continues to be a regenerative challenge. The microfracture (MFx) procedure has become a first-line arthroscopic treatment method for small, symptomatic chondral lesions, and it frequently serves as the standard technique against which other cartilage repair procedures are compared. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arthro.2019.01.037DOI Listing
April 2019
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Editorial Commentary: The Arthroscopist's Baton-Can Minimizing Motion Lead to Better Outcomes?

Arthroscopy 2019 Apr;35(4):1210-1211

Unlike an orchestra conductor, whose fundamental goal is to bring a written score to life through exaggerated arm and body motion, the arthroscopist's goal is to enhance his or her surgical procedure by minimizing wasteful motion. So, the next time you are in the operating room observing or assisting with an arthroscopic procedure, do not just watch the monitor. Look at the surgeon's arm motion and see if you can distinguish between the maestro and the novice! Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arthro.2019.01.003DOI Listing

Editorial Commentary: Posterior Cruciate Ligament Femoral Techniques: The "Critical Corner" Is Just Not as Exciting as the "Killer Turn".

Authors:
William M Weiss

Arthroscopy 2019 Apr;35(4):1195-1196

The "killer turn" between the graft and tibial tunnel in posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction has always been of technical and clinical importance. The "critical corner" of the graft and femoral tunnel has garnered less interest. Technical advances in arthroscopic instrumentation have allowed a move from inside-out to outside-in techniques, which can assist with tunnel placement and drilling. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arthro.2018.12.006DOI Listing

Editorial Commentary: Stronger and Faster Suture Configuration-But Is It Better? Challenges of Surgical Innovation in the Modern Era.

Authors:
Michael P McCabe

Arthroscopy 2019 Apr;35(4):1170-1171

When evaluating the characteristics of a new surgical technique, it is important to consider practical effects of the technique on clinical practice, as it would be inappropriate to advocate for cost-prohibitive or excessively time-consuming methods, even if biomechanically superior. The Krackow stitch has long been considered the gold standard for suture-graft fixation; potential limitations with this technique include the risk of needle sticks to the surgical team and the time required to perform the stitch. A new proprietary method (SpeedTrap, DePuy-Mitek, Raynham, MA) offers a significantly faster solution with equivalent or better biomechanics; however, elongation of the suture-graft construct is still a concern, and the cost effectiveness remains unclear. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arthro.2019.01.006DOI Listing
April 2019
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Editorial Commentary: Meniscal Tears or Meniscal Aging-That Is the Question.

Arthroscopy 2019 Apr;35(4):1160-1162

Rush University Medical Center (B.J.C.).

Meniscal tears constitute one of the most common pathologies in sports medicine. Although frequently grouped by shape, location, and size for didactic purposes, considering them according to their cause is probably the single most important factor to predict their behavior and prognosis. For instance, an acute traumatic tear and a degenerative tear of the meniscus are located on opposite ends of the spectrum of the meniscal pathology (which is comparable to focal chondral defects and osteoarthritis). Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S07498063183119
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arthro.2018.12.019DOI Listing
April 2019
4 Reads

Editorial Commentary: Medial Patellofemoral Complex: Driving a Better Understanding of Medial Knee Anatomy.

Authors:
Mohamed H Sobhy

Arthroscopy 2019 Apr;35(4):1147-1151

Although its importance as the prime restraint to lateral patellar instability is undoubted, the anatomy of the medial patellofemoral ligament has never been agreed on. Since it was first described by Warren and Marshall in 1979, most of the anatomic studies confirmed its presence in 90% of the cases, but they usually provide inconsistent descriptions of its femoral and patellar attachments. It is proven that length changes in the reconstructed medial patellofemoral ligament depend principally on the femoral attachment site. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arthro.2019.01.020DOI Listing

Editorial Commentary: The "F" in MPFL (Medial Patellofemoral Ligament) Reconstruction-How Should We Fix It and Does It Matter?

Authors:
Brian R Waterman

Arthroscopy 2019 Apr;35(4):1138-1140

Our understanding of the medial patellofemoral complex anatomy has evolved significantly over the past several decades, and this has informed our current surgical approach to management of lateral patellar instability. Medial patellofemoral ligament reconstruction remains the gold standard for decreasing the risk of secondary patellar dislocation and returning patients to active physical function. However, concerns about isometry, overconstraint, secondary arthrosis, and surgical-site morbidity remain with femoral socket fixation, particularly when patella alta, rotational malalignment, or hypermobility is present. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arthro.2019.01.030DOI Listing
April 2019
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Editorial Commentary: Hip Arthroscopy Capsular Approaches: Periportal, Puncture, Interportal, T-Cut…Does It Really Matter?

Authors:
Stephen K Aoki

Arthroscopy 2019 Apr;35(4):1128-1129

University of Utah.

When treating femoroacetabular impingement, appropriate visualization is needed to technically perform a complete osteoplasty. Adequate visualization typically requires some level of disruption of the hip capsule during the surgical approach. As a result, complications including microinstability or frank dislocation may result from any violation of the hip capsule. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arthro.2019.01.021DOI Listing
April 2019
3 Reads

Editorial Commentary: Quantifying Anterior and Lateral Acetabular Coverage in Hip Dysplasia: What About Posterior Coverage?

Authors:
Paul E Beaulé

Arthroscopy 2019 Apr;35(4):1117-1119

University of Ottawa.

When evaluating the young adult with hip pain, proper radiographic examination and interpretation are the cornerstones of the diagnostic process because the symptomatology and physical findings can be nonspecific. Although most orthopaedic surgeons are able to identify the key radiographic parameters of acetabular dysplasia, too often the patient is categorized into the "borderline" category; unfortunately, this has led to misdiagnosis and ultimately mistreatment. Because acetabular dysplasia is a 3-dimensional deformity, the assessment of anterior and posterior coverage (i. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arthro.2019.01.041DOI Listing

Editorial Commentary: "Dancing the Hip Away"-Does Joint Laxity Correlate With Worse Outcome in Dancers Undergoing Hip Arthroscopy for Femoral Acetabular Impingement?

Authors:
Struan H Coleman

Arthroscopy 2019 Apr;35(4):1109-1110

New York, New York.

Dancers have a disproportionately high prevalence of hip issues compared with other types of athletes. Many of these hip issues are complex: a cam and/or pincer impingement combined with a seemingly paradoxical borderline dysplasia, capsular laxity, and subsequent instability. Our experience as nonarthritic hip surgeons tells us that careful patient selection is critical for a successful outcome after the arthroscopic treatment of a dancer. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arthro.2019.01.039DOI Listing
April 2019
1 Read

Editorial Commentary: On Mentors and "Peeling Onions": Scoliosis Results in Inferior Outcomes Following Hip Gluteus Medius Tendon Repair.

Arthroscopy 2019 Apr;35(4):1099-1100

Virginia State and Polytechnic Institute School of Medicine (M.M.K.).

Scoliosis results in improved but inferior outcomes following gluteus medius repair. The hip is affected by lumbo-pelvic position and gravity, and the disorder is predominant in women and perhaps also related to pelvic morphology. Numerous opportunities for future study exist. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arthro.2018.12.030DOI Listing

Editorial Commentary: Open Versus Arthroscopic Elbow Osteocapsular Arthroplasty.

Authors:
Leesa M Galatz

Arthroscopy 2019 Apr;35(4):1090-1091

New York, New York.

Elbow osteoarthritis is a difficult clinical problem. As it is characterized primarily by osteophyte formation, it seems that simple removal of those osteophytes, release of the capsule, and removal of loose bodies would suffice to restore a normal range of motion. However, unfortunately, this is not always the case. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arthro.2019.02.004DOI Listing
April 2019
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Editorial Commentary: I Have a Hip Labral Tear? Well, That Makes Sense Because I Had a Labral Tear in My Shoulder Too.

Authors:
Joshua D Harris

Arthroscopy 2019 Apr;35(4):1080-1082

Most acetabular labral tears are caused by abnormal osseous morphology, such as cam and/or pincer morphology and dysplasia. There is a high prevalence of asymptomatic cam morphology, pincer morphology, dysplasia, and acetabular labral tears in the general population. The addition of subjective patient symptoms and objective physical examination findings to imaging (plain radiographs, magnetic resonance imaging, and computed tomography) may yield the diagnosis of femoroacetabular impingement syndrome. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arthro.2019.01.005DOI Listing
April 2019
2 Reads

Editorial Commentary: Teriparatide and Rotator Cuff Healing-Maybe Hormones Can Help Tendons to Heal.

Authors:
Brian C Werner

Arthroscopy 2019 Apr;35(4):1072-1073

University of Virginia Health System.

Achieving tendon-bone healing continues to be challenging after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair, particularly for larger tears, despite significant improvements in repair techniques and implants. Considerable effort has been invested in research to identify methods to improve healing, including patches and injectable biologics. Parathyroid hormone improves tendon-to-bone healing. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arthro.2018.12.021DOI Listing