90,157 results match your criteria Arthritis Research & Therapy[Journal]


Juvenile polyautoimmunity in a rheumatology setting.

Autoimmun Rev 2019 Feb 14. Epub 2019 Feb 14.

Center for Autoimmune Diseases Research (CREA), School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Universidad del Rosario, Bogota, Colombia.. Electronic address:

Overt polyautoimmunity (PolyA) corresponds to the presence of more than one well-defined autoimmune disease (AD) manifested clinically in a single patient. The current study aimed to describe the main characteristics of juvenile PolyA in a pediatric rheumatology setting and analyze the chronological aspects, index cases, familial autoimmunity, and clustering pattern. This was a cross-sectional and multicenter study in which 313 children with overt PolyA were included. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.autrev.2018.11.006DOI Listing
February 2019

Do recent research studies validate the medicinal plants used in British Columbia, Canada for immune-mediated and other problems in pets?

Authors:
Cheryl Lans

J Ethnopharmacol 2019 Feb 14. Epub 2019 Feb 14.

Institute for Ethnobotany and Zoopharmacognosy (IEZ) Rijksstraatweg 158A | 6573 DG | Beek | the Netherlands. Electronic address:

Ethnopharmacological Relevance: There are insufficient safe and effective treatments for chronic pain in pets. In cases such as osteoarthritis there is no commercially available cure and veterinarians use NSAIDs to manage pain. Pet owners may have to plan for a lifetime of plant-based treatment for the conditions that lead to chronic pain in pets. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jep.2019.02.030DOI Listing
February 2019

Design, synthesis and biological evaluation of low molecular weight CXCR4 ligands.

Bioorg Med Chem 2019 Feb 6. Epub 2019 Feb 6.

Institute of Biomaterials and Bioengineering, Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU), 2-3-10 Kandasurugadai, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101-0062, Japan; Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU), 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8150, Japan. Electronic address:

The chemokine receptor CXCR4/stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1: CXCL12) signaling axis represents a crucial drug target due to its relevance to several diseases such as HIV-1 infection, cancer, leukemia, and rheumatoid arthritis. With the aim of enhancing the binding affinity and anti-HIV activity of a potent CXCR4 ligand as a lead, 23 low molecular weight compounds containing dipicolylamine (Dpa) and cyclam cationic moieties with varying spacers and spatial positioning were designed, synthesized and biologically evaluated. All of the synthesized compounds screened at 1. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bmc.2019.02.013DOI Listing
February 2019

Joint AAD-NPF guidelines of care for the management and treatment of psoriasis with awareness and attention to comorbidities.

J Am Acad Dermatol 2019 Feb 7. Epub 2019 Feb 7.

Baylor Scott and White, Dallas, Texas.

Psoriasis is a chronic, inflammatory, multisystem disease that affects up to 3.2% of the US population. This guideline addresses important clinical questions that arise in psoriasis management and care, providing recommendations on the basis of available evidence. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaad.2018.11.058DOI Listing
February 2019

Amelioration of adjuvant induced arthritis in Sprague Dawley rats through modulation of inflammatory mediators by Ribes alpestre Decne.

J Ethnopharmacol 2019 Feb 13. Epub 2019 Feb 13.

Prince Abdullah Ben Khaled Celiac Disease Research Chair, Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

Ethnopharmacological Relevance: Ribes alpestre Decne has been commonly used in the treatment of joint complaints.

Aim Of Study: The present study was undertaken to evaluate the antiarthritic potential of ethanolic extract and fractions of Ribes alpestre and to explore its probable mechanism of action.

Material And Methods: Complete Freunds adjuvant induced arthritis in Sprague Dawley rats was used to assess antiarthritic activity of aqueous ethanol extract, butanol and aqueous fractions at 200mg/kg oral dose for 28 days. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jep.2019.02.025DOI Listing
February 2019
2.998 Impact Factor

A comparison of apremilast monotherapy and combination therapy for psoriatic arthritis in a real life setting: data from the Leeds Combined Psoriatic Service.

J Am Acad Dermatol 2019 Feb 13. Epub 2019 Feb 13.

NIHR Leeds Biomedical Research Centre, Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Leeds, UK; Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine, University of Leeds, UK.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaad.2019.02.014DOI Listing
February 2019

Evaluating the properties of a frailty index and its association with mortality risk among patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

Arthritis Rheumatol 2019 Feb 16. Epub 2019 Feb 16.

Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine and Department of Pathology, Queen Elizabeth II Health Sciences Center and Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada.

Objective: To evaluate the properties of a frailty index (FI), constructed using data from the Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics (SLICC) inception cohort, as a novel health measure in SLE.

Methods: For this secondary analysis, the baseline visit was defined as the first study visit at which both organ damage (SLICC/ACR Damage Index [SDI]) and health-related quality of life (Short-Form 36 [SF-36]) were assessed. The SLICC-FI was constructed using baseline data. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/art.40859
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/art.40859DOI Listing
February 2019
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Safety and efficacy of belimumab plus standard therapy for up to 13 years in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

Arthritis Rheumatol 2019 Feb 16. Epub 2019 Feb 16.

GSK, Raleigh-Durham, NC, USA.

Objective: Investigate long-term safety and efficacy of intravenous (IV) belimumab plus standard systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) therapy (SoC) in active, autoantibody-positive SLE.

Methods: This was a multicenter, open-label, continuation study of IV belimumab given every four weeks with SoC in patients with SLE who completed a Phase II, double-blind study. Adverse events (AEs) and laboratory data were monitored from the first belimumab dose (in either study) until 24 weeks after the final dose. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/art.40861DOI Listing
February 2019

Development and validation of an F-FDG PET/CT-based tool for the evaluation of joint counts and disease activity in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

Arthritis Rheumatol 2019 Feb 16. Epub 2019 Feb 16.

Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Korea.

Objectives: Clinical joint count assessment is important for detecting synovitis but its reliability is controversial. This study assessed the correlation of positron emission tomography (PET)-derived parameters in 68 joints with disease activity and compared the reliability of joint counts between PET/computed tomography (CT) and clinical assessment in rheumatoid arthritis (RA).

Methods: We enrolled 91 patients with active RA who underwent fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose PET/CT and disease activity evaluation at the same time. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/art.40860DOI Listing
February 2019

Disparity in online health information in pediatric vs. adult surgical conditions.

Pediatr Surg Int 2019 Feb 15. Epub 2019 Feb 15.

Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.

Background: Although the quality of online health information (OHI) for adult surgical conditions is well described, the availability of quality OHI for pediatric surgical conditions, and the comparison to that of adult surgical OHI, remains undefined.

Methods: Medical and lay terms for 15 pediatric and 15 adult surgical conditions were searched using Google in English. The Health on the Net Foundation, a non-governmental OHI accreditation body, designates approval for quality websites. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00383-019-04451-yDOI Listing
February 2019

An intact subscapularis tendon and compensatory teres minor hypertrophy yield lower failure rates for non-operative treatment of irreparable, massive rotator cuff tears.

Knee Surg Sports Traumatol Arthrosc 2019 Feb 15. Epub 2019 Feb 15.

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Severance Hospital, Arthroscopy and Joint Research Institute, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 50-1 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu, CPO Box 8044, Seoul, 03722, Republic of Korea.

Purpose: To investigate whether subscapularis integrity and compensatory teres, minor hypertrophy is associated with maintaining relatively good function and tolerable pain levels during non-operative treatment.

Methods: This study included 108 patients with irreparable, massive rotator cuff tears involving at least two tendons and stage III or IV muscle hypotrophy and fatty infiltration on oblique sagittal magnetic resonance imaging, in which even a partial repair does not seem feasible. All supraspinatus and infraspinatus muscles were grade IV; if the subscapularis was involved, only stage III or IV was included. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00167-019-05403-8DOI Listing
February 2019

Genetics and epigenetics in primary Sjögren's syndrome.

Rheumatology (Oxford) 2019 Feb 15. Epub 2019 Feb 15.

Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology and Science for Life Laboratory, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.

Primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS) is considered to be a multifactorial disease, where underlying genetic predisposition, epigenetic mechanisms and environmental factors contribute to disease development. In the last 5 years, the first genome-wide association studies in pSS have been completed. The strongest signal of association lies within the HLA genes, whereas the non-HLA genes IRF5 and STAT4 show consistent associations in multiple ethnicities but with a smaller effect size. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/rheumatology/key330DOI Listing
February 2019

Health-related quality of life in systemic sclerosis compared with other rheumatic diseases: a cross-sectional study.

Arthritis Res Ther 2019 Feb 15;21(1):61. Epub 2019 Feb 15.

Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, 03080, Republic of Korea.

Background: Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a rare autoimmune disease characterized by fibrosis of the skin and the involvement of multiple internal organs. Previous studies reported poorer health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in patients with SSc compared with the general population. However, very little is known about how HRQoL in SSc patients compares with that in patients with other systemic autoimmune diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and Sjogren's syndrome (SjS). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13075-019-1842-xDOI Listing
February 2019

Rates and outcomes of total knee replacement for rheumatoid arthritis compared to osteoarthritis.

ANZ J Surg 2019 Feb 15. Epub 2019 Feb 15.

South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute (SAHMRI), Adelaide, South Australia, Australia.

Background: Total knee replacement (TKR) has been shown to perform differently in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) when compared to osteoarthritis (OA). In this study, we compare the survivorship between these two groups and examine patient and prosthesis factors that impact the revision rate.

Methods: All RA and OA patients undergoing TKR in Australia from 1 September 1999 to 31 December 2016 were included. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ans.15035DOI Listing
February 2019

Measurement of synovial tissue volume in knee osteoarthritis using a semiautomated MRI-based quantitative approach.

Magn Reson Med 2019 Feb 15. Epub 2019 Feb 15.

Centre for Imaging Sciences, Division of Informatics, Imaging and Data Science, University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom.

Purpose: Synovitis is common in knee osteoarthritis and is associated with both knee pain and progression of disease. Semiautomated methods have been developed for quantitative assessment of structure in knee osteoarthritis. Our aims were to apply a novel semiautomated assessment method using 3D active appearance modeling for the quantification of synovial tissue volume (STV) and to compare its performance with conventional manual segmentation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/mrm.27633DOI Listing
February 2019

Radiographic Progression Inhibition with Intravenous Golimumab in Psoriatic Arthritis: Week 24 Results of a Phase III, Randomized, Double-blind, Placebo-controlled Trial.

J Rheumatol 2019 Feb 15. Epub 2019 Feb 15.

From Internal Medicine - Rheumatology, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, California; Department of Internal Medicine - Rheumatology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio; Immunology, Janssen Research & Development LLC, Spring House, Pennsylvania; Rheumatology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA. Janssen Research & Development LLC funded this study. Janssen Biotech Inc., part of the Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson, manufactures golimumab. Authors who are employees of the study sponsor were involved in the study design, collecting and analyzing the data, and interpreting the results. Writing support was provided by Janssen Scientific Affairs LLC. Janssen Research & Development LLC approved the content of the article; the authors made the decision to submit for publication. Drs. Harrison and Hsia, and L. Kim, K.H. Lo, and L. Noonan are employees of Janssen Research & Development LLC and own stock or stock options in Johnson & Johnson, of which Janssen Research & Development LLC is a wholly owned subsidiary. A. Kavanaugh, MD, Internal Medicine - Rheumatology, University of California at San Diego; M.E. Husni, MD, MPH, Internal Medicine - Rheumatology, Cleveland Clinic; D.D. Harrison, MD, MPH, Immunology, Janssen Research & Development LLC; L. Kim, PhD, Immunology, Janssen Research & Development LLC; K.H. Lo, PhD, Immunology, Janssen Research & Development LLC; L. Noonan, RT(MR), Immunology, Janssen Research & Development LLC; E.C. Hsia, MD, MSCE, Immunology, Janssen Research & Development LLC, and Rheumatology, University of Pennsylvania. Address correspondence to Dr. E.C. Hsia, Janssen Research & Development LLC, 1400 McKean Road, PO Box 776, Spring House, Pennsylvania 19477, USA. E-mail: Full Release Article. For details see Reprints and Permissions at jrheum.org. Accepted for publication October 18, 2018.

Objective: Evaluate effects of intravenous (IV) golimumab (GOL) on radiographic progression in psoriatic arthritis (PsA).

Methods: This phase III, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial (GO-VIBRANT) randomized patients with active PsA to receive IV placebo (n = 239) or IV GOL 2 mg/kg (n = 241) at weeks 0, 4, 12, and 20. Radiographic progression (controlled secondary endpoint) was evaluated as change from baseline at Week 24 in PsA-modified total Sharp/van der Heijde scores (SvdH). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3899/jrheum.180681DOI Listing
February 2019

Endorsement of the 66/68 joint count for the measurement of musculoskeletal disease activity: OMERACT 2018 Psoriatic Arthritis workshop report.

J Rheumatol 2019 Feb 15. Epub 2019 Feb 15.

Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA Robert D. and Patricia E. Kern Center for the Science of Health Care Delivery, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA Department of Rheumatology and Immunology, Singapore General Hospital, Singapore, Singapore University of Leeds, Leeds, UK, and University of Oxford, Oxford, UK Musculoskeletal Health and Outcomes Research, St. Michael's Hospital, and Institute for Work and Health, and Department of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, Rehabilitation Sciences Institute and the Institute for Health Policy Management and Evaluation, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada. Musculoskeletal Statistics Unit: The Parker Institute, Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg Hospital & Department of Rheumatology, Odense University Hospital, Denmark Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA Department of Medical Humanities, Patient Research Partner, Amsterdam University Medical Centre, , Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Department of Medicine, University of Toronto, Women's College Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada Pfizer Inc., Montreal, QC, Canada Department of Rheumatology, St Vincent's University Hospital and Conway Institute for Biomolecular Research, University College Dublin, Ireland. Department of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada Patient Research Partner; Division of Rheumatology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, NC; Kezar Life Sciences, South San Francisco, CA, USA Division of Rheumatology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, NC, USA Royal Prince Alfred Hospital Medical Centre, Sydney, Australia Patient Research Partner, employed by Amgen Inc, Thousand Oaks, CA, USA Cochrane Musculoskeletal Group, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, Centre for Practice-Changing Research, Ottawa, ON, Canada Swedish-Providence-St. John's Health Systems and University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA Division of Rheumatology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, and School of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Ottawa, ON, Canada Division of Immunology/Rheumatology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, CA, USA St. Vincent's University Hospital and University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland Royal National Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases and the University of Bath, Bath, UK. Address correspondence to Alexis Ogdie, MD, University of Pennsylvania, White Building Room 5023, 3400 Spruce St, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, United States. E-mail:

Objective: The psoriatic arthritis (PsA) core domain set for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and longitudinal observational studies (LOS) has recently been updated. The joint counts are central to the measurement of the peripheral arthritis component of the musculoskeletal (MSK) disease activity domain. We report the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) 2018 meeting approaches to seek endorsement of the 66/68-swollen and tender joint count (SJC66/TJC68) for inclusion in the PsA Core Outcome Measurement Set. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3899/jrheum.181089DOI Listing
February 2019
3.187 Impact Factor

Patient Perspectives on DMARD Safety Concerns in Rheumatology Trials: Results from Inflammatory Arthritis Patient Focus Groups and OMERACT Attendees Discussion.

J Rheumatol 2019 Feb 15. Epub 2019 Feb 15.

Department of Family Medicine, McGill University, Montreal, Canada. Musculoskeletal Statistics Unit, The Parker Institute, Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark. Canberra Rheumatology, Canberra, ACT, Australia College of Health and Medicine, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT, Australia; Centre for Kidney Research, The Children's Hospital at Westmead, Sydney, NSW, Australia. Patient Partners, Ingersoll, Canada. Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, NY, USA; Department Social Work Programs, Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, NY USA; Department Social Work Programs, Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, NY USA; Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, USA; Institute of Bone and Joint Research-Kolling Institute, University of Sydney; Rheumatology Department, Royal North Shore Hospital; Centre for Health Policy, School of Population and Global Health, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia; Northern Health, Epping Victoria. Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia; Institute of Bone and Joint Research, Kolling Institute, Northern Sydney Local Health District, St Leonards, NSW, Australia; Department of Rheumatology, Royal North Shore Hospital, Reserve Road, St Leonards, NSW, 2065, Australia. Clinical Investigator, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, Ottawa Hospital, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada; Adjunct Professor, School of Epidemiology and Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada; Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, and School of Epidemiology and Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa; Clinical Epidemiology Program, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, Ottawa; Professor of Biostatistics and Clinical Epidemiology; Musculoskeletal Statistics Unit, The Parker Institute, Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg Hospital; & Department of Rheumatology, Odense University Hospital, Denmark.Professor, Department of Medicine, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada Adjunct Professor, Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. Address correspondence to Dr. Susan J. Bartlett. Email:

Objective: The OMERACT Safety Working Group is identifying core safety domains that matter most to rheumatic disease patients.

Methods: International focus groups were held with 39 inflammatory arthritis patients to identify DMARD experiences and concerns. Themes were identified by pragmatic thematic coding and discussed in small groups by meeting attendees. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3899/jrheum.181185DOI Listing
February 2019

Adaptive Trial Designs in Rheumatology: Report from the OMERACT Special Interest Group.

J Rheumatol 2019 Feb 15. Epub 2019 Feb 15.

From the CREATE Centre, Section of Rheumatology, Division of Infection and Immunity, Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK; Schlosspark Klinik, Charité University Medicine, Berlin, Germany; Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics; Amsterdam Rheumatology and Immunology Center; Amsterdam University Medical Centers, location VUmc, Amsterdam, the Netherlands; Department of Rheumatology, Hospital for Special Surgery, Weill Cornell Medical College; Pfizer, New York, New York; Sanofi, Bridgewater, New Jersey; SDG LLC, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA; Rebecca McDonald Centre for Arthritis and Autoimmune Disease, Mount Sinai Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Musculoskeletal Statistics Unit, The Parker Institute, Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg Hospital; Department of Rheumatology, Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark; Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine and Therapeutics, and Faculty of Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong. EHC has received research grants and/or served as a member of advisory boards and speaker bureaus of Pfizer and Sanofi. HvH is an employee of Sanofi-Genzyme and holds stock in the company. LST has received research grants and/or served as a member of advisory boards and speaker bureaus of AbbVie, Eli Lilly, Celltrion, Janssen, Novartis, Pfizer, Roche, and Sanofi. JC is an employee of Pfizer. T. Pickles, MSc, CREATE Centre, Section of Rheumatology, Division of Infection and Immunity, Cardiff University; R. Alten, MD, PhD, Schlosspark Klinik, Charité University Medicine; M. Boers, MD, PhD, MSc, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, and Amsterdam Rheumatology and Immunology Center, and Amsterdam University Medical Centers VUmc; V. Bykerk, MD, FRCPC, Department of Rheumatology, Hospital for Special Surgery, Weill Cornell Medical College, and Rebecca McDonald Centre for Arthritis and Autoimmune Disease, Mount Sinai Hospital, University of Toronto; J. Christensen, MD, Pfizer; R. Christensen, PhD, MSc, Musculoskeletal Statistics Unit, The Parker Institute, Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg Hospital, and Department of Rheumatology, Odense University Hospital; H. van Hoogstraten, MD, PhD, Sanofi; L.S. Simon, MD, SDG LLC; L.S. Tam, MD, Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine and Therapeutics, and Faculty of Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong; E.H. Choy, MD, CREATE Centre, Section of Rheumatology, Division of Infection and Immunity, Cardiff University. Address correspondence to Professor E.H. Choy, CREATE Centre, Section of Rheumatology, Division of Infection and Immunity, Cardiff University School of Medicine, Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK CF14 4XN. E-mail: Accepted for publication December 18, 2018.

Objective: Adaptive trial design was developed initially for oncology to improve trial efficiency. If optimized for rheumatology, it may improve trial efficiency by reducing sample size and time.

Methods: A systematic review assessed design of phase II clinical trials in rheumatoid arthritis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3899/jrheum.181054DOI Listing
February 2019

OMERACT Hip Inflammation Magnetic Resonance Imaging Scoring System (HIMRISS) Assessment in Longitudinal Study.

J Rheumatol 2019 Feb 15. Epub 2019 Feb 15.

From the Department of Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging, University of Alberta; Department of Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada; Rigshospitalet-Glostrup, Copenhagen Center for Arthritis Research, Center for Rheumatology and Spine Diseases, Copenhagen; King Christian 10th Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases, Gråsten; Institute of Regional Health Research, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark; St. Vincent's Hospital, Melbourne, Australia. Supported by the Capital Health Chair in Diagnostic Imaging. Dr. Jaremko and Dr. Lambert are supported by Medical Imaging Consultants, Edmonton, Canada. J.L. Jaremko, MD, PhD, FRCPC, Department of Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging, University of Alberta; R.G. Lambert, MB, FRCPC, Department of Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging, University of Alberta; S.J. Pedersen, MD, Rigshospitalet-Glostrup, Copenhagen Center for Arthritis Research, Center for Rheumatology and Spine Diseases; U. Weber, MD, Danish Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases, University Hospital of Southern Denmark, and Hospital of Southern Jutland, University Hospital of the Region of Southern Denmark, and Department of Regional Health Research, University of Southern Denmark; D. Lindsay, MD, Department of Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging, University of Alberta; Z. Al-Ani, MD, Department of Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging, University of Alberta; K. Steer, BSc, Department of Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging, University of Alberta; M. Pianta, MD, St. Vincent's Hospital; S. Wichuk, BSc, Department of Medicine, University of Alberta; W.P. Maksymowych, MB ChB, FRCP(C), FACP, Department of Medicine, University of Alberta. Address correspondence to Dr. J.L. Jaremko, Radiologist and Associate Professor, Department of Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging, Faculty of Medicine, University of Alberta, 2A2.41 WMC, 8440-112 Street NW, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2B7, Canada. E-mail: Accepted for publication December 5, 2018.

Objective: To assess reliability, feasibility, and responsiveness of Hip Inflammation Magnetic resonance imaging Scoring System (HIMRISS) for bone marrow lesions (BML) in hip osteoarthritis (OA).

Methods: HIMRISS was scored by 8 readers in 360 hips of 90 patients imaged pre/post-hip steroid injection. Pre-scoring, new readers trained online to achieve intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) > 0. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3899/jrheum.181043DOI Listing
February 2019

Advancing stiffness measurement in rheumatic disease: report from the Stiffness Special Interest group at OMERACT 2018.

J Rheumatol 2019 Feb 15. Epub 2019 Feb 15.

From Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD USA; Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK; Leeds Biomedical Research Centre, Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Leeds, UK; McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada; Department of Rheumatology, Hospital for Special Surgery, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY, USA; Division of Medicine, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, Australia Rheumatology Unit, The Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Woodville, Australia; Horizon Pharma, Inc, Lake Forest, Illinois, USA and Adjunct Professor, College of Pharmacy, University of Illinois, Chicago, IL, USA; Healthy Motivation, Bone and Joint Decade Global Alliance for Musculoskeletal Health, Santa Barbara, California, USA; Janssen Scientific Affairs, LLC, Horsham, PA, USA; Singapore General Hospital, Duke-NUS Medical School; University of Bristol, Bristol, UK; University of West England - Bristol, Bristol, UK. AMO is a Jerome L. Greene Foundation Scholar and is supported in part by a research grant from the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) under award number P30-AR070254 (Core B), a Rheumatology Research Foundation Scientist Development award, and a Staurulakis Family Discovery award. Work from the US Cohort was supported by the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) under award numbers [P30-AR070254 Core B] and [P30-AR053503 Core D] and Patient Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) Pilot Project Award number [IP2-PI000737], and the Camille Julia Morgan Arthritis Research and Education Fund. All statements in this report including its conclusions are the opinions of the authors and do not necessarily reflect those of PCORI, its board of governors, or its methodology committee, or of NIH or NIAMS. RH is an employee of Horizon Pharma, LLC; CK is an employee of Janssen Scientific Affairs, LLC. Address correspondence to Ethan T Craig, 3900 Woodland Ave., Philadelphia, PA 19104. Email:

Objective: To improve measurement of stiffness in rheumatic disease.

Methods: Data presented included: 1) Two qualitative projects; 2) The RA Stiffness patient-reported outcome measure (RAST); 3) three items assessing stiffness severity, duration, and interference. 3) RESULTS: Stiffness is multidimensional and includes aspects of stiffness experience such as duration, severity, and impact. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3899/jrheum.181074DOI Listing
February 2019
3.187 Impact Factor

Validity and Responsiveness of Combined Inflammation and Combined Joint Damage Scores Based on the OMERACT Rheumatoid Arthritis MRI Scoring System (RAMRIS).

J Rheumatol 2019 Feb 15. Epub 2019 Feb 15.

From the Department of Rheumatology, Diakonhjemmet Hospital; Institute of Health and Society, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway; Copenhagen Center for Arthritis Research (COPECARE), Center for Rheumatology and Spine Diseases, Rigshospitalet, Glostrup; Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen; King Christian 10th Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases; University of Southern Denmark, Institute of Regional Health Research, Graasten; Institute of Clinical Medicine, Aarhus University Hospital, Århus; Odense University Hospital; Institute of Clinical Research, University of Southern Denmark, Odense; Zealand University Hospital, Køge, Denmark; University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia; Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine, University of Leeds; National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Leeds Biomedical Research Centre, Leeds, UK. U. Sundin, MD, Research Fellow, Department of Rheumatology, Diakonhjemmet Hospital, and Institute of Health and Society, University of Oslo; M. Østergaard, MD, PhD, DMSc, Professor, COPECARE, Center for Rheumatology and Spine Diseases, Rigshospitalet, and the Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Copenhagen; D. Glinatsi, MD, PhD, Postdoctoral Researcher, COPECARE, Center for Rheumatology and Spine Diseases, Rigshospitalet; A.B. Aga, MD, PhD, Senior Consultant and Postdoctoral Researcher, Department of Rheumatology, Diakonhjemmet Hospital Oslo; K. Hørslev-Petersen, MD, DMSc, Professor, Senior Consultant, King Christian 10th Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases, and the Institute of Regional Health Research, University of Southern Denmark; M.L. Hetland, MD, PhD, DMSc, Professor, COPECARE, Center for Rheumatology and Spine Diseases, Rigshospitalet, and the Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Copenhagen; K. Stengaard-Pedersen, MD, DMSc, Professor Emeritus, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Aarhus University Hospital; P. Junker, MD, DMSc, Professor, Department of Rheumatology, Odense University Hospital and Institute of Clinical Research, University of Southern Denmark; B.J. Ejbjerg, MD, PhD, Chief Consultant, Zealand University Hospital; P. Bird, BMed (Hons), FRACP, PhD, Grad Dip MRI, Associate Professor, University of New South Wales; P.G. Conaghan, MB, BS, PhD, FRACP, FRCP, Professor of Musculoskeletal Medicine, Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine, University of Leeds, and NIHR Leeds Biomedical Research Centre; S. Lillegraven, MD, MPH, PhD, Postdoctoral Researcher, Department of Rheumatology, Diakonhjemmet Hospital; E.A. Haavardsholm, MD, PhD, Professor, Department of Rheumatology, Diakonhjemmet Hospital, and Institute of Health and Society, University of Oslo. Address correspondence to Dr. U. Sundin, Diakonhjemmet Sykehus, Diakonveien 12, 0370 Oslo, Norway. E-mail: Accepted for publication December 6, 2018.

Objective: The RAMRIS [Outcome Measures in Rheumatology rheumatoid arthritis (RA) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) Scoring system] is used in clinical RA trials. We have investigated methods to combine the RAMRIS features into valid and responsive scores for inflammation and joint damage.

Methods: We used data from 3 large randomized early RA trials to assess 5 methods to develop a combined score for inflammation based on RAMRIS bone marrow edema, synovitis, and tenosynovitis scores, and a combined joint damage score based on erosions and joint space narrowing. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3899/jrheum.181064DOI Listing
February 2019

Development and Validation of an OMERACT MRI Whole-Body Score for Inflammation in Peripheral Joints and Entheses in Inflammatory Arthritis (MRI-WIPE).

J Rheumatol 2019 Feb 15. Epub 2019 Feb 15.

From the Copenhagen Center for Arthritis Research, Center for Rheumatology and Spine Diseases, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark; Department of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark; Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Sheba Medical Center, Affiliated to the Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel; University Pierre et Marie Curie - Paris 6, Sorbonne Universités, GRC-08 (EEMOIS); APHP, Rheumatology Dept., Pitié Salpêtrière University Hospital, Paris, France; Division of Medicine, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia; Department of Clinical Immunology & Rheumatology, Christian Medical College, Vellore, India; Department of Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada; CaRE Arthritis, Edmonton, Canada; Department of Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada; Department of Rheumatology, Cliniques Universitaires Saint-Luc, Institut de Recherche Expérimentale et Clinique (IREC), Université catholique de Louvain, Brussels, Belgium; Department of Radiology, Ghent University Hospital, Belgium; Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine, University of Leeds, & NIHR Leeds Biomedical Research Centre, Leeds Teaching Hospital NHS Trust, United Kingdom; Department of Radiology, Arthritis Imaging Research Group, University Hospital Charité, Berlin, Germany; 14Spire Sciences, Inc., Boca Raton, Florida, United States. S.K. received research grants from The Danish Rheumatism Association and Rigshospitalet. Address correspondence to Simon Krabbe, Copenhagen Center for Arthritis Research, Center for Rheumatology and Spine Diseases, Rigshospitalet, Valdemar Hansens Vej 17, DK-2600 Glostrup, Denmark. E-mail:

Objective: To develop a whole-body MRI-scoring system for peripheral arthritis and enthesitis.

Methods: After consensus on definitions/locations of MRI pathologies, four multi-reader exercises were performed. Eighty-three joints were scored 0-3 separately for synovitis and osteitis, thirty-three entheses 0-3 separately for soft tissue inflammation and osteitis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3899/jrheum.181084DOI Listing
February 2019

Structural Changes over a Short Period Are Associated with Functional Assessments in Rheumatoid Arthritis.

J Rheumatol 2019 Feb 15. Epub 2019 Feb 15.

From the Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, Musculoskeletal Quantitative Imaging Research, and the Department of Medicine, Division of Rheumatology, and the School of Pharmacy, at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), San Francisco, California; Department of Biomedical Engineering, Program of Advanced Musculoskeletal Imaging (PAMI), Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio; Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Faculty of Medicine and Graduate School of Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan. This study was supported by UCB Pharmaceutical Inc. (Xiaojuan Li). T. Shimizu, MD, PhD, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, Musculoskeletal Quantitative Imaging Research, UCSF, and Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Faculty of Medicine and Graduate School of Medicine, Hokkaido University; A. Cruz, BS, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, Musculoskeletal Quantitative Imaging Research, and School of Pharmacy, UCSF; M. Tanaka, BS, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, Musculoskeletal Quantitative Imaging Research, UCSF; K. Mamoto, MD, PhD, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, Musculoskeletal Quantitative Imaging Research, UCSF, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, PAMI, Cleveland Clinic; V. Pedoia, PhD, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, Musculoskeletal Quantitative Imaging Research, UCSF; A.J. Burghardt, BS, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, Musculoskeletal Quantitative Imaging Research, UCSF; U. Heilmeier, MD, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, Musculoskeletal Quantitative Imaging Research, UCSF; T.M. Link, MD, PhD, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, Musculoskeletal Quantitative Imaging Research, UCSF; J. Graf, MD, Department of Medicine, Division of Rheumatology, UCSF; J.B. Imboden, MD, Department of Medicine, Division of Rheumatology, UCSF; X. Li, PhD, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, Musculoskeletal Quantitative Imaging Research, UCSF, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, PAMI, Cleveland Clinic. Address correspondence to Dr. T. Shimizu, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Faculty of Medicine and Graduate School of Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan. E-mail: Accepted for publication October 24, 2018.

Objective: To investigate the correlation between changes in radiological quantitative assessment with changes in clinical and functional assessment from baseline to 3 months in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA).

Methods: Twenty-eight patients with RA [methotrexate (MTX) and anti-tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) group with high disease activity (n = 18); and MTX group with low disease activity (n = 10)] underwent assessments at baseline and 3 months: clinical [28-joint count Disease Activity Score (DAS28)], functional [Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) and Michigan Hand Outcome Questionnaire (MHQ)], and imaging-based [3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT)]. MR images were evaluated semiquantitatively [RA MRI scoring (RAMRIS)] and quantitatively for the volume of synovitis and bone marrow edema (BME) lesions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3899/jrheum.180496DOI Listing
February 2019

An Update on Arthritis in Canada - National and Provincial Data Regarding the Past, Present, and Future.

J Rheumatol 2019 Feb 15. Epub 2019 Feb 15.

From the Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto; Health Care and Outcomes Research, Krembil Research Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. E.M. Badley, DPhil, Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, and Health Care and Outcomes Research, Krembil Research Institute, University Health Network; C.M. Goulart, MPH, Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto; D.B. Millstone, MPH, Health Care and Outcomes Research, Krembil Research Institute, University Health Network; A.V. Perruccio, PhD, Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, and Health Care and Outcomes Research and Arthritis Program, Krembil Research Institute, University Health Network, and Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto. Address correspondence to Dr. E.M. Badley, Krembil Research Institute, Toronto Western Hospital, MP 10-310, 399 Bathurst St., Toronto, Ontario M5T 2S8, Canada. E-mail: Accepted for publication October 10, 2018.

Objective: To provide updated arthritis estimates for Canada given a change in wording in the 2015 Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS) arthritis question.

Methods: Prevalence data from the 2000 to 2016 CCHS were used to document trends in the prevalence of arthritis over time. Projections of arthritis prevalence were also calculated using data from CCHS 2015 in conjunction with Statistics Canada's published population projections. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3899/jrheum.180147DOI Listing
February 2019

Preliminary Definitions for Sacroiliac Joint Pathologies in the OMERACT Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis MRI Score (OMERACT JAMRIS-SIJ).

J Rheumatol 2019 Feb 15. Epub 2019 Feb 15.

Institute of Medical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto. Medical Sciences Building, 1 Kings College Circle, Room 2374, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5S 1A8. Department of Diagnostic Imaging, The Hospital for Sick Children, 555 University Avenue, Toronto ON, Canada M5G 1X8. Department of Translational Medicine, SickKids Research Institute, Peter Gilgan Center for Research and Learning, 686 Bay Street, Toronto Ontario, Canada M5G 0A4. Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine, University of Leeds & NIHR Leeds Biomedical Research Centre, Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Leeds, United Kingdom.Department of Rheumatology, University of Alberta, 562 Heritage Medical Research Building, Edmonton, AB, Canada, T6G 2S2. Department of Rheumatology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, the Netherlands. University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Division of Rheumatology, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and Departments of Pediatric and Epidemiology, Philadelphia, PA, USA. Department of Radiology, National Institute of Geriatrics, Rheumatology and Rehabilitation, Warsaw, Poland. Department of Radiology and Medical Imaging, Ghent University Hospital, De Pintelaan 185, Ghent, Belgium. Department of Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging, University of Alberta. 2A2.41 WC Mackenzie Health Sciences Center, 8440-112 Street, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, T6G2B7. Department of Radiology, Nemours Children's Hospital and Health System, Orlando Florida USA. Division of Pediatric Rheumatology, Department of Pediatrics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB Canada. Department of Radiology; Hospital Sant Joan de Deu, Adress: Passeige de Sant Joan deDeu, ES 08950 Esplugues de Llobregat, Barcelona, Spain. Department of Radiology, Rikshospitalet, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, 155 College Street, Toronto, ON Canada M5T 3M7. Reade | Emma Children's Hospital / Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Pediatric Rheumatology Research Institute, PRI Achtern Dieck 9, Bad Bramstedt, DE 2476. Department of Clinical Immunology and Rheumatology, Christian Medical College, Vellore, Tamil Nadu, India-632004. Division of Rheumatology, The Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto. Toronto, ON, Canada 555 University Avenue, Toronto ON, Canada M5G 1X8. State University of Campina-UNICAMP, Department of Internal Medicine, Cidade Universitaria, Campina, Sao Paulo Brazil Department of Medical Imaging, University of Toronto. 263 McCaul Street 4th Floor, Toronto, ON, Canada M5T1W7. Department of Rheumatology, Center for Prognosis Studies in Rheumatologic Diseases, Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto Canada. Research Ethics Board approval was granted by the Sickkids Research Ethics Board, REB Number 1000059077. Address correspondence to Andrea S. Doria.

Objective: To develop definitions for the assessment of MRI pathologies of the sacroiliac joints (SIJ) in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA).

Methods: An OMERACT consensus-driven methodology consisting of iterative surveys and focus group meetings within an international group of rheumatologists and radiologists.

Results: Two domains, inflammation and structural, were identified. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3899/jrheum.181115DOI Listing
February 2019

Establishing an updated core domain set for studies in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: a report from the OMERACT 2018 JIA Workshop.

J Rheumatol 2019 Feb 15. Epub 2019 Feb 15.

E.M. Morgan MD, Associate Professor, Division of Rheumatology, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH, J.E. Munro MBBS, Associate Professor, Head of Rheumatology at the Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne, Australia and Group Leader Arthritis research, Murdoch Children's Research Institute Melbourne Australia, J. Horonjeff, PhD, Instructor, Office of Research, Division of Rheumatology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY, B. Horgan, Consumer Advocate, Consumer and Community Health Research Network, Australia, B. Shea, PhD, Clinical Investigator, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, Adjunct Professor, School of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Canada, B.M. Feldman, MD, MSc, FRCPC, Professor Pediatrics, Medicine, Institute of Health Policy Management & Evaluation, University of Toronto, Head, Division of Rheumatology, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON, H. Clairman, M.Sc., Clinical Research Project Coordinator, Child Health Evaluative Sciences, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto ON, C.O. Bingham III, MD; Professor of Medicine, Division of Rheumatology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD; S. Thornhill, AA, Qualitative Research Consultant, Thornhill Associates, Hermosa Beach, CA, V. Strand MD, Adjunct Clinical Professor, Division of Immunology/Rheumatology, Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA, A. Alongi, PhD Student, IRCCS Istituto Giannina Gaslini, Clinica Pediatrica e Reumatologia, and Università degli studi di Genova, Genoa, Italy, S. Magni-Manzoni, M.D. Rheumatology Division, Ospedale Pediatrico Bambino Gesù, Roma, Italy, M. A.J. van Rossum, MD PhD, Pediatric Rheumatologist/Immunologist, Amsterdam Rheumatology and Immunology Center / Reade l Emma Children's Hospital Amsterdam Medical Center, Amsterdam, R. Vesely, MD, Head of the Rheumatology, Respiratory, Gastroenterology and Immunology Office Scientific and Regulatory Management Department European Medicines Agency, London, United Kingdom J. Vojinovic, MD PhD, Professor, University of Nis, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pediatric Rheumatology, Serbia H.I. Brunner, Professor, Division of Rheumatology, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH, J.G. Harris, MD, Assistant Professor, Division of Rheumatology, Children's Mercy - Kansas City, Kansas City, MO, D.B. Horton, MD, MSCE, Assistant Professor, Division of Pediatric Rheumatology, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Institute for Health, Health Care Policy and Aging Research, New Brunswick, NJ, D.J. Lovell, MD, Professor, Division of Rheumatology, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH, M. Mannion, MD, Assistant Professor of Rheumatology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, H. Rahimi, MD, Assistant Professor, Division of Rheumatology, University of Rochester, Golisano Children's Hospital, Rochester, NY; A. Ravelli, MD, Professor of Pediatrics, Università degli Studi di Genova and IRCCS Istituto Giannina Gaslini, Genoa, Italy, S. Ringold, MD, Assistant Professor, Division of Rheumatology, Seattle Children's, Seattle, WA, Nicolino Ruperto, MD, MPH, IRCCS Istituto Giannina Gaslini, Clinica Pediatrica e Reumatologia, PRINTO, Genoa, M.S. Schrandt, J.D., Director, Patient Engagement, Arthritis Foundation, Atlanta, GA, S. Shenoi, MBBS, MS Associate Professor, Seattle Children's Hospital, Seattle, WA Natalie J. Shiff, MD, University of Florida, Shands Children's Hospital, Gainesville, FL, K. Toupin-April, PhD, Associate Scientist, Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario Research Institute, Assistant Professor, Department of Pediatrics and School of Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Canada, N. Tzaribachev, MD, Pediatric Rheumatology Research Institute, Bad Bramstedt, Germany, P. Weiss, MD, MSCE, Associate Professor, Division of Rheumatology, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA, A. Consolaro, MD, PhD, Assistant Professor, IRCCS Istituto Giannina Gaslini, Clinica Pediatrica e Reumatologia, and Università degli studi di Genova, Genoa, Italy, Address correspondence to: E.M. Morgan MD, Associate Professor of Pediatrics, Division of Rheumatology Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center 3333 Burnet Ave, MLC 4010, Cincinnati, OH 45229; Email:

Objective: The current Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) Core Set used in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and longitudinal observational studies (LOS) was developed without input of patients/parents. At OMERACT 2016, a special interest group voted to reconsider the core set incorporating broader stakeholder input. We describe subsequent work culminating in an OMERACT 2018 plenary and consensus voting. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3899/jrheum.181088DOI Listing
February 2019

Clinical Characteristics of Patients with Spondyloarthritis in Japan in Comparison with Other Regions of the World.

J Rheumatol 2019 Feb 15. Epub 2019 Feb 15.

From the Immuno-Rheumatology Center, St. Luke's International Hospital, St. Luke's International University; Institute of Rheumatology, Tokyo Women's Medical University; Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Juntendo University School of Medicine; Division of Rheumatology, Department of Rheumatology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo; Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Shiga University of Medical Science, Shiga; Department of Rheumatology, Tonan Hospital, Hokkaido; Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Fujita Health University, Aichi; Department of Internal Medicine and Rheumatology, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo; Department of Rheumatology, Chubu Rosai Hospital, Aichi; Department of Endocrinology, Metabolism and Nephrology, Kochi Medical School, Kochi; Department of Orthopedics, Osaka Minami Medical Center, Osaka; Department of Rheumatology, Daido Hospital, Aichi; Department of Internal Medicine, Juntendo University Koshigaya Hospital, Saitama; Department of Orthopedic Biomaterial Science, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka, Japan; departments of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA; Division of Rheumatology, National University Hospital, Singapore; Division of Rheumatology, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, China; Department of Rheumatology, Hanyang University Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases, Seoul, South Korea; Department of Rheumatology, Allergy and Immunology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University, Tao-Yuan, Taiwan; Hospital Universitario Reina Sofía/IMIBIC/University of Córdoba, Córdoba, Spain; Department of Rheumatology, Paris Descartes University, Cochin Hospital, Paris, France; INSERM Unit 1183, CRESS, Paris, France; Department of Rheumatology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, the Netherlands. This study was conducted under the umbrella of the International Society for Spondyloarthritis Assessment (ASAS) and the COMOSPA study was supported by the unrestricted grants from Pfizer, AbbVie, and UCB. M.K. received honoraria from AbbVie and Ayumi; K.Y. receives tuition support from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health (partially supported by training grants from Pfizer, Takeda, Bayer, and PhRMA); A.M. has received research grants from Abbvie, Pfizer, and MSD. M. Kishimoto, MD, Immuno-Rheumatology Center, St. Luke's International Hospital, St. Luke's International University; K. Yoshida, MD, MPH, ScD, Departments of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health; N. Ichikawa, MD, Institute of Rheumatology, Tokyo Women's Medical University; H. Inoue, MD, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Juntendo University School of Medicine; Y. Kaneko, MD, Division of Rheumatology, Department of Rheumatology, Keio University School of Medicine; T. Kawasaki, MD, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Shiga University of Medical Science; K. Matsui, MD, Department of Rheumatology, Tonan Hospital, M. Morita, MD, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Fujita Health University; M. Suda, MD, Immuno-Rheumatology Center, St. Luke's International Hospital, St. Luke's International University; K. Tada, MD, Department of Internal Medicine and Rheumatology, Juntendo University School of Medicine; N. Takizawa, MD, Department of Rheumatology, Chubu Rosai Hospital; N. Tamura, MD, Department of Internal Medicine and Rheumatology, Juntendo University School of Medicine; A. Taniguchi, MD, Institute of Rheumatology, Tokyo Women's Medical University; Y. Taniguchi, MD, Department of Endocrinology, Metabolism and Nephrology, Kochi Medical School; S. Tsuji, MD, Department of Orthopedics, Osaka Minami Medical Center; Y. Haji, MD, Department of Rheumatology, Daido Hospital; R. Rokutanda, MD, Immuno-Rheumatology Center, St. Luke's International Hospital, St. Luke's International University; H. Yanaoka, MD, Immuno-Rheumatology Center, St. Luke's International Hospital, St. Luke's International University; P.P. Cheung, MD, Division of Rheumatology, National University Hospital; J. Gu, MD, Division of Rheumatology, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University; T.H. Kim, MD, Department of Rheumatology, Hanyang University Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases; S.F. Luo, MD, Department of Rheumatology, Allergy and Immunology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University; M. Okada, MD, Immuno-Rheumatology Center, St. Luke's International Hospital, St. Luke's International University; C. López Medina, MD, Hospital Universitario Reina Sofía/IMIBIC/University of Córdoba; A. Molto, MD, Department of Rheumatology, Paris Descartes University, Cochin Hospital, and INSERM Unit 1183, CRESS; M. Dougados, MD, Department of Rheumatology, Paris Descartes University, Cochin Hospital, and INSERM Unit 1183, CRESS; S. Kobayashi, MD, PhD, Department of Internal Medicine, Juntendo University Koshigaya Hospital; D. van der Heijde, MD, Department of Rheumatology, Leiden University Medical Center; T. Tomita, MD, Department of Orthopedic Biomaterial Science, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine. Address correspondence to Dr. M. Kishimoto, Immuno-Rheumatology Center, St. Luke's International Hospital, St. Luke's International University, 9-1 Akashicho, Chuo-ku, Tokyo, Japan, 104-8560. E-mail: Accepted for publication October 11, 2018.

Objective: To delineate clinical characteristics of patients with spondyloarthritis (SpA) in Japan in comparison to other areas of the world.

Methods: Using the ASAS-COMOSPA (Assessment of Spondyloarthritis international Society-COMOrbidities in SPondyloArthritis) data, an international cross-sectional observational study of patients with SpA, we analyzed information on demographics, disease characteristics, comorbidities, and risk factors. Patients were classified by region: Japan, other Asian countries (China, Singapore, South Korea, Taiwan), and non-Asian countries (Europe, the Americas, Africa). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3899/jrheum.180412DOI Listing
February 2019

Reproductive health outcomes in women with psoriatic arthritis.

Ann Rheum Dis 2019 Feb 15. Epub 2019 Feb 15.

EULAR Centre For Arthritis And Rheumatic Diseases, Dublin Academic Medical Centre, Dublin, Ireland.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/annrheumdis-2018-214790DOI Listing
February 2019

Innate Immune Modulation by GM-CSF and IL-3 in Health and Disease.

Int J Mol Sci 2019 Feb 15;20(4). Epub 2019 Feb 15.

Department of Translational Medical Sciences and Center for Basic and Clinical Immunology Research (CISI), University of Naples Federico II, 80131 Naples, Italy.

Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and inteleukin-3 (IL-3) have long been known as mediators of emergency myelopoiesis, but recent evidence has highlighted their critical role in modulating innate immune effector functions in mice and humans. This new wealth of knowledge has uncovered novel aspects of the pathogenesis of a range of disorders, including infectious, neoplastic, autoimmune, allergic and cardiovascular diseases. Consequently, GM-CSF and IL-3 are now being investigated as therapeutic targets for some of these disorders, and some phase I/II clinical trials are already showing promising results. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijms20040834DOI Listing
February 2019

IL33/ST2 Axis in Diabetic Kidney Disease: A Literature Review.

Medicina (Kaunas) 2019 Feb 14;55(2). Epub 2019 Feb 14.

School and Operative Unit of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Messina, Via Consolare Valeria, 98125 Messina, Italy.

Interleukin-33 (IL-33) is a cytokine belonging to the IL-1 family, playing a role in inflammatory, infectious and autoimmune diseases and expressed in the cellular nucleus in several tissues. High levels of IL-33 are expressed in epithelial barrier tissues and endothelial barriers. ST2 is a receptor for IL-33, expressed selectively on a subset of Th2 cells, mediating some of their functions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/medicina55020050DOI Listing
February 2019

Practice-Based Differences in Pediatric Discoid Lupus Erythematosus.

Br J Dermatol 2019 Feb 15. Epub 2019 Feb 15.

Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Dermatology and Pediatrics, Chicago, Illinois, United States.

Background: Children with discoid lupus erythematosus (DLE) are at risk for disfigurement and progression to systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Consensus is lacking regarding optimal care of children with DLE.

Objectives: We compared practice patterns among pediatric dermatologists/rheumatologists treating pediatric DLE. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjd.17780DOI Listing
February 2019

Patient Perspectives on Smoking Cessation and Interventions in Rheumatology Clinics.

Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken) 2019 Feb 15. Epub 2019 Feb 15.

UW-SMPH Department of Medicine, Rheumatology, Madison, WI, United States.

Objective: Although smoking is a risk factor for cardiovascular and rheumatic disease severity, only 10% of rheumatology visits document cessation counseling. After implementing a rheumatology clinic protocol that increased tobacco quitline referrals 20-fold, current objectives were to 1) examine patients' barriers and facilitators to smoking cessation based on prior rheumatology experiences, 2) solicit reactions to the new cessation protocol, and 3) identify patient-centered outcomes or "signs of cessation progress" following improved care.

Methods: We recruited 19 patients who smoke-12 with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and 7 with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)-to one of three semi-structured focus groups. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/acr.23858DOI Listing
February 2019

The mortality rate and causes of death among juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients in Finland.

Clin Exp Rheumatol 2019 Feb 11. Epub 2019 Feb 11.

Department of Children and Adolescents, Oulu University Hospital; Medical Research Centre, University of Oulu and Oulu University Hospital; and PEDEGO Research Unit, University of Oulu, Finland.

Objectives: To explore mortality rates and causes of death in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients in Finland compared with the general population.

Methods: All incident patients with JIA (age <16 years at the index day) during 2000-2014 were collected from the nationwide register maintained by the Social Insurance Institution of Finland and The National Population Registry identified three age-, sex- and residence-matched controls for each case. They were followed up together until 31st Dec 2015. Read More

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February 2019

Conventional synthetic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs and bone mineral density in rheumatoid arthritis patients with osteoporosis: possible beneficial effect of leflunomide.

Clin Exp Rheumatol 2019 Feb 11. Epub 2019 Feb 11.

Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, University of Ulsan, College of Medicine, Asan Medical Centre, Seoul, Korea.

Objectives: To investigate the effect of conventional synthetic disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (csDMARDs) on bone mineral density (BMD) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients with osteoporosis.

Methods: Patients with RA who were newly diagnosed with osteoporosis (T-score ≤ -2.5) between 2010 and 2017 were included. Read More

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February 2019

What are the main barriers to achieve minimal disease activity in psoriatic arthritis in real life?

Clin Exp Rheumatol 2019 Feb 11. Epub 2019 Feb 11.

Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Rheumatology, University of Ottawa Faculty of Medicine, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, Canada.

Objectives: Minimal disease activity (MDA) is an important target in patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA), however it is also criticised for having a low threshold for patient reported outcomes (PRO).The aim of the study was to assess the prevalence of MDA and its components in patients with PsA and to evaluate disease characteristics and patterns in patients with or without MDA (MDA+ or MDA-).

Methods: PsArt-ID (Psoriatic Arthritis-International Database) is a prospective, multicentre web-based registry. Read More

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February 2019
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Letter to the editor, "Fibromyalgia Criteria".

Authors:
Frederick Wolfe

J Pain 2019 Feb 11. Epub 2019 Feb 11.

National Data Bank for Rheumatic Diseases; University of Kansas School of Medicine - Wichita 1035 N. Emporia, Ste 288, Wichita, KS 67214. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jpain.2019.02.002DOI Listing
February 2019

What is the additional value of MRI of the foot to the hand in undifferentiated arthritis to predict rheumatoid arthritis development?

Arthritis Res Ther 2019 Feb 14;21(1):56. Epub 2019 Feb 14.

Department of Rheumatology, Leiden University Medical Centre, P.O. Box 9600, 2300 RC, Leiden, The Netherlands.

Background: MRI-detected subclinical joint inflammation in the hand joints of patients with undifferentiated arthritis (UA) predicts progression to rheumatoid arthritis (RA). It is unknown if adding MRI of the foot increases predictive accuracy compared to the hand alone.

Methods: 1. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13075-019-1845-7DOI Listing
February 2019

Do musculoskeletal ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging identify synovitis and tenosynovitis at the same joints and tendons? A comparative study in early inflammatory arthritis and clinically suspect arthralgia.

Arthritis Res Ther 2019 Feb 14;21(1):59. Epub 2019 Feb 14.

Department of Rheumatology, Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden, The Netherlands.

Objective: Ultrasound (US) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are recommended in the diagnostic process of rheumatoid arthritis. Research on its comparability in early disease phases is scarce. Therefore, we compared synovitis and tenosynovitis detected by US and MRI on joint/tendon level. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13075-019-1824-zDOI Listing
February 2019

Calm in the midst of cytokine storm: a collaborative approach to the diagnosis and treatment of hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis and macrophage activation syndrome.

Pediatr Rheumatol Online J 2019 Feb 14;17(1). Epub 2019 Feb 14.

Division of Immunolgy, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, MA, USA.

Background: Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) and macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) were historically thought to be distinct entities, often managed in isolation. In fact, these conditions are closely related. A collaborative approach, which incorporates expertise from subspecialties that previously treated HLH/MAS independently, is needed. Read More

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https://ped-rheum.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12969-
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12969-019-0309-6DOI Listing
February 2019
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Effect of Vitamin D supplementation on synovial tissue volume and subchondral bone marrow lesion volume in symptomatic knee osteoarthritis.

BMC Musculoskelet Disord 2019 Feb 14;20(1):76. Epub 2019 Feb 14.

Nuffield Department of Orthopaedics, Rheumatology and Musculoskeletal Sciences, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.

Background: Data from a recent clinical trial of vitamin D therapy in knee OA suggests that, compared to placebo, vitamin D therapy may be associated with a reduction in effusion-synovitis. Our aim was, using contrast-enhanced (CE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), to examine the effect of vitamin D therapy on synovial tissue volume (STV) and also subchondral bone marrow lesion (BML) volume in men and women with symptomatic knee OA.

Methods: Data was acquired from participants who took part in a randomised placebo-controlled trial (UK VIDEO) investigating the effect of vitamin D therapy (800 IU cholecalciferol daily) on radiographic joint space narrowing. Read More

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https://bmcmusculoskeletdisord.biomedcentral.com/articles/10
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12891-019-2424-4DOI Listing
February 2019
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Low dose naltrexone: Effects on medication in rheumatoid and seropositive arthritis. A nationwide register-based controlled quasi-experimental before-after study.

PLoS One 2019 14;14(2):e0212460. Epub 2019 Feb 14.

Department of Pharmacy, Faculty of Health Sciences, UiT - The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway.

In recent years, low dose naltrexone (LDN) has been used as an off-label therapy for several chronic diseases. Results from small laboratory and clinical studies indicate some beneficial effects of LDN in autoimmune diseases, but clinical research on LDN in rheumatic disease is limited. Using a pharmacoepidemiological approach, we wanted to test the hypothesis that starting LDN leads to reduced dispensing of medicines used in the treatment of rheumatic disease. Read More

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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0212460PLOS
February 2019
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Venous Thromboembolic Events in Idiopathic Inflammatory Myopathy: Occurrence and Relation to Disease Onset: comment on the article by Antovic et al.

Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken) 2019 Feb 14. Epub 2019 Feb 14.

Maricopa Integrated Health System, 2601 E Roosevelt St, Phoenix, Arizona, 85008, USA.

I read with great interest the article by Antovic et al, recently published in Arthritis Care & Research (1). In a population-based study, the investigators demonstrated an increased risk of venous thromboembolic events (VTE) in patients with idiopathic inflammatory myopathy (IIM), compared with the general population. Strikingly, the hazard ratio for VTE was 26. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/acr.23856DOI Listing
February 2019

Effects of Antibiotics on α-Toxin Levels during Staphylococcus aureus Culture: Implications for the Protection of Chondrocytes in a Model of Septic Arthritis.

Cartilage 2019 Feb 14:1947603519828433. Epub 2019 Feb 14.

1 Centre for Integrative Physiology, Deanery of Biomedical Sciences, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, Scotland, UK.

Objective: Septic arthritis results from joint infection by Staphylococcus aureus, which produces potent α-toxin causing cell death, potentially leading to permanent cartilage damage. Treatment is by joint irrigation and antibiotics, although it is unclear if, following treatment with antibiotics which cause bacterial lysis, there is release of additional stored α-toxin.

Design: A rabbit erythrocyte hemolysis assay was optimised to assess biologically-active α-toxin from cultured S. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1947603519828433DOI Listing
February 2019

Men and women's occupational activities and the risk of developing osteoarthritis of the knee, hip or hands: A systematic review and recommendations for future research.

Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken) 2019 Feb 14. Epub 2019 Feb 14.

Occupational Science & Occupational Therapy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, B.C., Canada.

Objective: To systematically review the evidence for an increased risk of osteoarthritis in the hip, knee, hand, wrist, finger, ankle, foot, shoulder, neck and spine related to men and women's diverse occupational activities and to examine dose response information related to the frequency, intensity, and duration of work exposures and the risk of OA.

Methods: Established guidelines for systematic reviews in occupational health and safety studies were followed. MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL and Cochrane Library were searched from inception to December 2017. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/acr.23855DOI Listing
February 2019

Patient-reported outcomes 1 to 5 years after ACL reconstruction: effect of combined injury, and associations with MRI-defined osteoarthritis features.

Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken) 2019 Feb 14. Epub 2019 Feb 14.

La Trobe Sport & Exercise Medicine Research Centre, School of Allied Health, La Trobe University, Bundoora, Australia.

Objective: Persistent symptoms and poor quality of life (QoL) are common following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR). We aimed to determine the influence of a combined ACL injury (i.e. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/acr.23854DOI Listing
February 2019
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Modifiable Determinants of Exercise Use in a Diverse Ethnic Population with Osteoarthritis.

Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken) 2019 Feb 14. Epub 2019 Feb 14.

University of Arizona Arthritis Center, Tucson, AZ.

Objectives: To determine the extent of ethnic differences in using exercise for therapy and Identify relevant modifiable determinants of exercise use among knee/hip osteoarthritis (OA) patients METHODS: Knee/hip OA study participants were identified. Surveys were administered to collect patient socio-demographics, clinical information, and beliefs and attitudes about providers and treatments. Final multivariable logistic regression models were created using a fully conditional method. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/acr.23852DOI Listing
February 2019

Long-term efficacy and safety of biosimilar infliximab (CT-P13) after switching from originator infliximab: Open-label extension of the NOR-SWITCH trial.

J Intern Med 2019 Feb 14. Epub 2019 Feb 14.

Department of Rheumatology, Diakonhjemmet Hospital, Oslo.

Background And Objectives: The 52-week, randomized, double blind, non-inferiority, government funded NOR-SWITCH trial demonstrated that switching from infliximab originator to less expensive biosimilar CT-P13 was not inferior to continued treatment with infliximab originator. The NOR-SWITCH extension trial aimed to assess efficacy, safety and immunogenicity in patients on CT-P13 throughout the 78-week study period (maintenance group) vs patients switched to CT-P13 at week 52 (switch group).

Primary Outcome: disease worsening during follow-up based on disease specific composite measures. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/joim.12880DOI Listing
February 2019

Factory and construction work is associated with an increased risk of severe lumbar spinal stenosis on MRI: A case control analysis within the wakayama spine study.

Am J Ind Med 2019 Feb 14. Epub 2019 Feb 14.

MRC Lifecourse Epidemiology Unit, Southampton General Hospital, Southampton, Hampshire, United Kingdom.

Background: To explore the association of MRI-diagnosed severe lumbar spinal stenosis with occupation.

Methods: Occupational data were collected by questionnaire and all participants underwent spine MRI scans using the same protocol. Central lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) was graded qualitatively. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajim.22957DOI Listing
February 2019

Synovial Tissue Sampling in Rheumatological Practice-Past Developments and Future Perspectives.

Authors:
Frances C Humby

Front Med (Lausanne) 2019 29;6. Epub 2019 Jan 29.

William Harvey Research Institute, Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London, London, United Kingdom.

Synovial biopsies are performed in routine clinical care in order to refine diagnosis as well as within a research setting. Progress in the development of minimally invasive synovial sampling methods in the last century has accelerated and facilitated novel insights into disease pathogenesis. This review discusses the development of synovial biopsy techniques as well as examining the three currently most commonly used approaches: arthroscopic, blind needle biopsy and ultrasound guided approaches. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fmed.2019.00004DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6361834PMC
January 2019