8 results match your criteria Area[Journal]

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A spectrum of methods for a spectrum of risk: Generating evidence to understand and reduce urban risk in sub-Saharan Africa.

Area (Oxf) 2019 Sep 9;51(3):586-594. Epub 2018 Dec 9.

Department of Geography University of Portsmouth Portsmouth UK.

Many African towns and cities face a range of hazards, which can best be described as representing a "spectrum of risk" of events that can cause death, illness or injury, and impoverishment. Yet despite the growing numbers of people living in African urban centres, the extent and relative severity of these different risks is poorly understood. This paper provides a rationale for using a spectrum of methods to address this spectrum of risk, and demonstrates the utility of mixed-methods approaches in planning for resilience. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/area.12510DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6774315PMC
September 2019

Is migration in later life good for wellbeing? A longitudinal study of ageing and selectivity of internal migration.

Area (Oxf) 2018 Dec 17;50(4):492-500. Epub 2018 May 17.

School of Social and Political Science University of Edinburgh Edinburgh UK.

Migration scholarship has recently paid attention to lifecourse and non-economic effects of moving house. Yet consideration of the effects of internal migration in later life has been relatively neglected despite their implications for social and spatial inequalities. Thus we address two questions: how trajectories of wellbeing in later life vary for movers and non-movers, and how the event of moving affects wellbeing. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/area.12428DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6282955PMC
December 2018
1 Read

Mapping the interview transcript: Identifying spatial policy areas from daily working practices.

Area (Oxf) 2018 Dec 24;50(4):529-541. Epub 2017 Nov 24.

School of Geography and Planning Cardiff University Cardiff UK.

An interview transcript can be a rich source of geographical references whose potential are not always fully realised in their conventional analysis. Geo-referencing techniques can be used to assign a spatial footprint to place names, adding value to these data and allowing the geographic information within them to be exploited when coupled with GIS technology. This paper discusses a method of analysing and visualising interview transcripts in order to understand the spatial extent of public policy practitioners' activities. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/area.12408
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/area.12408DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6282570PMC
December 2018
10 Reads

The body-space relations of research(ed) on bodies: The experiences of becoming participant researchers.

Area (Oxf) 2018 Jun 10;50(2):283-290. Epub 2017 Jul 10.

Faculty of Wellbeing Education and Language Studies Walton Hall Kents Hill Milton Keynes UK.

This paper heeds calls for reflections on how the research field is defined through embodied socio-spatial presence and immediacy. Focusing on classroom "body-training" observations that were part of a larger qualitative research project, and on the field notes and reflections of three researchers, we explore the transition from observer-researchers to participant-researchers. That is, we explore how, by researching others, we unexpectedly became researched on as our own bodies became instruments in the research process and were used to elicit knowledge on embodied learning, body-mapping and corporeal trace. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/area.12367DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6001647PMC
June 2018
2 Reads

Connectivity as a multiple: In, with and as "nature".

Authors:
Timothy Hodgetts

Area (Oxf) 2018 03 24;50(1):83-90. Epub 2017 May 24.

School of Geography and the Environment University of Oxford Oxford UK.

Connectivity is a central concept in contemporary geographies of nature, but the concept is often understood and utilised in plural ways. This is problematic because of the separation, rather than the confusion, of these different approaches. While the various understandings of connectivity are rarely considered as working together, the connections between them have significant implications. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/area.12353DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5873400PMC
March 2018
1 Read

On absence and abundance: biography as method in archival research.

Authors:
Jake Hodder

Area (Oxf) 2017 12 1;49(4):452-459. Epub 2017 Mar 1.

School of Geography University of Nottingham Nottingham NG7 2RD.

Geographical scholarship has rightly problematised the act of archival research, showing how the practice of archiving is not only concerned with how a society collectively remembers, but also forgets. As such, the dominant motif for discussing historical methods in geography has been through the lens of absence: the archive is a space of 'traces', 'fragments' and 'ghosts'. In this paper I suggest that the focus on incompleteness and partiality, while true, may also belie what many geographers working in archives find their greatest difficulty: an overwhelming volume of source materials. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/area.12329DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5765836PMC
December 2017
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The emotional challenges of conducting in-depth research into significant health issues in health geography: reflections on emotional labour, fieldwork and life course.

Authors:
Sarah McGarrol

Area (Oxf) 2017 12 9;49(4):436-442. Epub 2017 May 9.

Department of Public Health and Policy Health Protection Research Unit in Gastrointestinal Infection (NIHR) Farr Institute @ The Health eResearch Centre University of Liverpool Liverpool L69 3GL.

Emotions are increasingly being recognised and integrated into human geography and it has been highlighted that focusing on the 'interrelatedness' of the research process is crucial. By contextualising fieldwork within the life course of the researcher, greater acknowledgement of the 'emotional labour' involved in fieldwork can be highlighted. The author reflects on the 'emotional geographies' of conducting PhD research into significant health issues with participants who had recently suffered a heart attack in Fife, Scotland. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/area.12347DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5765835PMC
December 2017
1 Read

Creative construction: crafting, negotiating and performing urban food sharing landscapes.

Area (Oxf) 2017 12 26;49(4):510-518. Epub 2017 Apr 26.

Department of Geography School of Natural Sciences Trinity College Dublin Dublin Ireland.

Activities utilising online tools are an increasingly visible part of our everyday lives, providing new subjects, objects and relationships - essentially new landscapes - for research, as well as new conceptual and methodological challenges for researchers. In parallel, calls for collaborative interdisciplinary, even transdisciplinary, research are increasing. Yet practical guidance and critical reflection on the challenges and opportunities of conducting collaborative research online, particularly in emergent areas, is limited. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/area.12340DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5765837PMC
December 2017
4 Reads
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