9 results match your criteria Ardeola-international Journal Of Ornithology[Journal]

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Unexpected dietary preferences of Eurasian Spoonbills in the Dutch Wadden Sea: spoonbills mainly feed on small fish not shrimp.

J Ornithol 2018 24;159(3):839-849. Epub 2018 Mar 24.

1Conservation Ecology Group, Groningen Institute for Evolutionary Life Sciences (GELIFES), University of Groningen, P.O. Box 11103, 9700 CC Groningen, The Netherlands.

After an historical absence, over the last decades Eurasian Spoonbills have returned to breed on the barrier islands of the Wadden Sea. The area offers an abundance of predator-free nesting habitat, low degrees of disturbance, and an extensive intertidal feeding area with increasing stocks of brown shrimp , the assumed main prey of . Nevertheless, newly established and expanding colonies of spoonbills have surprisingly quickly reached plateau levels. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10336-018-1551-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6435024PMC

Exploring host and geographical shifts in transmission of haemosporidians in a Palaearctic passerine wintering in India.

Authors:
Farah Ishtiaq

J Ornithol 2017 Jul;158(3):869-874

Centre for Ecological Sciences, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012, India.

This is the first molecular study of avian haemosporidia diversity in wintering populations of the Blyth's Reed Warbler () in India that explores the extent of host and geographical shifts in transmission areas. In 156 birds, six lineages (37.8%; 95% CI 30. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10336-017-1444-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6038909PMC

Temperature and aridity determine body size conformity to Bergmann's rule independent of latitudinal differences in a tropical environment.

J Ornithol 2018 27;159(4):1053-1062. Epub 2018 Jun 27.

2School of Biology, University of St Andrews, Harold Mitchell Building, St Andrews, Fife KY16 9TH UK.

Bergmann's rule, defined as the tendency for endotherms to be larger in colder environments, is a biophysical generalization of body size variation that is frequently tested along latitudinal gradients, even though latitude is only a proxy for temperature variation. We test whether variation in temperature and aridity determine avian body size conformity to Bergmann's rule independent of latitude differences, using the ubiquitous Common Bulbul , along a West African environmental gradient. We trapped 538 birds in 22 locations between latitudes 6 and 13°N in Nigeria, and estimated average body surface area to mass ratio per location. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10336-018-1574-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6417377PMC

Fecal sacs do not increase nest predation in a ground nester.

J Ornithol 2018 29;159(4):985-990. Epub 2018 May 29.

Groningen Institute for Evolutionary Life Sciences, University of Groningen, 9700 CC Groningen, The Netherlands.

Most altricial birds remove their nestlings' feces from the nest, but the evolutionary forces driving this behavior are poorly understood. A possible adaptive explanation for this could be that birds avoid the attraction of nest predators to their nests due to the visual or olfactory cues produced by feces (nest predation hypothesis). This hypothesis has received contrasting support indicating that additional experimental studies are needed, particularly with respect to the visual component of fecal sacs. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10336-018-1566-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6417374PMC

Excretion patterns of coccidian oocysts and nematode eggs during the reproductive season in Northern Bald Ibis ().

J Ornithol 2016;157:839-851. Epub 2016 Feb 4.

Core Facility Konrad Lorenz Forschungsstelle for Behaviour and Cognition, University of Vienna, Fischerau 11, 4645 Grünau im Almtal, Austria ; Animal and Environment Research Group, Department of Life Sciences, Anglia Ruskin University, Cambridge, UK.

Individual reproductive success largely depends on the ability to optimize behaviour, immune function and the physiological stress response. We have investigated correlations between behaviour, faecal steroid metabolites, immune parameters, parasite excretion patterns and reproductive output in a critically endangered avian species, the Northern Bald Ibis (). In particular, we related haematocrit, heterophil/lymphocyte ratio, excreted immune-reactive corticosterone metabolites and social behaviour with parasite excretion and two individual fitness parameters, namely, number of eggs laid and number of fledglings. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10336-015-1317-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4986318PMC
February 2016
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Steroids in the Avian Brain: Heterogeneity across Space and Time.

J Ornithol 2015 Dec 13;156(Suppl 1):419-424. Epub 2015 Mar 13.

Department of Integrative Biology and Physiology & Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90290, USA.

Sex steroids influence a diversity of neural and behavioral endpoints in birds, including some that have little to do with reproduction per se. Recent advances in neurochemistry and molecular biology further indicate that the avian brain is comprised of a network of unique sex steroid microenvironments. Factors involved in steroid synthesis and metabolism are present in the avian brain with expression levels that vary from region to region and with activities that are, in some cases, subject to regulation over relatively slow or rapid time intervals. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10336-015-1184-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4767503PMC
December 2015

From neurons to nests: nest-building behaviour as a model in behavioural and comparative neuroscience.

J Ornithol 2015;156(Suppl 1):133-143. Epub 2015 Apr 12.

School of Biology, University of St Andrews, Harold Mitchell Building, St Andrews, KY16 9TH Scotland, UK.

Despite centuries of observing the nest building of most extant bird species, we know surprisingly little about how birds build nests and, specifically, how the avian brain controls nest building. Here, we argue that nest building in birds may be a useful model behaviour in which to study how the brain controls behaviour. Specifically, we argue that nest building as a behavioural model provides a unique opportunity to study not only the mechanisms through which the brain controls behaviour within individuals of a single species but also how evolution may have shaped the brain to produce interspecific variation in nest-building behaviour. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10336-015-1214-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4986315PMC

Socialized sub-groups in a temporary stable Raven flock?

J Ornithol 2012 Aug;153(1 Suppl):97-104

University Vienna, Vienna, Austria; Konrad Lorenz Research Station, Gruenau, Austria.

A complex social life serves as one of the main driving forces behind the evolution of higher cognitive abilities in vertebrates. In birds, however, data are primarily derived from captive animals, which strongly contrast with free-flying birds in terms of the number of interaction partners as well as available space. In captivity, Common Raven , nonbreeder groups show strong social bonds and complex tactical manoeuvring, whereas wild non-breeders are thought to resemble anonymous aggregations. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10336-011-0810-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4398859PMC
August 2012
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Neural systems for vocal learning in birds and humans: a synopsis.

Authors:
Erich D Jarvis

J Ornithol 2007 Dec;148(1):35-44

Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA e-mail:

I present here a synopsis on a hypothesis that I derived on the similarities and differences of vocal learning systems in vocal learning birds for learned song and in humans for spoken language. This hypothesis states that vocal learning birds-songbirds, parrots, and hummingbirds-and humans have comparable specialized forebrain regions that are not found in their close vocal non-learning relatives. In vocal learning birds, these forebrain regions appear to be divided into two sub-pathways, a vocal motor pathway mainly used to produce learned vocalizations and a pallial-basal-ganglia-thalamic loop mainly used to learn and modify the vocalizations. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10336-007-0243-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2726745PMC
December 2007
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