1,077 results match your criteria Archives of family medicine[Journal]


Phytophotodermatitis: a sometimes difficult diagnosis.

Arch Fam Med 2000 Nov-Dec;9(10):1195-6

Department of Dermatology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, USA.

Phytophotodermatitis may not be diagnosed when a patient is seen with erythema and vesicles on the skin. However, with the appropriate medical history, the diagnosis of phytophotodermatitis is easily made. Arch Fam Med. Read More

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January 2001
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Case description of ascariasis.

Arch Fam Med 2000 Nov-Dec;9(10):1193-4

Department of Family and Community Medicine, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, The Bowman Gray Campus, Medical Center Boulevard, Winston-Salem, NC 27157-1084, USA.

Ascaris lumbricoides are among the medically important worms belonging to the phylum Nematoda (roundworms) that are parasites of the human gastrointestinal tract. Despite current sanitation and hygiene standards in the United States, infection due to intestinal roundworms is not uncommon in children and adults. A high index of suspicion is warranted as patients may present anywhere along a spectrum of illness from asymptomatic to acutely ill. Read More

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January 2001

Microscopic polyangiitis in a pediatric patient.

Arch Fam Med 2000 Nov-Dec;9(10):1189-92

Division of Allergy, Immunology, & Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Buffalo General Hospital, State University of New York at Buffalo, 100 High St, Buffalo, NY 14203, USA.

Microscopic polyangiitis (MPA), previously called hypersensitivity angiitis, is a systemic necrotizing vasculitis that involves many organ systems including the skin, joints, kidneys, and lungs. Microscopic polyangiitis most commonly affects adults in the fourth and fifth decades of life, with only a few cases reported in children. We describe a pediatric patient with microscopic polyangiitis. Read More

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January 2001

Advance care planning.

Arch Fam Med 2000 Nov-Dec;9(10):1181-7

Project to Educate Physicians on End of Life Care, Interdisciplinary Program in Professionalism and Human Rights, Northwestern University Medical School, 750 N Lake Shore Drive, Suite 601, Chicago, IL 60611, USA.

Advance care planning is the process of planning for future medical care, particularly for the event when the patient is unable to make his or her own decisions. It should be a routine part of standard medical care and, when possible, conducted with the proxy decision maker present. It is helpful to think of the process as a stepwise approach. Read More

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January 2001

Gaps in end-of-life care.

Arch Fam Med 2000 Nov-Dec;9(10):1176-80

Education for Physicians on End-of Life Care, Interdisciplinary Program for Professionalism and Human Rights, Northwestern University Medical School,750 N Lake Shore Dr, Suite 601, Chicago, IL 60611.

Every year, more than 1 million Americans die of different causes. Some die easily and comfortably. Others die with a great deal of suffering and distress. Read More

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January 2001
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Enhancing drug compliance in lipid-lowering treatment.

Arch Fam Med 2000 Nov-Dec;9(10):1169-75

Department of Preventive Medicine and Community Health, State University of New York Health Science Center at Brooklyn, 450 Clarkson Ave, Box 43, Brooklyn, NY 11203, USA.

Hyperlipidemia and the atherosclerotic conditions that result from it are well recognized as major contributors to coronary heart disease (CHD). Fortunately, several large-scale clinical trials have shown that there are effective treatments that can substantially lower atherogenic lipid levels and thereby reduce the risk of CHD mortality and morbidity. However, duplication of these dramatic trial results can be negatively affected in "real life" clinical practice by an important issue: compliance. Read More

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January 2001

The physician-patient relationship: three psychodynamic concepts that can be applied to primary care.

Authors:
P E Goldberg

Arch Fam Med 2000 Nov-Dec;9(10):1164-8

Psychodynamic concepts can be used to help understand and manage certain difficulties that arise within the physician-patient relationship. The concepts of transference, countertransference, and action (in the form of acting out and enactment) are discussed. A case description is included to show how these concepts apply to the day-to-day practice of primary care medicine. Read More

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January 2001

Racial and ethnic disparities in perceptions of physician style and trust.

Arch Fam Med 2000 Nov-Dec;9(10):1156-63

Department of Family Medicine, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, 98105-6099, USA.

Context: While pervasive racial and ethnic inequalities in access to care and health status have been documented, potential underlying causes, such as patients' perceptions of their physicians, have not been explored as thoroughly.

Objective: To assess whether a person's race or ethnicity is associated with low trust in the physician.

Design, Setting, And Participants: Data were obtained from the 1996 through 1997 Community Tracking Survey, a nationally representative sample. Read More

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January 2001

Visit-specific expectations and patient-centered outcomes: a literature review.

Arch Fam Med 2000 Nov-Dec;9(10):1148-55

Center for Health Services Research in Primary Care, Durham VAMC, NC, USA.

Background: Primary care patients often have certain expectations when visiting physicians, many of which may be undetected. These unmet expectations can affect outcomes such as satisfaction with care. We performed a formal literature review to examine the effect of fulfillment of patients' visit-specific expectations on their satisfaction as well as on health status and compliance. Read More

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January 2001

The neurosurgical treatment of epilepsy.

Arch Fam Med 2000 Nov-Dec;9(10):1142-7

Department of Neurology, Tampa General Hospital Epilepsy Center, University of South Florida, USA.

Despite the new advancements in antiepileptic drug development, thousands of people with epilepsy will remain intractable to medication. For a considerable proportion of these people, epilepsy surgery is a consideration for better control of their seizures. Resective surgery is now standard practice for patients with medication-refractory epilepsy. Read More

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January 2001
2 Reads

New antiepileptic drugs: into the new millennium.

Arch Fam Med 2000 Nov-Dec;9(10):1135-41

Department of Neurology, Tampa General Hospital, University of South Florida, USA.

There has been an explosion of new antiepileptic drug availability for physicians to treat patients with recurrent seizures. Principal antiepileptic drugs consisted of 6 key agents for both generalized and partial epilepsy for nearly 8 decades. Since 1993, the availability of newer "second-generation" agents has nearly doubled the armamentarium available for the 2. Read More

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January 2001

Rofecoxib, a new cyclooxygenase 2 inhibitor, shows sustained efficacy, comparable with other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs: a 6-week and a 1-year trial in patients with osteoarthritis. Osteoarthritis Studies Group.

Arch Fam Med 2000 Nov-Dec;9(10):1124-34

Division of Clinical Immunology and Rheumatology, University of Alabama, Birmingham, USA.

Introduction: Rofecoxib, a cyclooxygenase 2 inhibitor (sometimes known as a specific cyclooxygenase 2 inhibitor or Coxib), is used in osteoarthritis (OA). Published information indicates rofecoxib's improved gastrointestinal safety profile over nonselective nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents (NSAIDs).

Objective: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of rofecoxib in treating OA in 2 studies. Read More

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January 2001

Athletes resuming activity after infectious mononucleosis.

Authors:
K E Burroughs

Arch Fam Med 2000 Nov-Dec;9(10):1122-3

Moses Cone Health System, Greensboro, NC, USA.

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January 2001

Selection bias from requiring patients to give consent to examine data for health services research.

Arch Fam Med 2000 Nov-Dec;9(10):1111-8

Department of Family Practice, Medical College of Virginia, Virginia Commonwealth University, 3712 Charles Stewart Dr, Fairfax, VA 22033, USA.

Background: New rulings nationwide require health services researchers to obtain patient consent before examining personally identifiable data. A selection bias may result if consenting patients differ from those who do not give consent.

Objective: To compare patients who consent, refuse, and do not answer. Read More

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January 2001
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Why family practice research?

Authors:
B D Weiss

Arch Fam Med 2000 Nov-Dec;9(10):1105-7

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January 2001

A comparison of family medicine research in research intense and less intense institutions.

Arch Fam Med 2000 Nov-Dec;9(10):1100-4

Department of Family Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, 295 Calhoun St, PO Box 250192, Charleston, SC 29425, USA.

Background: Family medicine is a relatively new specialty that has been trying to develop a research base for 30 years. It is unclear how institutional research success and emphasis have affected the research productivity of family medicine departments.

Objective: To examine the research infrastructure, productivity, and barriers to productivity in academic family medicine in research intense and less intense institutions. Read More

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January 2001

Who gets screened during pregnancy for partner violence?

Arch Fam Med 2000 Nov-Dec;9(10):1093-9

Department of Maternal and Child Health, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, CB #7400, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7400, USA.

Context: Despite recommendations to screen prenatal care patients for partner violence, the prevalence of such screening is unknown.

Objectives: To estimate the statewide prevalence of partner violence screening during prenatal care among a representative sample of North Carolina women with newborns and to compare women screened for partner violence with women not screened.

Design, Setting, And Participants: This investigation examines data gathered through the North Carolina Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System, a random sample of more than 2600 recently postpartum women who were delivered of newborns between July 1997 and December 1998. Read More

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January 2001

Factors associated with emergency department utilization for nonurgent pediatric problems.

Arch Fam Med 2000 Nov-Dec;9(10):1086-92

Department of Family Medicine, Medical College of Ohio, 1015 Garden Lake Pkwy, Toledo, OH 43614, USA.

Objective: To identify specific caretaker and utilization characteristics predictive of the use of the emergency departments (EDs) for nonurgent reasons. Each year more than 20 million children in the United States seek medical care in EDs. Between one third and one half of these visits are for nonurgent reasons. Read More

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January 2001

Self-reported health, illness, and self-care among finnish physicians: a national survey.

Arch Fam Med 2000 Nov-Dec;9(10):1079-85

Research and Development Centre for Occupational Health Services, Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, PO Box 93, 70701 Kuopio, Finland.

Background: Physicians' health problems have been discussed mainly in relation to substance abuse and psychiatric disorders. In this study, the prevalence of common chronic diseases and their treatment were determined.

Objective: To find differences in self-reported health status, amount of sick leave, and the use of health services among physicians according to sex and specialty. Read More

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January 2001
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Risks associated with the practice of traditional Chinese medicine: an Australian study.

Arch Fam Med 2000 Nov-Dec;9(10):1071-8

Research Unit for Complementary Medicine, Faculty of Health, University of Western Sydney, PO Box 555, Campbelltown, New South Wales 2560, Australia.

Objective: To investigate the nature and frequency of adverse events that occur as a result of the practice of traditional Chinese medicine (acupuncture and Chinese herbal medicine) in Australia.

Methods: Data on adverse events were obtained as part of a comprehensive survey of all occupational health groups, government-registered and unregistered, who practiced traditional Chinese medicine or 1 of its main modalities.

Results: Practitioners reported numerous adverse events arising from the application of acupuncture (including fainting, nausea and vomiting, and increased pain), or the consumption of Chinese herbal medicines (including direct toxic effects and allergic reactions). Read More

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January 2001
2 Reads

Clues to early Alzheimer dementia in the outpatient setting.

Authors:
C Holzer G Warshaw

Arch Fam Med 2000 Nov-Dec;9(10):1066-70

Department of Geriatric Medicine, University of Cincinnati, Ohio, USA.

Background: As the elderly population booms and the prevalence of dementia soars, it becomes imperative that primary care physicians recognize early dementia within their own practices. Early recognition and diagnosis of dementia will allow appropriate intervention and treatment to improve morbidity.

Objective: To examine the most common symptoms associated with early Alzheimer disease (AD), as presented by patients and their families, and to compare these with the recommendations of the "7-Minute Screen" by Solomon et al for the identification of AD and the recommendations of the Agency for Health Care Policy and Research (AHCPR) for the early recognition of dementia. Read More

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January 2001
14 Reads

Competing demands from physical problems: effect on initiating and completing depression care over 6 months.

Arch Fam Med 2000 Nov-Dec;9(10):1059-64

Department of Family Medicine, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Denver, USA.

Objective And Design: To evaluate a cohort of patients with major depression to examine the effect of competing demands on depression care during multiple visits over 6 months.

Participants And Setting: Ninety-two patients with 5 or more symptoms of depression and no recent depression treatment were evaluated by 12 primary care physicians in 6 practices in the usual-care arm of an effectiveness trial of the Agency for Health Care Policy and Research Depression Guidelines.

Main Outcome Measure: Treatment was considered to be initiated if the patient reported starting a guideline-concordant antidepressant medication or making a visit for specialty counseling. Read More

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January 2001

Can depression treatment in primary care reduce disability? A stepped care approach.

Arch Fam Med 2000 Nov-Dec;9(10):1052-8

Center for Health Studies, Group Health Cooperative of Puget Sound, Center for Health Studies, Met Park II, 1730 Minor Ave, Suite 1600, Seattle, WA 98101-1448, USA.

Objective: To assess effects of stepped collaborative care depression intervention on disability.

Design: Randomized controlled trial.

Setting: Four primary care clinics of a large health maintenance organization. Read More

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January 2001
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Health behaviors, health status, and access to and use of health care: a population-based study of lesbian, bisexual, and heterosexual women.

Arch Fam Med 2000 Nov-Dec;9(10):1043-51

Department of Medicine, Division of General Internal Medicine and Health Services Research, University of California, 911 Broxton Ave, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA.

Background: There is a dearth of validated information about lesbian and bisexual women's health. To better understand some of these issues, we used population-based data to assess variations in health behaviors, health status, and access to and use of health care based on sexual orientation.

Methods: Our study population was drawn from a population-based sample of women, the 1997 Los Angeles County Health Survey. Read More

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January 2001
7 Reads

Profile of users of real-time interactive teleconference clinical consultations.

Arch Fam Med 2000 Nov-Dec;9(10):1036-40

Eastern Area Health Education Center/Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC 27836, USA.

Background: Real-time interactive teleconference clinical consultations are envisioned for increasing accessibility to medical care by patients whose demographics restrict care. There are no published studies, however, describing referrals and the referring practitioners, patients, and specialists participating in these consultations.

Objective: To assess characteristics of participants of interactive teleconference clinical consultations. Read More

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January 2001

Symptom severity and perceptions in subjects with panic attacks.

Authors:
D A Katerndahl

Arch Fam Med 2000 Nov-Dec;9(10):1028-35

Department of Family Practice, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, 7703 Floyd Curl Dr, MSC-7795, San Antonio, TX 78229-3900, USA.

Objectives: To (1) identify aspects that defined the self-perceived worst panic attack, (2) determine how subjects with panic attacks perceive symptoms compared with control subjects, and (3) determine the role of symptom perceptions in seeking care for the worst panic attack.

Design: Cross-sectional survey.

Setting: Community-based. Read More

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January 2001

A survey of skin cancer screening in the primary care setting: a comparison with other cancer screenings.

Arch Fam Med 2000 Nov-Dec;9(10):1022-7

Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, 1275 York Ave, New York, NY 10021, USA.

Objective: To determine primary care physicians' perceived importance and frequency of performance of skin cancer screening in comparison with other cancer screening examinations.

Design: Descriptive survey study.

Participants: Five thousand US family physicians and internal medicine specialists randomly selected from the Official American Board of Medical Specialists Directory of Board-Certified Medical Specialists. Read More

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January 2001

A survey of primary care physician practice patterns and adherence to acute low back problem guidelines.

Arch Fam Med 2000 Nov-Dec;9(10):1015-21

Department of Family and Community Medicine, University of Illinois College of Medicine, Rockford, USA.

Objective: This study evaluated physicians' self-reported management of acute low back problems in adults and adherence with published guidelines.

Design: Self-administered written survey based on the US Agency for Health Care Policy and Research (now the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality) guideline on acute low back problems in adults.

Setting: A region of northern Illinois with a population around 250 000 and encompassing a medium-sized city. Read More

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January 2001

Prevalence and nature of orofacial and dental problems in family medicine.

Arch Fam Med 2000 Nov-Dec;9(10):1009-12

Department of Oral Medicine, Carolinas Medical Center, PO Box 32861, Charlotte, NC 28232-2861, USA.

Objective: To determine the prevalence and nature of orofacial and dental problems in 2 family medicine practices.

Design: Prospective, cross-sectional analysis of consecutive patient visits.

Setting: Urban and rural family medicine practices. Read More

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January 2001

Prescription medication costs: a study of physician familiarity.

Arch Fam Med 2000 Nov-Dec;9(10):1002-7

Division of Clinical and Administrative Pharmacy, College of Pharmacy, The University of Iowa, S411 Pharmacy Bldg, Iowa City, IA 52242, USA.

Background: Studies in the past 25 years have suggested that physicians are not familiar with the costs of common prescription medications.

Objectives: To determine physician familiarity with the cost of common prescription medications and to determine the value physicians place on knowing information regarding the cost of medications.

Design: Survey. Read More

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January 2001

Does drug treatment of patients with acute bronchitis reduce additional care seeking? Evidence from the Practice Partner Research Network.

Arch Fam Med 2000 Nov-Dec;9(10):997-1001

Department of Family Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, 295 Calhoun St, PO Box 250192, Charleston, SC 29425.

Background: Considerable discussion has focused on treatment methods for patients with acute bronchitis.

Objective: To examine whether antibiotic or bronchodilator treatment is associated with differences in follow-up visit rates for patients with acute bronchitis.

Methods: A retrospective medical chart review was conducted for patients with a new episode of acute bronchitis over a 3-year period in the Practice Partner Research Network (29,248 episodes in 24,753 patients). Read More

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January 2001

Costs of illness due to Bordetella pertussis in families.

Arch Fam Med 2000 Nov-Dec;9(10):989-96

Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration, HFM 475, Suite 370N, 1401 Rockville Pike, Rockville, MD 20852.

Objective: To assess costs of pertussis morbidity among families in a community setting.

Design: Prospective survey.

Results: Sixty-nine families (87 individuals) were studied. Read More

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January 2001

Effectiveness of pseudoephedrine plus acetaminophen for treatment of symptoms attributed to the paranasal sinuses associated with the common cold.

Arch Fam Med 2000 Nov-Dec;9(10):979-85

Department of Internal Medicine, Hackensack University Medical Center, 20 Prospect Ave, Suite 507, Hackensack, NJ 07601.

Background: Little data exist on the cause and treatment of subfacial pain and pressure and other discomfort attributed to the paranasal sinuses that develop early during the course of the common cold. The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy of the combination of pseudoephedrine hydrochloride with acetaminophen for the treatment of early symptoms during colds, which are attributed by the patient to the sinuses.

Methods: Four hundred thirty subjects (216, pseudoephedrine and acetaminophen recipients; 214, placebo recipients) with cold symptoms of 48 hours or less who reported overall "sinus" symptoms of at least moderate severity were enrolled in this randomized double-blind placebo-controlled 2-dose study. Read More

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January 2001

Using geographic information systems to understand health care access.

Arch Fam Med 2000 Nov-Dec;9(10):971-8

Department of Family and Community Medicine, University of Missouri-Columbia, USA.

Background: Determining a community's health care access needs and testing interventions to improve access are difficult. This challenge is compounded by the task of translating the relevant data into a format that is clear and persuasive to policymakers and funding agencies. Geographic information systems can analyze and transform complex data from various sources into maps that illustrate problems effortlessly for experts and nonexperts. Read More

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January 2001

Alcohol consumption and compliance among inner-city minority patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

Arch Fam Med 2000 Nov-Dec;9(10):964-70

Department of Family Medicine, Charles R. Drew University of Science and Medicine, Los Angeles, CA, USA.

Objective: To examine the relation between alcohol consumption and self-reported compliance with prescribed therapies for type 2 diabetes mellitus among underserved minority patients.

Design: Cross-sectional sampling of consecutive patients with diabetes was performed following routine visits to their primary care physicians. Interviewers measured compliance using the Summary of Diabetes Self-Care Questionnaire and alcohol use using the timeline followback method and the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test. Read More

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January 2001
15 Reads

Living in medicine: med school after 50 years plus 2 weeks

Authors:
Spudis

Arch Fam Med 2000 Nov;9(10):1197

Wake Forest Medical School and Forsyth Medical Center, Medical Center Boulevard, Winston-Salem, NC 27157-1052, USA.

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November 2000

Authors' comment

Authors:
West Gustke

Arch Fam Med 2000 Nov;9(10):1040

Greenville, NC.

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November 2000

Special selection: frosted branch angiitis with ocular toxoplasmosis

Authors:
Ysasaga Davis

Arch Fam Med 2000 Nov;9(10):962-3

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November 2000

Dear readers

Authors:
DeAngelis

Arch Fam Med 2000 Nov;9(10):961

Chicago, IL.

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November 2000

Dear readers

Authors:
Bowman

Arch Fam Med 2000 Nov;9(10):957

Editor.

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November 2000

Improving quality or shifting diagnoses? What happens when antibiotic prescribing is reduced for acute bronchitis?

Authors:
W J Hueston K Slott

Arch Fam Med 2000 Sep-Oct;9(9):933-5

Department of Family Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, 295 Calhoun St, PO Box 250192, Charleston, SC 29425, USA.

Background: A quality improvement project in an academic practice demonstrated a reduction in antibiotic prescribing for acute bronchitis. However, it was unclear whether this represented a reduction in antibiotic use or whether physicians assigned new diagnoses to the same patients to avoid scrutiny and continue to use antibiotic therapy.

Objective: To examine whether a substantial amount of diagnostic shifting occurred while antibiotic prescribing for acute bronchitis decreased during a 14-month period (from January 1, 1996, to February 28, 1997). Read More

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November 2000

Are antibiotics necessary in the treatment of locally infected ingrown toenails?

Arch Fam Med 2000 Sep-Oct;9(9):930-2

Ankle and Foot Clinic, 1114 Broadway St, Longview, WA 98665, USA.

Context: A wide variety of generalists and specialists treat locally infected ingrown toenails, with perhaps the most common treatment regimen including resection of the nail border coupled with oral antibiotics.

Objective: To determine whether oral antibiotic therapy is beneficial as an adjunct to the phenol chemical matrixectomy in the treatment of infected ingrown toenails.

Design: We prospectively enrolled healthy patients with infected ingrown toenails. Read More

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November 2000
1 Read

False-positive and indeterminate human immunodeficiency virus test results in pregnant women.

Authors:
T I Doran E Parra

Arch Fam Med 2000 Sep-Oct;9(9):924-9

University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, Department of Pediatrics, San Antonio, TX 78229-3900, USA.

Guidelines from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Ga, recommend that all pregnant women be offered human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) testing to ensure that they have the opportunity to use currently available therapeutic interventions to reduce the risk infecting their offspring with HIV. These recommendations have resulted in an increased number of low-risk women being tested and a significant rise in the percentage of false-positive results from HIV antibody screening tests and ambiguous (indeterminate) findings from confirmatory tests. Women receiving such results are generally in emotional turmoil yet must make treatment choices if they prove to be infected. Read More

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November 2000

A family physician's perspective on picornavirus infections in primary care.

Authors:
J L Temte

Arch Fam Med 2000 Sep-Oct;9(9):921-2

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November 2000

Picornavirus infections: a primer for the practitioner.

Arch Fam Med 2000 Sep-Oct;9(9):913-20

University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, 4200 E Ninth Ave, Box C227, Denver, CO 80262.

Picornaviruses, including the rhinoviruses and enteroviruses, are common causes of infections in the developed world and the most common reason for prescribing antibiotics. These ubiquitous pathogens are increasingly being recognized in more serious illnesses, such as sinusitis, exacerbations of asthma, exacerbations of cystic fibrosis, myocarditis, meningitis, and severe neonatal sepsislike disease. Recent advances have improved our ability to diagnosis and treat these infections. Read More

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November 2000

Tamoxifen's clinical applications: old and new.

Authors:
A U Buzdar

Arch Fam Med 2000 Sep-Oct;9(9):906-12

Department of Breast Medical Oncology, M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77037, USA.

The American Cancer Society estimates that this year more than 180, 000 women in the United States will develop breast cancer and more than 40,000 women will die of the disease. According to a National Cancer Institute model, 5 years of preventive therapy with tamoxifen citrate reduced the risk of invasive breast cancer by 49% (P<.00001) in women at increased risk for breast cancer. Read More

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November 2000

Use of simvastatin treatment in patients with combined hyperlipidemia in clinical practice. For the Simvastatin Combined Hyperlipidemia Registry Group.

Arch Fam Med 2000 Sep-Oct;9(9):898-905

Melbourne Internal Medicine Associates, 200 E Sheridan Rd, Melbourne, FL 32901, USA.

Objective: To describe and understand current care of simvastatin-treated patients with combined hyperlipidemia in routine clinical practice.

Design: A 6-month prospective observational study. Demographics, simvastatin dosage, cardiac risk factors, and lipid profile were collected from August 1997 to December 1998 at 20 sites (230 patients) across the United States. Read More

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November 2000

Barriers and benefits to leisure-time physical activity among older Mexican Americans.

Arch Fam Med 2000 Sep-Oct;9(9):892-7

University of Texas Health Sciences Center, 7703 Floyd Curl Dr, San Antonio, TX 78284-7795, USA.

Objective: To identify the perceived barriers to and benefits of leisure-time physical activity among older Mexican Americans (MA) and European Americans (EA).

Design: Cross-sectional survey using in-home interviews of subjects.

Setting: Subjects recruited from 10 family practice offices in South Texas that are part of a practice-based research network. Read More

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November 2000
3 Reads

SOAP: solutions to often asked problems. Chlamydia trachomatis testing.

Authors:
C E Reust

Arch Fam Med 2000 Sep-Oct;9(9):885-6

Department of Family and Community Medicine, Center for Family Medicine Science, University of Missouri, Columbia, USA.

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November 2000