5,076 results match your criteria Archives of environmental health[Journal]


Exposure of a Cree population living near mine tailings in northern Quebec (Canada) to metals and metalloids.

Arch Environ Health 2004 Dec;59(12):732-41

Institut National de Santé Publique du Québec, Canada.

The authors investigated the effect of residues from copper- and gold-mining on the Cree population of Oujé-Bougoumou, located 560 km north of Quebec City, Canada. Subjects (225) from Oujé-Bougoumou and a control population (100) completed a questionnaire on lifestyle and dietary habits and provided blood and urine samples for analysis. Geometric means of arsenic, lead, cadmium, and copper concentrations were not significantly different for subjects or controls 15 yr and older or children (8-14 yr old). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00039890409602960DOI Listing
December 2004
1 Read

Relationship between health status and psychological distress among the inhabitants in a methylmercury-polluted area in Japan.

Arch Environ Health 2004 Dec;59(12):725-31

Department of Public Health, Kumamoto University School of Medicine, Kumamoto, Japan.

This study examined the relationship between health parameters and psychological distress among inhabitants of methylmercury-polluted areas in Japan. The subjects were 133 inhabitants over the age of 40 yr living in two methylmercury-polluted villages. Information on demographic factors, health status, and mental health was obtained using questionnaires, including the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00039890409602959DOI Listing
December 2004
4 Reads

Medical assessment of the health effects of short leisure trips.

Arch Environ Health 2004 Dec;59(12):717-24

Department of Social and Environmental Medicine Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine Osaka, Japan.

Using responses to questionnaires and results of saliva samples from 40 women, the authors assessed the effects on health of participation in a short leisure trip (2 nights, 3 d) to Kyushu Island in Japan. They addressed transportation, sightseeing, and group activities during the tour, which might differ from participants' usual activities. Levels of the salivary endocrinological stress markers cortisol and chromogranin A (CgA) were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00039890409602958DOI Listing
December 2004
2 Reads

Association between exposure to cadmium and blood pressure in Japanese peoples.

Arch Environ Health 2004 Dec;59(12):711-6

Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Chiba, Japan.

The authors studied the effects of environmental cadmium exposure on blood pressure (BP). Subjects 1140 men and 1713 women, aged > or =50 yr lived in three areas of Japan considered "unpolluted" by cadmium. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate relationships between hypertension/nonhypertension and cadmium concentrations in blood (B-Cd) or urine (U-Cd). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00039890409602957DOI Listing
December 2004
1 Read

Development and reduction of hypertension and oxidative stress among detergent industry workers.

Arch Environ Health 2004 Dec;59(12):700-10

Department of Biology, University of Tarbiat Moalem Tehran, Iran.

Hypertension status and oxidative stress parameters were assessed in 291 workers (hypertensive workers were divided into three grades, non-equivalently) at two detergent production plants, one of which included enzymes in the detergent (n=138) and another which did not (n=153), and 45 control workers in another industry three times (at the time of employment, 7 yrs later at the time of installation of a filter system, and about 3 yrs later). Malondialdehyde (MDA) was measured by high-performance liquid chromatography, antioxidant enzymes and lipid status by ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometry, trace elements by atomic absorption spectroscopy, and blood pressure using an oscilometric device. Prior to filter system installation, enzyme-exposed workers had significantly higher MDA, antioxidant enzyme activities, and prevalence of hypertension, compared with controls. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00039890409602956DOI Listing
December 2004
1 Read

Evaluation of residential exposure to intermediate frequency magnetic fields.

Arch Environ Health 2004 Dec;59(12):693-9

Regional Environment Division, National Institute for Environmental Studies, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan.

The authors measured the exposure to intermediate-frequency (IF: 10 kHz to 30 MHz) electromagnetic fields (EMF) in residential environments. They developed a system to acquire and record waveforms of IF magnetic fields (MFs) and set 5 nanotesla (nT) for the trigger level of acquisition. They operated the system near power lines, railroads, and electrical appliances as possible sources of IF-MFs. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00039890409602955DOI Listing
December 2004
3 Reads

Determination of urinary trace elements (arsenic, copper, cadmium, manganese, lead, zinc, selenium) in patients with Blackfoot disease.

Arch Environ Health 2004 Dec;59(12):686-92

Graduate Institute of Occupational Safety, College of Health Science, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan.

To determine the relationship of arsenic, copper, cadmium, manganese, lead, zinc and selenium to Blackfoot disease (BFD, a peripheral vascular disorder endemic to areas of Taiwan, which has been linked to arsenic in drinking water) the authors measured the amount of these substances in urine from BFD patients, using atomic absorption spectrometry. Results indicate significantly higher amounts of urinary arsenic, copper, cadmium, manganese, and lead for BFD patients than for normal controls, also significantly lower urinary zinc and selenium. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00039890409602954DOI Listing
December 2004

Effectiveness of clean indoor air ordinances in controlling environmental tobacco smoke in restaurants.

Arch Environ Health 2004 Dec;59(12):677-85

Medical University of Ohio, Department of Public Health, Toledo, Ohio 43614-5803, USA.

Clean indoor air (CIA) ordinances in Toledo, Ohio, and Bowling Green, Ohio, regulate smoking in restaurants to protect patrons and employees. Yet complete protection is questionable because the ordinances allow for smoking in certain dining sections. Two restaurants were studied in each city, one smoking and one nonsmoking. Read More

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http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/00039890409602953
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00039890409602953DOI Listing
December 2004
4 Reads

Air pollution, passive smoking, and respiratory symptoms in adults.

Arch Environ Health 2004 Dec;59(12):669-76

Sepia-sante Melrand, France.

We studied the independent role of air pollution and passive smoking on respiratory symptoms and group of symptoms by following 46 adult nonsmokers for 14 wk. Outcomes included the incidence of 15 symptoms. After adjustment for passive smoking, clear rhinorrhea and cough were positively related to nitrogen dioxide (NO2), particles (PM10), and black smoke (BS); whereas headache was positively related to BS. Read More

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http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/00039890409602952
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00039890409602952DOI Listing
December 2004
3 Reads

Increased risks of term low-birth-weight infants in a petrochemical industrial city with high air pollution levels.

Arch Environ Health 2004 Dec;59(12):663-8

Department of Healthcare Information and Management, Ming Chuan University, Taoyuan, Taiwan, ROC.

This study investigated the influence of petrochemical air pollution on birth weight. Birth data on 92,288 singleton infants with gestational periods of 37-44 wk born in a petrochemical industrial city (Kaohsiung, n = 31,530) with severe pollution or a nonpetrochemical industrial city (Taipei, n = 60,758) in Taiwan between 1995 and 1997 were included in this analysis. Air pollutant concentration derived from routinely monitored data showed significantly higher concentrations of SO2, O3, and PM10 in Kaohsiung. Read More

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http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/00039890409602951
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00039890409602951DOI Listing
December 2004
15 Reads

Determination of environmental exposure to asbestos (tremolite) and mesothelioma risks in the southeastern region of Turkey.

Arch Environ Health 2004 Dec;59(12):658-62

Dicle University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Chest Diseases, Diyarbakir, Turkey.

In this study, the authors examined the concentrations and mineralogical analyses of asbestos, and investigated mesothelioma risk in southeastern Anatolia, Turkey. They used a gravimetric dust sampler to collect samples from 2 villages and 2 asbestos mines (1 active). Samples were then evaluated by an X-ray diffractometer and an electron microscope. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00039890409602950DOI Listing
December 2004
2 Reads

Gliomas and farm pesticide exposure in men: the upper midwest health study.

Arch Environ Health 2004 Dec;59(12):650-7

Division of Surveillance, Hazard Evaluations and Field Studies, The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Cincinnati, Ohio 45226, USA.

The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health evaluated farm pesticide exposure and glioma risk in a study that included 457 glioma cases and 648 population-based controls, all adult men (18-80 yr old) and nonmetropolitan residents of Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, and Wisconsin. Multiple logistic regressions were used to control for farm residence, age, age group, education, and exposure to other pesticides. No associations were found between glioma and 12 specific pesticides. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00039890409602949DOI Listing
December 2004
14 Reads
4 Citations

Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-DNA adducts and breast cancer: a pooled analysis.

Arch Environ Health 2004 Dec;59(12):640-9

Department of Epidemiology, University of North Carolina School of Public Health, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599-7435, USA.

Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-DNA adducts have been associated with breast cancer in several small studies. The authors' pooled analysis included 873 cases and 941 controls from a population-based case-control study. Competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in peripheral mononuclear cells was conducted in 2 rounds, and results were pooled on the basis of round-specific quantiles. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00039890409602948DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4277204PMC
December 2004
12 Reads

Health hazards from volcanic gases: a systematic literature review.

Arch Environ Health 2004 Dec;59(12):628-39

Department of Epidemiology & Public Health Imperial College London, London, UK.

Millions of people are potentially exposed to volcanic gases worldwide, and exposures may differ from those in anthropogenic air pollution. A systematic literature review found few primary studies relating to health hazards of volcanic gases. SO2 and acid aerosols from eruptions and degassing events were associated with respiratory morbidity and mortality but not childhood asthma prevalence or lung function decrements. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00039890409602947DOI Listing
December 2004
1 Read

What constitutes good science in environmental and occupational health?

Authors:
Tee L Guidotti

Arch Environ Health 2004 Dec;59(12):625-7

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00039890409602946DOI Listing
December 2004

Young infants' morbidity and exposure to fine particles in a region with two power plants.

Arch Environ Health 2004 Nov;59(11):611-6

Health Systems Management Department, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva, Israel.

This study investigated the effect of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) in ambient air on hospital admissions and emergency room (ER) visits among young children (0-3 yr) residing in 4 communities in southern Israel, within an area 5-25 km from the 2 power plants, which operate within 25 km of each other. Daily records of hospitalizations and ER visits for respiratory diseases at the 3 hospitals serving the region were examined for 9 mo, October 1, 2000-June 30, 2001. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00039890409603441DOI Listing
November 2004

Perinatal mortality in West Germany following atmospheric nuclear weapons tests.

Authors:
Alfred Körblein

Arch Environ Health 2004 Nov;59(11):604-9

Munich Environmental Institute, Munich, Germany.

Using trend analysis, the author sought a possible association between perinatal mortality rates in West Germany, 1955-1993, and the fallout from atmospheric nuclear weapons testing in the years 1952-1993. The regression model used a continuously falling trend and a superimposed extra term that reflects the average strontium content in pregnant women. Mortality rates show an upward deviation that peaked in 1970. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00039890409603440DOI Listing
November 2004

Domestic exposure to legionellae for Dutch Legionnaires' disease patients.

Arch Environ Health 2004 Nov;59(11):597-603

Municipal Health Service Kennemerland Haarlem, The Netherlands.

The source of infection for travelers who develop Legionnaires' disease (LD) shortly after a journey abroad is difficult to ascertain. Infection is likely to have occurred abroad, but could also have occurred at the patient's own residence. The authors conducted a case-control study to determine risk for acquiring LD at home in the Netherlands after traveling abroad. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00039890409603439DOI Listing
November 2004
1 Read

Polymorphisms in glutathione-related genes affect methylmercury retention.

Arch Environ Health 2004 Nov;59(11):588-95

Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Lund University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.

Methylmercury is eliminated from the human body as glutathione (GSH) conjugates. GSH production is mediated by glutamyl-cysteine ligase (GCL) and conjugation by glutathione S-transferases (GST). In this study, the authors tested whether polymorphisms in GCL and GST genes modify methylmercury retention. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00039890409603438DOI Listing
November 2004
4 Reads

Thyroid function of newborns and exposure to chlorine dioxide by-products.

Arch Environ Health 2004 Nov;59(11):582-7

Institut national de santé publique du Québec, Sainte-Foy (Quebec) Canada.

In this study, the authors compared thyroid function of newborns from 11 municipalities where drinking water was disinfected by chlorine dioxide (ClO2) with that of newborns from 15 municipalities using chlorine disinfection. They estimated the mean neonatal blood thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) levels and proportion of congenital hypothyroidism cases using the results of the Quebec neonatal screening for congenital hypothyroidism for 32,978 newborns over the period 1993-1999. There was no significant increase in the TSH level and no excess of congenital hypothyroidism when all newborns exposed to ClO2 were considered. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00039890409603437DOI Listing
November 2004

Guillain-Barre syndrome in a rural farming district in South Africa: a possible relationship to environmental organophosphate exposure.

Arch Environ Health 2004 Nov;59(11):575-80

Occupational and Environmental Health Research Unit, School of Public Health and Family Medicine, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa.

Although organophosphate (OP) insecticides have been recognized as having neuropathic potential, a relationship with Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS) has not been previously confirmed. A cluster of 7 cases of GBS was noted over an 11-yr period in an isolated farming region in the Northern Cape Province of South Africa, an area subject to intensive aerial application of OP insecticides. Observed cases were more than 4 times higher than expected based on a Poisson probability distribution. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00039890409603436DOI Listing
November 2004

Neuropsychological effects of long-term low-level organophosphate exposure in orchard sprayers in England.

Arch Environ Health 2004 Nov;59(11):566-74

School of Psychology, Keele University, Staffordshire ST5 5BG, UK.

The health effects from prolonged low-level organophosphate exposure are unknown. We hypothesized that exposed individuals would show neuropsychological decrements when compared with unexposed individuals, and that cumulative organophosphate exposure would be correlated with neuropsychological performance. We used a quasiexperimental cross-sectional design to compare neuropsychological test scores among three groups: orchard sprayers exposed to organophosphates, and construction worker and pig farm workers who were not exposed. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00039890409603435DOI Listing
November 2004

Serum DDT and DDE levels in pregnant women of Chiapas, Mexico.

Arch Environ Health 2004 Nov;59(11):559-65

School of Public Health, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720-7360, USA.

The authors measured the main ingredients of technical DDT (1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl [p,p'-DDT]) and its principal metabolite, 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis (p-chlorophenyl)ethylene [p,p'-DDE]) in serum collected from 52 pregnant women in Tapachula, Chiapas, Mexico in 1998. The median lipid-adjusted serum levels for the women were 676 ng/g p,p'-DDT (range: 56-23,169 ng/g) and 4,843 ng/g p,p'-DDE (range: 113-41,964 ng/g). In regression analysis, serum DDT and DDE increased with age (test for trend, p = . Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00039890409603434DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4030544PMC
November 2004
3 Reads
10 Citations

Assessment of sources of second-hand smoke exposure in a putatively unexposed population.

Arch Environ Health 2004 Nov;59(11):553-7

Department of Public Health and Family Medicine, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02111, USA.

The authors sought to determine levels of urinary cotinine and its association with collateral exposure to second-hand smoke in public health workers. Urinary cotinine was measured twice at 1-wk intervals in 28 public health workers or their spouses. Information on sources of second-hand smoke exposure and a dietary history were obtained from each participant. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00039890409603433DOI Listing
November 2004

The effect of alcohol, tobacco, and aspirin consumption on seminal quality among healthy young men.

Arch Environ Health 2004 Nov;59(11):548-52

Institute of Physiology, Medical School, National University of Córdoba, Argentina.

In this study, the authors examined the effects of alcohol, tobacco, and drug use on plasma testosterone and seminal parameters (in accordance with the World Health Organization's standards) in healthy Argentine medical students (n = 34). Some alterations in seminal parameters were detected in 19 (56%) subjects. Alcohol and tobacco use were correlated significantly, p = 0. Read More

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http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/00039890409603432
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00039890409603432DOI Listing
November 2004
1 Read

Predicting premature mortality from new power plant development in Virginia.

Arch Environ Health 2004 Oct;59(10):529-35

Chesterfield Health District, Richmond, Virginia, USA.

The authors estimated the number of premature deaths from particulate matter less than 2.5 microm (PM2.5) that would result from making 29 proposed fossil fuel power plants in Virginia operational. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00039890409605170DOI Listing
October 2004
2 Reads

Extrapolations and public policy.

Authors:
Tee L Guidotti

Arch Environ Health 2004 Oct;59(10):527-8

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00039890409605169DOI Listing
October 2004

Endotoxin exposure and respiratory symptoms in the cotton textile industry.

Arch Environ Health 2004 Oct;59(10):519-25

Institute of Occupational Medicine (ZfA), University of Hamburg, Hamburg State Department of Science and Health, Germany.

One hundred fourteen male employees of a cotton spinning mill in western Germany participated in a cross-sectional study, the purpose of which was to clarify the dose effect of endotoxin exposure on respiratory symptoms. Airborne endotoxin exposures were classified as low (< or = 100 endotoxin units [EU]/m3), medium (> 100-450 EU/m3), or high (> 450 EU/m3), on the basis of endotoxin activity in the Limulus amoebocyte lysate assay. Age- and smoking-adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00039890409605168DOI Listing
October 2004
2 Reads

Systemic vasculitis and prior recent exposure to organic solvents: report of two cases.

Arch Environ Health 2004 Oct;59(10):515-7

Department of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles 90048, USA.

The authors describe two patients with systemic vasculitis and prior occupational exposure to organic solvents. Systemic vasculitis should be considered a sentinel event for such exposures. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00039890409605167DOI Listing
October 2004
2 Reads

Effects of ambient air pollutants on asthma medication use and wheezing among fourth-grade school children from 12 Southern California communities enrolled in The Children's Health Study.

Arch Environ Health 2004 Oct;59(10):505-14

Department of Preventive Medicine, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, USA.

To investigate the effects of 12 monthly average air pollution levels on monthly prevalence of respiratory morbidity, the authors examined retrospective questionnaire data on 2034 4th-grade children from 12 Southern California communities that were enrolled in The Children's Health Study. Wheezing during the spring and summer months was associated with community levels of airborne particulate matter with a diameter < or = 10 microm (PM10) (odds ratio (OR) = 2.91; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00039890409605166DOI Listing
October 2004
4 Reads

Risk of cancer as a result of community exposure to gasoline vapors.

Arch Environ Health 2004 Oct;59(10):497-503

Department of Epidemiology, University of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA.

The Tranguch Gasoline Spill leaked 50,000-900,000 gallons of gasoline from underground storage tanks, potentially exposing an area of Hazle Township and Hazleton, Pennsylvania, to chronic low levels of benzene since at least 1990. A retrospective cohort study of 663 individuals representing 275 households assessed whether affected residents were at increased risk for cancer from 1990-2000 compared with the Pennsylvania populace. Age-adjusted standard incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated using Pennsylvania rates to determine expected numbers. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00039890409605165DOI Listing
October 2004
2 Reads
1 Citation

Reduction in kidney cancer mortality following installation of a tap water supply system in an arsenic-endemic area of Taiwan.

Arch Environ Health 2004 Sep;59(9):484-8

Institute of Public Health, Kaohsiung Medical University, Taiwan.

Arsenic is the major risk factor for blackfoot disease, a peripheral vascular disease that has been endemic to the southwest coast of Taiwan for more than 50 yr because of the consumption of local artesian well water containing high levels of arsenic. Long-term arsenic exposure has been associated with kidney cancer mortality in a dose-response relationship. In the early 1960s, a tap water supply system was implemented in the blackfoot-endemic areas. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00039890409603430DOI Listing
September 2004
3 Reads

Increased risk of preterm delivery in women residing near thermal power plants in Taiwan.

Arch Environ Health 2004 Sep;59(9):478-83

Department of Healthcare Administration, I-Shou University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan.

In this article, the researchers studied the prevalence of preterm births for women living near thermal power plants. The prevalence of delivery of preterm birth infants was significantly higher among women living within 3 km of a thermal power plant than among women living within 3-4 km of a plant. After controlling for several possible confounders (including maternal age, season, marital status, maternal education, infant gender, and birth site), the adjusted odds ratio was 1. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00039890409603429DOI Listing
September 2004
4 Reads

Association of outdoor air pollution with chronic respiratory morbidity in an industrial town in northern India.

Arch Environ Health 2004 Sep;59(9):471-7

Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India.

A cross-sectional study was performed in one industrial (study) and one non-industrial (reference) town in Punjab State, northern India. Ambient air quality samples were collected and analyzed each week for 2 yr. Subjects were 3,603 individuals >15 yr old who were interviewed and whose lung functions were measured spirometrically. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00039890409603428DOI Listing
September 2004
1 Read

A dried blood spot method to evaluate cholinesterase activity in young children.

Arch Environ Health 2004 Sep;59(9):467-70

National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Development, US Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27711, USA.

Field methods are needed to detect and monitor the organophosphate pesticide exposure of young children. Twenty children, aged 11 to 18 mo, living in an agricultural community along the United States/Mexico border were enrolled in a pilot study investigating methods to detect pesticide exposure. Healthy children were recruited at pediatric clinics with the informed consent of their parents. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00039890409603427DOI Listing
September 2004
1 Read

Time and temperature effects on the viability and infectivity of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in chlorinated tap water.

Arch Environ Health 2004 Sep;59(9):462-6

Laboratory of Medical Parasitology, Faculty of Medicine-Pharmacy, Rouen, France.

The authors compared the viability and infectivity of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in chlorinated tap water at various storage durations (i.e., 2 wk, 4 wk, 6 wk, or 8 wk) and at 2 cool temperatures (i. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00039890409603426DOI Listing
September 2004
2 Reads

Blood lead levels in preprimary school-age children in Nicosia, Cyprus, and their relationship with leaded soil dust exposure.

Arch Environ Health 2004 Sep;59(9):455-61

The Cyprus Institute of Neurology and Genetics, Nicosia.

The authors conducted a cross-sectional study to determine blood lead levels in children who attended kindergarten schools and nurseries in Nicosia, Cyprus, and to correlate their findings with (a) home and school environments, (b) behavior of the children, and (c) socioeconomic characteristics. Capillary blood for lead assay was collected from March 2001 to September 2001 from children who lived and attended school in Nicosia. Children who lived and attended school in a rural setting served as controls. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00039890409603425DOI Listing
September 2004
1 Read

Gastrointestinal absorption of metallic mercury.

Arch Environ Health 2004 Sep;59(9):449-54

Institute of Odontology, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge, Sweden.

The absorption of mercury from the gastrointestinal systems of 7 subjects, of whom none had any amalgam fillings, was examined in this study. The authors obtained quantitative information about mercury concentration in plasma and duodenal fluid after the gastrointestinal systems of the subjects were exposed to liquid elemental mercury enclosed in rubber balloons (i.e. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00039890409603424DOI Listing
September 2004
1 Read

Organochlorine pesticide levels in blood serum samples taken at autopsy from auto accident victims in Veracruz, Mexico.

Arch Environ Health 2004 Sep;59(9):441-8

Institute of Forensic Medicine, University of Veracruz, Mexico.

Samples of human blood sera (N = 118) for the determination of organochlorine pesticide levels were obtained at autopsy from auto accident victims in Veracruz, Mexico, during the years 2000 and 2001. The presence of hexachlorobenzene (HCH), beta-hexachlorocyclohexane (beta-HCH), 2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)-1,1-dichloroethylene (p,p'-DDE), 1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis(4-chlorophenyl)ethane (p,p'-DDT), and o,p'-DDT was confirmed by gas-liquid-electron-capture detection chromatography. During the years 2000 and 2001, the respective mean levels of (a) HCB, (b) beta-HCH, (c) p,p'-DDE, (d) o,p'-DDT, (e) p,p'-DDT, and (f) total DDT were (a) 2. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00039890409603423DOI Listing
September 2004
4 Reads

An evaluation of residual organochlorine pesticides in popular Indian herbal teas.

Arch Environ Health 2004 Aug;59(8):426-30

Herbal Research Section, Industrial Toxicology Research Centre, Lucknow, India.

Herbal preparations are gaining popularity worldwide because of their history of use and the belief that they are free of harmful side effects. Among the most popular products are herbal teas, which are marketed extensively with emphasis on their medicinal properties. At the same time, the World Health Organization has been emphasizing the need for quality assurance of herbal products, including testing for inadvertent contamination. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3200/AEOH.59.8.426-430DOI Listing
August 2004
1 Read

Effect of pesticide exposure on acetylcholinesterase activity in subsistence farmers from Campeche, Mexico.

Arch Environ Health 2004 Aug;59(8):418-25

Centro EPOMEX, Universidad Autónoma de Campeche, Mexico.

The authors surveyed agricultural production methods and pesticide use among subsistence farmers (campesinos) in 4 rural communities of Campeche, Mexico. Self-reports of symptoms of poisoning resulting from occupational pesticide exposure were elicited by questionnaire (N = 121), and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity during insecticide use was evaluated from blood samples (N = 127). In individuals from 2 of the 4 communities, AChE activity was significantly lower (p < 0. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3200/AEOH.59.8.418-425DOI Listing
August 2004
1 Read

Somatic and psychological characteristics of noise-sensitive adults in Finland.

Arch Environ Health 2004 Aug;59(8):410-7

University of Helsinki, Department of Public Health, Helsinki, Finland.

The authors examined the relationship of noise sensitivity with health status and psychological factors in individuals <70 yr of age in Finland. Subjects (n = 1,355) were selected from a 1988 case-control study, based on the Finnish Twin Cohort, that assessed noise sensitivity, lifetime noise exposure, and hypertension. Other health status and psychological factors were obtained from a questionnaire that had been administered to the same individuals in 1981. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3200/AEOH.59.8.410-417DOI Listing
August 2004
1 Read

Environmental exposure and fingernail analysis of arsenic and mercury in children and adults in a Nicaraguan gold mining community.

Arch Environ Health 2004 Aug;59(8):400-9

Department of Biological Sciences, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire, USA.

Gold mining can release contaminants, including mercury, into the environment, and may increase exposure to naturally occurring elements such as arsenic. The authors investigated environmental and human tissue concentrations of arsenic and mercury in the gold mining town of Siuna, Nicaragua. The study involved 49 randomly selected households in Siuna, from whom a questionnaire along with environmental and fingernail samples were collected. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3200/AEOH.59.8.400-409DOI Listing
August 2004
7 Reads

Acute effects of noise on blood pressure and heart rate.

Arch Environ Health 2004 Aug;59(8):392-9

School of Nursing, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2003, USA.

The authors assessed the acute effects of exposure to noise on systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and heart rate, among 46 workers in a midwestern auto assembly plant. Workers wore ambulatory blood pressure monitors and personal noise dosimeters during one work shift. After adjustment for covariates of cardiovascular function, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, along with heart rate, were shown to be significantly positively associated with noise exposure. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3200/AEOH.59.8.392-399DOI Listing
August 2004
1 Read

Exhaled nitric oxide: sources of error in offline measurement.

Arch Environ Health 2004 Aug;59(8):385-91

Environmental Health Service, Los Amigos Research and Education Institute, Downey, California, USA.

Delayed offline measurement of exhaled nitric oxide (eNO), although useful in environmental and clinical research, is limited by the instability of stored breath samples. The authors characterized sources of instability with the goal of minimizing them. Breath and other air samples were stored under various conditions, and NO levels were measured repeatedly over 1-7 d. Read More

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http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.3200/AEOH.59.8.385-391
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1866170PMC
http://dx.doi.org/10.3200/AEOH.59.8.385-391DOI Listing
August 2004
3 Reads

The vanilloid receptor as a putative target of diverse chemicals in multiple chemical sensitivity.

Arch Environ Health 2004 Jul;59(7):363-75

School of Molecular Biosciences, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington 99164-4234, USA.

The vanilloid receptor (TRPV1 or VR1), widely distributed in the central and peripheral nervous system, is activated by a broad range of chemicals similar to those implicated in Multiple Chemical Sensitivity (MCS) Syndrome. The vanilloid receptor is reportedly hyperresponsive in MCS and can increase nitric oxide levels and stimulate N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor activity, both of which are important features in the previously proposed central role of nitric oxide and NMDA receptors in MCS. Vanilloid receptor activity is markedly altered by multiple mechanisms, possibly providing an explanation for the increased activity in MCS and symptom masking by previous chemical exposure. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3200/AEOH.59.7.363-375DOI Listing
July 2004
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Blood lead survey of children, pregnant women, professional drivers, street workers, and office workers in Trujillo, Peru.

Arch Environ Health 2004 Jul;59(7):359-62

College of Public Health, Department of Environmental Health Science, The University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602-2102, USA.

In this pilot study, conducted in summer 2002, the authors measured blood lead levels (BLLs) for 118 subjects in the city of Trujillo, Peru, where leaded gasoline is in the process of being phased out. Subjects included bus drivers, combi (minivan) drivers, street vendors, newspaper vendors, traffic police, taxi drivers, gas station attendants, children living both near and distant from gas stations, pregnant women, and office workers (controls). The highest BLLs were 9. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3200/AEOH.59.7.359-362DOI Listing

Effects of particulate air pollution on the respiratory health of subjects who live in three areas in Kanpur, India.

Arch Environ Health 2004 Jul;59(7):348-58

Environmental Engineering and Management Program, Department of Civil Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur, India.

In this study, the authors assessed the relationship between daily changes in respiratory health and particulate levels with diameters of (a) less than 10 microm (PM10) and (b) less than 2.5 microm (PM2.5) in Kanpur, India. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3200/AEOH.59.7.348-358DOI Listing