9 results match your criteria Archaeological And Anthropological Sciences[Journal]

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Livestock faecal indicators for animal management, penning, foddering and dung use in early agricultural built environments in the Konya Plain, Central Anatolia.

Archaeol Anthropol Sci 2020 18;12(2):40. Epub 2020 Jan 18.

2Department of Archaeology, School of Archaeology, Geography and Environmental Sciences, University of Reading, Reading, UK.

Livestock dung is a valuable material for reconstructing human and animal inter-relations and activity within open areas and built environments. This paper examines the identification and multi-disciplinary analysis of dung remains from three neighbouring sites in the Konya Plain of Central Anatolia, Turkey: Boncuklu (ninth-eighth millennium cal BC), the Çatalhöyük East Mound (eighth-sixth millennium cal BC), and the Late Neolithic occupation at the Pınarbaşı rockshelter (seventh millennium cal BC). It presents and evaluates data on animal management strategies and husbandry practices through the simultaneous examination of plant and faecal microfossils and biomarkers with thin-section micromorphology and integrated phytolith, dung spherulite, and biomolecular analyses, together with comparative reference geo-ethnoarchaeological assemblages. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12520-019-00988-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6977141PMC
January 2020

Agricultural systems in Bangladesh: the first archaeobotanical results from Early Historic Wari-Bateshwar and Early Medieval Vikrampura.

Archaeol Anthropol Sci 2020 15;12(1):37. Epub 2020 Jan 15.

3UCL Institute of Archaeology, 31-34 Gordon Square, London, WC1H 0PY UK.

The present paper reports the first systematic archaeobotanical evidence from Bangladesh together with direct AMS radiocarbon dates on crop remains. Macro-botanical remains were collected by flotation from two sites, Wari-Bateshwar (WB), an Early Historic archaeological site, dating mainly between 400 and 100 BC, with a later seventh century AD temple complex, and Raghurampura Vikrampura (RV), a Buddhist Monastery () located within the Vikrampura city site complex and dating to the eleventh and sixteenth centuries AD. Despite being a tropical country, with high rainfall and intensive soil processes, our work demonstrates that conventional archaeobotany, the collection of macro-remains through flotation, has much potential towards putting together a history of crops and agricultural systems in Bangladesh. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12520-019-00991-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6962288PMC
January 2020

The bioarchaeology of mid-Holocene pastoralist cemeteries west of Lake Turkana, Kenya.

Archaeol Anthropol Sci 2019 1;11(11):6221-6241. Epub 2019 Nov 1.

1Department of Anthropology, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-4364 USA.

Early herders in eastern Africa built elaborate megalithic cemeteries ~ 5000 BP overlooking what is now Lake Turkana in northwestern Kenya. At least six 'pillar sites' were constructed during a time of rapid change: cattle, sheep, and goats were introduced to the basin as the lake was shrinking at the end of the African Humid Period. Cultural changes at this time include new lithic and ceramic technologies and the earliest monumentality in eastern Africa. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12520-019-00914-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6941650PMC
November 2019

Dry, rainfed or irrigated? Reevaluating the role and development of rice agriculture in Iron Age-Early Historic South India using archaeobotanical approaches.

Archaeol Anthropol Sci 2019 19;11(12):6485-6500. Epub 2019 Nov 19.

Institute of Archaeology, University College London, London, WC1H 0PY UK.

Domestic rice agriculture had spread across the mainland Indian subcontinent by c.500 BC. The initial spread of rice outside the core zone of the central Gangetic Plains is thought to have been limited by climatic constraints, particularly seasonal rainfall levels, and so the later spread of rice into the dry regions of South India is largely supposed to have relied on irrigation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12520-019-00795-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6890616PMC
November 2019

Multidisciplinary investigations of the diets of two post-medieval populations from London using stable isotopes and microdebris analysis.

Archaeol Anthropol Sci 2019 16;11(11):6161-6181. Epub 2019 Aug 16.

2BioArch, Department of Archaeology, University of York, York, UK.

This paper presents the first multi-tissue study of diet in post-medieval London using both the stable light isotope analysis of carbon and nitrogen and analysis of microdebris in dental calculus. Dietary intake was explored over short and long timescales. Bulk bone collagen was analysed from humans from the Queen's Chapel of the Savoy (QCS) ( = 66) and the St Barnabas/St Mary Abbots (SB) ( = 25). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12520-019-00910-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6874522PMC

Diet, cuisine and consumption practices of the first farmers in the southeastern Baltic.

Archaeol Anthropol Sci 2019 15;11(8):4011-4024. Epub 2019 Feb 15.

3Lithuanian Institute of History, Kražių st. 5, Vilnius 01108, Lithuania.

With the arrival of the Early Neolithic Globular Amphora and Corded Ware cultures into the southeastern Baltic, ca. 2900/2800-2400 cal BC, a new type of economy was introduced, animal husbandry. However, the degree to which this transformed the subsistence economy is unknown. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12520-019-00804-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6743674PMC
February 2019

Estimating body mass and composition from proximal femur dimensions using dual energy x-ray absorptiometry.

Archaeol Anthropol Sci 2019 18;11(5):2167-2179. Epub 2018 Jun 18.

6UCL Great Ormond Street Institute of Child Health, UCL, London, UK.

Body mass prediction from the skeleton most commonly employs femoral head diameter (FHD). However, theoretical predictions and empirical data suggest the relationship between mass and FHD is strongest in young adults, that bone dimensions reflect lean mass better than body or fat mass and that other femoral measurements may be superior. Here, we generate prediction equations for body mass and its components using femoral head, neck and proximal shaft diameters and body composition data derived from dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scans of young adults ( = 155, 77 females and 78 males, mean age 22. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12520-018-0665-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6743672PMC

The trade of glass beads in early medieval Illyricum: towards an Islamic monopoly.

Archaeol Anthropol Sci 2019 12;11(3):1107-1122. Epub 2018 Jan 12.

IRAMAT-CEB, UMR5060, CNRS/Université d'Orléans, 3D, rue de la Férollerie, 45071 Orléans cedex 2, France.

The trade of glass beads has long been assumed to have been under Islamic dominance during the early centuries following the Arab conquest of the Middle East, judged by the prevalence of Islamic beads in the archaeological contexts from Viking Scandinavia to medieval Morocco. This paper explores the impact of the Byzantine-Slavic transition on the use and by extension trade of glass beads in the Balkans from the seventh to the ninth century CE. A series of 48 glass beads and 4 vessel fragments from two excavated sites in modern day Albania have been analysed morphologically, technologically and chemically by LA-ICP-MS. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12520-017-0583-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6743683PMC
January 2018

Population and forest dynamics during the Central European Eneolithic (4500-2000 BC).

Archaeol Anthropol Sci 2016 Dec;10(5):1153-1164

Department of Vegetation Ecology, Institute of Botany of the Czech Academy of Sciences, Lidická 25/27, CZ-60200 Brno, Czech Republic.

The population boom-and-bust during the European Neolithic (7000-2000 BC) has been the subject of lively discussion for the past decade. Most of the research on this topic was carried out with help of summed radiocarbon probability distributions. We aim to reconstruct population dynamics within the catchment of a medium sized lake on the basis of information on the presence of all known past human activities. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s12520-016-0446-5
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12520-016-0446-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6173282PMC
December 2016
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