45 results match your criteria Applied Psycholinguistics[Journal]

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Orthographic Knowledge and Lexical Form Influence Vocabulary Learning.

Appl Psycholinguist 2017 Mar 26;38(2):427-456. Epub 2016 Jul 26.

Northwestern University.

Many adults struggle with second language acquisition, but learn new native-language words relatively easily. We investigated the role of sublexical native-language patterns on novel word acquisition. Twenty English monolinguals learned 48 novel written words in five repeated testing blocks. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0142716416000242DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5538268PMC
March 2017
1 Read

Understanding and Assessing Word Comprehension.

Appl Psycholinguist 2016 May 10;37(3):529-549. Epub 2015 Apr 10.

Department of Psychology, Rhode Island College.

The Intermodal Preferential Looking (IPL) task was developed to assess comprehension in infants and toddlers. We extend this methodology to examine word comprehension in preschool children using two measures: proportion of looking time to target (LTT) and longest look (LL) to target. Children (3-6 years) were tested with the IPL for comprehension of nouns, verbs, and adjectives. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0142716415000107DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5421562PMC
May 2016
3 Reads

Vocabulary size and auditory word recognition in preschool children.

Appl Psycholinguist 2017 Jan 11;38(1):89-125. Epub 2016 May 11.

University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Recognizing familiar words quickly and accurately facilitates learning new words, as well as other aspects of language acquisition. This study used the visual world paradigm with semantic and phonological competitors to study lexical processing efficiency in 2-5 year-old children. Experiment 1 found this paradigm was sensitive to vocabulary-size differences. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0142716416000126DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5400288PMC
January 2017
2 Reads

Performance Pressure Enhances Speech Learning.

Appl Psycholinguist 2016 Nov 23;37(6):1369-1396. Epub 2015 Dec 23.

Department of Psychology, 1 University Station A8000, Austin, TX, USA, 78712; Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, 1 University Station A1100, Austin, TX, USA, 78712.

Real-world speech learning often occurs in high pressure situations such as trying to communicate in a foreign country. However, the impact of pressure on speech learning success is largely unexplored. In this study, adult, native speakers of English learned non-native speech categories under pressure or no-pressure conditions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0142716415000600DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5222599PMC
November 2016
1 Read

Effects of concurrent task demands on language planning in fluent children and adults.

Appl Psycholinguist 2016 Nov 23;37(6):1311-1336. Epub 2015 Dec 23.

Department of Speech - Language - Hearing Sciences, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, USA.

Purpose: The aim of the present study was to investigate how children and adults allocate cognitive resources to performing segmental encoding and monitoring in a dual task paradigm and the response patterns of the primary and secondary tasks in the dual task.

Methods: Participants were 20 children divided equally into two age groups-7 to 11 years, 12 to 15 years, and 10 adults. The primary task required participants to monitor phonemic segments in a picture - written word interference paradigm while silently naming the pictures. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/s0142716415000582DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5786384PMC
November 2016

Interactions between Bilingual Effects and Language Impairment: Exploring Grammatical Markers in Spanish-Speaking Bilingual Children.

Appl Psycholinguist 2016 Sep 25;37(5):1147-1173. Epub 2015 Nov 25.

SUNY Buffalo.

This study examines the interaction between language impairment and different levels of bilingual proficiency. Specifically, we explore the potential of articles and direct object pronouns as clinical markers of primary language impairment (PLI) in bilingual Spanish-speaking children. The study compared children with PLI and typically developing children (TD) matched on age, English language proficiency, and mother's education level. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0142716415000521DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4994710PMC
September 2016
17 Reads

Reading Skill and Exposure to Orthography Influence Speech Production.

Appl Psycholinguist 2016 Mar 13;37(2):411-434. Epub 2015 Apr 13.

Department of Linguistics, University of Chicago, 1010 East 59 Street, Chicago, IL 60637, .

Orthographic experience during the acquisition of novel words may influence production processing in proficient readers. Previous work indicates interactivity among lexical, phonological, and articulatory processing; we hypothesized that experience with orthography can also influence phonological processing. Phonetic accuracy and articulatory stability were measured as adult, proficient readers repeated and read aloud nonwords, presented in auditory or written modalities and with variations in orthographic neighborhood density. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0142716415000053DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4820249PMC
March 2016
1 Read

A longitudinal analysis of sentence interpretation in bilingual children.

Appl Psycholinguist 2016 Mar 14;37(2):461-485. Epub 2015 Apr 14.

Rush University.

This longitudinal study used sentence interpretation tasks to consider growth in language processing among school-aged children learning Vietnamese and English. Thirty-two children participated yearly over three time points. Children were asked to identify the agent of sentences that manipulated linguistic cues relevant to Vietnamese (animacy) and English (word order). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0142716415000077DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6171365PMC
March 2016
1 Read

Attention-getting skills of deaf children using American Sign Language in a preschool classroom.

Authors:
Amy M Lieberman

Appl Psycholinguist 2015 Jul;36(4):855-873

University of California, San Diego.

Visual attention is a necessary prerequisite to successful communication in sign language. The current study investigated the development of attention-getting skills in deaf native-signing children during interactions with peers and teachers. Seven deaf children (aged 21-39 months) and five adults were videotaped during classroom activities for approximately 30 hr. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0142716413000532DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4495734PMC

Noun Case Suffix Use by Children with Specific Language Impairment: An Examination of Finnish.

Appl Psycholinguist 2014 Jul;35(4):833-854

King's College, UK.

Finnish-speaking children with specific language impairment (SLI, = 15, age = 5;2), a group of same-age typically developing peers (TD-A, = 15, age = 5;2) and a group of younger typically developing children (TD-Y, = 15, age = 3;8) were compared in their use of accusative, partitive, and genitive case noun suffixes. The children with SLI were less accurate than both groups of TD children in case marking, suggesting that their difficulties with agreement extend to grammatical case. However, these children were also less accurate in making the phonological changes in the stem needed for suffixation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0142716412000598DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4435715PMC
July 2014
2 Reads

An investigation of morphological awareness and processing in adults with low literacy.

Appl Psycholinguist 2015 Mar;36(2):245-273

Mount Holyoke College.

Morphological awareness, which is an understanding of how words can be broken down into smaller units of meaning such as roots, prefixes, and suffixes, has emerged as an important contributor to word reading and comprehension skills. The first aim of the current study was to investigate the contribution of morphological awareness independent of phonological awareness and decoding to the reading comprehension abilities of adults with low literacy. Results indicated that morphological awareness was a significant unique predictor of reading comprehension. Read More

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http://www.journals.cambridge.org/abstract_S0142716413000222
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0142716413000222DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4405785PMC
March 2015
3 Reads

Academic discourse: Dissociating standardized and conversational measures of language proficiency in bilingual kindergarteners.

Appl Psycholinguist 2015 Mar;36(2):437-461

York University.

This study examined the relationship between performance on standardized measures of language proficiency and conversational measures of the same features used in academic discourse among 24 monolingual and 25 bilingual kindergarteners. Academic discourse performance was considered for both its linguistic and its genre features in two discourse forms: narrative and explanation. Bilinguals performed more poorly than monolinguals on standardized measures of language proficiency, yet they performed similarly to monolinguals in the discourse-based linguistic and genre features. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0142716413000301DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4350147PMC
March 2015
8 Reads

A Bilingual-Monolingual Comparison of Young Children's Vocabulary Size: Evidence from Comprehension and Production.

Appl Psycholinguist 2014 Nov 28;35(6):1189-1211. Epub 2013 Jan 28.

Child and Family Research, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, USA.

It is often assumed that young bilinguals are lexically delayed in comparison to monolinguals. A comprehensive comparison of comprehension and production vocabulary in 31 firstborn bilingual and 30 matched monolingual children fails to find empirical foundation for this assumption. Several raters completed Dutch and French adaptations of the MacArthur Communicative Development Inventories for children aged 13 and 20 months. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0142716412000744DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5842817PMC
November 2014
5 Reads

Older Sibling Influences on the Language Environment and Language Development of Toddlers in Bilingual Homes.

Appl Psycholinguist 2014 Mar;35(2):225-241

Florida Atlantic University.

Two separate studies examined older siblings' influence on the language exposure and language development of U.S.-born toddlers who were being raised in bilingual homes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0142716412000379DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4208071PMC

Do iconic gestures pave the way for children's early verbs?

Appl Psycholinguist 2014 Nov;35(6):1143-1162

University of Chicago.

Children produce a deictic gesture for a particular object (point at dog) approximately three months before they produce the verbal label for that object ("dog") (Iverson & Goldin-Meadow, 2005). Gesture thus paves the way for children's early nouns. We ask here whether the same pattern-gesture preceding and predicting speech-holds for iconic gestures-that is, do gestures that depict actions precede and predict early verbs? We observed spontaneous speech and gestures produced by 40 children (22 girls, 18 boys) from age 14 to 34 months. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0142716412000720DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4188428PMC
November 2014
2 Reads

Dual language profiles of Latino children of immigrants: Stability and change over the early school years.

Appl Psycholinguist 2014 May;35(3):581-620

Harvard Medical School and Judge Baker Children's Center.

Dual language children enter school with varying levels of proficiencies in their first and second language. This study of Latino children of immigrants ( = 163) analyzes their dual language profiles at kindergarten and second grade, derived from the direct assessment of Spanish and English proficiencies (Woodcock Language Proficiency Batteries-Revised). Children were grouped based on the similarity of language profiles (competent profiles, such as dual proficient, Spanish proficient, and English proficient; and low-performing profiles, including borderline proficient and limited proficient). Read More

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http://www.journals.cambridge.org/abstract_S0142716412000513
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0142716412000513DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4016964PMC
May 2014
8 Reads

Producing bilinguals through immersion education: Development of metalinguistic awareness.

Appl Psycholinguist 2014 Jan;35(1):177-191

Rotman Research Institute of Baycrest.

This study examined metalinguistic awareness in children who were becoming bilingual in an immersion education program. The purpose was to determine at what point in emerging bilingualism the previously reported metalinguistic advantages appear and what types of metalinguistic tasks reveal these developmental differences. Participants were 124 children in second and fifth grades who were enrolled in either a French immersion or a regular English program. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0142716412000288DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3987956PMC
January 2014
10 Reads

SEPARATING THE EFFECTS OF ACOUSTIC AND PHONETIC FACTORS IN LINGUISTIC PROCESSING WITH IMPOVERISHED SIGNALS BY ADULTS AND CHILDREN.

Appl Psycholinguist 2014 Mar;35(2):333-370

The Ohio State University.

Cochlear implants allow many individuals with profound hearing loss to understand spoken language, even though the impoverished signals provided by these devices poorly preserve acoustic attributes long believed to support recovery of phonetic structure. Consequently questions may be raised regarding whether traditional psycholinguistic theories rely too heavily on phonetic segments to explain linguistic processing while ignoring potential roles of other forms of acoustic structure. This study tested that possibility. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0142716412000410DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3981461PMC
March 2014
2 Reads

Predictors of growth or attrition of the first language in Latino children with specific language impairment.

Appl Psycholinguist 2013 Nov;34(6):1219-1243

Department of Psychology, University of California, San Diego.

We investigated the factors that may help understand the differential rates of language development in the home language (i.e., Spanish) of Latino preschoolers with specific language impairment (SLI). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0142716412000215DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3904461PMC
November 2013

Cross-linguistic differences in prosodic cues to syntactic disambiguation in German and English.

Appl Psycholinguist 2014 Jan;35(1):27-70

Pennsylvania State University.

This study examined whether late-learning English-German L2 learners and late-learning German-English L2 learners use prosodic cues to disambiguate temporarily ambiguous L1 and L2 sentences during speech production. Experiments 1a and 1b showed that English-German L2 learners and German-English L2 learners used a pitch rise and pitch accent to disambiguate prepositional phrase-attachment sentences in German. However, the same participants, as well as monolingual English speakers, only used pitch accent to disambiguate similar English sentences. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0142716412000252DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3894114PMC
January 2014

Fast Mapping in Late-Talking Toddlers.

Appl Psycholinguist 2013 Jan;34(1):69-89

Waisman Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1500 Highland Avenue, Madison, WI 53705.

This study investigated fast mapping in late-talking (LT) toddlers and toddlers with normal language (NL) development matched on age, nonverbal cognition, and maternal education. The fast mapping task included novel object labels and familiar words. The LT group performed significantly worse than the NL group on novel word comprehension and production, as well as familiar word production. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0142716411000610DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3724169PMC
January 2013
2 Reads

A Comparative Analysis of Pausing in Child and Adult Storytelling.

Appl Psycholinguist 2013 Jul;34(3):569-589

University of Oregon.

The goals of the current study were (1) to assess differences in child and adult pausing, and (2) to determine whether characteristics of child and adult pausing can be explained by the same language variables. Spontaneous speech samples were obtained from ten 5-year-olds and their accompanying parent using a storytelling/retelling task. Analyses of pause frequency, duration, variation in durations, and pause location indicated that pause time decreased with retelling, but not with age group except when child and adult pausing was considered in its speech and language context. Read More

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http://www.journals.cambridge.org/abstract_S0142716411000877
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0142716411000877DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3681305PMC
July 2013
2 Reads

Cross-sectional study of phoneme and rhyme monitoring abilities in children between 7 and 13 years.

Appl Psycholinguist 2012 Apr 8;33(2):253-279. Epub 2011 Jun 8.

University of Minnesota.

We investigated phonemic competence in production in three age groups of children - 7 and 8 years, 10 and 11 years, 12 and 13 years-using rhyme and phoneme monitoring. Participants were required to name target pictures silently while monitoring covert speech for the presence or absence of a rhyme or phoneme match. Performance in the verbal tasks was compared to a nonverbal control task in which participants monitored tone sequence pairs for a pattern match. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0142716411000348DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3508765PMC

"What is this?" Gesture as a potential cue to identify referents in discourse.

Appl Psycholinguist 2012 Apr;33(2):329-342

Department of Psychology, National University of Singapore.

This study explores whether caregivers follow the discourse-pragmatic principle of information status of referents (given vs. new) in their gestures and how children respond to their caregivers' gestures. Chinese and American caregivers were videotaped while interacting spontaneously with their children. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0142716411000373DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3322668PMC

Tense and Aspect in Childhood Language Impairment: Contributions from Hungarian.

Appl Psycholinguist 2012 Apr;33(2):308-328

Hungarian Academy of Sciences and Eötvös Loránd University of Sciences.

Previous studies of children with language impairment (LI) reveal an insensitivity to aspect that may constitute part of the children's deficit. In this study, we examine aspect as well as tense in Hungarian-speaking children with LI. Twenty-one children with LI, 21 typically developing children matched for age, and 21 typically developing children matched for receptive vocabulary scores were tested on their comprehension and production of both imperfective and perfective verb forms in past tense contexts. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0142716411000361DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4446974PMC
April 2012
2 Reads

Age of word acquisition effects in treatment of children with phonological delays.

Appl Psycholinguist 2012 Jan;33(1):121-144

Indiana University.

The effects of the age of acquisition (AoA) of words were examined in the clinical treatment of 10 preschool children with phonological delays. Using a single-subject multiple-baseline experimental design, children were enrolled in one of four conditions that varied the AoA of the treated words (early vs. late acquired) relative to their corresponding word frequency (high vs. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0142716411000294DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3293394PMC
January 2012

Bilingual parents' modeling of pragmatic language use in multiparty interactions.

Appl Psycholinguist 2011 Oct;32(4):761-780

University of Virginia.

Parental input represents an important source of language socialization. Particularly in bilingual contexts, parents may model pragmatic language use and metalinguistic strategies to highlight language differences. The present study examines multiparty interactions involving 28 bilingual English- and Marathi-speaking parent-child pairs in the presence of monolingual bystanders (children's mean ages: 3;2 and 4;6). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0142716411000051DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3786164PMC
October 2011
3 Reads

Narrative Skill in Boys with Fragile X Syndrome with and without Autism Spectrum Disorder.

Appl Psycholinguist 2011 ;32(2):359-388

FPG Child Development Institute, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

We examined recalled narratives of boys with fragile X syndrome with autism spectrum disorder (FXS-ASD; N=28) and without ASD (FXS-O; N=29), and compared them to those of boys with Down syndrome (DS; N=33) and typically developing boys (TD; N=39). Narratives were scored for mentions of macrostructural Story Grammar elements (Introduction, Relationship, Initiating Events, Internal Response, Attempts/Actions, and Ending). We found that narrative recall is predicted by short-term memory and nonverbal mental age levels in almost all groups (except TD), but not by expressive syntax or caregiver education. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0142716410000445DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3080252PMC
January 2011
2 Reads

Changes in language usage of Puerto Rican mothers and their children: Do gender and timing of exposure to English matter?

Appl Psycholinguist 2011 Apr;32(2):275-297

Temple University.

This longitudinal study investigated changes in reported language usage between Puerto Rican mothers and their preschoolers over a 4-year period. It also examined whether differences in language usage occurred depending on the timing of children's exposure to English and children's gender. Seventy-six mothers reported the languages they and their children used when talking to each other during 2 years in Head Start, kindergarten, and first grade. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S014271641000041XDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3524524PMC
April 2011
2 Reads

Sentence interpretation by typically developing Vietnamese-English bilingual children.

Appl Psycholinguist 2010 Jul 1;31(3):507-529. Epub 2010 Jun 1.

University of Minnesota.

We examined developing bilinguals' use of animacy and word order cues during sentence interpretation tasks administered in each of their languages. Participants were 6- to 8-year-old children who learned Vietnamese as a first language and English as a second language ( = 23). Participants listened to simple sentences and identified the agent or "doer" of the action. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0142716410000093DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6171759PMC

When speech is ambiguous gesture steps in: Sensitivity to discourse-pragmatic principles in early childhood.

Appl Psycholinguist 2010 Jan;31(1):209-224

Department of Psychology, University of Chicago.

Young children produce gestures to disambiguate arguments. This study explores whether the gestures they produce are constrained by discourse-pragmatic principles: person and information status. We ask whether children use gesture more often to indicate the referents that have to be specified, i. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0142716409990221DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2854417PMC
January 2010
5 Reads

Language Combinations, Subtypes, and Severity in the Study of Bilingual Children with Specific Language Impairment.

Appl Psycholinguist 2010 Apr 11;31(2):310-315. Epub 2010 Mar 11.

Purdue University.

I commend Johanne Paradis not only for her interesting keynote article but also for the careful research that she has conducted along with her collaborators in the area of bilingual language development and disorders. Her contributions have been significant and are sure to shape our theoretical as well as clinical understanding of specific language impairment (SLI). In this commentary, I focus on three issues. Read More

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http://www.journals.cambridge.org/abstract_S0142716409990476
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0142716409990476DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3619729PMC
April 2010
3 Reads

The processing and comprehension of wh-questions among L2 German speakers.

Appl Psycholinguist 2009 Oct;30(4):603-636

The Pennsylvania State University.

Using the self-paced-reading paradigm, the present study examines whether highly proficient second language (L2) speakers of German (English L1) use case-marking information during the on-line comprehension of unambiguous wh-extractions, even when task demands do not draw explicit attention to this morphosyntactic feature in German. Results support previous findings, in that both the native and the L2 German speakers exhibited an immediate subject-preference in the matrix clause, suggesting they were sensitive to case-marking information. However, only among the native speakers did this subject-preference carry over to reading times in the complement clause. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S014271640999004XDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2757782PMC
October 2009

The influence of visual feedback and register changes on sign language production: A kinematic study with deaf signers.

Appl Psycholinguist 2009 Jan;30(1):187-203

San Diego State University.

Speakers monitor their speech output by listening to their own voice. However, signers do not look directly at their hands and cannot see their own face. We investigated the importance of a visual perceptual loop for sign language monitoring by examining whether changes in visual input alter sign production. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0142716408090085DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2726740PMC
January 2009
1 Read

Spoken verb processing in Spanish: An analysis using a new online resource.

Appl Psycholinguist 2010 Jan;31(1):29-57

University of Texas at San Antonio and University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio.

Verbs are one of the basic building blocks of grammar, yet few studies have examined the grammatical, morphological, and phonological factors contributing to lexical access and production of Spanish verb inflection. This report describes an online data set that incorporates psycholinguistic dimensions for 50 of the most common early-acquired Spanish verbs. Using this data set, predictors of response time (RT) from stimulus onset and mean differences at offset are examined. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3446816PMC
January 2010
1 Read

What compound words mean to children with specific language impairment.

Appl Psycholinguist 2010 4;31(3):463-487. Epub 2010 Jun 4.

University of Iowa.

Sixteen children (17 age mates, 17 vocabulary mates) with specific language impairment (SLI) participated in two studies. In the first, they named fantasy objects. All groups coined novel noun-noun compounds on a majority of trials but only the SLI group had difficulty ordering the nouns as dictated by semantic context. Read More

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http://www.journals.cambridge.org/abstract_S014271641000007X
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S014271641000007XDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3354768PMC
June 2010
2 Reads

When study abroad experience fails to deliver: The internal resources threshold effect.

Appl Psycholinguist 2009 Jan;30(1):79-99

Florida State University.

Some second language (L2) learners return from study abroad experiences with seemingly no change in their L2 ability. In this study we investigate whether a certain level of internal cognitive resources is necessary in order for individuals to take full advantage of the study abroad experience. Specifically, we examined the role of working memory resources in lexical comprehension and production for learners who had or had not studied abroad. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0142716408090048DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2731967PMC
January 2009
2 Reads

A cross-linguistic and bilingual evaluation of the interdependence between lexical and grammatical domains.

Appl Psycholinguist 2009 ;30(2):315-337

Joint Doctoral Program in Language and Communicative Disorders, San Diego State University/University of California, San Diego.

The purpose of this study was to examine within and across language relationships between lexical and grammatical domains by focusing on measures of lexical diversity and grammatical complexity in Spanish and English. One hundred and ninety-six preschool and school-aged Latino children with different levels of English and Spanish proficiencies and different language abilities produced narratives in Spanish, English, or both. Analyses revealed strong associations between lexical (number of different words and number of different verbs) and grammatical measures (mean length of utterances in words and use of ditransitive predicates), supporting the domain interdependence hypothesis within a language. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0142716409090134DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2681320PMC
January 2009

Talking About Writing: What We Can Learn from Conversations between Parents and Their Young Children.

Appl Psycholinguist 2009 ;30(3):463-484

Department of Philosophy, Washington University in St. Louis.

In six analyses using CHILDES (MacWhinney, 2000), we explored whether and how parents and their 1.5 to 5-year-old children talk about writing. Parent speech might include information about the similarity between print and speech and about the difference between writing and drawing. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0142716409090237DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2868192PMC
January 2009

The Acquisition of Tense in English: Distinguishing child second language from first language and specific language impairment.

Appl Psycholinguist 2008 ;29(4):689-722

University of Alberta.

This study reports on a comparison of the use and knowledge of tense-marking morphemes in English by first language (L1), second language (L2) and specifically language-impaired (SLI) children. The objective of our research was to ascertain whether the L2 children's tense acquisition patterns were similar or dissimilar to those of the L1 and SLI groups, and whether they would fit an (Extended) Optional Infinitive profile, or an L2-based profile, e.g. Read More

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http://www.journals.cambridge.org/abstract_S0142716408080296
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0142716408080296DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2565586PMC
January 2008
3 Reads

Bilingual children with language impairment: A comparison with monolinguals and second language learners.

Appl Psycholinguist 2008 12;29(1):3-19. Epub 2007 Dec 12.

San Diego State University.

The purpose of this study is twofold: (a) to examine whether English finite morphology has the potential to differentiate children with and without language impairment (LI) from Spanish-speaking backgrounds and different levels of English proficiency in comparison to Hispanic English speakers and (b) to investigate the extent to which children who are bilingual exhibit differences in their grammatical performance because of cross-linguistic influence from their first language. Seventy-one children between the ages of 4 years, 5 months and 6 years, 5 months were distributed into the following five groups: English as a first language (EL1) speakers with typical language development (TLD), EL1 speakers with LI, Spanish-English bilinguals with TLD, Spanish-English bilinguals with LI, and English as a second language (EL2) learners with TLD were compared on regular verb finiteness and nominative subject use using spontaneous narrative samples. The EL1 children with LI had significantly lower verb accuracy rates than the EL1 controls with TLD. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0142716408080016DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3368375PMC
December 2007
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Profile effects in early bilingual language and literacy.

Appl Psycholinguist 2007 Apr 1;28(2):191-230. Epub 2007 Mar 1.

University of Memphis.

Bilingual children's language and literacy is stronger in some domains than others. Reanalysis of data from a broad-scale study of monolingual English and bilingual Spanish-English learners in Miami provided a clear demonstration of "profile effects," where bilingual children perform at varying levels compared to monolinguals across different test types. The profile effects were strong and consistent across conditions of socioeconomic status, language in the home, and school setting (two way or English immersion). Read More

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http://www.journals.cambridge.org/abstract_S0142716407070117
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0142716407070117DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3358777PMC
April 2007
2 Reads

The Production of Passives by Children with Specific Language Impairment Acquiring English or Cantonese.

Appl Psycholinguist 2006 Apr;27(2):267-299

University College, Cork.

The production of passive sentences by children with specific language impairment (SLI) was studied in two languages, English and Cantonese. In both languages, the word order required for passive sentences differs from the word order used for active sentences. However, English and Cantonese passive sentences are quite different in other respects. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0142716406060280DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4435617PMC
April 2006
1 Read
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