7 results match your criteria Applied Physiology Nutrition And Metabolism[Journal]

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Press-pulse: a novel therapeutic strategy for the metabolic management of cancer.

Nutr Metab (Lond) 2017 23;14:19. Epub 2017 Feb 23.

Department of Molecular Pharmacology and Physiology, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida USA.

Background: A shift from respiration to fermentation is a common metabolic hallmark of cancer cells. As a result, glucose and glutamine become the prime fuels for driving the dysregulated growth of tumors. The simultaneous occurrence of "Press-Pulse" disturbances was considered the mechanism responsible for reduction of organic populations during prior evolutionary epochs. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12986-017-0178-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5324220PMC
February 2017
5 Reads

Effects of orally applied butyrate bolus on histone acetylation and cytochrome P450 enzyme activity in the liver of chicken - a randomized controlled trial.

Nutr Metab (Lond) 2013 Jan 22;10(1):12. Epub 2013 Jan 22.

Department of Physiology, University of Veterinary Medicine, Bischofsholer Damm 15/102, D-30173, Hannover, Germany.

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Background: Butyrate is known as histone deacetylase inhibitor, inducing histone hyperacetylation in vitro and playing a predominant role in the epigenetic regulation of gene expression and cell function. We hypothesized that butyrate, endogenously produced by intestinal microbial fermentation or applied as a nutritional supplement, might cause similar in vivo modifications in the chromatin structure of the hepatocytes, influencing the expression of certain genes and therefore modifying the activity of hepatic microsomal drug-metabolizing cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes.

Methods: An animal study was carried out in chicken as a model to investigate the molecular mechanisms of butyrate's epigenetic actions in the liver. Read More

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http://nutritionandmetabolism.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1743-7075-10-12DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3561214PMC
January 2013
13 Reads

Early prevention by L-Arginine attenuates coronary atherosclerosis in a model of hypercholesterolemic animals; no positive results for treatment.

Nutr Metab (Lond) 2009 Mar 24;6:13. Epub 2009 Mar 24.

Applied Physiology Research Center and Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran.

Background: Endothelial dysfunction (ED) is an independent predictor of cardiovascular events. ED is also a reversible disorder, and nitric oxide donors like L-arginine may promote this process. Despite the positive results from several studies, there are some studies that have shown that L-arginine administration did not improve endothelium-dependent dilation or the inflammatory state of patients. Read More

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http://nutritionandmetabolism.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1743-7075-6-13DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2666738PMC
March 2009
1 Read

Physiological models of body composition and human obesity.

Nutr Metab (Lond) 2007 Sep 20;4:19. Epub 2007 Sep 20.

Department of Integrative Biology and Physiology, University of Minnesota, 321 Church St, S,E,, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA.

Background: The body mass index (BMI) is the standard parameter for predicting body fat fraction and for classifying degrees of obesity. Currently available regression equations between BMI and fat are based on 2 or 3 parameter empirical fits and have not been validated for highly obese subjects. We attempt to develop regression relations that are based on realistic models of body composition changes in obesity. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1743-7075-4-19DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2082278PMC
September 2007

Uptake and distribution of orally applied N-acetyl-(14C)neuraminosyl-lactose and N-acetyl-(14C)neuraminic acid in the organs of newborn rats.

Nutr Metab 1979 ;23(1):51-61

N-acetyl-(14C)neuraminosyl-(alpha,2 leads to 3)lactose enzymatically prepared of CMP-NeuNAc and lactose by a particulate enzyme fraction from lactating rat mammary gland was applied orally to newborn rats and examined for uptake and distribution in relation to those of free N-acetyl-(14C)neuraminic acid. The neonates were allowed to stay with their mother before and during the incubation time up to 6 h. Within this time 70% of the given dose was excreted while 30% was retained in the body. Read More

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Hydrogen ion production secondary to metabolism of sulfur-amino acids and organic acids.

Authors:
J C Chan

Nutr Metab 1978 ;22(5):288-94

The rate of acid production in infants and young children was quoted to be 1-2 mEq/kg/day but in fact, the sole reference used in all these instances did not permit such quantitation. In order to evaluate the rate of endogenous acid production, we applied the quantitative technique of Lennon et al. in the following normal subjects, where column A represents hydrogen ion released from metabolism of sulfur-containing amion acids; column B represents hydrogen ion released from incomplete oxidation of organic acids; the sum A and B gives an estimation of endogenous net acid production (NAP). Read More

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The nutritional significance of inborn errors of amino acid metabolism.

Authors:
J H Jonxis

Nutr Metab 1977 ;21(1-3):33-48

Inborn errors of metabolism affect the metabolism of 7 out of 8 essential amino acids and a number of non-essential ones. Dietary treatment has been applied with varying success. The wide variations in the severity of symptoms in this group of diseases are discussed. Read More

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December 1977
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