36 results match your criteria Applied Developmental Science[Journal]

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Promoting physical activity within under-resourced afterschool programs: A qualitative investigation of staff experiences and motivational strategies for engaging youth.

Appl Dev Sci 2018 11;22(1):58-73. Epub 2016 Aug 11.

University of South Carolina.

Afterschool programs (ASPs) have become increasingly recognized as a key context to support youth daily physical activity (PA) accrual. Using Self-Determination Theory (SDT) as a framework, this study examined staff perspectives on the strengths and barriers within under-resourced ASPs for establishing a social-motivational climate for encouraging and supporting youth PA. Analysis of semi-structured staff interviews (28 staff; 7 ASPs) indicated that staff had knowledge and value for establishing a PA-supportive motivational climate. Read More

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https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/10888691.2016.1
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10888691.2016.1211482DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6107084PMC
August 2016
2 Reads

Preadolescents' Relationships with Pet Dogs: Relationship Continuity and Associations with Adjustment.

Appl Dev Sci 2017 31;21(1):67-80. Epub 2016 Mar 31.

Department of Psychological Sciences, Kent State University.

Research on human-animal interaction in children has been studied in isolation rather than integrated with core theories of children's relationships. This study is one of the first to examine how children's relationships with pet dogs are related to their human relationships (parent-child attachments, friendships) and to child adjustment, and to include observational assessment of children's interactions with their pet dog. Children (9 to 11 years old, n = 99) completed questionnaires regarding relationships with pet dogs, parents, and friends. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10888691.2016.1160781DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5800779PMC

Parental Attachment and Children's Memory for Attachment-Relevant Stories.

Appl Dev Sci 2017 6;21(1):14-29. Epub 2016 Feb 6.

Department of Psychology and Social Behavior, University of California, Irvine.

Despite evidence that parents' attachment is associated with children's memory, less is known about the mechanisms underlying this association or the contexts in which the association is most meaningful. The present study examined whether parents' attachment predicted children's memory for stories about attachment-related topics, whether the cohesiveness of children's stories mediated the association between attachment and memory, and whether the association varied by interview support at retrieval. Five- to 6-year-olds completed attachment-relevant stories while parents provided information about their romantic attachment. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10888691.2016.1140577DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5754038PMC
February 2016
3 Reads

Animal Assisted Therapy for Incarcerated Youth: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

Appl Dev Sci 2018 10;22(2):139-153. Epub 2016 Oct 10.

Teacher's Pet: Dogs and Kids Learning Together and Oakland University Animal Assisted Therapy Certificate Program.

Teacher's Pet, an animal assisted therapy (AAT) was assessed in a randomized controlled trial with incarcerated youth from two Midwestern United States detention facilities. The AAT was expected to increase empathy and reduce behavior problems. Participants trained dogs one hour, twice weekly for 10 weeks. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10888691.2016.1234935DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6430139PMC
October 2016
3 Reads

Grateful parents raising grateful children: Niche selection and the socialization of child gratitude.

Appl Dev Sci 2017 24;21(2):106-120. Epub 2016 May 24.

Duke University.

Given that children's exposure to gratitude-related activities may be one way that parents can socialize gratitude in their children, we examined whether parents' niche selection (i.e., tendency to choose perceived gratitude-inducing activities for their children) mediates the association between parents' reports of their own and their children's gratitude. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10888691.2016.1175945DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5608270PMC
May 2016
8 Reads

Animal-Assisted Therapies for Youth with or at risk for Mental Health Problems: A Systematic Review.

Appl Dev Sci 2017 25;21(1):1-13. Epub 2016 Jan 25.

Public Health Communications Consulting, LLC, 900 Mission Hills Lane, Columbus, OH 43235.

To systematically review experimental evidence about animal-assisted therapies (AAT) for children or adolescents with or at risk for mental health conditions, we reviewed all experimental AAT studies published between 2000-2015, and compared studies by animal type, intervention, and outcomes.

Methods: Studies were included if used therapeutically for children and adolescents (≤21 years) with or at risk for a mental health problem; used random assignment or a waitlist comparison/control group; and included child-specific outcome data. Of 1,535 studies, 24 met inclusion criteria. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10888691.2015.1134267DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5546745PMC
January 2016
20 Reads

Children's exposure to sustainability practices during the transition from preschool into school and their learning and socioemotional development.

Appl Dev Sci 2017 19;21(2):121-134. Epub 2016 May 19.

University of Texas, Austin.

Evidence that the learning gains of preschool fade as children transition into elementary school has led to increased efforts to sustain preschool advantages during this key transitional period. This study explores whether the observed benefits of sustainability practices for a range of child outcomes are explained and/or moderated by family and school mechanisms selecting children into experiencing these practices. Analyses of the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Birth Cohort revealed that both family and school factors predicted children's exposure to several PK-3 sustainability practices. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10888691.2016.1175946DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5546791PMC
May 2016
1 Read

Evaluating Youth Development Programs: Progress and Promise.

Appl Dev Sci 2016 17;20(3):188-202. Epub 2015 Dec 17.

Teachers College and the College of Physicians & Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA.

Advances in theories of adolescent development and positive youth development have greatly increased our understanding of how programs and practices with adolescents can impede or enhance their development. In this paper the authors reflect on the progress in research on youth development programs in the last two decades, since possibly the first review of empirical evaluations by Roth, Brooks-Gunn, Murray, and Foster (1998). The authors use the terms Version 1. Read More

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http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/10888691.2015.11
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10888691.2015.1113879DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5222537PMC
December 2015
1 Read

Integrating developmental theory and methodology: Using derivatives to articulate change theories, models, and inferences.

Appl Dev Sci 2016;19(4):217-231

Vanderbilt University.

Matching theories about growth, development, and change to appropriate statistical models can present a challenge, which can result in misuse, misinterpretation, and underutilization of different analytical approaches. We discuss the use of --- the change of a construct with respect to changes in another construct. Derivatives provide a common language linking developmental theory and statistical methods. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10888691.2015.1021924DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4776324PMC
January 2016
18 Reads

Effects of the Program on Indicators of Positive Youth Development Among Urban Youth.

Appl Dev Sci 2016;20(1):16-28. Epub 2015 May 29.

Oregon State University

This study evaluated effects of , a school-based social-emotional and character development (SECD) intervention, on indicators of positive youth development (PYD) among a sample of low-income, ethnic minority youth attending 14 urban schools. The study used a matched-pair, cluster-randomized controlled design at the school level. A multiple-measure self-report protocol assessed four key strengths and resources for PYD: self-concept, peer affiliations, ethics, and social skills. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10888691.2015.1039123DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4771016PMC
May 2015
1 Read

Sports Participation and Positive Correlates in African American, Latino, and White Girls.

Appl Dev Sci 2015 Oct 26;19(4):206-216. Epub 2015 May 26.

Purpose: The purpose of the study was to examine relations among sports participation and positive correlates across African American, Latino, and white girls. Positive correlate variables were self-perceptions (self-worth, body attractiveness, athletic competence), less depression, and participation in extracurricular activities.

Methods: The sample comprised 372 girls (mean age = 12. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10888691.2015.1020156DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4675037PMC
October 2015
2 Reads

The dimensions of successful young adult development: A conceptual and measurement framework.

Appl Dev Sci 2016 16;20(3):150-174. Epub 2015 Dec 16.

Saginaw Valley State University.

In this article, we draw on the theoretical and empirical literature to name what appear to be core dimensions of successful young adult development. We also describe some possible indicators and measures of those dimensions and sketch the kinds of developmental relationships and opportunities young people need in adolescence to effectively transition to a successful young adulthood, as well as the developmental relationships and opportunities young adults need for continued well-being. We name eight social, psychological, behavioral, educational, occupational, health, ethical, and civic dimensions of successful young adult development, and suggest that only a minority of adolescents are well-prepared to make a transition to successful young adulthood. Read More

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http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/10888691.2015.10
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10888691.2015.1082429DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6176765PMC
December 2015
13 Reads

Time-limited, structured youth mentoring and adolescent problem behaviors.

Appl Dev Sci 2015 Oct 16;19(4):196-205. Epub 2015 Mar 16.

Department Head; Department of Human Development and Family Studies, Associate Dean for Research; College of Health and Human Sciences, Colorado State University, 303 Behavioral Sciences Building, Fort Collins, CO 80523, (970) 491-5558.

Youth mentoring can have a profound impact on the lives of high-risk youth. This study presents the Campus Corps program, a time-limited (12-week), structured mentoring program for high-risk youth (ages 11-18), and results from a quasi-experimental pilot evaluation. Baseline and post-intervention problem behavior data from 315 offending youth were used in multiple regression analyses. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10888691.2015.1014484DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4667804PMC
October 2015
19 Reads

Classroom Race/Ethnic Composition, Family-School Connections, and the Transition to School.

Appl Dev Sci 2015;19(3):127-138. Epub 2014 Dec 15.

Southwest University Chongqing, China.

Using data from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Kindergarten Cohort ( = 13,970), we examined whether two aspects of school-family connections-parental involvement and communication quality-accounted for the association between classroom composition and children's academic and socioemotional functioning following the transition to elementary school. For students with more same-race/ethnic representation in their classrooms, greater classroom race/ethnic diversity promoted more parental involvement, which in turn promoted children's interpersonal skills and reading achievement. Classroom diversity made little difference on parental involvement when students had fewer same-race/ethnic peers in the classroom. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10888691.2014.983028DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4633067PMC
December 2014
1 Read

Does IQ Really Predict Job Performance?

Appl Dev Sci 2015 Jul;19(3):153-169

University of Salford.

IQ has played a prominent part in developmental and adult psychology for decades. In the absence of a clear theoretical model of internal cognitive functions, however, construct validity for IQ tests has always been difficult to establish. Test validity, therefore, has always been indirect, by correlating individual differences in test scores with what are assumed to be other criteria of intelligence. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10888691.2014.983635DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4557354PMC
July 2015
1 Read

Family Background, School-Age Trajectories of Activity Participation, and Academic Achievement at the Start of High School.

Appl Dev Sci 2015 Jul;19(3):139-152

Tufts University.

Applying latent class and regression techniques to data from the NICHD Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development ( = 997), this study explored the potential academic advantages of time spent in out-of-school activities. Of particular interest was how these potential advantages played out in relation to the timing and duration of activity participation and the family contexts in which it occurred. Participation closer to the start of high school-including consistent participants and latecomers-was associated with higher grades at the transition into high school, especially for youth from low-income families. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10888691.2014.983031DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4532342PMC
July 2015
1 Read

Understanding Differences in College Persistence: A Longitudinal Examination of Financial Circumstances, Family Obligations, and Discrimination in an Ethnically Diverse Sample.

Appl Dev Sci 2015 Jan;19(1):4-18

University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA.

Ethnic and generation differences in motivation and achievement have been well-established. However, less work has examined the role of social factors on educational outcomes among individuals from diverse backgrounds. With a longitudinal sample of 408 Latino, Asian, and European-American students, we examine family, discrimination, and financial factors in 12th grade and two years later as predictors of persistence four years after high school, and as mediators of ethnic and generation differences in persistence. Read More

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http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/10888691.2014.946
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10888691.2014.946030DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4401427PMC
January 2015
1 Read

Development and Coherence of Beliefs About Disease Causality and Prevention.

Authors:
Carol K Sigelman

Appl Dev Sci 2014 Oct;18(4):201-213

George Washington University.

Guided by a naïve theories perspective on the development of thinking about disease, this study of 188 children aged 6 to 18 examined knowledge of HIV/AIDS causality and prevention using parallel measures derived from open-ended and structured interviews. Knowledge of both risk factors and prevention rules, as well as conceptual understanding of AIDS causality, increased with age. Younger children displayed more advanced knowledge in response to structured questions than in response to open-ended questions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10888691.2014.950734DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4287964PMC
October 2014

Perceived Neighborhood Safety and Adolescent School Functioning.

Appl Dev Sci 2014 Jan;18(2):61-75

Department of Sociology and Population Research Center, The University of Texas at Austin, 305 E. 23rd Street, G1800, Austin, TX 78712-1699,

This study examined the association between adolescents' perceptions of their neighborhoods' safety and multiple elements of their functioning in school with data on 15 year olds from the NICHD Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development ( = 924). In general, perceived neighborhood safety was more strongly associated with aspects of schooling that were more psychosocial in nature (e.g. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10888691.2014.876276DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4097377PMC
January 2014

Multiple Forensic Interviews During Investigations of Child Sexual Abuse: A Cost-Effectiveness Analysis.

Appl Dev Sci 2013 ;17(4)

Department of Psychology, University of Massachusetts, Lowell.

In cases of suspected child sexual abuse (CSA) some professionals routinely recommend multiple interviews by the same interviewer because any additional details provided might improve decision-making and increase perpetrator convictions. We analyzed alternative policies about child interviewing to estimate the probability that a policy of all children receiving multiple interviews will increase criminal convictions and better protect children. Using decision analysis, we prepared a decision tree reflecting the structure through which a case of possible CSA passes through the health care, welfare, and legal systems with an estimated probability of conviction of the offender. Read More

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http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/10888691.2013.836
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10888691.2013.836033DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3825174PMC
January 2013
5 Reads

Mapping temporal dynamics in social interactions with unified structural equation modeling: A description and demonstration revealing time-dependent sex differences in play behavior.

Appl Dev Sci 2013 Jul;17(3):152-168

Department of Psychology, The Pennsylvania State University.

Developmental science is rich with observations of social interactions, but few available methodological and statistical approaches take full advantage of the information provided by these data. The authors propose implementation of the unified structural equation model (uSEM), a network analysis technique, for observational data coded repeatedly across time; uSEM captures the temporal dynamics underlying changes in behavior at the individual level by revealing the ways in which a single person influences - concurrently and in the future - other people. To demonstrate the utility of uSEM, the authors applied it to ratings of positive affect and vigor of activity during children's unstructured laboratory play with unfamiliar, same-sex peers. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10888691.2013.805953DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3772550PMC
July 2013
6 Reads

Perceived Discrimination, Coping Strategies, and Mexican Origin Adolescents' Internalizing and Externalizing Behaviors: Examining the Moderating Role of Gender and Cultural Orientation.

Appl Dev Sci 2013 ;17(1):4-19

Department of Educational Psychology, University of Illinois at Chicago.

The literature identifying effective coping strategies related to perceived discrimination has yielded mixed findings, suggesting that recommendations for effective coping may vary by individual and group differences. The current study examined the influence of perceived discrimination and coping strategies on Mexican origin adolescents' later internalizing symptoms and externalizing behaviors, and assessed the moderating roles of gender and cultural orientation. Participants included 189 adolescents (46% male, 54% female) interviewed at 7 and 8 grade. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10888691.2013.748417DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3700552PMC
January 2013
3 Reads

Developmental Pathways among Adaptive Functioning and Externalizing and Internalizing Behavioral Problems: Cascades from Childhood into Adolescence.

Appl Dev Sci 2013 ;17(2):76-87

Child and Family Research Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development.

A describes a longitudinal cross-domain unique relation. Here, a 3-wave multivariate design and developmental cascade analysis were used to investigate pathways among adaptive functioning and externalizing and internalizing behavioral problems in a community sample of 134 children seen at 4, 10, and 14 years. Children, mothers, and teachers provided data. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10888691.2013.774875DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3622712PMC
January 2013

High School Gay-Straight Alliances (GSAs) and Young Adult Well-Being: An Examination of GSA Presence, Participation, and Perceived Effectiveness.

Appl Dev Sci 2011 Nov;15(4):175-185

Prevention Research Center, Arizona State University.

Gay-Straight Alliances (GSAs) are student-led, school-based clubs that aim to provide a safe environment in the school context for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) students, as well as their straight allies. The present study examines the potential for GSAs to support positive youth development and to reduce associations among LGBT-specific school victimization and negative young adult well-being. The sample includes 245 LGBT young adults, ages 21-25, who retrospectively reported on the presence of a GSA in their high school, their participation in their school's GSA, and their perceptions of whether or not their GSA was effective in improving school safety. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10888691.2011.607378DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3217265PMC
November 2011
2 Reads

Nonmarital Fertility, Family Structure, and the Early School Achievement of Young Children from Different Race/Ethnic and Immigration Groups.

Appl Dev Sci 2011 Jul;15(3):156-170

Department of Sociology and Population Research Center, University of Texas at Austin.

Working from a life course perspective, this study examined the links between mothers' fertility and relationship statuses and children's early school achievement and how these links varied by race/ethnicity and immigration status. Analyses of nationally representative data from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Kindergarten Cohort revealed that children born to unmarried women scored lower than children of married women on math tests in kindergarten and first grade. This pattern was most attributable to associated differences in family income and parent education, and it was moderated by women's marital and relationship statuses after having their children. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10888691.2011.587721DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3164985PMC

Racial/Ethnic Differences in Effects of Welfare Policies on Early School Readiness and Later Achievement.

Appl Dev Sci 2010 ;14(3):137-153

Harvard Graduate School of Education.

This study examined whether the effects of employment-based policies on children's math and reading achievement differed for African American, Latino and Caucasian children of welfare receiving parents, and if so, why. Two kinds of employment policies were examined: education-first programs with an emphasis on adult education and job training; and work-first programs with an emphasis on immediate employment. With data from two- and five-year follow-ups in four experimental demonstrations in Grand Rapids, Michigan (N = 591) and Riverside County, California (N = 629), there was evidence of small positive effects of the Grand Rapids and Riverside education-first programs on African American and Latino children's school readiness and math scores. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10888691.2010.493068DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3211096PMC
January 2010

Disentangling Ethnic and Contextual Influences Among Parents Raising Youth in High-Risk Communities.

Appl Dev Sci 2008 Oct;12(4):211-219

University of Vermont.

This article reports on analyses examining contextual influences on parenting with an ethnically and geographically diverse sample of parents (predominantly mothers) raising 387 children (49% ethnic minority; 51% male) in high-risk communities. Parents and children were followed longitudinally from first through tenth grades. Contextual influences included geographical location, neighborhood risk, SES, and family stress. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10888690802388151DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2748935PMC
October 2008
5 Reads

Sociocultural Factors and School Engagement among African American Youth: The Roles of Racial Discrimination, Racial Socialization and Ethnic Identity.

Appl Dev Sci 2009 Apr 10;13(2):51-73. Epub 2009 Apr 10.

Department of Human Development and Family Studies, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania.

This study investigated the links between racial discrimination and school engagement and the roles of racial socialization and ethnic identity as protective factors in those linkages in a sample of 148, 6 through 12 grade African American adolescents from working and middle class two-parent families. In home interviews youth described their ethnic identity, discrimination experiences at school, and school engagement (school bonding, school grades, school self-esteem), and parents rated their racial socialization practices. Analyses revealed that discrimination was negatively related to school self-esteem and school bonding. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10888690902801442DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4850833PMC
April 2009
8 Reads

Is Maternal Marriage Beneficial for Low-Income Adolescents?

Appl Dev Sci 2009 ;13(4):153-171

University of Pittsburgh.

The present study investigated the association of mothers' marriage and changes in young adolescents' cognitive and socioemotional development and changes in family processes. Analyses employed longitudinal data from the Three-City Study to track maternal partnerships for 860 lowincome adolescents (10-14 years-old in Wave 1) across a 16 month period. No short-term benefits or risks emerged for youth when mothers entered marriage, with few changes in family or maternal functioning linked with marriage formation as well. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10888690903287633DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2871334PMC
January 2009
2 Reads

Excavating Culture: Summary of Results.

Appl Dev Sci 2008 Oct;12(4):220-226

University of Michigan.

This is a companion paper to the seven articles also published in this special issue of This paper summarizes and discusses the results from common analyses that were conducted on different datasets. The common analyses were designed to disentangle contextual and ethnic influences on parenting. Initial ethnic group differences were found in many of the datasets with multiple ethnic groups. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10888690802388169DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3806321PMC
October 2008
21 Reads

Excavating Culture: Disentangling Ethnic Differences from Contextual Influences in Parenting.

Appl Dev Sci 2008 ;12(4):163-175

George Washington University.

Historically, much of the research on parenting has not disentangled the influences of race/ethnicity, SES, and culture on family functioning and the development of children and adolescents. This special issue addresses this gap by disentangling ethnic differences in parenting behaviors from their contextual influences, thereby deepening understanding of parenting processes in diverse families. Six members of the Parenting section of the Study Group on Race, Culture and Ethnicity (SGRCE) introduce and implement a novel approach toward understanding this question. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10888690802387880DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3773221PMC
January 2008
11 Reads

Disentangling Ethnicity and Context as Predictors of Parenting Within Rural African American Families.

Appl Dev Sci 2008 Jan 14;12(4):202-210. Epub 2008 Oct 14.

University of Georgia.

This study will address the initial question: Are there ethnic differences in parenting that remain when contextual variables are controlled and are related to culture, focusing on two samples of rural African American families. This study is part of a series of coordinated studies presented in this special issue (Le et al., 2008). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10888690802388144DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3513757PMC
January 2008
3 Reads

Predicting Positive Citizenship from Adolescence to Young Adulthood: The Effects of a Civic Context.

Appl Dev Sci 2008 18;12(8):38-53. Epub 2008 Mar 18.

America's Promise-The Alliance for Youth.

Researchers have theorized that programs to promote positive citizenship should begin with an opportunity for adolescents to participate in civic activities, such as community service or political volunteering. In this article we extend the theory by arguing that a more systemic approach is needed, in which a civic context is developed to promote citizenship. We hypothesize that living within a consistent civic context leads to civic engagement in late adolescence and into young adulthood. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10888690801910567DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3403711PMC
March 2008
5 Reads

Long-Term Effects of the Seattle Social Development Intervention on School Bonding Trajectories.

Appl Dev Sci 2001 ;5(4):225-236

University of Washington.

Bonding to school has been shown to be a protective factor against many problem behaviors. This study examines the effects of intervention during the elementary grades on changes in school bonding from middle school through high school, using hierarchical linear modeling. A full intervention group (Grades 1-6), a late intervention group (interventions in Grades 5 and 6 only), and a control group offered no special intervention were compared. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1207/S1532480XADS0504_04DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2040120PMC
January 2001

Issues in the Economic Evaluation of Prevention Programs.

Appl Dev Sci 2003 Apr;7(2):76-86

Pennsylvania State University.

Economic analysis plays an increasingly important role in prevention research. In this article, we describe one form of economic analysis, a cost analysis. Such an analysis captures not only the direct costs of an intervention but also its impact on the broader social costs of the illness or problem targeted. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1207/S1532480XADS0702_4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2836594PMC
April 2003
1 Read

The Color of My Skin: A Measure to Assess Children's Perceptions of Their Skin Color.

Appl Dev Sci 2000 Sep;4(4):208-221

Wellesley College.

The Color of My Skin is an instrument developed to assess children's internalized idea (abstraction) of the color of their skin; their satisfaction with that color; the desire, if any, to change the color of their skin; and their affect regarding their skin color. The assessment is part of a questionnaire utilized in a 3-year longitudinal study that examines psychosocial development, physical health, and behavioral adjustment of Puerto Rican children (N = 257) reared in the Greater Boston area. The results demonstrate that children's internalized representation of their skin color is a construct that can be reliably and validly measured. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1207/S1532480XADS0404_3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3060784PMC
September 2000
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