42 results match your criteria Applied Cognitive Psychology[Journal]

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Effects of Probabilities, Adverse Outcomes, and Status Quo on Perceived Riskiness of Medications: Testing Explanatory Hypotheses Concerning Gist, Worry, and Numeracy.

Appl Cogn Psychol 2018 Nov-Dec;32(6):714-726. Epub 2018 Sep 1.

Cornell University.

We tested predictions of fuzzy-trace theory that qualitative health status and gist representations (ordinal and categorical) of risks contribute to willingness to start medications, beyond effects of objective risk, emotion (worry), and numeracy. Adults in two experiments were given hypothetical scenarios based on actual medications, varying health status quo (acceptable or unacceptable), adverse event (pneumonia or cancer), and four levels of quantitative risk (from 1/100,000 to 1/100) between subjects. In both experiments, cancer and higher quantitative risk elicited greater worry and risk perceptions and reduced willingness to start a new medication. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/acp.3448DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6345391PMC
September 2018

Narrative skill and testimonial accuracy in typically developing children and those with intellectual disabilities.

Appl Cogn Psychol 2018 Sep-Oct;32(5):550-560. Epub 2018 Jun 27.

Psychology University of Cambridge Cambridge UK.

Children must describe maltreatment coherently for their testimony to be influential in court. We know little about how well children with intellectual disabilities (CWID) describe their experiences relative to typically developing (TD) children, despite CWID's vulnerability to maltreatment. We investigated children's reports of an experienced event and compared coherence in CWID (mild to moderate impairment: 7-11 years) with TD children matched for mental (4-10 years) or chronological age (7-11 years). Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/acp.3427
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/acp.3427DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6175339PMC
June 2018
1 Read

The effect of layout and pacing on learning from diagrams with unnecessary text.

Appl Cogn Psychol 2018 Sep-Oct;32(5):610-621. Epub 2018 Aug 8.

Department of Education Utrecht University Utrecht The Netherlands.

Although the presentation of extraneous (i.e., irrelevant or unnecessary) information hinders learning, it is unclear whether and how layout and pacing influence this effect. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/acp.3445DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6175313PMC

The first direct replication on using verbal credibility assessment for the detection of deceptive intentions.

Appl Cogn Psychol 2018 Sep-Oct;32(5):592-599. Epub 2018 Jul 16.

Department of Psychology University of Amsterdam Amsterdam The Netherlands.

Verbal deception detection has gained momentum as a technique to tell truth-tellers from liars. At the same time, researchers' degrees of freedom make it hard to assess the robustness of effects. Replication research can help evaluate how reproducible an effect is. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/acp.3439DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6174984PMC

A sound effect: Exploration of the distinctiveness advantage in voice recognition.

Appl Cogn Psychol 2018 Sep-Oct;32(5):526-536. Epub 2018 Jul 4.

University of Southampton Department of Psychology Southampton UK.

Two experiments are presented, which explore the presence of a distinctiveness advantage when recognising unfamiliar voices. In Experiment 1, distinctive voices were recognised significantly better, and with greater confidence, in a sequential same/different matching task compared with typical voices. These effects were replicated and extended in Experiment 2, as distinctive voices were recognised better even under challenging listening conditions imposed by nonsense sentences and temporal reversal. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/acp.3424
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/acp.3424DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6175009PMC
July 2018
15 Reads

Effects of cannabis on eyewitness memory: A field study.

Appl Cogn Psychol 2018 Jul-Aug;32(4):420-428. Epub 2018 Apr 19.

Department of Criminal Law and Criminology, Faculty of Law Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam Amsterdam The Netherlands.

Eyewitnesses to crimes are regularly under the influence of drugs, such as cannabis. Yet there is very little research on how the use of cannabis affects eyewitness memory. In the present study, we assessed the effects of cannabis on eyewitness recall and lineup identification performance in a field setting. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/acp.3414DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6055797PMC

Drawing what lies ahead: False intentions are more abstractly depicted than true intentions.

Appl Cogn Psychol 2018 Jul-Aug;32(4):518-522. Epub 2018 Jun 13.

Department of Psychology University of Gothenburg Gothenburg Sweden.

The aim of this study was to examine how people mentally represent and depict true and false statements about claimed future actions-so-called true and false intentions. On the basis of construal level theory, which proposes that subjectively unlikely events are more abstractly represented than likely ones, we hypothesized that false intentions should be represented at a more abstract level than true intentions. Fifty-six hand drawings, produced by participants to describe mental images accompanying either true or false intentions, were rated on level of abstractness by a second set of participants ( = 117) blind to the veracity of the intentions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/acp.3422DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6055733PMC

Cross-cultural differences in object recognition: Comparing asylum seekers from Sub-Saharan Africa and a matched Western European control group.

Appl Cogn Psychol 2018 Jul-Aug;32(4):463-473. Epub 2018 May 29.

Department of Criminal Law and Criminology Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam Amsterdam The Netherlands.

Nowadays, more and more people report about their memories in cross-cultural contexts. In international criminal settings and asylum procedures, object recognition tests can provide valuable information, for example, about weapons used during a crime or landmarks from the claimed region of origin. This study was the first to compare object recognition performance by asylum seekers from Sub-Saharan Africa to a matched Western European control group. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/acp.3419DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6055677PMC
May 2018
3 Reads

Supporting child witnesses during identification lineups: Exploring the effectiveness of registered intermediaries.

Appl Cogn Psychol 2018 May-Jun;32(3):367-375. Epub 2018 Apr 2.

City, University of London London UK.

Performance at identification lineup was assessed in eighty-five 6- to 11-year-old typically developing children. Children viewed a live staged event involving 2 male actors, and were asked to identify the perpetrators from 2 separate lineups (one perpetrator-present lineup and one perpetrator-absent lineup). Half the children took part in lineups adapted by a registered intermediary (an impartial, trained professional who facilitates understanding and communication between vulnerable witnesses and members of the justice system), and half took part in "best-practice" lineups, according to the current guidance for eyewitness identification in England and Wales. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/acp.3412
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/acp.3412DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5969220PMC
April 2018
2 Reads

Automated verbal credibility assessment of intentions: The model statement technique and predictive modeling.

Appl Cogn Psychol 2018 May-Jun;32(3):354-366. Epub 2018 Apr 2.

Department of Psychology University of Amsterdam Amsterdam The Netherlands.

Recently, verbal credibility assessment has been extended to the detection of deceptive intentions, the use of a model statement, and predictive modeling. The current investigation combines these 3 elements to detect deceptive intentions on a large scale. Participants read a model statement and wrote a truthful or deceptive statement about their planned weekend activities (Experiment 1). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/acp.3407DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5969289PMC
April 2018
1 Read

Training self-assessment and task-selection skills to foster self-regulated learning: Do trained skills transfer across domains?

Appl Cogn Psychol 2018 Mar-Apr;32(2):270-277. Epub 2018 Feb 9.

Department of EducationUtrecht UniversityUtrechtThe Netherlands.

Students' ability to accurately self-assess their performance and select a suitable subsequent learning task in response is imperative for effective self-regulated learning. Video modeling examples have proven effective for training self-assessment and task-selection skills, and-importantly-such training fostered self-regulated learning outcomes. It is unclear, however, whether trained skills would transfer across domains. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/acp.3392DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5873380PMC
February 2018
3 Reads

Selective Association Between Tetris Game Play and Visuospatial Working Memory: A Preliminary Investigation.

Appl Cogn Psychol 2017 Jul-Aug;31(4):438-445. Epub 2017 Jul 12.

Medical Research Council Cognition and Brain Sciences UnitCambridgeUK.

Recent experimental and clinical research has suggested that Tetris game play can disrupt maladaptive forms of mental imagery because Tetris competes for limited cognitive resources within visuospatial working memory (WM) that contribute to imagery. Whether or not Tetris performance is selectively associated with visuospatial WM remains to be tested. In this study, young adults (N = 46) completed six standardized measures indexing verbal and non-verbal reasoning, verbal and visuospatial short-term memory, and verbal and visuospatial WM. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/acp.3339DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5836929PMC
July 2017
1 Read

The Effects of Alcohol Intoxication on Accuracy and the Confidence-Accuracy Relationship in Photographic Simultaneous Line-ups.

Appl Cogn Psychol 2017 Jul-Aug;31(4):379-391. Epub 2017 Jun 27.

School of PsychologyFlinders UniversityAdelaideAustralia.

Acute alcohol intoxication during encoding can impair subsequent identification accuracy, but results across studies have been inconsistent, with studies often finding no effect. Little is also known about how alcohol intoxication affects the identification confidence-accuracy relationship. We randomly assigned women ( = 153) to consume alcohol (dosed to achieve a 0. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/acp.3332DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5519942PMC
June 2017
1 Read

More Evidence for Three Types of Cognitive Style: Validating the Object-Spatial Imagery and Verbal Questionnaire Using Eye Tracking when Learning with Texts and Pictures.

Appl Cogn Psychol 2017 Jan-Feb;31(1):109-115. Epub 2016 Nov 28.

University of Duisburg-Essen Essen Germany.

There is some indication that people differ regarding their visual and verbal cognitive style. The Object-Spatial Imagery and Verbal Questionnaire (OSIVQ) assumes a three-dimensional cognitive style model, which distinguishes between object imagery, spatial imagery and verbal dimensions. Using eye tracking as a means to observe actual gaze behaviours when learning with text-picture combinations, the current study aims to validate this three-dimensional assumption by linking the OSIVQ to learning behaviour. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/acp.3300DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5248590PMC
November 2016
1 Read

Why Education Predicts Decreased Belief in Conspiracy Theories.

Appl Cogn Psychol 2017 Jan-Feb;31(1):50-58. Epub 2016 Nov 28.

Department of Experimental and Applied Psychology VU Amsterdam/The NSCR Amsterdam The Netherlands.

People with high education are less likely than people with low education to believe in conspiracy theories. It is yet unclear why these effects occur, however, as education predicts a range of cognitive, emotional, and social outcomes. The present research sought to identify mediators of the relationship between education and conspiracy beliefs. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/acp.3301DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5248629PMC
November 2016

False Memories and Free Speech: Is Scientific Debate Being Suppressed?

Appl Cogn Psychol 2017 Jan-Feb;31(1):45-49. Epub 2016 Oct 14.

University College London London UK.

Commentators have raised important points, including the relative contribution of false beliefs versus false memories and the issue of how findings in the laboratory can be generalized to the real world, which we have addressed here. However, some of the commentaries misrepresent what we said, make criticisms that are unfounded, or imply that our article should not have been published in Applied Cognitive Psychology. We relate these responses to a more general literature on the suppression of unwanted scientific findings and suggest that the study of false memory would be better served by more openness to alternative perspectives. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/acp.3285DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5248650PMC
October 2016

Misrepresentations and Flawed Logic About the Prevalence of False Memories.

Appl Cogn Psychol 2017 Jan-Feb;31(1):31-33. Epub 2016 Oct 14.

University of Portsmouth Portsmouth UK.

Brewin and Andrews (2016) propose that just 15% of people, or even fewer, are susceptible to false childhood memories. If this figure were true, then false memories would still be a serious problem. But the figure is higher than 15%. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/acp.3265DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5248607PMC
October 2016
2 Reads

Creating Memories for False Autobiographical Events in Childhood: A Systematic Review.

Appl Cogn Psychol 2017 Jan-Feb;31(1):2-23. Epub 2016 Apr 8.

Royal Holloway, University of London London UK.

Using a framework that distinguishes autobiographical belief, recollective experience, and confidence in memory, we review three major paradigms used to suggest false childhood events to adults: imagination inflation, false feedback and memory implantation. Imagination inflation and false feedback studies increase the belief that a suggested event occurred by a small amount such that events are still thought unlikely to have happened. In memory implantation studies, some recollective experience for the suggested events is induced on average in 47% of participants, but only in 15% are these experiences likely to be rated as full memories. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/acp.3220DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5248593PMC

Public Attitudes on the Ethics of Deceptively Planting False Memories to Motivate Healthy Behavior.

Appl Cogn Psychol 2016 Nov-Dec;30(6):885-897. Epub 2016 Sep 21.

School of Psychology University of Surrey Guildford UK.

Researchers have proposed that planting false memories could have positive behavioral consequences. The idea of deceptively planting 'beneficial' false memories outside of the laboratory raises important ethical questions, but how might the general public appraise this moral dilemma? In two studies, participants from the USA and UK read about a fictional 'false-memory therapy' that led people to adopt healthy behaviors. Participants then reported their attitudes toward the acceptability of this therapy, via scale-rating (both studies) and open-text (study 2) responses. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/acp.3274
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/acp.3274DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5215583PMC
September 2016
2 Reads

The Potential for False Memories is Bigger than What Brewin and Andrews Suggest.

Appl Cogn Psychol 2017 Jan-Feb;31(1):24-25. Epub 2016 Oct 14.

Forensic Psychology Section, Faculty of Psychology and Neuroscience Maastricht University Maastricht The Netherlands.

Brewin and Andrews (2016) reviewed the literature on false memory propensity for childhood events. In this commentary, we critically evaluate their basic claim that proneness to false memories of childhood experiences is more limited than has been articulated in the literature. We show that Brewin and Andrews were selective in their inclusion of false memory studies, thereby ignoring relevant research related to autobiographical false memories. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/acp.3262DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6084313PMC
October 2016
1 Read

The Impact of Testing on the Formation of Children's and Adults' False Memories.

Appl Cogn Psychol 2016 Sep-Oct;30(5):785-794. Epub 2016 Jul 19.

Section Forensic Psychology, Department of Clinical Psychological Science, Faculty of Psychology and NeuroscienceMaastricht Universitythe Netherlands; Department of PsychologyCity University LondonUK.

Witnesses are frequently questioned immediately following a crime. The effects of such testing on false recall are inconclusive: Testing may inoculate against subsequent misinformation or enhance false memory formation. We examined whether different types of processing can account for these discrepancies. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/acp.3254DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5129519PMC
July 2016
1 Read

LearningRx Cognitive Training Effects in Children Ages 8-14: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

Appl Cogn Psychol 2016 Sep-Oct;30(5):815-826. Epub 2016 Aug 2.

Gibson Institute of Cognitive Research Colorado Springs USA.

In a randomized controlled study, we examined the effects of a one-on-one cognitive training program on memory, visual and auditory processing, processing speed, reasoning, attention, and General Intellectual Ability (GIA) score for students ages 8-14. Participants were randomly assigned to either an experimental group to complete 60 h of cognitive training or to a wait-list control group. The purpose of the study was to examine changes in multiple cognitive skills after completing cognitive training with ThinkRx, a LearningRx program. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/acp.3257DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5108426PMC
August 2016
6 Reads

Effects of Task Interruption and Background Speech on Word Processed Writing.

Appl Cogn Psychol 2016 May-Jun;30(3):430-439. Epub 2016 Apr 13.

Department of Building, Energy, and Environmental Engineering University of Gävle Gävle Sweden.

Task interruptions and background speech, both part of the everyday situation in office environments, impair cognitive performance. The current experiments explored the combined effects of background speech and task interruptions on word processed writing-arguably, a task representative of office work. Participants wrote stories, in silence or in the presence of background speech (monologues, halfalogues and dialogues), and were occasionally interrupted by a secondary task. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/acp.3221DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5074307PMC
April 2016
1 Read

Please be Honest and Provide Evidence: Deterrents of Deception in an Online Insurance Fraud Context.

Appl Cogn Psychol 2016 Sep-Oct;30(5):768-774. Epub 2016 Jul 19.

Department of Psychology University of Portsmouth Portsmouth UK.

The present experiment examined whether people could be deterred from lying in an online insurance claim setting. A total of 96 participants were asked to submit a theft insurance claim. Reflecting real life, submitting a claim that went beyond the actual costs of the stolen items was associated with advantages and disadvantages. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/acp.3252DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6084311PMC

Reducing the Misinformation Effect Through Initial Testing: Take Two Tests and Recall Me in the Morning?

Appl Cogn Psychol 2016 Jan-Feb;30(1):61-69. Epub 2015 Sep 15.

Department of Psychology, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada.

Initial retrieval of an event can reduce people's susceptibility to misinformation. We explored whether protective effects of initial testing could be obtained on final free recall and source-monitoring tests. After studying six household scenes (e. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/acp.3167DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4776340PMC
September 2015
1 Read

Super-recognisers in Action: Evidence from Face-matching and Face Memory Tasks.

Appl Cogn Psychol 2016 Jan-Feb;30(1):81-91. Epub 2015 Oct 20.

Department of Psychology Bournemouth University Dorset UK.

Individuals employed in forensic or security settings are often required to compare faces of ID holders to document photographs, or to recognise the faces of suspects in closed-circuit television footage. It has long been established that both tasks produce a high error rate amongst typical perceivers. This study sought to determine the performance of individuals with exceptionally good face memory ('super-recognisers') on applied facial identity matching and memory tasks. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/acp.3170DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6084338PMC
October 2015

Attorneys' Questions and Children's Productivity in Child Sexual Abuse Criminal Trials.

Appl Cogn Psychol 2014 Sep-Oct;28(5):780-788

USC Gould School of Law, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, USA.

We investigated the links between questions child witnesses are asked in court, children's answers, and case outcome. Samples of acquittals and convictions were matched on child age, victim-defendant relationship, and allegation count and severity. Transcripts were coded for question types, including a previously under-examined type of potentially suggestive question, declarative questions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/acp.3048DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4390047PMC
April 2015
2 Reads

Mediators of the relationship between life events and memory functioning in a community sample of adults.

Appl Cogn Psychol 2014 September-October;28(5):626-633

Department of Biobehavioral Health, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, USA ; Department of Medicine, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, USA.

The present study examines the association of frequency and severity of life events with memory functioning in a community sample of adults. We tested the hypothesis that stress-related cognitive interference mediated the effects of recent life events on cognition, in addition to examining the potential roles of fatigue, sleep disturbances, and depression. The sample consisted of 310 adults (age range 19-83) who received a battery of cognitive tests assessing their primary memory, episodic memory, and working memory. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/acp.3043
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/acp.3043DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4339058PMC
March 2015
9 Reads

Memory for Patient Information as a Function of Experience in Mental Health.

Appl Cogn Psychol 2012 May;26(3):462-474

Department of Psychology, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, USA.

Mental health clinicians are tasked to diagnose and treat the millions of people worldwide seeking help for mental health issues. This paper investigates the memory clinicians have for patient information. We hypothesize that clinicians encapsulate mental health knowledge through experience into more abstract concepts, as in other domains changing what clinicians remember about patients compared with non-professionals. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/acp.2832DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3481845PMC
May 2012
1 Read

The Integration of Emotions in Memories: Cognitive-Emotional Distinctiveness and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder.

Appl Cogn Psychol 2011 Sep;25(5):811-816

University of North Texas.

The current study examined cognitive-emotional distinctiveness (CED), the extent to which emotions are linked with event information, in memories associated with PTSD. Participants either with PTSD (n=68) or without PTSD (n=40) completed a modified multidimensional scaling technique to measure CED for their most negative and most positive events. The results revealed that participants in the PTSD group evidenced significantly lower levels of CED. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/acp.1752DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3577054PMC
September 2011
12 Reads

SAT Performance: Understanding the Contributions of Cognitive/Learning and Social/Personality Factors.

Appl Cogn Psychol 2011 Jul;25(4):528-535

Department of Psychology, The University of Texas at San Antonio, USA.

This study identifies a number of sources of individual differences in SAT performance by examining the simultaneous contributions of factors from two otherwise disparate research areas, namely cognition/learning and social/personality. Preliminary analysis revealed that just the cognitive/learning measures accounted for 37.8, 41. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/acp.1725DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3144549PMC

Age Effects in Cultural Life Scripts.

Appl Cogn Psychol 2011 Mar;25(2):291-298

Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, Duke University.

Life scripts are culturally shared expectations about the timing of life events in an idealized life course. Because they are cultural semantic knowledge, they should be known by all adult age groups including those who have not lived through all events in the life script, but this has not been tested previously. Young, middle-aged and older adults from the Netherlands were therefore asked in this online study to imagine an ordinary Dutch infant and to name the seven most important events that were likely to take place in the life of this prototypical child. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/acp.1690DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3972131PMC
March 2011
6 Reads

Do human figure diagrams help alleged victims of sexual abuse provide elaborate and clear accounts of physical contact with alleged perpetrators?

Appl Cogn Psychol 2010 Feb;24(2):287-300

University of Cambridge, UK.

The present study examined whether the use of human figure diagrams within a well-structured interview was associated with more elaborate and clearer accounts about physical contact that had occurred in the course of an alleged abuse. The sample included investigative interviews of 88 children ranging from 4 to 13 years of age. Children were interviewed using the NICHD Investigative Interview Protocol, and were then asked a series of questions in association with unclothed gender-neutral outline diagrams of a human body. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/acp.1564DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2824239PMC
February 2010
3 Reads

How Accurately Can Older Adults Evaluate the Quality of Their Text Recall? The Effect of Providing Standards on Judgment Accuracy.

Appl Cogn Psychol 2009 ;24(1):134

Department of Psychology, Wake Forest University.

Adults have difficulties accurately judging how well they have learned text materials; unfortunately, such low levels of accuracy may obscure age-related deficits. Higher levels of accuracy have been obtained when younger adults make postdictions about which test questions they answered correctly. Accordingly, we focus on the accuracy of postdictive judgments to evaluate whether age deficits would emerge with higher levels of accuracy and whether people's postdictive accuracy would benefit from providing an appropriate standard of evlauation. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/acp.1553
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/acp.1553DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2814426PMC
January 2009
2 Reads

Most People who Think that They are Likely to Enter Psychotherapy also Think it is Plausible that They could have Forgotten their own Memories of Childhood Sexual Abuse.

Appl Cogn Psychol 2009 ;23(2):170-173

Duke University, Durham North Carolina.

Pezdek and Blandon-Gitlin (in press) found that 25% of their participants reported as plausible or very plausible that they themselves could have been a victim of childhood sexual abuse without being able to remember it. In addition, they found that the 25% figure increased to 61% for participants who reported that they were likely at some point in their life to seek psychotherapy. Given past work showing that it is easier to implant a false memory for plausible events, and counter to Pezdek and Blandon-Gitlin's conclusions, these data point to a substantial danger of implanting false memories of childhood sexual abuse during therapy in many people and in most people who are likely to go into therapy. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/acp.1462DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2752902PMC
January 2009
2 Reads

The Reverse-Caricature Effect Revisited: Familiarization With Frontal Facial Caricatures Improves Veridical Face Recognition.

Appl Cogn Psychol 2009 Jul;23(5):733-742

Texas A&M University, USA.

Prior research suggests that recognition of a person's face can be facilitated by exaggerating the distinctive features of the face during training. We tested if this 'reverse-caricature effect' would be robust to procedural variations that created more difficult learning environments. Specifically, we examined whether the effect would emerge with frontal rather than three-quarter views, after very brief exposure to caricatures during the learning phase and after modest rotations of faces during the recognition phase. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/acp.1539
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/acp.1539DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2995276PMC
July 2009
8 Reads

Eye Movements When Looking at Print Advertisements: The Goal of the Viewer Matters.

Appl Cogn Psychol 2008 Jul;22(5):697-707

Department of Psychology, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, USA.

Viewers looked at print advertisements as their eye movements were recorded. Half of them were asked to rate how much they liked each ad (for convenience, we will generally use the term 'ad' from this point on), while the other half were asked to rate the effectiveness of each ad. Previous research indicated that viewers who were asked to consider purchasing products in the ads looked at the text earlier and more often than the picture part of the ad. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/acp.1389DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2677816PMC
July 2008
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Remembering and Retelling Stories in Individual and Collaborative Contexts.

Appl Cogn Psychol 2008 Dec;22(9):1275-1297

Department of Psychiatry, Foothills Medical Centre and University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada.

Collaborative cognition, in which two or more people work together on a cognitive task, may be typical of everyday life, and may even represent an important aspect of everyday cognitive adaptation for older adults. We examined collaborative memory for stories by comparing younger (n = 64) older (n = 66) individuals and dyads with collaborative performance produced by married spouses and stranger dyads. Overall, across four collaborative recall products (two positive and two negative performance indicators), some evidence for our hypothesis of general or selective collaborative effectiveness was observed. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/acp.1437DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2843526PMC
December 2008
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Children's Dietary Recalls from Three Validation Studies: Types of Intrusion Vary with Retention Interval.

Appl Cogn Psychol 2008 Dec;22(8):1038-1061

University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, USA.

Using previously collected data of fourth-grade children observed eating school meals and then interviewed, we categorized intrusions (food items reported but not observed eaten) as stretches (on the child's tray) or confabulations (not on the child's tray). We investigated intrusions, confabulations, and stretches, and the role of liking, at different retention intervals (morning interviews about the previous day's intake; evening interviews about that day's intake) and under different reporting-order prompts (forward; reverse). As retention interval between consumption and report increased, the likelihood 1) increased that reported items were intrusions, that reported items were confabulations, and that intrusions were confabulations; and 2) was constant that reported items were stretches. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/acp.1399DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2480524PMC
December 2008
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Gender effects in spatial orientation: cognitive profiles and mental strategies.

Appl Cogn Psychol 2004 Jul;18(5):519-532

Dipartimento di Psicologia, Università di Bari Italy.

Experimental evidence and meta-analyses offer some support for gender-related differences in visuo-spatial ability. However, few studies addressed this issue in an ecological context and/or in everyday tasks implying spatial abilities, such as geographical orientation. Moreover, the relation of specific strategies and gender is still unclear. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/acp.1000DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2909401PMC
July 2004
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Arctic cognition: a study of cognitive performance in summer and winter at 69 degrees N.

Appl Cogn Psychol 1999 Dec;13(6):561-80

University of Tromso, Norway.

Evidence has accumulated over the past 15 years that affect in humans is cyclical. In winter there is a tendency to depression, with remission in summer, and this effect is stronger at higher latitudes. In order to determine whether human cognition is similarly rhythmical, this study investigated the cognitive processes of 100 participants living at 69 degrees N. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/(SICI)1099-0720(199912)13:6<561::AID-ACP661>3.0.CO;2-JDOI Listing
December 1999
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