226 results match your criteria Applied Animal Behaviour Science[Journal]


The effect of supplementary ultraviolet wavelengths on broiler chicken welfare indicators.

Appl Anim Behav Sci 2018 Dec;209:55-64

Department of Animal Sciences, University of Nottingham, Sutton Bonington Campus, Leicestershire, UK.

Qualities of the light environment are important for good welfare in a number of species. In chickens, UVA light is visible and may facilitate flock interactions. UVB wavelengths promote endogenous vitamin D synthesis, which could support the rapid skeletal development of broiler chickens. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.applanim.2018.10.002DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6222521PMC
December 2018
6 Reads

Examining affective structure in chickens: valence, intensity, persistence and generalization measured using a Conditioned Place Preference Test.

Appl Anim Behav Sci 2018 Oct;207:39-48

Bristol Veterinary School, University of Bristol, Langford House, Langford, Bristol, BS40 5DU, UK.

When measuring animals' valenced behavioural responses to stimuli, the Conditioned Place Preference (CPP) test goes a step further than many approach-based and avoidance-based tests by establishing whether a learned preference for, or aversion to, the location in which the stimulus was encountered can be generated. We designed a novel, four-chambered CPP test to extend the capability of the usual CPP paradigm to provide information on four key features of animals' affective responses: valence, scale, persistence and generalization. Using this test, we investigated the affective responses of domestic chickens () to four potentially aversive stimuli: 1. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.applanim.2018.07.007DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6131270PMC
October 2018
3 Reads

Animal emotion: Descriptive and prescriptive definitions and their implications for a comparative perspective.

Appl Anim Behav Sci 2018 Aug;205:202-209

School of Veterinary Sciences, University of Bristol, Langford House, Langford, Bristol, BS40 5DU, UK.

In recent years there has been a growing research interest in the field of animal emotion. But there is still little agreement about whether and how the word "emotion" should be defined for use in the context of non-human species. Here, we make a distinction between descriptive and prescriptive definitions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.applanim.2018.01.008DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6041721PMC

Behavioural and physiological responses of laying hens to automated monitoring equipment.

Appl Anim Behav Sci 2018 Feb;199:17-23

School of Veterinary Sciences, University of Bristol, Langford house, Langford, BS40 5DU, United Kingdom.

Automated monitoring of behaviour can offer a wealth of information in circumstances where observing behaviour is difficult or time consuming. However, this often requires attaching monitoring devices to the animal which can alter behaviour, potentially invalidating any data collected. Birds often show increased preening and energy expenditure when wearing devices and, especially in laying hens, there is a risk that individuals wearing devices will attract aggression from conspecifics. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.applanim.2017.10.017DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5805850PMC
February 2018
4 Reads

A cross-species comparison of abnormal behavior in three species of singly-housed old world monkeys.

Authors:
Corrine K Lutz

Appl Anim Behav Sci 2018 Feb 20;199:52-58. Epub 2017 Oct 20.

Southwest National Primate Research Center, Texas Biomedical Research Institute, 7620 NW Loop 410, San Antonio, TX, USA.

Abnormal behavior occurs in a number of captive nonhuman primate species and is often used as an indicator of welfare. However, reported levels of abnormal behavior often vary across species, making general welfare judgments difficult. The purpose of this study was to assess differences in levels of abnormal behavior and associated risk factors across three species of Old World monkeys in order to identify similarities and differences across species. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.applanim.2017.10.010DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5798485PMC
February 2018

Playful pigs: Evidence of consistency and change in play depending on litter and developmental stage.

Appl Anim Behav Sci 2018 Jan;198:36-43

SRUC, West Mains Road, Edinburgh, EH9 3JG, United Kingdom.

Play behaviour in pre-weaned piglets has previously been shown to vary consistently between litters. This study aimed to determine if these pre-weaning litter differences in play behaviour were also consistent in the post-weaning period. Seven litters of commercially bred piglets were raised in a free farrowing system (PigSAFE) and weaned at 28 days post-farrowing (+/-2 days). Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S01681591173026
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.applanim.2017.09.018DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5761341PMC
January 2018
1 Read

Rhesus macaques () displaying self-injurious behavior show more sleep disruption than controls.

Appl Anim Behav Sci 2017 Dec 6;197:62-67. Epub 2017 Sep 6.

Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Tobin Hall, 135 Hicks Way, University of Massachusetts Amherst, Amherst, MA. 01003.

Self-injurious behavior (SIB) is a pathology observed in both humans and animals. In humans, SIB has been linked to various mental health conditions that are also associated with significant sleep disruption. In rhesus macaques, SIB consists of self-directed biting which can range from mild skin abrasions to wounds requiring veterinary care. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.applanim.2017.09.002DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5739341PMC
December 2017
1 Read

A protocol for training group-housed rhesus macaques () to cooperate with husbandry and research procedures using positive reinforcement.

Appl Anim Behav Sci 2017 Dec;197:90-100

Centre for Research in Brain and Behaviour, School of Natural Sciences and Psychology, Liverpool John Moores University, L3 3AF, UK.

There has been increased recognition of the 3Rs in laboratory animal management over the last decade, including improvements in animal handling and housing. For example, positive reinforcement is now more widely used to encourage primates to cooperate with husbandry procedures, and improved enclosure design allows housing in social groups with opportunity to escape and avoid other primates and humans. Both practices have become gold standards in captive primate care resulting in improved health and behavioural outcomes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.applanim.2017.08.006DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5678497PMC
December 2017
2 Reads

Fos Expression in the Olfactory Pathway of High- and Low-Sexually Performing Rams Exposed to Urine from Estrous or Ovariectomized Ewes.

Appl Anim Behav Sci 2017 Jan 21;186:22-28. Epub 2015 Sep 21.

University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY, Department of Animal Science, Dept 3684, 1000 E. University Ave., Laramie, WY 82071 USA.

Exposure to estrous ewe urine stimulates investigation and mounting activity in sexually active but not sexually inactive rams. It was hypothesized sexual indifference may result from an inability to detect olfactory cues or an interruption of the pathway from detection of the olfactory stimulus to the motor response. Sexually active (n=4) and inactive (n=3) rams were exposed to urine from estrous ewes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.applanim.2015.09.001DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5365086PMC
January 2017

Individual and group level trajectories of behavioural development in Border collies.

Appl Anim Behav Sci 2016 07;180:78-86

Clever Dog Lab, Messerli Research Institute, University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna, Medical University of Vienna and University of Vienna, Veterinärplatz 1, 1210 Vienna, Austria.

In order to assess dogs' personality changes during ontogeny, a cohort of 69 Border collies was followed up from six to 18-24 months. When the dogs were 6, 12, and 18-24 months old, their owners repeatedly filled in a dog personality questionnaire (DPQ), which yielded five personality factors divided into fifteen facets. All five DPQ factors were highly correlated between the three age classes, indicating that the dogs' personality remained consistent relative to other individuals. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.applanim.2016.04.021DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5295634PMC
July 2016
2 Reads

Using the mouse grimace scale and behaviour to assess pain in CBA mice following vasectomy.

Appl Anim Behav Sci 2016 Aug;181:160-165

School of Agriculture, Food and Rural Development, Agriculture Building, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 7RU, UK.

Mice used in biomedical research should have pain reduced to an absolute minimum through refinement of procedures or by the provision of appropriate analgesia. Vasectomy is a common and potentially painful surgical procedure carried out on male mice to facilitate the production of genetically modified mice. The aim of our study was to determine if 0. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.applanim.2016.05.020DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4962773PMC
August 2016
16 Reads

Evaluation of environmental and intrinsic factors that contribute to stereotypic behavior in captive rhesus macaques ().

Appl Anim Behav Sci 2015 Oct;171:184-191

Full body repetitive behaviors, known as motor stereotypic behaviors (MSBs), are one of the most commonly seen abnormal behaviors in captive non-human primates, and are frequently used as a behavioral measure of well-being. The main goal of this paper was to examine the role of environmental factors (i.e. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.applanim.2015.08.005DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4809023PMC
October 2015
14 Reads

Manifestation of neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis in Australian Merino sheep: observations on altered behaviour and growth.

Appl Anim Behav Sci 2016 Feb;175:32-40

The University of Sydney, Faculty of Veterinary Science, Private Bag 4003 Narellan, New South Wales 2567, Australia.

Neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCL) is an inherited neurodegenerative disorder in children. Presently there is no effective treatment and the disorder is lethal. NCL occur in a variety of non-human species including sheep, which are recognised as valuable large animal models for NCL. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.applanim.2015.11.012DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4776667PMC
February 2016

The effect of isoflurane anaesthesia and buprenorphine on the mouse grimace scale and behaviour in CBA and DBA/2 mice.

Appl Anim Behav Sci 2015 Nov;172:58-62

School of Agriculture, Food and Rural Development, Agriculture Building, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne NE1 7RU, United Kingdom.

Prevention or alleviation of pain in laboratory mice is a fundamental requirement of research. The mouse grimace scale (MGS) has the potential to be an effective and rapid means of assessing pain and analgesic efficacy in laboratory mice. Preliminary studies have demonstrated its potential utility for assessing pain in mouse models that involve potentially painful procedures. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.applanim.2015.08.038DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4768077PMC
November 2015

Evidence for litter differences in play behaviour in pre-weaned pigs.

Appl Anim Behav Sci 2015 Nov;172:17-25

Division of Neurobiology, The Roslin Institute, The University of Edinburgh, Easter Bush, Midlothian EH25 9RG, United Kingdom; Animal & Veterinary Sciences, SRUC, West Mains Road, Edinburgh EH9 3JG, United Kingdom.

The aim of this study was to analyse spontaneous play behaviour in litters of domestic pigs () for sources of variation at individual and litter levels and to relate variation in play to measures of pre and postnatal development. Seven litters of commercially bred piglets ( = 70) were born (farrowed) within a penning system (PigSAFE) that provided opportunities for the performance of spontaneous play behaviours. Individual behaviour was scored based on an established play ethogram for 2 days per week over the 3 week study period. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S01681591150026
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.applanim.2015.09.007DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4768079PMC
November 2015
2 Reads

The long-term impact of infant rearing background on the affective state of adult common marmosets ().

Appl Anim Behav Sci 2016 Jan;174:128-136

Behaviour and Evolution Research Group and Scottish Primate Research Group, Psychology, School of Natural Sciences, University of Stirling, Scotland, United Kingdom.

Early life environment, including temporary family separation, can have a major influence on affective state. Using a battery of tests, the current study compared the performance of adult common marmosets (), reared as infants under 3 different conditions: family-reared twins, family-reared animals from triplet litters where only 2 remain (2stays) and supplementary fed triplets. No significant differences were found in latency to approach and obtain food from a human or a novel object between rearing conditions, suggesting no effect on neophobia. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.applanim.2015.10.009DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4727505PMC
January 2016
3 Reads

Dominance rank is associated with body condition in outdoor-living domestic horses ().

Appl Anim Behav Sci 2015 May;166:71-79

University of Bristol, School of Biological Sciences, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TQ, UK.

The aim of our study was to explore the association between dominance rank and body condition in outdoor group-living domestic horses, . Social interactions were recorded using a video camera during a feeding test, applied to 203 horses in 42 herds. Dominance rank was assigned to 194 individuals. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.applanim.2015.02.019DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4407901PMC

Choice of conflict resolution strategy is linked to sociability in dog puppies.

Appl Anim Behav Sci 2013 Dec;149(1-4):36-44

Clever Dog Lab, Messerli Research Institute, University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna, Medical University of Vienna and University of Vienna. Veterinärplatz 1, 1210 Vienna, Austria.

Measures that are likely to increase sociability in dog puppies, such as appropriate socialisation, are considered important in preventing future fear or aggression related problems. However, the interplay between sociability and conflict behaviour has rarely been investigated. Moreover, while many studies have addressed aggression in domestic dogs, alternative, non-aggressive conflict resolution strategies have received less scientific attention. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.applanim.2013.09.006DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4044588PMC
December 2013
1 Read

Pain-Suppressed Behaviors in the Red-tailed Hawk 1 ().

Appl Anim Behav Sci 2014 Mar;152:83-91

, Tufts Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine, Department of Environmental and Population Health, 200 Westboro Rd., North Grafton, MA 01536, United States of America.

Our ability to provide analgesia in wild and exotic patients is hampered by a lack of species-specific information on effective drugs and protocols. One contributing factor is the difficulty of applying data from traditional laboratory tests of nociception to clinical conditions frequently involving combinations of inflammatory, mechanical, and neuropathic pain. Pain-suppressed behaviors have become a valuable predictor of clinical utility in other species; in this study we extend this framework to red -tailed hawks in a wildlife hospital, in an attempt to develop a new, humane testing method for birds of prey. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.applanim.2013.12.011DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4041117PMC
March 2014
1 Read

Salivary cortisol concentrations and behavior in a population of healthy dogs hospitalized for elective procedures.

Appl Anim Behav Sci 2012 Nov;141(3-4):149-157

Department of Animal Science, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, USA 16802.

Identification of severe stress in hospitalized veterinary patients may improve treatment outcomes and welfare. To assess stress levels, in Study 1, we collected salivary cortisol samples and behavioral parameters in 28 healthy dogs hospitalized prior to elective procedures. Dogs were categorized into two groups; low cortisol (LC) and high cortisol (HC), based on the distribution of cortisol concentrations (< or ≥ 0. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.applanim.2012.08.007DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3817620PMC
November 2012
3 Reads

Stress, the HPA axis, and nonhuman primate well-being: A review.

Appl Anim Behav Sci 2013 Jan;143(2-4):135-149

Department of Psychology, 135 Hicks Way, University of Massachusetts, Amherst MA 01002-9271, USA.

Numerous stressors are routinely encountered by wild-living primates (e.g., food scarcity, predation, aggressive interactions, and parasitism). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.applanim.2012.10.012DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3580872PMC
January 2013
19 Reads

The Effects of Predictability in Daily Husbandry Routines on Captive Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta).

Appl Anim Behav Sci 2013 Jan 2;143(2-4):117-127. Epub 2012 Nov 2.

Animal Behavior Graduate Group, University of California Davis, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA, 95616, USA ; California National Primate Research Center, University of California Davis, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA, 95616, USA.

Rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) housed indoors experience many routine husbandry activities on a daily basis. The anticipation of these events can lead to stress, regardless of whether the events themselves are positive or aversive in nature. The specific goal of this study was to identify whether increasing the predictability of husbandry events could decrease stress and anxiety in captive rhesus macaques. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.applanim.2012.10.010DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3578712PMC
January 2013

Effects of stressors on the behavior and physiology of domestic cats.

Appl Anim Behav Sci 2013 Jan;143(2-4):157-163

Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, The Ohio State University College of Veterinary Medicine, 601 Vernon L. Tharp Street, Columbus, Ohio 43210.

Feline interstitial cystitis (FIC) is a chronic pain syndrome of domestic cats. Cats with FIC have chronic, recurrent lower urinary tract signs (LUTS) and other comorbid disorders that are exacerbated by stressors. The aim of this study was to evaluate behavioral and physiological responses of healthy cats and cats diagnosed with FIC after exposure to a five day stressor. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.applanim.2012.10.014DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4157662PMC
January 2013
1 Read

Qualitative Behavioural Assessment of emotionality in pigs.

Appl Anim Behav Sci 2012 Jul;139(3-4):218-224

Animal Behaviour and Welfare, Animal and Veterinary Sciences Research Group, SAC, West Mains Rd., Edinburgh, EH9 3JG, Scotland, United Kingdom.

Scientific assessment of affective states in animals is challenging but vital for animal welfare studies. One possible approach is Qualitative Behavioural Assessment (QBA), a 'whole animal' methodology which integrates information from multiple behavioural signals and styles of behavioural expression (body language) directly in terms of an animal's emotional expression. If QBA provides a valid measure of animals' emotional state it should distinguish between groups where emotional states have been manipulated. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.applanim.2012.04.004DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3417235PMC
July 2012
5 Reads

Physiological and Welfare Consequences of Transport, Relocation, and Acclimatization of Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes).

Appl Anim Behav Sci 2012 Mar 30;137(3-4):183-193. Epub 2011 Oct 30.

Department of Veterinary Sciences, Michale E. Keeling Center for Comparative Medicine, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Bastrop, TX.

Manipulations of the environments of captive nonhuman primates often have welfare consequences to the animals, including behavioral effects, and for certain manipulations, physiological effects as well. The processes of transporting, relocating, and acclimatizing nonhuman primates across facilities represent manipulations that are likely to have welfare, behavioral, and physiological consequences to the relocated animals. Seventy-two chimpanzees were relocated from the Primate Foundation of Arizona (PFA) in Arizona to the Keeling Center (KCCMR) in Texas. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.applanim.2011.11.004DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3388538PMC
March 2012
20 Reads

Comparing the relative benefits of grooming-contact and full-contact pairing for laboratory-housed adult female Macaca fascicularis.

Appl Anim Behav Sci 2012 Mar 1;137(3-4):157-165. Epub 2011 Oct 1.

Washington National Primate Research Center.

Tactile social contact is the most effective form of environmental enrichment for promoting normal behavior in captive primates. For laboratory macaques housed indoors, pair housing is the most common method for socialization. Pairs can be housed either in full contact (FC), or in protected contact (PC). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.applanim.2011.08.013DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3367453PMC
March 2012
2 Reads

Sex Ratio, Conflict Dynamics, and Wounding in Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta).

Appl Anim Behav Sci 2012 Mar 6;137(3-4):137-147. Epub 2011 Aug 6.

California National Primate Research Center, University of California Davis, Davis, CA 95616.

Rhesus macaques, like many other primates, live in stable, multi-male multi-female groups in which adult females typically outnumber adult males. The number of males in multi-male/multi-female groups is most commonly discussed in terms of mate competition, where the sex ratio is a function of an adult male's ability to monopolize a group of females. However, the relationship between sex ratio and group stability is unclear because the presence of many males may either reduce stability by increasing mate competition or may improve stability if adult males are key conflict managers. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.applanim.2011.07.008DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3357203PMC
March 2012
1 Read

How can social network analysis contribute to social behavior research in applied ethology?

Appl Anim Behav Sci 2012 May;138(3-4)

Animal Behavior Graduate Group, University of California, Davis, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95916, USA ; Department of Animal Science and Center for Animal Welfare, University of California, Davis, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616, USA.

Social network analysis is increasingly used by behavioral ecologists and primatologists to describe the patterns and quality of interactions among individuals. We provide an overview of this methodology, with examples illustrating how it can be used to study social behavior in applied contexts. Like most kinds of social interaction analyses, social network analysis provides information about direct relationships (e. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.applanim.2012.02.003DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3865988PMC
May 2012
2 Reads

Individual differences in temperament and behavioral management practices for nonhuman primates.

Authors:
Kristine Coleman

Appl Anim Behav Sci 2012 Mar 8;137(3-4):106-113. Epub 2011 Sep 8.

Oregon National Primate Research Center, 505 NW 185 Ave, Beaverton, OR 97006 USA.

Effective behavioral management plans are tailored to unique behavioral patterns of each individual species. However, even within a species behavioral needs of individuals can vary. Factors such as age, sex, and temperament can affect behavioral needs of individuals. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.applanim.2011.08.002DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3327443PMC

Benefits of pair housing are consistent across a diverse population of rhesus macaques.

Appl Anim Behav Sci 2012 Mar;137(3-4):148-156

Tulane National Primate Research Center, 18703 Three Rivers Road, Covington, LA 70433, USA.

Introducing singly housed rhesus macaques () into isosexual pairs is widely considered to improve welfare. The population of laboratory rhesus macaques is heterogeneous on a variety of factors and there is little literature available to directly evaluate the influence of many of these factors on the benefits of pair housing. Subjects were 46 adult female and 18 adult male rhesus macaques housed at the Tulane National Primate Research Center and the Yerkes National Primate Research Center. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.applanim.2011.09.010DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4307811PMC
March 2012
1 Read

Early rearing interacts with temperament and housing to influence the risk for motor stereotypy in rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta).

Appl Anim Behav Sci 2011 Jun;132(1-2):81-89

Laboratory and zoo housed non-human primates sometimes exhibit abnormal behaviors that are thought to reflect reduced wellbeing. Previous research attempted to identify risk factors to aid in the prevention and treatment of these behaviors, and focused on demographic (e.g. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.applanim.2011.02.010DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3084485PMC

A Response to the Influence of Observer Presence on Baboon (Papio spp.) and Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta) Behavior: A Comment On.

Appl Anim Behav Sci 2011 Jan;129(1):55-56

Southwest National Primate Research Center, Southwest Foundation for Biomedical Research, P.O. Box 760549, San Antonio, TX 78245, USA,

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S01681591100031
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.applanim.2010.11.008DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3023306PMC
January 2011
1 Read

The use of positive reinforcement training to reduce stereotypic behavior in rhesus macaques.

Appl Anim Behav Sci 2010 May;124(3-4):142-148

Oregon National Primate Research Center 505 NW 185th Ave Beaverton, OR 97006 USA.

Stereotypic behavior is a pervasive problem for captive monkeys and other animals. Once this behavior pattern has started, it can be difficult to alleviate. We tested whether or not using positive reinforcement training (PRT) can reduce this undesired behavior. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S01681591100007
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.applanim.2010.02.008DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2859718PMC
May 2010
1 Read

The Influence of Observer Presence on Baboon (Papio spp.) and Rhesus Macaque (Macaca mulatta) Behavior.

Appl Anim Behav Sci 2010 Jan;122(1):53-57

Southwest National Primate Research Center, Southwest Foundation for Biomedical Research, P.O. Box 760549 San Antonio, Texas, 78245, USA.

A common method for collecting behavioral data is through direct observations. However, there is very little information available on how a human observer affects the behavior of the animals being observed. This study assesses the effects of a human observer on the behavior of captive nonhuman primates. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.applanim.2009.11.002DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2836517PMC
January 2010
1 Read

Time budget-, behavioral synchrony- and body score development of a newly released Przewalski's horse group Equus ferus przewalskii, in the Great Gobi B Strictly Protected Area in SW Mongolia.

Appl Anim Behav Sci 2007 Nov;107(3-4):307-321

International Takhi Group, Paris, France.

The Przewalski's horse (Equus ferus przewalskii) became extinct in the wild in the 1960s, but survived as a species due to captive breeding. There have been several initiatives to re-introduce the species in central Asia, but until now only two projects in Mongolia establish free-ranging populations. Data on basic ecology and behavior of the species prior to extinction is largely lacking and a good documentation of the re-introduction process is essential. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.applanim.2006.09.023DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3207227PMC
November 2007
2 Reads

The involvement of dopamine (DA) and serotonin (5-HT) in stress-induced stereotypies in bank voles (Clethrionomys glareolus).

Appl Anim Behav Sci 2001 Aug;73(4):311-319

Zoological Institute, University of Copenhagen, Tagensvej 16, DK-2200 N, Copenhagen, Denmark

In order to clarify the dependency of stress-induced stereotypies on dopamine (DA) and serotonin (5-HT) functioning, undisturbed and acutely stressed stereotyping bank voles were treated during 3 weeks with the commonly used human atypical neurolepticum clozapine and the SSRI antidepressant citalopram. Clozapine blocks DA receptors (D sub (4)) and acts as a partial 5-HT antagonist (5-HT sub (2) receptors), while citalopram increases 5-HT transmitter activity. Levels of stereotypies were quantified under undisturbed conditions during the treatment period and immediately after the acute stress of handling and injections. Read More

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August 2001
1 Citation
1.690 Impact Factor

The effectiveness of a citronella spray collar in reducing certain forms of barking in dogs.

Authors:
D L. Wells

Appl Anim Behav Sci 2001 Aug;73(4):299-309

Canine Behaviour Centre, School of Psychology, The Queen's University of Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN, Northern Ireland, UK

This study examined the effectiveness of a citronella spay collar in reducing barking in 30 dogs which wore the collar continuously, i.e. every day for 30min, or intermittently, i. Read More

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Behavioural responses of red deer to fences of five different designs.

Appl Anim Behav Sci 2001 Aug;73(4):289-298

The Royal Society for the Protection of Birds, North Scotland Office, Etive House, Beechwood Park, IV2 3BW, Inverness, UK

Capercaillie, a large species of grouse, are sometimes killed when they fly into high-tensile deer fences. A fence design which is lower or has a less rigid top section than conventional designs would reduce bird deaths, but such fences would still have to be deer-proof. The short-term behavioural responses of farmed red deer (Cervus elaphus) to fences of five designs, including four that were designed to be less damaging to capercaillie, were measured. Read More

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A note on the effects of forward and rear-facing orientations on movement of horses during transport.

Appl Anim Behav Sci 2001 Aug;73(4):281-287

Department of Animal Science, 2471 TAMUS, Texas A&M University, 77843-2471, College Station, TX, USA

Several studies have attempted to determine the effects of orientation on a horse's ability to maintain balance during transportation. The results have often been contradictory because of differences in trailer design and lack of simultaneous comparisons. In this study, three replications of two forward-facing and two rear-facing horses were transported at the same time over a standardized course to allow for simultaneous comparisons. Read More

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PGF(2alpha)-induced nest building and choice behaviour in female domestic pigs.

Appl Anim Behav Sci 2001 Aug;73(4):267-279

MAFF Welfare and Behaviour Group, Department of Neurobiology, The Babraham Institute, Babraham, CB2 4AT, Cambridge, UK

The domestic pig, Sus scrofa, builds a maternal nest in the day before parturition. A model for porcine nest building has been established, in which exogenously administered prostaglandin (PG)F(2alpha) is used to induce nesting behaviour in cyclic, pseudopregnant and pregnant pigs. This experiment was designed to examine the effect of PGF(2alpha) on the preferences of non-pregnant gilts for pens bedded with straw compared with bare pens. Read More

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A note on the influence of starting position, time of testing and test order on the backtest in pigs.

Appl Anim Behav Sci 2001 Aug;73(4):263-266

Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Pig Unit of the Department of Farm Animal Health, Utrecht University, Yalelaan 7, Utrecht, The Netherlands

The backtest determines the coping behaviour of a piglet in a standardised stress situation, which might be a measure for the coping style of that animal. Backtest results are related to other parameters such as immune responses and production. In this study, the backtest was standardised and it was studied if time of testing or the order in which animals were tested influenced backtest results. Read More

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Manipulating cattle distribution with salt and water in large arid-land pastures: a GPS/GIS assessment.

Authors:
D Ganskopp

Appl Anim Behav Sci 2001 Aug;73(4):251-262

USDA Agricultural Research Service, Eastern Oregon Agricultural Research Center, HC-71 4.51 Hwy. 205, 97720, Burns, OR, USA

Several of the problems associated with grazing animals in extensive settings are related to their uneven patterns of use across the landscape. After fencing, water and salt are two of the most frequently used tools for affecting cattle distribution in extensive settings. Cattle are attracted to water in arid regions, but mixed results have been obtained with salt and mineral supplements. Read More

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A survey assessment of variables related to stereotypy in captive giraffe and okapi.

Appl Anim Behav Sci 2001 Aug;73(3):235-247

TECHlab, Zoo Atlanta, 800 Cherokee Avenue SE, 30315, Atlanta, GA, USA

Stereotypic behavior has been investigated in a wide variety of animals, but little published information is available on this problem in captive exotic ungulates. A survey was used to gather information on the prevalence of stereotypic behavior in giraffe and okapi and to identify variables associated with these behaviors. Of the 71 institutions that received a survey, 69. Read More

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August 2001
4 Reads

Behavior and cortisol levels of dogs in a public animal shelter, and an exploration of the ability of these measures to predict problem behavior after adoption.

Appl Anim Behav Sci 2001 Aug;73(3):217-233

Department of Psychology, 335 Fawcett Hall, 3640 Colonel Glenn Highway, Wright State University, 45435, Dayton, OH, USA

Behavior and plasma cortisol levels were examined in puppies and juvenile/adult dogs admitted to a public animal shelter. A behavioral test was developed to assess the responses of the dogs to novel or threatening conditions. Factor analysis of the behavioral responses of 166 dogs on day 3 in the shelter yielded six factors (locomotor activity, flight, sociability, timidity, solicitation, and wariness) that accounted for 68% of the total variance. Read More

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The aversion of broiler chickens to concurrent vibrational and thermal stressors.

Appl Anim Behav Sci 2001 Aug;73(3):199-215

Bio-engineering Division, Silsoe Research Institute, Wrest Park, Silsoe, MK45 4HS, Bedford, UK

The requirement for assessing the effects of multiple concurrent stressors in improving the welfare of broiler chickens during transport has not been widely recognised. A discrete-choice technique was used to investigate the aversion of broiler chickens to concurrent vibrational and thermal transport stressors. In experiment 1, 12 female broiler chickens, aged 42+/-3 days were studied individually using two choice-chambers. Read More

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A note on the effect of continuous ram presence on estrus onset, estrus duration and ovulation time in estrus synchronized ewes.

Appl Anim Behav Sci 2001 Aug;73(3):193-198

Large Animal Medicine & Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, Texas A&M University, 77843-4475, College Station, TX, USA

During fall season, 18 multiparous Corriedale ewes were divided into two equal groups for the continuous (CON) and intermittent (INT) presence of a ram. Estrus was synchronized with fluorgestone acetate intravaginal sponges that were left 14 days, plus an injection of 200&mgr;g of a prostaglandin F-2alpha analog at sponge removal. Estrus was detected three times a day (at 6 a. Read More

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Birth weight variation in the domestic pig: effects on offspring survival, weight gain and suckling behaviour.

Appl Anim Behav Sci 2001 Aug;73(3):179-191

Department of Biology, McGill University, 1205 Avenue Docteur Penfield, Que., H3A 1B1, Montreal, Canada

In domestic pigs, litter-mates often vary considerably in birth weight. To examine whether this size variation influences piglet survival, weight gain and suckling behaviour, we experimentally manipulated the number and size distribution of litter-mates in 51 litters. Litters were small (eight or nine piglets) or large (11 or 12 piglets) compared to the herd mean of 10 piglets, and were made more or less variable in weight by using the largest and smallest quartiles of two combined litters (variable) or the middle two quartiles (uniform). Read More

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Effects of two stall flooring systems on the behaviour of tied dairy cows.

Authors:
J Hultgren

Appl Anim Behav Sci 2001 Aug;73(3):167-177

Department of Animal Environment and Health, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, P.O. Box 234, SE-53223, Skara, Sweden

Effects on dairy cow behaviour of a new type of flooring in tie-stalls, with the ability to drain faeces and urine, was studied in a controlled randomised trial in one Swedish university herd. Forty-two Swedish Red and White cows were kept tied in traditional long-stalls (2.20m). Read More

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Mother-offspring bonding in farmed red deer: accuracy of visual observation verified by DNA analysis.

Appl Anim Behav Sci 2001 Jul;73(2):157-165

Ethology group, Research Institute of Animal Production, 10-Uhríneves, Prague, Czech Republic

The accuracy of a maternity assessment based on visual observation was tested during the post parturient phase in farmed red deer. The mother of the calf was determined using visual observation of the hind's peri-parturient and early maternal behaviour during the first week of the calf's life. This assessment was compared with genetic analysis based on DNA microsatellite polymorphism. Read More

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Influence of prior exposure to wood shavings on feather pecking, dustbathing and foraging in adult laying hens.

Appl Anim Behav Sci 2001 Jul;73(2):141-155

Department of Clinical Veterinary Science, University of Bristol, Langford House, BS40 5DU, Langford, UK

It has been proposed that chicks acquire substrate preferences during an early 'sensitive' period. If a suitable substrate is absent during this period birds may develop alternative preferences for pecking at feathers. The aim of this study was to examine whether early substrate exposure has durable effects on the subsequent behaviour of adult hens. Read More

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