3 results match your criteria Applied Acoustics[Journal]

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Acoustic source localization with microphone arrays for remote noise monitoring in an Intensive Care Unit.

Appl Acoust 2018 Oct;139:93-100

Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Level 6, West Wing, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford OX3 9DU, United Kingdom.

An approach is described to apply spatial filtering with microphone arrays to localize acoustic sources in an Intensive Care Unit (ICU). This is done to obtain more detailed information about disturbing noise sources in the ICU with the ultimate goal of facilitating the reduction of the overall background noise level, which could potentially improve the patients' experience and reduce the time needed for recovery. This paper gives a practical description of the system, including the audio hardware setup as well as the design choices for the microphone arrays. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.apacoust.2018.04.019DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6039849PMC
October 2018

A priori mesh grading for the numerical calculation of the head-related transfer functions.

Appl Acoust 2016 Dec;114:99-110

Acoustics Research Institute, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Wohllebengasse 12-14, Vienna 1040, Austria.

Head-related transfer functions (HRTFs) describe the directional filtering of the incoming sound caused by the morphology of a listener's head and pinnae. When an accurate model of a listener's morphology exists, HRTFs can be calculated numerically with the boundary element method (BEM). However, the general recommendation to model the head and pinnae with at least six elements per wavelength renders the BEM as a time-consuming procedure when calculating HRTFs for the full audible frequency range. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.apacoust.2016.07.005DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5321476PMC
December 2016

Pilot study of methods and equipment for in-home noise level measurements.

Appl Acoust 2015 Jan;102:1-11

Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Bethesda, MD 20852.

Knowledge of the auditory and non-auditory effects of noise has increased dramatically over the past decade, but indoor noise exposure measurement methods have not advanced appreciably, despite the introduction of applicable new technologies. This study evaluated various conventional and smart devices for exposure assessment in the National Children's Study. Three devices were tested: a sound level meter (SLM), a dosimeter, and a smart device with a noise measurement application installed. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.apacoust.2015.08.018DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4820284PMC
January 2015
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