8 results match your criteria Apidologie[Journal]

  • Page 1 of 1

Fine scale population genetic structure of , an ectoparasitic mite of the honey bee ().

Apidologie 2016 13;2016:1-9. Epub 2016 Jun 13.

Population Biology, Ecology, and Evolution, Emory University, 400 Dowman Dr, Atlanta, GA 30322; Dept of Environmental Science, Emory University, 400 Dowman Dr, Atlanta, GA 30322.

is an obligate ectoparasitic mite and the most important biotic threat currently facing honey bees (). We used neutral microsatellites to analyze previously unreported fine scale population structure of , a species characterized by extreme lack of genetic diversity owing to multiple bottleneck events, haplodiploidy, and primarily brother-sister matings. Our results surprisingly indicate that detectable hierarchical genetic variation exists between apiaries, between colonies within an apiary, and even within colonies. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13592-016-0453-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5089174PMC
June 2016
2 Reads

Distance Between Honey Bee Colonies Regulates Populations of at a Landscape Scale.

Apidologie 2016 2;2016:1-9. Epub 2016 May 2.

Department of Entomology, University of Georgia, 413 Biological Sciences Building, Athens, GA 30602 USA.

Inter-colony distance of significantly affects colony numbers of the parasitic mite . We set up 15 apiaries, each consisting of two colonies. Each apiary pair was assigned an inter-colony distance of 0, 10, or 100 m. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13592-016-0443-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5089168PMC
May 2016
1 Read

Pathogen prevalence and abundance in honey bee colonies involved in almond pollination.

Apidologie 2016;47:251-266. Epub 2015 Oct 21.

Department of Plant Sciences and Plant Pathology, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717 USA ; Institute on Ecosystems, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717 USA.

Honey bees are important pollinators of agricultural crops. Since 2006, US beekeepers have experienced high annual honey bee colony losses, which may be attributed to multiple abiotic and biotic factors, including pathogens. However, the relative importance of these factors has not been fully elucidated. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13592-015-0395-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4766222PMC
October 2015
2 Reads

Establishment risk of the commercially imported bumblebee -can they survive UK winters?

Apidologie 2016;47:66-75. Epub 2015 Jul 21.

School of Biosciences, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham, B15 2TT UK.

Bumblebees are regularly exported to countries outside their native range for the purposes of commercial pollination. In contrast to the tight regulations imposed on biological control introductions, the movement of bumblebees has largely been without risk assessment. This study represents the first formal assessment of establishment risk for in the UK. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13592-015-0376-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4729803PMC
July 2015
1 Read

Immune responses of honeybees and their fitness costs as compared to bumblebees.

Apidologie 2015;46(2):238-249. Epub 2014 Oct 17.

Department of Zoology, Universitätsplatz 2, Karl-Franzens University of Graz, A-8010 Graz, Austria.

Immune responses of invertebrates imply more than developing a merely unspecific response to an infection. Great interest has been raised to unveil whether this investment into immunity also involves fitness costs associated to the individual or the group. Focusing on the immune responses of honeybees, we use the well-studied insect bumblebee for comparison. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13592-014-0318-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4579911PMC
October 2014
2 Reads

The Architecture of the Pollen Hoarding Syndrome in Honey Bees: Implications for Understanding Social Evolution, Behavioral Syndromes, and Selective Breeding.

Authors:
Olav Rueppell

Apidologie 2014 May;45(3):364-374

Department of Biology, The University of North Carolina at Greensboro, 312 Eberhart Building, 321 McIver Street, Greensboro, North Carolina, 27403, USA.

Social evolution has influenced every aspect of contemporary honey bee biology, but the details are difficult to reconstruct. The reproductive ground plan hypothesis of social evolution proposes that central regulators of the gonotropic cycle of solitary insects have been coopted to coordinate social complexity in honey bees, such as the division of labor among workers. The predicted trait associations between reproductive physiology and social behavior have been identified in the context of the pollen hoarding syndrome, a larger suite of interrelated traits. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s13592-013-0244-3
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13592-013-0244-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4264964PMC
May 2014
5 Reads

Metabolism and upper thermal limits of and

Apidologie 2014 Nov;45(6):664-677

CRA-Consiglio per la Ricerca e la Sperimentazione in Agricoltura, Unità di ricerca di apicoltura e bachicoltura, Via di Saliceto, 80, 42100, Bologna, Italy.

The Western honeybees and are closely related subspecies living in neighbouring regions. Metabolism and the upper lethal thermal limits are crucial physiological traits, adapted in the evolutionary process to environment and climate conditions. We investigated whether samples from these two ecotypes differ in these traits. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13592-014-0284-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4218932PMC
November 2014
7 Reads

Contribution of honeybee drones of different age to colonial thermoregulation.

Apidologie 2009 Jan;40(1):82-95

Karl-Franzens-Universität Graz, Institut für Zoologie, Universitätsplatz 2, 8010 Graz, Austria.

In addition to honeybee workers, drones also contribute to colonial thermoregulation. We show the drones' contribution to thermoregulation at 5 different experimental temperatures ranging from 15-34 °C. The frequency and the degree of endothermy depended on the drones' local ambient temperature and age. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1051/apido/2008069DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3227730PMC
January 2009
1 Read
  • Page 1 of 1