139 results match your criteria Aphasiology[Journal]


Effects of Phonomotor Treatment on discourse production.

Aphasiology 2019 4;33(2):125-139. Epub 2018 Sep 4.

VA Puget Sound Health Care System, Seattle, and University of Washington, Seattle.

Background: Aphasia is an acquired language disorder that makes it difficult for people to produce and comprehend language, with every person with aphasia (PWA) demonstrating difficulty accessing and selecting words (anomia). While aphasia treatments typically focus on a single aspect of language, such as word retrieval, the ultimate goal of aphasia therapy is to improve communication, which is best seen at the level of discourse.

Aims: This retrospective study investigated the effects of one effective anomia therapy, Phonomotor Treatment, on discourse production. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02687038.2018.1512080DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6448574PMC
September 2018
1 Read

Use of co-verbal gestures during word-finding difficulty among Cantonese speakers with fluent aphasia and unimpaired controls.

Aphasiology 2019 16;33(2):216-233. Epub 2018 Apr 16.

Division of Speech and Hearing Sciences, University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong.

Background: Co-verbal gestures refer to hand or arm movements made during speaking. Spoken language and gestures have been shown to be tightly integrated in human communication.

Aims: The present study investigated whether co-verbal gesture use was associated with lexical retrieval in connected speech in unimpaired speakers and persons with aphasia (PWA). Read More

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https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/02687038.2018.1
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02687038.2018.1463085DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6402778PMC
April 2018
5 Reads

Patterns of Decline in Naming and Semantic Knowledge in Primary Progressive Aphasia.

Aphasiology 2018 28;32(9):1010-1030. Epub 2018 Jun 28.

Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Phipps 446, 600 N. Wolfe Street, Baltimore, Maryland 21287 USA; Telephone (410) 614-2381;

Background: Individuals with primary progressive aphasia (PPA) and their caregivers want to know what to expect so that they can plan support appropriately. The ability to predict decline in naming and semantic knowledge, and advise individuals with PPA and their caregivers regarding future planning, would be invaluable clinically.

Aims: The aims of this study were to investigate patterns of decline in naming and semantic knowledge in each of the clinical variants of PPA (logopenic variant PPA, lvPPA; nonfluent agrammatic PPA, nfaPPA; and semantic variant PPA, svPPA) and to examine the effects of other variables on rate of decline. Read More

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https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/02687038.2018.1
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02687038.2018.1490388DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6317736PMC
June 2018
9 Reads

Vowel Formant Dispersion Reflects Severity of Apraxia of Speech.

Aphasiology 2018 2;32(8):902-921. Epub 2017 Oct 2.

Dept. of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina.

Background: Apraxia of Speech (AOS) has been associated with deviations in consonantal voice-onset-time (VOT), but studies of vowel acoustics have yielded conflicting results. However, a speech motor planning disorder that is not bound by phonological categories is expected to affect vowel as well as consonant articulations.

Aims: We measured consonant VOTs and vowel formants produced by a large sample of stroke survivors, and assessed to what extent these variables and their dispersion are predictive of AOS presence and severity, based on a scale that uses clinical observations to rate gradient presence of AOS, aphasia, and dysarthria. Read More

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https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/02687038.2017.1
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02687038.2017.1385050DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6173518PMC
October 2017
12 Reads

Longitudinal Imaging of Reading and Naming Recovery after Stroke.

Aphasiology 2018 18;32(7):839-854. Epub 2017 Dec 18.

Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore MD 21287, USA.

Background: Functional neuroimaging techniques can provide a unique window into the neural basis of language recovery after a stroke. The functional neuroimaging literature on post-stroke language recovery is complex; multiple factors such as the time post-stroke, degree of initial impairment, nature of the task, and lesion location and size, influence recovery patterns. Some of these factors may not be applicable across different stroke participants, and therefore, influence recovery trajectories in vastly different manners across patients. Read More

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https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/02687038.2017.1
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02687038.2017.1417538DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6097621PMC
December 2017
16 Reads

Connected speech in transient aphasias after left hemisphere resective surgery.

Aphasiology 2017 17;31(11):1266-1281. Epub 2017 Jan 17.

Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, USA.

Background: Transient aphasias are common in the first few days after resective surgery to the language-dominant hemisphere. The specific speech and language deficits that occur are related to the location of the surgical site, and may include impairments in fluency, lexical access, repetition, and comprehension. The impact of these transient aphasias on connected speech production has not previously been investigated. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02687038.2017.1278740DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5646839PMC
January 2017
7 Reads

Rapid recovery from aphasia after infarction of Wernicke's area.

Aphasiology 2017 2;31(8):951-980. Epub 2016 Sep 2.

Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721, USA.

Background: Aphasia following infarction of Wernicke's area typically resolves to some extent over time. The nature of this recovery process and its time course have not been characterized in detail, especially in the acute/subacute period.

Aims: The goal of this study was to document recovery after infarction of Wernicke's area in detail in the first 3 months after stroke. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02687038.2016.1225276DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5642116PMC
September 2016
5 Reads

The curious case of processing unaccusative verbs in aphasia.

Aphasiology 2017 3;31(10):1205-1225. Epub 2017 Jan 3.

SDSU/UCSD Joint Doctoral Program in Language and Communicative Disorders, School of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences, San Diego, CA, USA.

Background: Individuals with agrammatic Broca's aphasia (IWBA) exhibit a delay in lexical activation in S-V-O word order sentences and delayed lexical reactivation in sentences that contain syntactic dependencies. This pattern is in contrast to neurologically unimpaired individuals who immediately evince lexical reactivation at the gap in sentences that contain syntactic dependencies. However, in the case of sentences that contain unaccusative verbs, neurologically unimpaired individuals also exhibit a delay in lexical reactivation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02687038.2016.1274873DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5630171PMC
January 2017
2 Reads

Slowed articulation rate is a sensitive diagnostic marker for identifying non-fluent primary progressive aphasia.

Aphasiology 2017 21;31(2):241-260. Epub 2016 Jul 21.

Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, MGH Institute of Health Professions, Boston, MA, USA.

Background: Primary progressive aphasia (PPA) is a neurodegenerative aphasic syndrome with three distinct clinical variants: non-fluent (nfvPPA), logopenic (lvPPA), and semantic (svPPA). Speech (non-) fluency is a key diagnostic marker used to aid identification of the clinical variants, and researchers have been actively developing diagnostic tools to assess speech fluency. Current approaches reveal coarse differences in fluency between subgroups, but often fail to clearly differentiate nfvPPA from the variably fluent lvPPA. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02687038.2016.1191054DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5531197PMC
July 2016
3 Reads

Long-term Recovery in Stroke Accompanied by Aphasia: A Reconsideration.

Aphasiology 2017 27;31(2):152-165. Epub 2016 May 27.

Carnegie Mellon University.

Background: This work focuses on the twenty-six individuals who provided data to AphasiaBank on at least two occasions, with initial testing between 6 months and 5.8 years post-onset of aphasia. The data are archival in nature and were collected from the extensive database of aphasic discourse in AphasiaBank. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02687038.2016.1184221DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5509222PMC
May 2016
9 Reads

Effects of semantic context on access to words of low imageability in deep-phonological dysphasia: a treatment case study.

Aphasiology 2017 30;31(5):542-562. Epub 2016 Jul 30.

Department of Communication Sciences, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, USA.

Background: Deep dysphasia is a relatively rare subcategory of aphasia, characterised by word repetition impairment and a profound auditory-verbal short-term memory (STM) limitation. Repetition of words is better than nonwords (lexicality effect) and better for high-image than low-image words (imageability effect). Another related language impairment profile is phonological dysphasia, which includes all of the characteristics of deep dysphasia except for the occurrence of semantic errors in single word repetition. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02687038.2016.1208803DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5484078PMC
July 2016
2 Reads

Implicit learning and implicit treatment outcomes in individuals with aphasia.

Aphasiology 2017 19;31(1):25-48. Epub 2016 Feb 19.

Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Northwestern University.

Background: Implicit learning is a process of learning that occurs outside of conscious awareness and may be involved in implicit, exposure-based language training. However, research shows that implicit learning abilities are variable among individuals with aphasia, and it remains unknown whether individuals who show basic implicit learning abilities also benefit from implicit language training.

Aims: The aims of this series of experiments were to test implicit learning in individuals with agrammatic aphasia, examine the effects of a novel implicit language treatment, and investigate whether individuals with aphasia who show implicit learning ability also benefit from implicit treatment focused on passive sentence comprehension. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02687038.2016.1147526DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5461970PMC
February 2016
9 Reads

The impact of dose on naming accuracy with persons with aphasia.

Aphasiology 2016 16;30(9):983-1011. Epub 2016 Oct 16.

Science and Research, American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, 2200 Research Blvd., Rockville, MD 20850-3289, USA, (301) 897-0133,

Background: Although aphasia rehabilitation has been shown to be efficacious, many questions remain regarding how best to deliver treatment to maximize functional gains for persons with aphasia. Treatment delivery variables, such as intensity and dosage, are likely to influence both behavioral and structural changes during anomia treatment. While numerous protocols have concluded that treatment intensity positively impacts functional outcomes, few studies to date have examined the role that dose plays in patient outcomes for anomia treatment. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02687038.2015.1100705DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5268500PMC
October 2016
5 Reads

Validating the Communicative Participation Item Bank (CPIB) for use with people with aphasia: an analysis of Differential Item Function (DIF).

Aphasiology 2017 9;31(8):861-878. Epub 2016 Sep 9.

University of Washington, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Box 356490, Seattle, WA 98195, 206-543-3345.

Background: The term 'communicative participation' refers to participation in the communication aspects of life roles at home, at work, and in social and leisure situations. Participation in life roles is a key element in biopsychosocial frameworks of health such as the World Health Organization's (WHO) International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF), and the Aphasia Framework for Outcomes Measurement (AFROM). The Communicative Participation Item Bank (CPIB) was developed as a patient-reported measure of communicative participation for adults. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02687038.2016.1225274DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6433404PMC
September 2016

Corpus-Based Transitivity Biases in Individuals with Aphasia.

Aphasiology 2017 20;31(4):447-464. Epub 2017 Jan 20.

Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA.

Background: This study investigated whether individuals with aphasia (IWA) retain verb biases in expressive language. Verb biases refer to the likelihood that a given verb will occur in different sentence structures. We focused on the likelihood of verbs occurring in transitive and intransitive structures. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02687038.2016.1271105DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5926238PMC
January 2017

The Relationship Between Baseline Volume in Temporal Areas and Post-Treatment Naming Accuracy in Primary Progressive Aphasia.

Aphasiology 2017 2;31(9):1059-1077. Epub 2017 Mar 2.

Center for Aphasia Research and Rehabilitation, Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, DC.

Background: Structural imaging has not been used previously to predict the effect of treatment in primary progressive aphasia (PPA).

Aims: This study examined relationships between baseline brain volume and the effects of phonological and orthographic treatments for anomia in PPA. It was predicted that lower baseline volume would be associated with lower post-treatment naming accuracy for treated items and smaller generalization effects. Read More

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https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/02687038.2017.1
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02687038.2017.1296557DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5889050PMC
March 2017
6 Reads

The comprehension of sentences with unaccusative verbs in aphasia: a test of the intervener hypothesis.

Aphasiology 2017 9;31(1):67-81. Epub 2016 Mar 9.

SDSU/UCSD Joint Doctoral Program in Language and Communicative Disorders, San Diego, CA, USA; School of Speech Language and Hearing Sciences, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA, USA.

Background: It is well accepted that individuals with agrammatic Broca's aphasia have difficulty comprehending some sentences with filler-gap dependencies. While investigations of these difficulties have been conducted with several different sentence types (e.g. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02687038.2016.1154499DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5125727PMC
March 2016
3 Reads

Assessing Syntactic Deficits in Chinese Broca's aphasia using the -Chinese (NAVS-C).

Aphasiology 2016;30(7):815-840. Epub 2015 Nov 16.

Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, USA; Department of Neurology, Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL, USA; Cognitive Neurology and Alzheimer's Disease Center, Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL, USA.

Background: English-speaking patients with Broca's aphasia and agrammatism evince difficulty with complex grammatical structures, including verbs and sentences. A few studies have found similar patterns among Chinese-speaking patients with broca's aphasia, despite structural differences between these two languages. However, no studies have explicitly examined verb properties, including the number and optionality of arguments (participant roles) selected by the verb, and only a few studies have examined sentence deficits among Chinese patients. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02687038.2015.1111995DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4955954PMC
November 2015
3 Reads

Semantic Knowledge Use in Discourse Produced by Individuals with Anomic Aphasia.

Aphasiology 2016;30(9):1012-1025. Epub 2015 Aug 26.

Portland State University.

Background: Researchers have demonstrated that people with aphasia (PWA) have preserved semantic knowledge (Dell et al., 1997; Jefferies & Lambon Ralph, 2006). However, Antonucci (2014) demonstrated that some PWA have impaired access to certain types of knowledge more than others. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02687038.2015.1081140DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4945119PMC
August 2015
1 Read

The Single-Case Reporting Guideline In BEhavioural Interventions (SCRIBE) 2016 Statement.

Aphasiology 2016 Jul 29;30(7):862-876. Epub 2016 Apr 29.

Oliver Zangwill Centre , Cambridgeshire , United Kingdom.

We developed a reporting guideline to provide authors with guidance about what should be reported when writing a paper for publication in a scientific journal using a particular type of research design: the single-case experimental design. This report describes the methods used to develop the Single-Case Reporting guideline In BEhavioural interventions (SCRIBE) 2016. As a result of 2 online surveys and a 2-day meeting of experts, the SCRIBE 2016 checklist was developed, which is a set of 26 items that authors need to address when writing about single-case research. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02687038.2016.1178022DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4873717PMC
July 2016
17 Reads

Telerehabilitation of Anomia in Primary Progressive Aphasia.

Aphasiology 2016 Apr 4;30(4):483-507. Epub 2015 Sep 4.

Center for Aphasia Research and Rehabilitation, Georgetown University Medical Center.

Background: The efficacy of telerehabilitation-based treatment for anomia has been demonstrated in post-stroke aphasia, but the efficacy of this method of anomia treatment delivery has not been established within the context of degenerative illness.

Aims: The current study evaluated the feasibility and efficacy of a telerehabilitation-based approach to anomia treatment within the three subtypes of primary progressive aphasia (PPA).

Methods & Procedures: Each of the three telerehabilitation participants represented a distinct subtype of PPA. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02687038.2015.1081142DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4831866PMC
April 2016
10 Reads

Understanding semantic and phonological processing deficits in adults with aphasia: Effects of category and typicality.

Aphasiology 2016;30(6):719-749. Epub 2015 Sep 12.

Aphasia Research Laboratory, Speech, Language & Hearing Sciences, Boston University, 635 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA, USA 02215, 617-358-5478.

Background: Semantic and phonological processing deficits are often present in aphasia. The degree of interdependence between the deficits has been widely studied with variable findings. Semantic variables such as category and typicality have been found to influence semantic processing in healthy individuals and persons with aphasia but their influence on phonological processing is unknown. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02687038.2015.1081137DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4811611PMC
September 2015
3 Reads

Increasing aphasia treatment intensity in an acute inpatient rehabilitation program: A feasibility study.

Aphasiology 2016 May 19;30(5):542-565. Epub 2015 Mar 19.

;

Background: Intensity of therapy is a critical factor influencing outcomes in aphasia. However, there are many barriers to increasing treatment intensity for those with acute/subacute aphasia including the demands of the inpatient medical facilities and the endurance of the participants. Nevertheless, with some modifications to its original procedures, evidence suggests that Constraint Induced Language Therapy (CILT) may yield positive outcomes when given in the early stages of recovery. Read More

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http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/02687038.2015.10
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02687038.2015.1023695DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4808295PMC
May 2016
2 Reads

The effect of speaking rate on serial-order sound-level errors in normal healthy controls and persons with aphasia.

Aphasiology 2016;30(1):74-95. Epub 2015 Jan 14.

Department of Speech Pathology & Audiology, West Virginia University.

Background: Although many speech errors can be generated at either a linguistic or motoric level of production, phonetically well-formed sound-level serial-order errors are generally assumed to result from disruption of phonologic encoding (PE) processes. An influential model of PE (Dell, 1986; Dell, Burger & Svec, 1997) predicts that speaking rate should affect the relative proportion of these serial-order sound errors (anticipations, perseverations, exchanges). These predictions have been extended to, and have special relevance for persons with aphasia (PWA) because of the increased frequency with which speech errors occur and because their localization within the functional linguistic architecture may help in diagnosis and treatment. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02687038.2015.1063581DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4782975PMC
January 2015
18 Reads

The effect of a sentence comprehension treatment on discourse comprehension in aphasia.

Aphasiology 2015 Nov 6;29(11):1289-1311. Epub 2015 Jan 6.

Department of Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Boston University, Boston, MA.

Background: While it is well understood that individuals with aphasia have difficulty with discourse comprehension, very few studies have examined the nature of discourse comprehension deficits in aphasia and the potential for improvement in discourse comprehension after rehabilitation. To address the first goal, we previously developed the Test of Syntactic Effects on Discourse Comprehension (TSEDC), which provides a measure of the extent to which a participant's sentence comprehension ability aids in comprehending passages (Levy et al., 2012). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02687038.2014.997182DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4620060PMC
November 2015
4 Reads
1.732 Impact Factor

Phonological facilitation effects on naming latencies and viewing times during noun and verb naming in agrammatic and anomic aphasia.

Aphasiology 2015;29(10):1164-1188

Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, USA ; Cognitive Neurology and Alzheimer's Disease Center, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, USA ; Department of Neurology, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, USA.

Background: Phonological priming has been shown to facilitate naming in individuals with aphasia as well as healthy speakers, resulting in faster naming latencies. However, the mechanisms of phonological facilitation (PF) in aphasia remain unclear.

Aims: Within discrete vs. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02687038.2015.1035225DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4583128PMC
January 2015
1 Read

Prophylactic Treatments for Anomia in the Logopenic Variant of Primary Progressive Aphasia: Cross-Language Transfer.

Aphasiology 2015;29(9):1062-1081

Center for Aphasia Research and Rehabilitation, Georgetown University Medical Center.

Background: Treatment studies for anomia in PPA have rarely compared multiple treatments in the same individual, and few anomia treatment studies have included participants with the logopenic variant of PPA (lvPPA).

Aims: The goals of this study were to evaluate two types of treatment for anomia in a bilingual participant (ND) with lvPPA, and to examine possible cross-language transfer of treatment effects.

Methods & Procedures: ND is a Norwegian-English bilingual woman with lvPPA who began this study at the age of 69. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02687038.2015.1028327DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4524746PMC
January 2015
4 Reads

Training Pseudoword Reading in Acquired Dyslexia: A Phonological Complexity Approach.

Aphasiology 2015 Feb;29(2):129-150

Aphasia and Neurolinguistics Research Laboratory, Department of Communication Sciences & Disorders, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL ; Cognitive Neurology and Alzheimer's Disease Center, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL.

Background: Individuals with acquired phonological dyslexia experience difficulty associating written letters with corresponding sounds, especially in pseudowords. Previous studies have shown that reading can be improved in these individuals by training letter-sound correspondence, practicing phonological skills, or using combined approaches. However, generalization to untrained items is typically limited. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02687038.2014.955389DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4467909PMC
February 2015
1 Read

Language and iconic gesture use in procedural discourse by speakers with aphasia.

Aphasiology 2015 Jul 3;29(7):826-844. Epub 2015 Jan 3.

School of Psychology and Speech Pathology, Curtin University , Perth , Australia.

: Conveying instructions is an everyday use of language, and gestures are likely to be a key feature of this. Although co-speech iconic gestures are tightly integrated with language, and people with aphasia (PWA) produce procedural discourses impaired at a linguistic level, no previous studies have investigated how PWA use co-speech iconic gestures in these contexts. : This study investigated how PWA communicated meaning using gesture and language in procedural discourses, compared with neurologically healthy people (NHP). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02687038.2014.993912DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4409036PMC
July 2015
1 Read

Grammatical Impairments in PPA.

Aphasiology 2014 Sep;28(8-9):1018-1037

Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Northwestern University Francis Searle Building, 2240 Campus Drive, Evanston, IL 60208.

Background: Grammatical impairments are commonly observed in the agrammatic subtype of primary progressive aphasia (PPA-G), whereas grammatical processing is relatively preserved in logopenic (PPA-L) and semantic (PPA-S) subtypes.

Aims: We review research on grammatical deficits in PPA and associated neural mechanisms, with discussion focused on production and comprehension of four aspects of morphosyntactic structure: grammatical morphology, functional categories, verbs and verb argument structure, and complex syntactic structures. We also address assessment of grammatical deficits in PPA, with emphasis on behavioral tests of grammatical processing. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02687038.2014.912744DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4306464PMC
September 2014
2 Reads

Conversation focused aphasia therapy: investigating the adoption of strategies by people with agrammatism.

Aphasiology 2015 Mar;29(3):355-377

Division of Psychology and Language Sciences, University College London , London , UK.

: A recent review of interaction (or conversation)-focused therapy highlighted the potential of programmes targeting the person with aphasia (PWA) directly. However, it noted the key limitations of current work in this field to be a reliance on single case analyses and qualitative evidence of change, a situation that is not unusual when a complex behavioural intervention is in the early stages of development and evaluation. : This article aims to evaluate an intervention that targeted a PWA and their conversation partner (CP), a dyad, as equals in a novel conversation therapy for agrammatic aphasia, using both quantitative and qualitative evidence of change. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02687038.2014.881459DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4299855PMC
March 2015
3 Reads

Biomarkers in the primary progressive aphasias.

Authors:
Murray Grossman

Aphasiology 2014 Sep;28(8-9):922-940

Department of Neurology, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA.

Background: Primary progressive aphasia (PPA) is a progressive disorder of language that is increasingly recognised as an important presentation of a specific spectrum of neurodegenerative conditions.

Aims: In an era of etiologically specific treatments for neurodegenerative conditions, it is crucial to establish the histopathologic basis for PPA. In this review, I discuss biomarkers for identifying the pathology underlying PPA. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02687038.2014.929631DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4287262PMC
September 2014

Speech segmentation in aphasia.

Aphasiology 2015 28;29(6):724-743. Epub 2014 Nov 28.

Cognition and Brain Plasticity Group, Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute - IDIBELL, Barcelona, Spain.

Background: Speech segmentation is one of the initial and mandatory phases of language learning. Although some people with aphasia have shown a preserved ability to learn novel words, their speech segmentation abilities have not been explored.

Aims: We examined the ability of individuals with chronic aphasia to segment words from running speech via statistical learning. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02687038.2014.982500DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5560767PMC
November 2014
7 Reads

The case for single-case studies in treatment research-comments on Howard, Best and Nickels "Optimising the design of intervention studies: critiques and ways forward".

Aphasiology 2015 24;29(5):570-574. Epub 2014 Dec 24.

Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02687038.2014.987049DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5560595PMC
December 2014
1 Read

Effects of context and word class on lexical retrieval in Chinese speakers with anomic aphasia.

Aphasiology 2015 Jan;29(1):81-100

Division of Speech and Hearing Sciences, University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong SAR.

Background: Differences in processing nouns and verbs have been investigated intensely in psycholinguistics and neuropsychology in past decades. However, the majority of studies examining retrieval of these word classes have involved tasks of single word stimuli or responses. While the results have provided rich information for addressing issues about grammatical class distinctions, it is unclear whether they have adequate ecological validity for understanding lexical retrieval in connected speech which characterizes daily verbal communication. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02687038.2014.951598DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4259268PMC
January 2015
4 Reads

Longitudinal Imaging and Deterioration in Word Comprehension in Primary Progressive Aphasia: Potential Clinical Significance.

Aphasiology 2014 Aug;28(8-9):948-963

Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 600 N. Wolfe Street, Baltimore MD 21287, USA ; Department of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 600 N. Wolfe Street, Baltimore MD 21287, USA ; Department of Cognitive Science, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218, USA.

Background: Three variants of primary progressive aphasia (PPA), distinguished by language performance and supportive patterns of atrophy on imaging, have different clinical courses and the prognoses for specific functions. For example, semantic variant PPA alone is distinguished by impaired word comprehension. However, sometimes individuals with high education show normal performance on word comprehension tests early on, making classification difficult. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02687038.2014.911241DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4243664PMC
August 2014
8 Reads

Use of the Progressive Aphasia Severity Scale (PASS) in monitoring speech and language status in PPA.

Aphasiology 2014 Jan;28(8-9):993-1003

Frontotemporal Dementia Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA ; Department of Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA ; Department of Psychiatry, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA ; Department of Massachusetts Alzheimer's Disease Research Center, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA ; Department of Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.

Background: Primary progressive aphasia (PPA) is a devastating neurodegenerative syndrome involving the gradual development of aphasia, slowly impairing the patient's ability to communicate. Pharmaceutical treatments do not currently exist and intervention often focuses on speech-language behavioral therapies, although further investigation is warranted to determine how best to harness functional benefits. Efforts to develop pharmaceutical and behavioral treatments have been hindered by a lack of standardized methods to monitor disease progression and treatment efficacy. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02687038.2014.931563DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4235969PMC
January 2014
67 Reads

Motor Speech Disorders Associated with Primary Progressive Aphasia.

Aphasiology 2014 Aug;28(8-9):1004-1017

Dept. of Neurology, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, MN, U.S.A.

Background: Primary progressive aphasia (PPA) and conditions that overlap with it can be accompanied by motor speech disorders. Recognition and understanding of motor speech disorders can contribute to a fuller clinical understanding of PPA and its management as well as its localization and underlying pathology.

Aims: To review the types of motor speech disorders that may occur with PPA, its primary variants, and its overlap syndromes (progressive supranuclear palsy syndrome, corticobasal syndrome, motor neuron disease), as well as with primary progressive apraxia of speech. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02687038.2013.869307DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4191906PMC
August 2014
21 Reads

Role for Memory Capacity in Sentence Comprehension: Evidence from Acute Stroke.

Aphasiology 2014 ;28(10):1258-1280

Department of Neurology Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine 600 North Wolfe Street Baltimore, MD 21287 (410) 614-2381

Background: Previous research has suggested that short-term and working memory resources play a critical role in sentence comprehension, especially when comprehension mechanisms cannot rely on semantics alone. However, few studies have examined this association in participants in acute stroke, before the opportunity for therapy and reorganization of cognitive functions.

Aims: The present study examined the hypothesis that severity of short-term memory deficit due to acute stroke predicts the severity of impairment in the comprehension of syntactically complex sentences. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02687038.2014.919436DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4158714PMC
January 2014
11 Reads

Treating apraxia of speech with an implicit protocol that activates speech motor areas via inner speech.

Aphasiology 2014 Jan;28(5):515-532

Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences and Department of Neurology, University of Arizona, Tuscon, AZ, USA.

Background: Treatments of apraxia of speech (AOS) have traditionally relied on overt practice. One alternative to this method is implicit phoneme manipulation which was derived from early models on inner speech. Implicit phoneme manipulation requires the participant to covertly move and combine phonemes to form a new word. Read More

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http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/02687038.2014.886
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02687038.2014.886323DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4136530PMC
January 2014
12 Reads

Effects of Verb Bias and Syntactic Ambiguity on Reading in People with Aphasia.

Authors:
Gayle Dede

Aphasiology 2013 Oct;27(10-12):1408-1425

Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences University of Arizona.

Background: The Lexical Bias Hypothesis (Gahl, 2002) claims that people with aphasia have difficulty understanding sentences when the verb's argument structure bias conflicts with the sentence structure. This hypothesis can account for comprehension deficits that affect simple sentences, but the role of verb bias has not been clearly demonstrated in temporarily ambiguous sentences.

Aims: This study examined how verb bias affects comprehension of temporarily ambiguous and unambiguous sentences using self-paced reading. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02687038.2013.843151DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3966628PMC
October 2013
1 Read

"Penguins don't fly": An investigation into the effect of typicality on picture naming in people with aphasia.

Aphasiology 2013 Jul 19;27(7):784-798. Epub 2013 Feb 19.

Psychology and Language Sciences, University College London, London, UK.

Background: PREVIOUS RESEARCH HAS HIGHLIGHTED PSYCHOLINGUISTIC VARIABLES INFLUENCING NAMING ABILITY FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH APHASIA, INCLUDING: familiarity, frequency, age of acquisition, imageability, operativity, and length (Nickels & Howard, 1995) and a potential link between typicality and generalisation to untreated items in intervention (Kiran, Sandberg, & Sebastian, 2011). However, the effect of concept typicality (the extent to which an item can be considered a prototype of a category) on naming in aphasia warrants further examination.

Aims: To investigate first whether typicality can be reliably rated across a range of natural semantic categories and second whether, and if so in which direction, typicality influences naming performance for people with aphasia. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02687038.2012.751579DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3935221PMC

Psycholinguistics of Aphasia Pharmacotherapy: Asking the Right Questions.

Aphasiology 2014 Jan;28(2):133-154

Boston University School of Medicine, Department of Neurology, Harold Goodglass Aphasia Research Center, VA Boston Healthcare System, 150 South Huntington Avenue Boston, MA02130.

Background: Among the obstacles to demonstrating efficacy of pharmacological intervention for aphasia is quantifying patients' responses to treatment in a statistically valid and reliable manner. In many of the review papers on this topic (e.g. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02687038.2013.818099DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3904395PMC
January 2014

What matters in semantic feature processing for persons with stroke-aphasia: Evidence from an auditory concept-feature verification task.

Aphasiology 2014;28(7):823-839. Epub 2014 May 20.

Worcester State University, Communication Sciences and Disorders, 486 Chandler Street, Worcester, MA 01602.

Background: The relationship between object concept domains (living vs. nonliving) and their underlying feature structures is a frequent area of investigation regarding semantic processing in healthy individuals and some individuals with neuropsychological impairment resulting from herpes simplex encephalitis, semantic dementia and Alzheimer's disease. However, this relationship has been less well-investigated in persons with stroke-aphasia (PWA), even though many treatments for anomia following stroke are predicated on the use of semantic feature cues. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02687038.2014.913769DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5026234PMC

Challenges facing COS development for aphasia.

Authors:
Brian MacWhinney

Aphasiology 2014;28(11):1393-1395. Epub 2014 Jul 15.

Department of Psychology, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02687038.2014.930263DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4860263PMC
July 2014
2 Reads

Augmentation of spelling therapy with transcranial direct current stimulation in primary progressive aphasia: Preliminary results and challenges.

Aphasiology 2014;28(8-9):1112-1130

Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA ; Department of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, Johns Hopkins Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA ; Department of Cognitive Science, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USA.

Background: Primary progressive aphasia (PPA) is a neurodegenerative disease that primarily affects language functions and often begins in the fifth or sixth decade of life. The devastating effects on work and family life call for the investigation of treatment alternatives. In this article, we present new data indicating that neuromodulatory treatment, using transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) combined with a spelling intervention, shows some promise for maintaining or even improving language, at least temporarily, in PPA. Read More

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http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/02687038.2014.930
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02687038.2014.930410DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4470615PMC
January 2014
2 Reads

Formulaic Language in Alzheimer's Disease.

Aphasiology 2013 Jul;27(7)

New York University, Communicative Sciences and Disorders, 665 Broadway, New York, 10012 United States & The Nathan S. Kline Institute for Psychiatric Research, Geriatrics Department, 140 Old Orangeburg Rd., Orangeburg, 10962 United States.

Background: Studies of productive language in Alzheimer's disease (AD) have focused on formal testing of syntax and semantics but have directed less attention to naturalistic discourse and formulaic language. Clinical observations suggest that individuals with AD retain the ability to produce formulaic language long after other cognitive abilities have deteriorated.

Aims: This study quantifies production of formulaic expressions in the spontaneous speech of individuals with AD. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02687038.2012.757760DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3811161PMC

The impact of impaired semantic knowledge on spontaneous iconic gesture production.

Aphasiology 2013 Sep;27(9):1050-1069

Language and Communication Science Division, City University, London, UK.

Background: Previous research has found that people with aphasia produce more spontaneous iconic gesture than control participants, especially during word-finding difficulties. There is some evidence that impaired semantic knowledge impacts on the diversity of gestural handshapes, as well as the frequency of gesture production. However, no previous research has explored how impaired semantic knowledge impacts on the frequency and type of iconic gestures produced during fluent speech compared with those produced during word-finding difficulties. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02687038.2013.770816DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3778580PMC
September 2013
3 Reads

Neural Basis of Action Understanding: Evidence from Sign Language Aphasia.

Aphasiology 2013 ;27(9):1147-1158

Department of Cognitive Sciences, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697.

Background: The neural basis of action understanding is a hotly debated issue. The mirror neuron account holds that motor simulation in fronto-parietal circuits is critical to action understanding including speech comprehension, while others emphasize the ventral stream in the temporal lobe. Evidence from speech strongly supports the ventral stream account, but on the other hand, evidence from manual gesture comprehension (e. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02687038.2013.812779DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3767459PMC
January 2013
12 Reads