6 results match your criteria Antipode[Journal]

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Political Ecologies of Global Health: Pesticide Exposure in Southwestern Ecuador's Banana Industry.

Antipode 2018 Jan 13;50(1):61-81. Epub 2017 Jun 13.

School of Population and Public HealthUniversity of British ColumbiaVancouverBCCanada.

Pesticide exposure in Ecuador's banana industry reflects political economic and ecological processes that interact across scales to affect human health. We use this case study to illustrate opportunities for applying political ecology of health scholarship in the burgeoning field of global health. Drawing on an historical literature review and ethnographic data collected in Ecuador's El Oro province, we present three main areas where a political ecological approach can enrich global health scholarship: perceptive characterization of multi-scalar and ecologically entangled pathways to health outcomes; critical analysis of discursive dynamics such as competing scalar narratives; and appreciation of the environment-linked subjectivities and emotions of people experiencing globalized health impacts. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/anti.12340DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5812055PMC
January 2018

A manifesto against femicide.

Authors:
M W Wright

Antipode 2001 ;33(3):550-66

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March 2009
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The production of diaspora: Algerian emigration from colonialism to neo-colonialism (1840-1970).

Authors:
M Samers

Antipode 1997 Jan;29(1):32-64

"This paper is part of a larger project investigating the production and regulation of North African immigrants in the greater Paris automobile industry. Its aims are twofold. First, to reverse the emphasis placed on immigrants in the receiving countries and to (re-)explore the historical production of Algerian emigration into metropolitan industry, more specifically within the automobile industry. Read More

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January 1997

Population and poverty in dependent states: Latin America considered.

Antipode 1990 Aug;22(2):121-55

"Malthusians maintain that rapid population growth aggravates poverty, while Marxists contend that social formations determine its nature and extent. Each perspective is incomplete, however, since it ignores the insights of the other. Latin American states, characterized by dependent capitalism formations and dominated by ruling elites, are generally incapable of solving the problems of population and poverty. Read More

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Urbanisation, crisis and urban policy in Greece.

Antipode 1987 Sep;19(2):154-77

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September 1987
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