11 results match your criteria Anthropological Quarterly[Journal]

  • Page 1 of 1

Refusing the Development NGO? Departure, Dismissal, and Misrecognition in Angolan Development Interventions.

Anthropol Q 2019 ;92(1):203-229

Department of Public Administration and International Affairs, Syracuse University.

Nongovernmental organizations working in international development increasingly follow a neoliberalized management model, hiring professional employees to conduct the work of social transformation under a bureaucratic regime that sees the recruitment and retention of staff members as rational transactions between employer and employee. Such managerialist thinking holds that staff members represent bundles of skills and knowledge to be sorted and allocated according to the requirements of work, that they seek to exchange their labor for payment, and that they may justifiably be fired for misdeeds like misuse of materials, misrepresenting themselves, or poor work quality, as determined by the institution. I use the example of local staff members resigning and being fired from an international democratization intervention in postwar Angola to argue that some development professionals refuse to occupy such management-defined subject positions, asserting instead their independent moralities about the place of implementation staff in international development work. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/anq.2019.0007DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6786788PMC
January 2019

From the Cross (and Crescent) to the Cedar and Back Again: Transnational Religion and Politics Among Lebanese Christians in Senegal.

Authors:
Mara A Leichtman

Anthropol Q 2013 ;86(1):35-75

Michigan State University.

This article examines the changing relationship between religion, secularism, national politics, and identity formation among Lebanese Christians in Senegal. Notre Dame du Liban, the first Lebanese religious institution in West Africa, draws on its Lebanese "national" character to accommodate Lebanese Maronite Catholic and Greek Orthodox Christians in Dakar, remaining an icon of "Lebanese" religion, yet departing from religious sectarianism in Lebanon. As such, can vary from gaining new resonances and reinforcing a wider "secular" ethno-national identity. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/anq.2013.0008DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3783353PMC
January 2013
1 Read

Promiscuous Girls, Good Wives, and Cheating Husbands: Gender Inequality, Transitions to Marriage, and Infidelity in Southeastern Nigeria.

Anthropol Q 2010 ;83(1)

Brown University.

The transition from premarital sexual relationships and courtship to marriage and parenthood in southeastern Nigeria involves particularly dramatic adjustments for young women who have absorbed changing ideas about sexuality, marriage, and gender equality, and who have had active premarital sexual lives. In the eyes of society, these women must transform from being promiscuous girls to good wives. This paper examines these adjustments and, specifically, how young married women's lives are affected by the reality of male infidelity and a persistent gendered double standard regarding the acceptability of extramarital sex. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/anq.0.0118DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3831578PMC
January 2010
1 Read

Support Groups, Marriage, and the Management of Ambiguity among HIV-Positive Women in Northern Nigeria.

Authors:
Kathryn A Rhine

Anthropol Q 2009 ;82(2):369-400

Brown University.

In the context of the African HIV epidemic, support groups are not simply spaces for discussions of social and health well-being; neither are they institutions functioning solely to cultivate self-responsible and economically empowered patients. HIV-positive women in northern Nigeria have appropriated a support group to facilitate their marriage arrangements. In this group, women negotiate the threats of stigma and the promises of respectable marriage through what I call the management of ambiguity surrounding their HIV status. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/anq.0.0067DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3740595PMC
January 2009
1 Read

Human subjects protection and cultural anthropology.

Authors:
Stuart Plattner

Anthropol Q 2003 ;76(2):287-97

National Science Foundation, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/anq.2003.0030DOI Listing
June 2004
3 Reads

Human subjects protections, institutional review boards, and cultural anthropological research.

Anthropol Q 2003 ;76(2):269-85

Case Western University, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/anq.2003.0028DOI Listing
June 2004
4 Reads

Healing dilemmas.

Authors:
Donald Pollock

Anthropol Q 1996 Jul;69(3):149-57

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July 1996
2 Reads

Collecting medical specimens in South America: a dilemma in medical ethics.

Authors:
Judith Kempf

Anthropol Q 1996 Jul;69(3):142-8

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July 1996
1 Read

Hippocrates in the bush.

Authors:
Jean E Jackson

Anthropol Q 1996 Jul;69(3):120-2

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July 1996
3 Reads

Avoiding shame: the ethical context of abortion in Ghana.

Authors:
Wolf Bleek

Anthropol Q 1981 Oct;54(4):203-10

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October 1981
2 Reads
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