446 results match your criteria Annual review of nursing research[Journal]


School Nurses and Climate Change.

Annu Rev Nurs Res 2019 12;38(1):275-286

Climate change is a serious threat to human health. Nurses recognize vulnerable populations are disproportionately affected by the consequences from climate change, especially the elderly, pregnant women, and children. Children with asthma and chronic health conditions are at the greatest risk for negative health outcomes and are the most important reason for climate advocacy. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1891/0739-6686.38.275DOI Listing
December 2019

A Proposal: Nurse-Sensitive Environmental Indicators.

Annu Rev Nurs Res 2019 12;38(1):265-274

Healthcare contributes significant pollution to the natural environment. Nurses are obligated by professional commitment, to avoid causing harm in their care processes and decisions, including environmental harm. Nurse awareness of healthcare-generated pollution is growing but nurses may lack an understanding of how nursing contributes specifically to this pollution and what nurses can do within their scope and span to address it. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1891/0739-6686.38.265DOI Listing
December 2019

The Confidence of New Nurse Graduates in the Application of Environmental Health in the Nursing Process.

Annu Rev Nurs Res 2019 12;38(1):257-264

The purpose of this chapter is to report the findings gathered in an author-designed survey of new nurse graduates in Connecticut of their confidence in the application of environmental health in their nursing practice. An invitation to the survey was included in newsletters of Connecticut Nurses Association sent to all practicing nurses in Connecticut. New nurse graduates' confidence level regarding incorporation of environmental health vary substantially among the aspects of environmental health and this confidence decreases as they progress through the steps of the nursing process. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1891/0739-6686.38.257DOI Listing
December 2019

The Crisis and the Shutoffs: Reimagining Water in Detroit and Flint, Michigan, Through an EcoJustice Analysis.

Annu Rev Nurs Res 2019 12;38(1):223-256

This chapter outlines the guiding theoretical framework of EcoJustice Education (EJE), research questions, semistructured interviews with nursing scholars that begin to question the perceptions that lead us to the crisis and recommendations of how sustainability efforts can help to address the vital relationality of human beings to water. It highlights the profession of nursing education in order for nurses to understand their roles within the context of the crises. The EJE theoretical framework will help nurse educators reimagine a new understanding and a powerful discovery that includes the awareness of a broad set of historically constructed and politically motivated power knowledge relations in nursing. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1891/0739-6686.38.223DOI Listing
December 2019

Farmworkers: Environmental Health and Social Determinants.

Authors:
Barbara Sattler

Annu Rev Nurs Res 2019 12;38(1):203-222

The health implications of food and agriculture production are not generally part of the nursing curriculum and yet nurses understand that vulnerable populations, such as farmworkers, may need special attention in terms of health education, disease prevention, and access to mental health and healthcare services. Nurses also learn about the social determinants of health and increasingly are applying this knowledge to health and wellness in their communities. This article will consider the health impacts of the social determinants and both environmental and occupational exposures experienced by farmworkers and the associated implications for the nursing profession. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1891/0739-6686.38.203DOI Listing
December 2019

Environmental Health Equity: A Concept Analysis.

Annu Rev Nurs Res 2019 12;38(1):183-202

Public health practice and ethics address both individual and environmental health, in order to optimize the well-being of an entire population. Consideration of environmental health equity (EHE) is an evolving component of environmental ethics and public health, with evidence of disparities in exposure to vulnerable communities. Related terms for studying EHE include elements of justice, social determinants of health (SDOH), disparities, and environmental racism. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1891/0739-6686.38.183DOI Listing
December 2019

Per- and Polyfluoroalkyl Substances: An Emerging Contaminant of Concern.

Annu Rev Nurs Res 2019 12;38(1):159-182

Concerns about the health impacts from per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) continue to grow as the science continues to emerge associating this chemical family with a wide range of health impacts. PFAS exposure may affect growth, learning, and behavior of infants and older children, and also impact reproductive health, cardiovascular health, and the immune system. PFAS exposure is widespread, with communities surrounding military bases at potentially greater risk of exposure from the use of fire fighting foam that may have entered the drinking water. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1891/0739-6686.38.159DOI Listing
December 2019

Advancing a School of Nursing Center for Climate Change, Climate Justice, and Health.

Annu Rev Nurs Res 2019 12;38(1):145-158

This chapter addresses the development and advancement of the Center for Climate Change, Climate Justice, and Health (CCCCJH) in the School of Nursing at the MGH Institute of Health Professions, the first nurse-led center emerged from the overwhelming evidence of climate change and its associated deleterious health consequences. The Center steering committee developed a mission, vision, and core values as well as a logo to guide the first year of initiatives and galvanize the efforts for the future. Workshop and symposium development, implementation, and evaluation are discussed. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1891/0739-6686.38.145DOI Listing
December 2019

Environmental and Climate Change Initiatives in Nursing Education.

Annu Rev Nurs Res 2019 12;38(1):131-144

Climate change has been labeled the greatest threat to public health and to global health in the 21st century. Addressing climate change has also been reframed as the greatest opportunity for global health in the 21st century, providing a more proactive lens through which to plan and implement actions. Significant climate change impacts to human health are numerous and mounting, including the direct effects of heatwaves, thermal stress and changed frequency or intensity of other extreme weather events. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1891/0739-6686.38.131DOI Listing
December 2019

A Comparison of Environmental Concerns in Two Disparate Montana and Nevada Communities.

Annu Rev Nurs Res 2019 12;38(1):113-130

Asbestos refers to six fibrous minerals that occur naturally in the environment in the United States and throughout the world. Deposits may be found in soil, rocks, and deposits of other minerals such as vermiculite and talc. These naturally occurring asbestos (NOA) minerals belong to the serpentine and amphibole family of minerals. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1891/0739-6686.38.113DOI Listing
December 2019

CHANT: Climate, Health, and Nursing Tool: Item Development and Exploratory Factor Analysis.

Annu Rev Nurs Res 2019 12;38(1):97-112

Climate change poses significant health risks. Nurses assess, treat, and educate patients about health risks. However, nurses' level of awareness, motivation, and behaviors related to climate change and health is not known. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1891/0739-6686.38.97DOI Listing
December 2019

A Scoping Review of Nurses' Contributions to Health-Related, Wildfire Research.

Annu Rev Nurs Res 2019 12;38(1):73-96

Exposure to unprecedented levels of wildfire smoke is increasing cardiopulmonary mortality and is especially catastrophic to people with preexisting respiratory conditions such as asthma. Wildfire smoke is a mixture of hazardous air pollutants and airborne particulate matter and wildfires are burning larger areas of land and lasting longer, extending the smoke season. The wildfire season is also expected to lengthen as a result of the changing climate. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1891/0739-6686.38.73DOI Listing
December 2019

Neighborhood Environment and Asthma Exacerbation in Washington, DC.

Annu Rev Nurs Res 2019 12;38(1):53-72

Approximately one in eight people in the United States have been diagnosed with asthma. Asthma is associated with significant medical expenditure and has been implicated as a leading reason for chronic school absences. Environmental risk factors such as access to green space and exposure to poor air quality are patterned such that some vulnerable populations may be at higher risk. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1891/0739-6686.38.53DOI Listing
December 2019

Omics for Nurse Scientists Conducting Environmental Health Research.

Annu Rev Nurs Res 2019 12;38(1):35-52

Nurse scientists are ideally positioned to perform environmental health research and it is critical that the role of omics in the complex relationships between environmental exposures and an individual's unique physiology in human health outcomes be appreciated. Importantly, omics can offer nurse scientists a tool to measure exposure, demonstrate molecular phenotypic changes associated with exposure, and potentially uncover mechanisms of exposure-related disease or negative health outcomes. The purpose of this summary is to serve as an overview of omics methodologies for nurse scientists conducting environmental health research and provides future directions of this work as well as exemplar funding opportunities that demonstrate the growing need and interest in this area. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1891/0739-6686.38.35DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7100388PMC
December 2019

The Impact of Chronic Ambient Exposure to PM and Ozone on Asthma Prevalence and COPD Mortality Rates in the Southeastern United States.

Annu Rev Nurs Res 2019 12;38(1):15-34

Respiratory diseases affect millions of people across the United States annually. Two of the most common respiratory diseases are chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma. Mortality rates due to COPD have increased by an estimated 30% between 1980 and 2014, with significant variances among geographic regions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1891/0739-6686.38.15DOI Listing
December 2019

Utility of a Low-Cost, Dense Sensor Network for the Study of Air Quality Impact Upon Human Health in Urban and Rural Areas.

Annu Rev Nurs Res 2019 12;38(1):1-14

The chemical composition of air changes from moment to moment. While the atmosphere may appear clear and cloudless to the human eye, gases, aerosols, and particulates are in constant interaction with Earth's surface under the influence of meteorological conditions. The recent emergence of low-cost, dense environmental air quality monitoring networks suggests growing interest in highly granular temporospatial exposure assessments by scientists and citizens. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1891/0739-6686.38.1DOI Listing
December 2019

The Lens of Culture and Forensic Nursing Practice.

Annu Rev Nurs Res 2018 12;37(1):301-310

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1891/0739-6686.37.1.301DOI Listing
December 2018
4 Reads

A Policy Apprenticeship in the Office of U.S. Senator Daniel K. Inouye.

Authors:
Robin Squellati

Annu Rev Nurs Res 2018 12;36(1):219-228

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1891/0739-6686.36.1.219DOI Listing
December 2018
1 Read

Engaging in Policy During Graduate Training.

Annu Rev Nurs Res 2018 12;36(1):205-218

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1891/0739-6686.36.1.205DOI Listing
December 2018
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Body Art in the Perioperative Setting.

Annu Rev Nurs Res 2018 12;36(1):75-105

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1891/0739-6686.36.1.75DOI Listing
December 2018
1 Read

The Use of Restraints in Civilian and Military Health Care Settings.

Authors:
Jean Fisak

Annu Rev Nurs Res 2018 12;36(1):7-25

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1891/0739-6686.36.1.7DOI Listing
December 2018
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The Role of Pharmacogenomics in Anesthesia Pharmacology.

Annu Rev Nurs Res 2017 01;35(1):241-256

The field of pharmacogenomics seeks to identify the impact of genetic variants on drug dosing, response, metabolism, and safety outcomes. The narrow therapeutic indices for anesthesia drugs, variability of patient responses to anesthesia, and the risks associated with surgery make anesthetics and the perioperative period prime targets for pharmacogenetic research. Anesthesia providers strive to optimize anesthesia delivery and patient outcomes and to specifically reduce anesthesia-related risks and negative outcomes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1891/0739-6686.35.241DOI Listing
January 2017
2 Reads

Wet or Dry? A Review of Intravenous Fluid Administration in Anesthesia Practice.

Annu Rev Nurs Res 2017 01;35(1):221-239

Fluid therapy has dramatically changed since its early inception nearly 200 years ago. Administration of intravenous fluid (IVF) has evolved from a "drip" technique to the algorithmic approach of the anesthetic fluid plan, and is now moving toward Goal-Directed Fluid Therapy. As the science and culture of fluid management evolves, anesthetists must remain focused on "why" anesthetic fluid matters. Read More

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January 2017
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The Neurotoxicity of General Anesthetic Drugs: Emphasis on the Extremes of Age.

Annu Rev Nurs Res 2017 01;35(1):201-219

A substantial body of research suggests that anesthetic exposure to patients who are very young or very old may impair cognitive, behavioral, and emotional development or recovery. In lower animal models of pre- and postnatal age, anesthetic exposure may impact inflammation, synaptogenesis, neuronal apoptosis, and glial cell development. To date, research in humans is inconclusive regarding the long-term cognitive and behavioral sequelae of general anesthesia in the young child. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1891/0739-6686.35.201DOI Listing
January 2017
5 Reads

Forced-Air Warmers and Surgical Site Infections in Patients Undergoing Knee or Hip Arthroplasty.

Authors:
Paul N Austin

Annu Rev Nurs Res 2017 01;35(1):179-199

The majority of the evidence indicates preventing inadvertent perioperative hypothermia reduces the incidence of many perioperative complications. Among the results of inadvertent perioperative hypothermia are increased bleeding, myocardial events, impaired wound healing, and diminished renal function. Most researchers agree there is an increased incidence of surgical site infections in patients who experience inadvertent perioperative hypothermia. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1891/0739-6686.35.179DOI Listing
January 2017
1 Read

Treatment and Prevention of Spinal-Induced Hypotension in the Cesarean Section Patient: What Does the Evidence Say?

Annu Rev Nurs Res 2017 01;35(1):159-178

Most anesthesia providers prefer to do a subarachnoid block (SAB) for cesarean section because of its rapid onset and reliability to provide adequate anesthesia. However an effect of the SAB is that it causes a spinal-induced hypotension (SIH) in up to 85% of the population. There have been multiple studies that assessed fluid administration, vasopressor administration, maternal positioning, or serotonin blockers given prophylactically to attenuate the SIH response. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1891/0739-6686.35.159DOI Listing
January 2017
5 Reads

Anesthesia Involvement in Palliative Care.

Annu Rev Nurs Res 2017 01;35(1):135-158

Palliative care teams require multidisciplinary support. While this is an emerging area in anesthesia practice, there are many avenues for certified registered nurse anesthetists (CRNAs) to share their unrivaled clinical knowledge. CRNAs may become involved with or consult on palliative sedation, medical management, interventional pain management, terminal wean/extubation, and organ donation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1891/0739-6686.35.135DOI Listing
January 2017
19 Reads

Acupuncture and Chronic Pain Management.

Authors:
Ladan Eshkevari

Annu Rev Nurs Res 2017 01;35(1):117-134

According to National Institute of Health Pathways to Prevention Workshop (2014), chronic pain affects an estimated 100 million Americans, with approximately 25 million people experiencing moderate to severe chronic pain, which negatively impacts their ability to function leading to a diminished quality of life. Pain is the primary reason Americans are on disability, which adds to the economic and social burden of suffering for the nation. Chronic pain costs are estimated to be between 560 and 630 billion per year. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1891/0739-6686.35.117DOI Listing
January 2017
2 Reads

Chronic Postsurgical Pain.

Authors:
Steven R Wooden

Annu Rev Nurs Res 2017 01;35(1):91-115

Chronic postsurgical pain (CPSP) is defined as a persistent pain state that exists more than 2 months postoperatively and cannot be explained by other causes such as recurrence of disease, apparent inflammation, or other nonsurgical related factors. CPSP is a type of persistent pain condition that often complicates recovery from surgical procedures. It is thought to be caused by surgical nerve injury, but the fact that an identifiable nerve injury can be found in only one-third of CPSP patients suggests that the problem may be far more complex than a simple surgically created nerve injury. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1891/0739-6686.35.91DOI Listing
January 2017
1 Read

Anesthesia Information Management Systems.

Annu Rev Nurs Res 2017 01;35(1):71-90

Anesthesia information management systems (AIMS) are rapidly gaining widespread acceptance. Aggressively promoted as an improvement to manual-entry recordkeeping systems in the areas of accuracy, completeness, quality improvement, billing, and vigilance, these systems record all patient vital signs and parameters, providing a legible hard copy and permanent electronic record. With well-documented financial incentives, as well as government subsidies, AIMS are becoming adopted at an unprecedented rate. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1891/0739-6686.35.71DOI Listing
January 2017
1 Read

Communication in the Operating Room Setting.

Annu Rev Nurs Res 2017 01;35(1):55-69

Ideal and effective communication consists of a clear, audible, and focused message from a transmitter that is delivered to an attentive, undistracted receiver, and consists of both verbal and nonverbal types. Communication in the health care setting is highly complex and dynamic, involving multiple settings, participants, and unique challenges. Effective communication in the perioperative environment is a requirement for safe patient care delivery and an important element of teamwork. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1891/0739-6686.35.55DOI Listing
January 2017
1 Read

Lung-Protective Ventilation.

Annu Rev Nurs Res 2017 01;35(1):37-53

Historically, mechanical ventilation of the lungs utilizing relatively large tidal volumes was common practice in the operating room and intensive care unit (ICU). The rationale behind this treatment strategy was to yield better patient outcomes, that is, fewer pulmonary complications, and a reduction in morbidity and mortality. As evidence-based practice has evolved, potential harmful effects of traditional, nonphysiological mechanical ventilation (ventilation with larger tidal volumes and the tolerance of high airway pressures) even in shortterm treatment have been shown to correlate with systemic inflammation and the development of ventilator-associated lung injury. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1891/0739-6686.35.37DOI Listing
January 2017
3 Reads

Anesthetic Implications of Obesity and Obstructive Sleep Apnea.

Annu Rev Nurs Res 2017 01;35(1):17-35

The incidence of morbid obesity has tripled within the past 25 years in developed countries, with the highest rate of growth noted among people with body mass index (BMI) greater than 50. The physiologic derangements that accompany obesity affect almost every organ system leading to a vast array of comorbid conditions including obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). This review focuses on the unique perioperative management considerations that the nurse anesthetist must address when caring for these patients as well as the impact of obesity and OSA on postoperative complications and mortality rates. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1891/0739-6686.35.17DOI Listing
January 2017
1 Read

Preparing Anesthetists to Manage Cannot Intubate/Cannot Ventilate Situations.

Annu Rev Nurs Res 2017 01;35(1):1-16

Cannot intubate/cannot ventilate (CICV) situations during anesthesia are rare, potentially catastrophic to the patient, and difficult to predict. Widely adopted practice guidelines advocate an algorithmic approach to CICV situations in which the anesthetist: (a) recognizes the CICV situation, (b) calls for help, (c) steadily progresses through a variety of methods to ventilate the patient and secure the airway, (d) restores ventilation via an infraglottic airway if the patient cannot be safely awakened prior to becoming moribund. Despite widespread consensus that rapid progression to placement of an infraglottic airway is critical to the survival of the patient in a CICV situation, the rarity of CICV is a substantial barrier for anesthetists attempting to gain and maintain skill at placing infraglottic airways. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1891/0739-6686.35.1DOI Listing
January 2017
18 Reads

Foreword.

Annu Rev Nurs Res 2016 ;34:xiii-xiv

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March 2016
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