664 results match your criteria Annual Review Of Phytopathology[Journal]


Social Evolution and Cheating in Plant Pathogens.

Authors:
Maren L Friesen

Annu Rev Phytopathol 2020 Jun 29. Epub 2020 Jun 29.

Department of Plant Pathology and Department of Crop and Soil Sciences, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington 99164, USA; email:

Plant pathogens are a critical component of the microbiome that exist as populations undergoing ecological and evolutionary processes within their host. Many aspects of virulence rely on social interactions mediated through multiple forms of public goods, including quorum-sensing signals, exoenzymes, and effectors. Virulence and disease progression involve life-history decisions that have social implications with large effects on both host and microbe fitness, such as the timing of key transitions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-phyto-010820-012740DOI Listing

Managing Crop Diseases Under Water Scarcity.

Annu Rev Phytopathol 2020 Jun 24. Epub 2020 Jun 24.

Department of Plant Pathology, University of California, Davis, California 95616, USA; email:

The significance of water scarcity to crop production and food security has been globally recognized as a pivotal sustainability challenge in the UN Sustainable Development Goals (86). The critical link between water scarcity and sustainability is adaptation. Various changes in water use practices have been employed to alleviate production constraints. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-phyto-030320-041421DOI Listing

Developing Public-Private Partnerships in Plant Pathology Extension: Case Studies and Opportunities in the United States.

Annu Rev Phytopathol 2020 Jun 16. Epub 2020 Jun 16.

Department of Plant Pathology and Microbiology, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011, USA.

Public-private partnerships (PPPs) can be an effective and advantageous way to accomplish extension and outreach objectives in plant pathology. The greatest opportunities for extension-focused PPPs may be in response to large-scale or emerging disease management concerns or in addressing complex issues that impact agriculture, such as climate change, digital technology, and public perception of science. The most fertile ground for forming PPPs is where the needs and strengths of the public and private sectors are complementary. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-phyto-030320-041359DOI Listing

Disease in Invasive Plant Populations.

Annu Rev Phytopathol 2020 Jun 9. Epub 2020 Jun 9.

Agronomy Department, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611, USA.

Non-native invasive plants can establish in natural areas, where they can be ecologically damaging and costly to manage. Like cultivated plants, invasive plants can experience a relatively disease-free period upon introduction and accumulate pathogens over time. Diseases of invasive plant populations are infrequently studied compared to diseases of agriculture, forestry, and even native plant populations. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-phyto-010820-012757DOI Listing

Modeling the Impact of Crop Diseases on Global Food Security.

Annu Rev Phytopathol 2020 Jun 8. Epub 2020 Jun 8.

INRAE, Université de Toulouse, UMR AGIR, F-31320, Castanet-Tolosan, France; email:

Plant pathology must contribute to improving food security in a safe operating space, which is shrinking as a result of declining natural resources, climate change, and the growing world population. This review analyzes the position of plant pathology in a nexus of relationships, which is mapped and where the coupled dynamics of crop growth, disease, and yield losses are modeled. We derive a hierarchy of pathogens, whereby pathogens reducing radiation interception (RI), radiation use efficiency (RUE), and harvest index increasingly impact crop yields in the approximate proportions: 1:4. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-phyto-010820-012856DOI Listing

Deep Roots and Splendid Boughs of the Global Plant Virome.

Annu Rev Phytopathol 2020 May 27. Epub 2020 May 27.

National Center for Biotechnology Information, National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20894, USA.

Land plants host a vast and diverse virome that is dominated by RNA viruses, with major additional contributions from reverse-transcribing and single-stranded (ss) DNA viruses. Here, we introduce the recently adopted comprehensive taxonomy of viruses based on phylogenomic analyses, as applied to the plant virome. We further trace the evolutionary ancestry of distinct plant virus lineages to primordial genetic mobile elements. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-phyto-030320-041346DOI Listing

Epigenetic Mechanisms in Nematode-Plant Interactions.

Authors:
Tarek Hewezi

Annu Rev Phytopathol 2020 May 15. Epub 2020 May 15.

Department of Plant Sciences, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996, USA; email:

Epigenetic mechanisms play fundamental roles in regulating numerous biological processes in various developmental and environmental contexts. Three highly interconnected epigenetic control mechanisms, including small noncoding RNAs, DNA methylation, and histone modifications, contribute to the establishment of plant epigenetic profiles. During the past decade, a growing body of experimental work has revealed the intricate, diverse, and dynamic roles that epigenetic modifications play in plant-nematode interactions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-phyto-010820-012805DOI Listing

Tolerance of Plants to Pathogens: A Unifying View.

Annu Rev Phytopathol 2020 May 13. Epub 2020 May 13.

Centro de Biotecnología y Genómica de Plantas (CBGP), Universidad Politécnica de Madrid (UPM) and Instituto Nacional de Investigación y Tecnología Agraria y Alimentaria (INIA), and E.T.S.I. Agronómica, Alimentaria y de Biosistemas, Campus de Montegancedo, UPM, 28223 Pozuelo de Alarcón, Madrid, Spain; email:

Increasing evidence indicates that tolerance is a host defense strategy against pathogens as widespread and successful as resistance. Since the concept of tolerance was proposed more than a century ago, it has been in continuous evolution. In parallel, our understanding of its mechanistic bases and its consequences for host and pathogen interactions, ecology, and evolution has grown. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-phyto-010820-012749DOI Listing

Origins and Immunity Networking Functions of EDS1 Family Proteins.

Annu Rev Phytopathol 2020 May 12. Epub 2020 May 12.

Department of Plant-Microbe Interactions, Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research, 50829 Cologne, Germany; email:

The EDS1 family of structurally unique lipase-like proteins EDS1, SAG101, and PAD4 evolved in seed plants, on top of existing phytohormone and nucleotide-binding-leucine-rich-repeat (NLR) networks, to regulate immunity pathways against host-adapted biotrophic pathogens. Exclusive heterodimers between EDS1 and SAG101 or PAD4 create essential surfaces for resistance signaling. Phylogenomic information, together with functional studies in and tobacco, identify a coevolved module between the EDS1-SAG101 heterodimer and coiled-coil (CC) HET-S and LOP-B (CC domain helper NLRs that is recruited by intracellular Toll-interleukin1-receptor (TIR) domain NLR receptors to confer host cell death and pathogen immunity. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-phyto-010820-012840DOI Listing

Functional Ecology of Forest Disease.

Annu Rev Phytopathol 2020 May 12. Epub 2020 May 12.

Department of Forest Mycology and Plant Pathology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, 750 07 Uppsala, Sweden.

Global change is putting pressure on forest pathologists who face increasingly complex problems. We argue that understanding interactive effects between forest pathogens and global warming, globalization, and land-use changes may benefit from a functional ecology mindset. Traits can be more informative about ecological functions than species inventories and may deliver a more mechanistic description of forest disease. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-phyto-080417-050028DOI Listing

Progress in Biological Control of Weeds with Plant Pathogens.

Authors:
Louise Morin

Annu Rev Phytopathol 2020 May 8. Epub 2020 May 8.

Health and Biosecurity, Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), Canberra, Australian Capital Territory, 2601, Australia; email:

Plant pathogens have played an important role in weed biological control since the 1970s. So far, 36 fungal pathogens have been authorized for introduction across 18 countries for the classical biological control of weeds. Their safety record has been excellent, but questions continue to be asked about the risk that they could transfer to other plants. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-phyto-010820-012823DOI Listing

: Insights into an Emerging Rice Pathogen.

Annu Rev Phytopathol 2020 May 4. Epub 2020 May 4.

State Key Laboratory of Crop Gene Exploration and Utilization in Southwest China, Rice Research Institute, Sichuan Agricultural University, Chengdu 611130, China; email:

False smut of rice, caused by , has become one of the most important diseases in rice-growing regions worldwide. The disease causes a significant yield loss and imposes health threats to humans and animals by producing mycotoxins. In this review, we update our understanding of the pathogen, including the disease cycle and infection strategies, the decoding of the genome, comparative/functional genomics, and effector biology. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-phyto-010820-012908DOI Listing
May 2020
9.620 Impact Factor

RPS5-Mediated Disease Resistance: Fundamental Insights and Translational Applications.

Annu Rev Phytopathol 2020 Apr 13. Epub 2020 Apr 13.

Department of Biology, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana 47405, USA; email:

Focusing on the discovery and characterization of the disease resistance protein RPS5 and its guardee PBS1, this review discusses work done in the Innes laboratory from the initial identification of the gene in 1995 to the recent deployment of the PBS1 decoy system in crops. This is done through discussion of the structure, function, and signaling environment of RPS5 and PBS1, highlighting collaborations and influential ideas along the way. RPS5, a nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat (NLR) protein, is activated by the proteolytic cleavage of PBS1. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-phyto-010820-012733DOI Listing

Surviving in a Hostile World: Plant Strategies to Resist Pests and Diseases.

Annu Rev Phytopathol 2019 08;57:505-529

Plant Production and Protection Institute and Department of Animal and Plant Sciences, The University of Sheffield, Western Bank, Sheffield S10 2TN, United Kingdom; email:

As primary producers, plants are under constant pressure to defend themselves against potentially deadly pathogens and herbivores. In this review, we describe short- and long-term strategies that enable plants to cope with these stresses. Apart from internal immunological strategies that involve physiological and (epi)genetic modifications at the cellular level, plants also employ external strategies that rely on recruitment of beneficial organisms. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-phyto-082718-095959DOI Listing
August 2019
1 Read

A Decade Decoded: Spies and Hackers in the History of TAL Effectors Research.

Annu Rev Phytopathol 2019 08 6;57:459-481. Epub 2019 Aug 6.

IRD, CIRAD, Université Montpellier, IPME, 34000 Montpellier, France; email:

Transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) from the genus are proteins with the remarkable ability to directly bind the promoters of genes in the plant host to induce their expression, which often helps bacterial colonization. Metaphorically, TALEs act as spies that infiltrate the plant disguised as high-ranking civilians (transcription factors) to trick the plant into activating weak points that allow an invasion. Current knowledge of how TALEs operate allows researchers to predict their activity (counterespionage) and exploit their function, engineering them to do our bidding (a Manchurian agent). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-phyto-082718-100026DOI Listing

Never Walk Alone: Clathrin-Coated Vesicle (CCV) Components in Plant Immunity.

Annu Rev Phytopathol 2019 08 6;57:387-409. Epub 2019 Aug 6.

Division of Biochemistry, Interdisciplinary Plant Group, University of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri 65211, USA; email:

At the host-pathogen interface, the protein composition of the plasma membrane (PM) has important implications for how a plant cell perceives and responds to invading microbial pathogens. A plant's ability to modulate its PM composition is critical for regulating the strength, duration, and integration of immune responses. One mechanism by which plant cells reprogram their cell surface is vesicular trafficking, including secretion and endocytosis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-phyto-080417-045841DOI Listing

Interactions and Coadaptation in Plant Metaorganisms.

Annu Rev Phytopathol 2019 08 26;57:483-503. Epub 2019 Jul 26.

Environmental Genomics, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, 24306 Plön, Germany; email:

Plants associate with a wide diversity of microorganisms. Some microorganisms engage in intimate associations with the plant host, collectively forming a metaorganism. Such close coexistence with plants requires specific adaptations that allow microorganisms to overcome plant defenses and inhabit plant tissues during growth and reproduction. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-phyto-082718-100008DOI Listing

Understanding Adaptation, Coevolution, Host Specialization, and Mating System in Castrating Anther-Smut Fungi by Combining Population and Comparative Genomics.

Annu Rev Phytopathol 2019 08 23;57:431-457. Epub 2019 Jul 23.

Ecologie Systématique Evolution, Univ. Paris-Sud, AgroParisTech, CNRS, Université Paris-Saclay, 91400 Orsay, France; email:

Anther-smut fungi provide a powerful system to study host-pathogen specialization and coevolution, with hundreds of species specialized on diverse Caryophyllaceae plants, castrating their hosts through manipulation of the hosts' reproductive organs to facilitate disease transmission. fungi have exceptional genomic characteristics, including dimorphic mating-type chromosomes, that make this genus anexcellent model for studying the evolution of mating systems and their influence on population genetics structure and adaptive potential. Important insights into adaptation, coevolution, host specialization, and mating system evolution have been gained using anther-smut fungi, with new insights made possible by the recent advent of genomic approaches. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-phyto-082718-095947DOI Listing

Molecular Interactions Between Smut Fungi and Their Host Plants.

Annu Rev Phytopathol 2019 08 23;57:411-430. Epub 2019 Jul 23.

Botanical Institute and Cluster of Excellence on Plant Sciences (CEPLAS), University of Cologne, 50674 Cologne, Germany; email:

Smut fungi are a large group of biotrophic plant pathogens that infect mostly monocot species, including economically relevant cereal crops. For years, has stood out as the model system to study the genetics and cell biology of smut fungi as well as the pathogenic development of biotrophic plant pathogens. The identification and functional characterization of secreted effectors and their role in virulence have particularly been driven forward using the -maize pathosystem. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-phyto-082718-100139DOI Listing
August 2019
1 Read

Activity and Phylogenetics of the Broadly Occurring Family of Microbial Nep1-Like Proteins.

Annu Rev Phytopathol 2019 08 5;57:367-386. Epub 2019 Jul 5.

Plant-Microbe Interactions, Department of Biology, Utrecht University, 3584 CH Utrecht, The Netherlands; email:

Necrosis- and ethylene-inducing peptide 1 (Nep1)-like proteins (NLP) have an extremely broad taxonomic distribution; they occur in bacteria, fungi, and oomycetes. NLPs come in two forms, those that are cytotoxic to eudicot plants and those that are noncytotoxic. Cytotoxic NLPs bind to glycosyl inositol phosphoryl ceramide (GIPC) sphingolipids that are abundant in the outer leaflet of plant plasma membranes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-phyto-082718-100054DOI Listing

Boxwood Blight: Threat to Ornamentals.

Annu Rev Phytopathol 2019 08 5;57:189-209. Epub 2019 Jul 5.

Plant Pathology and Plant-Microbe Biology Section, School of Integrative Plant Science, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853, USA; email:

Boxwood blight, caused by and , has had devastating effects in gardens since its first appearance in the United Kingdom in 1994. The disease affects two other plants in the Buxaceae: sweet box ( spp.) and pachysandra ( spp. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-phyto-082718-100156DOI Listing

The Evolution, Ecology, and Mechanisms of Infection by Gram-Positive, Plant-Associated Bacteria.

Annu Rev Phytopathol 2019 08 5;57:341-365. Epub 2019 Jul 5.

Department of Botany and Plant Pathology, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon 97331, USA; email:

Gram-positive bacteria are prominent members of plant-associated microbial communities. Although many are hypothesized to be beneficial, some are causative agents of economically important diseases of crop plants. Because the features of Gram-positive bacteria are fundamentally different relative to those of Gram-negative bacteria, the evolution and ecology as well as the mechanisms used to colonize and infect plants also differ. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-phyto-082718-100124DOI Listing

Molecular Dialog Between Parasitic Plants and Their Hosts.

Annu Rev Phytopathol 2019 08 21;57:279-299. Epub 2019 Jun 21.

School of Plant and Environmental Sciences, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061, USA; email:

Parasitic plants steal sugars, water, and other nutrients from host plants through a haustorial connection. Several species of parasitic plants such as witchweeds ( spp.) and broomrapes ( and spp. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-phyto-082718-100043DOI Listing
August 2019
5 Reads

Pathways of DNA Transfer to Plants from and Related Bacterial Species.

Annu Rev Phytopathol 2019 08 21;57:231-251. Epub 2019 Jun 21.

Department of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, State University of New York, Stony Brook, New York 11794-5215, USA; email:

Genetic transformation of host plants by and related species represents a unique model for natural horizontal gene transfer. Almost five decades of studying the molecular interactions between and its host cells have yielded countless fundamental insights into bacterial and plant biology, even though several steps of the DNA transfer process remain poorly understood. spp. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-phyto-082718-100101DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6717549PMC
August 2019
11 Reads

Resolving : Current Status of the Genus.

Annu Rev Phytopathol 2019 08 21;57:323-339. Epub 2019 Jun 21.

Royal Botanic Garden and Domain Trust, Sydney, New South Wales 2000, Australia; email:

The fungal genus is one of the most important groups of plant-pathogenic fungi and affects a huge diversity of crops in all climatic zones across the globe. In addition, it is also a human pathogen and produces several extremely important mycotoxins in food products that have deleterious effects on livestock and humans. These fungi have been plagued over the past century by different perspectives of what constitutes the genus and how many species occur within the genus. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-phyto-082718-100204DOI Listing
August 2019
23 Reads

Ecology and Evolution of the Sudden Oak Death Pathogen .

Annu Rev Phytopathol 2019 08 21;57:301-321. Epub 2019 Jun 21.

Department of Forest and Conservation Sciences, Faculty of Forestry, The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 1Z4, Canada.

The sudden oak and sudden larch death pathogen emerged simultaneously in the United States on oak and in Europe on in the 1990s. This pathogen has had a devastating impact on larch plantations in the United Kingdom as well as mixed conifer and oak forests in the Western United States. Since the discovery of this pathogen, a large body of research has provided novel insights into the emergence, epidemiology, and genetics of this pandemic. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-phyto-082718-100117DOI Listing
August 2019
14 Reads
9.620 Impact Factor

Durability of Quantitative Resistance in Crops: Greater Than We Know?

Annu Rev Phytopathol 2019 08 14;57:253-277. Epub 2019 Jun 14.

Department of Crop Genetics, John Innes Centre, Colney, Norwich NR4 7UK, United Kingdom; email:

Quantitative resistance (QR) to crop diseases has usually been much more durable than major-gene, effector-triggered resistance. It has been observed that the effectiveness of some QR has eroded as pathogens adapt to it, especially when deployment is extensive and epidemics occur regularly, but it generally declines more slowly than effector-triggered resistance. Changes in aggressiveness and specificity of diverse pathogens on cultivars with QR have been recorded, along with experimental data on fitness costs of pathogen adaptation to QR, but there is little information about molecular mechanisms of adaptation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-phyto-082718-100016DOI Listing
August 2019
1 Read

Plant Virus Vectors 3.0: Transitioning into Synthetic Genomics.

Annu Rev Phytopathol 2019 08 11;57:211-230. Epub 2019 Jun 11.

Department of Plant Pathology and Microbiology, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas 77843, USA; email:

Plant viruses were first implemented as heterologous gene expression vectors more than three decades ago. Since then, the methodology for their use has varied, but we propose it was the merging of technologies with virology tools, which occurred in three defined steps discussed here, that has driven viral vector applications to date. The first was the advent of molecular biology and reverse genetics, which enabled the cloning and manipulation of viral genomes to express genes of interest (vectors 1. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-phyto-082718-100301DOI Listing
August 2019
13 Reads

Stealth Pathogens: The Sooty Blotch and Flyspeck Fungal Complex.

Annu Rev Phytopathol 2019 08 31;57:135-164. Epub 2019 May 31.

State Key Laboratory of Crop Stress Biology in Arid Areas and College of Plant Protection, Northwest A&F University, Yangling 712100, Shaanxi Province, China; email:

Sooty blotch and flyspeck (SBFS) fungi produce superficial, dark-colored colonies on fruits, stems, and leaves of many plant genera. These blemishes are economically damaging on fruit, primarily apple and pear, because they reduce the sale price of fresh fruit. Fungicide spray programs can control SBFS but are costly and impair human and environmental health; thus, less chemically intensive management strategies are needed. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-phyto-082718-100237DOI Listing
August 2019
13 Reads

Genome Editing, Gene Drives, and Synthetic Biology: Will They Contribute to Disease-Resistant Crops, and Who Will Benefit?

Annu Rev Phytopathol 2019 08 31;57:165-188. Epub 2019 May 31.

Department of Plant Sciences and Center for Agricultural Synthetic Biology, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996, USA.

Genetically engineered crops have been grown for more than 20 years, resulting in widespread albeit variable benefits for farmers and consumers. We review current, likely, and potential genetic engineering (GE) applications for the development of disease-resistant crop cultivars. Gene editing, gene drives, and synthetic biology offer novel opportunities to control viral, bacterial, and fungal pathogens, parasitic weeds, and insect vectors of plant pathogens. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-phyto-080417-045954DOI Listing
August 2019
19 Reads

Current Status of Potato Cyst Nematodes in North America.

Annu Rev Phytopathol 2019 08 17;57:117-133. Epub 2019 May 17.

Department of Plant Sciences, University of Idaho, Moscow, Idaho 83844, USA.

The potato cyst nematodes (PCNs) and are internationally recognized quarantine pests. Although not widely distributed in either the United States or Canada, both are present and are regulated by the national plant protection organizations (NPPOs) of each country. was first discovered in New York in the 1940s, and was first detected in a limited area of Idaho in 2006. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-phyto-082718-100254DOI Listing
August 2019
12 Reads

Mangroves in the Leaves: Anatomy, Physiology, and Immunity of Epithemal Hydathodes.

Annu Rev Phytopathol 2019 08 17;57:91-116. Epub 2019 May 17.

LIPM, Université de Toulouse and INRA and CNRS, F-31326 Castanet-Tolosan, France; email:

Hydathodes are organs found on aerial parts of a wide range of plant species that provide almost direct access for several pathogenic microbes to the plant vascular system. Hydathodes are better known as the site of guttation, which is the release of droplets of plant apoplastic fluid to the outer leaf surface. Because these organs are only described through sporadic allusions in the literature, this review aims to provide a comprehensive view of hydathode development, physiology, and immunity by compiling a historic and contemporary bibliography. Read More

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https://www.annualreviews.org/doi/10.1146/annurev-phyto-0827
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-phyto-082718-100228DOI Listing
August 2019
8 Reads

Lessons from a Life in Time and Space.

Authors:
Jeremy J Burdon

Annu Rev Phytopathol 2019 08 13;57:1-13. Epub 2019 May 13.

CSIRO Agriculture and Food, Canberra, ACT 2601, Australia; email:

A research career investigating epidemiological and evolutionary patterns in both natural and crop host-pathogen systems emphasizes the need for flexibility in thinking and a willingness to adopt ideas from a wide diversity of subdisciplines. Here, I reflect on the pivotal issues, research areas, and interactions, including the role of science management, that shaped my career in the hope of demonstrating that career paths and collaborations in science can be as diverse and unpredictable as the natural world in which we study our organisms of choice. Read More

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https://www.annualreviews.org/doi/10.1146/annurev-phyto-0827
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-phyto-082718-095938DOI Listing
August 2019
6 Reads

Revisiting the Concept of Host Range of Plant Pathogens.

Annu Rev Phytopathol 2019 08 13;57:63-90. Epub 2019 May 13.

Pathologie Végétale, INRA, 84140, Montfavet, France; email:

Strategies to manage plant disease-from use of resistant varieties to crop rotation, elimination of reservoirs, landscape planning, surveillance, quarantine, risk modeling, and anticipation of disease emergences-all rely on knowledge of pathogen host range. However, awareness of the multitude of factors that influence the outcome of plant-microorganism interactions, the spatial and temporal dynamics of these factors, and the diversity of any given pathogen makes it increasingly challenging to define simple, all-purpose rules to circumscribe the host range of a pathogen. For bacteria, fungi, oomycetes, and viruses, we illustrate that host range is often an overlapping continuum-more so than the separation of discrete pathotypes-and that host jumps are common. Read More

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https://www.annualreviews.org/doi/10.1146/annurev-phyto-0827
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-phyto-082718-100034DOI Listing
August 2019
4 Reads

Trichothecene Mycotoxins: Biosynthesis, Regulation, and Management.

Annu Rev Phytopathol 2019 08 20;57:15-39. Epub 2019 Mar 20.

State Key Laboratory of Rice Biology, Institute of Biotechnology, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058, China; email:

Fusarium head blight (FHB) of small grain cereals caused by and other species is an economically important plant disease worldwide. infections not only result in severe yield losses but also contaminate grain with various mycotoxins, especially deoxynivalenol (DON). With the complete genome sequencing of , tremendous progress has been made during the past two decades toward understanding the basis for DON biosynthesis and its regulation. Read More

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https://www.annualreviews.org/doi/10.1146/annurev-phyto-0827
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-phyto-082718-100318DOI Listing
August 2019
2 Reads

Paving the Way to Tospovirus Infection: Multilined Interplays with Plant Innate Immunity.

Annu Rev Phytopathol 2019 08 20;57:41-62. Epub 2019 Mar 20.

Department of Plant Pathology, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095, China; email:

Tospoviruses are among the most important plant pathogens and cause serious crop losses worldwide. Tospoviruses have evolved to smartly utilize the host cellular machinery to accomplish their life cycle. Plants mount two layers of defense to combat their invasion. Read More

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https://www.annualreviews.org/doi/10.1146/annurev-phyto-0827
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-phyto-082718-100309DOI Listing
August 2019
60 Reads

Endosymbionts of Plant-Parasitic Nematodes.

Authors:
Amanda M V Brown

Annu Rev Phytopathol 2018 08;56:225-242

Department of Biological Sciences, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas 79410, USA; email:

Some of the most agriculturally important plant-parasitic nematodes (PPNs) harbor endosymbionts. Extensive work in other systems has shown that endosymbionts can have major effects on host virulence and biology. This review highlights the discovery, development, and diversity of PPN endosymbionts, incorporating inferences from genomic data. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-phyto-080417-045824DOI Listing
August 2018
3 Reads

World Management of Geminiviruses.

Annu Rev Phytopathol 2018 08;56:637-677

Department of Plant Pathology, University of California, Davis, California 95616, USA; email: , ,

Management of geminiviruses is a worldwide challenge because of the widespread distribution of economically important diseases caused by these viruses. Regardless of the type of agriculture, management is most effective with an integrated pest management (IPM) approach that involves measures before, during, and after the growing season. This includes starting with resistant cultivars and virus- and vector-free transplants and propagative plants. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-phyto-080615-100327DOI Listing
August 2018
10 Reads

Biology of Fungi and Their Bacterial Endosymbionts.

Annu Rev Phytopathol 2018 08;56:289-309

Department of Life Sciences & Systems Biology, University of Torino, 10125 Torino, Italy.

Heritable symbioses, in which endosymbiotic bacteria (EB) are transmitted vertically between host generations, are an important source of evolutionary novelties. A primary example of such symbioses is the eukaryotic cell with its EB-derived organelles. Recent discoveries suggest that endosymbiosis-related innovations can be also found in associations formed by early divergent fungi in the phylum Mucoromycota with heritable EB from two classes, Betaproteobacteria and Mollicutes. Read More

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https://www.annualreviews.org/doi/10.1146/annurev-phyto-0804
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-phyto-080417-045914DOI Listing
August 2018
32 Reads

The Future of Nanotechnology in Plant Pathology.

Annu Rev Phytopathol 2018 08;56:111-133

Department of Analytical Chemistry, The Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station, New Haven, Connecticut 06504, USA.

Engineered nanoparticles are materials between 1 and 100 nm and exist as metalloids, metallic oxides, nonmetals, and carbon nanomaterials and as functionalized dendrimers, liposomes, and quantum dots. Their small size, large surface area, and high reactivity have enabled their use as bactericides/ fungicides and nanofertilizers. Nanoparticles can be designed as biosensors for plant disease diagnostics and as delivery vehicles for genetic material, probes, and agrichemicals. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-phyto-080417-050108DOI Listing
August 2018
2 Reads

Advances in Wheat and Pathogen Genomics: Implications for Disease Control.

Annu Rev Phytopathol 2018 08;56:67-87

Biological and Environmental Science and Engineering Division (BESE), King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), Thuwal, 23955-6900, Saudi Arabia; email:

The gene pool of wheat and its wild and domesticated relatives contains a plethora of resistance genes that can be exploited to make wheat more resilient to pathogens. Only a few of these genes have been isolated and studied at the molecular level. In recent years, we have seen a shift from classical breeding to genomics-assisted breeding, which makes use of the enormous advancements in DNA sequencing and high-throughput molecular marker technologies for wheat improvement. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-phyto-080516-035419DOI Listing
August 2018
38 Reads

Hyperspectral Sensors and Imaging Technologies in Phytopathology: State of the Art.

Annu Rev Phytopathol 2018 08;56:535-558

Institute of Agricultural Sciences, ETH Zürich, 8092 Zürich, Switzerland.

Plant disease detection represents a tremendous challenge for research and practical applications. Visual assessment by human raters is time-consuming, expensive, and error prone. Disease rating and plant protection need new and innovative techniques to address forthcoming challenges and trends in agricultural production that require more precision than ever before. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-phyto-080417-050100DOI Listing
August 2018
40 Reads

The Rise and Rise of Nicotiana benthamiana: A Plant for All Reasons.

Annu Rev Phytopathol 2018 08;56:405-426

Centre for Tropical Crops and Biocommodities, Queensland University of Technology, 4001 Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; email:

A decade ago, the value of Nicotiana benthamiana as a tool for plant molecular biologists was beginning to be appreciated. Scientists were using it to study plant-microbe and protein-protein interactions, and it was the species of choice with which to activate plasmid-encoded viruses, screen for gene functions with virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS), and transiently express genes by leaf agroinfiltration. However, little information about the species' origin, diversity, genetics, and genomics was available, and biologists were asking the question of whether N. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-phyto-080417-050141DOI Listing
August 2018
1 Read

Multiple-Disease System in Coffee: From Crop Loss Assessment to Sustainable Management.

Annu Rev Phytopathol 2018 08 11;56:611-635. Epub 2018 Jul 11.

UMR AGIR, Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique (INRA), Université de Toulouse, INPT, INP-EI Purpan, Castanet-Tolosan, France; email: ,

Assessment of crop loss due to multiple diseases and pests (D&P) is a necessary step in designing sustainable crop management systems. Understanding the drivers of D&P development and yield loss helps identify leverage points for crop health management. Crop loss assessment is also necessary for the quantification of D&P regulation service to identify promising systems where ecosystem service provision is optimized. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-phyto-080417-050117DOI Listing
August 2018
4 Reads

Network Analysis: A Systems Framework to Address Grand Challenges in Plant Pathology.

Annu Rev Phytopathol 2018 08 6;56:559-580. Epub 2018 Jul 6.

Plant Pathology Department, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611, USA; email:

Plant pathology must address a number of challenges, most of which are characterized by complexity. Network analysis offers useful tools for addressing complex systems and an opportunity for synthesis within plant pathology and between it and relevant disciplines such as in the social sciences. We discuss applications of network analysis, which ultimately may be integrated together into more synthetic analyses of how to optimize plant disease management systems. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-phyto-080516-035326DOI Listing
August 2018
9 Reads

RNA Interference Mechanisms and Applications in Plant Pathology.

Annu Rev Phytopathol 2018 08 6;56:581-610. Epub 2018 Jul 6.

Department of Plant Pathology, University of California, Davis, California 95616, USA; email:

The origin of RNA interference (RNAi), the cell sentinel system widely shared among eukaryotes that recognizes RNAs and specifically degrades or prevents their translation in cells, is suggested to predate the last eukaryote common ancestor ( 138 ). Of particular relevance to plant pathology is that in plants, but also in some fungi, insects, and lower eukaryotes, RNAi is a primary and effective antiviral defense, and recent studies have revealed that small RNAs (sRNAs) involved in RNAi play important roles in other plant diseases, including those caused by cellular plant pathogens. Because of this, and because RNAi can be manipulated to interfere with the expression of endogenous genes in an intra- or interspecific manner, RNAi has been used as a tool in studies of gene function but also for plant protection. Read More

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https://www.annualreviews.org/doi/10.1146/annurev-phyto-0804
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-phyto-080417-050044DOI Listing
August 2018
72 Reads

Understanding Cytoskeletal Dynamics During the Plant Immune Response.

Annu Rev Phytopathol 2018 08 5;56:513-533. Epub 2018 Jul 5.

Department of Biological Sciences and Department of Botany and Plant Pathology, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907, USA; email:

The plant cytoskeleton is a dynamic framework of cytoplasmic filaments that rearranges as the needs of the cell change during growth and development. Incessant turnover mechanisms allow these networks to be rapidly redeployed in defense of host cytoplasm against microbial invaders. Both chemical and mechanical stimuli are recognized as danger signals to the plant, and these are perceived and transduced into cytoskeletal dynamics and architecture changes through a collection of well-recognized, previously characterized players. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-phyto-080516-035632DOI Listing
August 2018
19 Reads

Wheat Blast: Past, Present, and Future.

Annu Rev Phytopathol 2018 08 5;56:427-456. Epub 2018 Jul 5.

Embrapa Wheat (Embrapa Trigo), Brazilian Agricultural Research Corporation, Passo 99050-970, Fundo, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.

The devastating wheat blast disease first emerged in Brazil in 1985. The disease was restricted to South America until 2016, when a series of grain imports from Brazil led to a wheat blast outbreak in Bangladesh. Wheat blast is caused by Pyricularia graminis-tritici ( Pygt), a species genetically distinct from the Pyricularia oryzae species that causes rice blast. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-phyto-080417-050036DOI Listing
August 2018
3 Reads

CRISPR Crops: Plant Genome Editing Toward Disease Resistance.

Annu Rev Phytopathol 2018 08 5;56:479-512. Epub 2018 Jul 5.

The Sainsbury Laboratory, Norwich Research Park, Norwich, NR4 7UH, United Kingdom; email:

Genome editing by sequence-specific nucleases (SSNs) has revolutionized biology by enabling targeted modifications of genomes. Although routine plant genome editing emerged only a few years ago, we are already witnessing the first applications to improve disease resistance. In particular, CRISPR-Cas9 has democratized the use of genome editing in plants thanks to the ease and robustness of this method. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-phyto-080417-050158DOI Listing
August 2018
5 Reads

Lessons from the Incursion of Myrtle Rust in Australia.

Annu Rev Phytopathol 2018 08 5;56:457-478. Epub 2018 Jul 5.

Department of Agriculture and Fisheries, Dutton Park, Queensland 4102, Australia.

Austropuccinia psidii (myrtle rust) is a globally invasive neotropical rust of the Myrtaceae that came into international prominence following extensive damage to exotic Eucalyptus plantations in Brazil in the 1970s and 1980s. In 2005, myrtle rust established in Hawaii (USA), and over the past 12 years has spread from the Americas into Asia, the Pacific, and South Africa. Myrtle rust was detected in Australia in 2010, and the response and ultimately unsuccessful eradication attempt was a lesson to those concerned about the threat of exotic pests and diseases to Australia's environment. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-phyto-080516-035256DOI Listing
August 2018
5 Reads