807 results match your criteria Annual Review Of Entomology[Journal]


Bee Viruses: Ecology, Pathogenicity, and Impacts.

Annu Rev Entomol 2019 01;64:205-226

Department of Plant Sciences and Plant Pathology and Pollinator Health Center, Montana State University, Bozeman, Montana 59717, USA; email:

Bees-including solitary, social, wild, and managed species-are key pollinators of flowering plant species, including nearly three-quarters of global food crops. Their ecological importance, coupled with increased annual losses of managed honey bees and declines in populations of key wild species, has focused attention on the factors that adversely affect bee health, including viral pathogens. Genomic approaches have dramatically expanded understanding of the diversity of viruses that infect bees, the complexity of their transmission routes-including intergenus transmission-and the diversity of strategies bees have evolved to combat virus infections, with RNA-mediated responses playing a prominent role. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-ento-011118-111942DOI Listing
January 2019

An Unlikely Beginning: A Fortunate Life.

Annu Rev Entomol 2019 01;64:1-13

Department of Entomology, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721, USA; email:

Elizabeth A. Bernays grew up in Australia and studied at the University of Queensland before traveling in Europe and teaching high school in London. She later obtained a PhD in entomology at London University. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-ento-011118-111820DOI Listing
January 2019

Blueberry IPM: Past Successes and Future Challenges.

Annu Rev Entomol 2019 01;64:95-114

Department of Entomology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824, USA; email:

Blueberry is a crop native to North America with expanding production and consumption worldwide. In the historical regions of production, integrated pest management (IPM) programs have been developed and provided effective control of key insect pests. These have integrated monitoring programs with physical, cultural, biological, behavioral, and chemical controls to meet the intense demands of consumers and modern food systems. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-ento-011118-112147DOI Listing
January 2019

Life and Death at the Voltage-Sensitive Sodium Channel: Evolution in Response to Insecticide Use.

Authors:
Jeffrey G Scott

Annu Rev Entomol 2019 01;64:243-257

Department of Entomology, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853, USA; email:

The voltage-sensitive sodium channel (VSSC) is a critical component of the insect nervous system. Pyrethroids and DDT are insecticides that have been widely used, and they kill insects by perturbations of the VSSC. Decades of insecticide use selected for mutations in Vssc that give rise to resistance in almost all pest insects. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-ento-011118-112420DOI Listing
January 2019
11 Reads

Water Beetles as Models in Ecology and Evolution.

Annu Rev Entomol 2019 01;64:359-377

Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology; and Division of Entomology, Biodiversity Institute, University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas 66045, USA; email:

Beetles have colonized water many times during their history, with some of these events involving extensive evolutionary radiations and multiple transitions between land and water. With over 13,000 described species, they are one of the most diverse macroinvertebrate groups in most nonmarine aquatic habitats and occur on all continents except Antarctica. A combination of wide geographical and ecological range and relatively accessible taxonomy makes these insects an excellent model system for addressing a variety of questions in ecology and evolution. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-ento-011118-111829DOI Listing
January 2019
18 Reads

Preface.

Authors:
Angela E Douglas

Annu Rev Entomol 2019 01;64:v-vii

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https://www.annualreviews.org/doi/10.1146/annurev-en-64-1030
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-en-64-103018-100001DOI Listing
January 2019
7 Reads

Invasive Cereal Aphids of North America: Ecology and Pest Management.

Annu Rev Entomol 2019 01 29;64:73-93. Epub 2018 Oct 29.

Wheat, Peanut, and Other Field Crops Research Unit, USDA-ARS, Stillwater, Oklahoma 74075, USA; email:

Aphid invasions of North American cereal crops generally have started with colonization of a new region or crop, followed by range expansion and outbreaks that vary in frequency and scale owing to geographically variable influences. To improve understanding of this process and management, we compare the invasion ecology of and management response to three cereal aphids: sugarcane aphid, Russian wheat aphid, and greenbug. The region exploited is determined primarily by climate and host plant availability. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-ento-011118-111838DOI Listing
January 2019

Phylogeography of Ticks (Acari: Ixodida).

Annu Rev Entomol 2019 01 24;64:379-397. Epub 2018 Oct 24.

Department of Evolution, Ecology, and Organismal Biology and Museum of Biological Diversity, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43212, USA.

Improved understanding of tick phylogeny has allowed testing of some biogeographical patterns. On the basis of both literature data and a meta-analysis of available sequence data, there is strong support for a Gondwanan origin of Ixodidae, and probably Ixodida. A particularly strong pattern is observed for the genus Amblyomma, which appears to have originated in Antarctica/southern South America, with subsequent dispersal to Australia. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-ento-020117-043027DOI Listing
January 2019
19 Reads

Systematics, Phylogeny, and Evolution of Braconid Wasps: 30 Years of Progress.

Annu Rev Entomol 2019 01 17;64:335-358. Epub 2018 Oct 17.

Department of Terrestrial Zoology, Naturalis Biodiversity Center, 2300 RA Leiden, The Netherlands; email:

The parasitoid wasp family Braconidae is likely the second-most species-rich family in the animal kingdom. Braconid wasps are widely distributed and often encountered. They constitute one of the principal groups of natural enemies of phytophagous insects, of which many are serious pest species. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-ento-011118-111856DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Molecular Mechanisms of Wing Polymorphism in Insects.

Annu Rev Entomol 2019 01 12;64:297-314. Epub 2018 Oct 12.

State Key Laboratory of Rice Biology, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058, China.

Many insects are capable of developing into either long-winged or short-winged (or wingless) morphs, which enables them to rapidly match heterogeneous environments. Thus, the wing polymorphism is an adaptation at the root of their ecological success. Wing polymorphism is orchestrated at various levels, starting with the insect's perception of environmental cues, then signal transduction and signal execution, and ultimately the transmitting of signals into physiological adaption in accordance with the particular morph produced. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-ento-011118-112448DOI Listing
January 2019

Nonreproductive Effects of Insect Parasitoids on Their Hosts.

Annu Rev Entomol 2019 01 12;64:259-276. Epub 2018 Oct 12.

Instituto Valenciano de Investigaciones Agrarias, 46113 Valencia, Spain; email: ,

The main modes of action of insect parasitoids are considered to be killing their hosts with egg laying followed by offspring development (reproductive mortality), and adults feeding on hosts directly (host feeding). However, parasitoids can also negatively affect their hosts in ways that do not contribute to current or future parasitoid reproduction (nonreproductive effects). Outcomes of nonreproductive effects for hosts can include death, altered behavior, altered reproduction, and altered development. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-ento-011118-111753DOI Listing
January 2019

Fat Body Biology in the Last Decade.

Annu Rev Entomol 2019 01 12;64:315-333. Epub 2018 Oct 12.

Guangzhou Key Laboratory of Insect Development Regulation and Application Research, Institute of Insect Science and Technology, School of Life Sciences, South China Normal University, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510631, China; email: , ,

The insect fat body is analogous to vertebrate adipose tissue and liver. In this review, the new and exciting advancements made in fat body biology in the last decade are summarized. Controlled by hormonal and nutritional signals, insect fat body cells undergo mitosis during embryogenesis, endoreplication during the larval stages, and remodeling during metamorphosis and regulate reproduction in adults. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-ento-011118-112007DOI Listing
January 2019

Molecular Evolution of the Major Arthropod Chemoreceptor Gene Families.

Authors:
Hugh M Robertson

Annu Rev Entomol 2019 01 12;64:227-242. Epub 2018 Oct 12.

Department of Entomology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801, USA; email:

The evolutionary origins of the three major families of chemoreceptors in arthropods-the odorant receptor (OR), gustatory receptor (GR), and ionotropic receptor (IR) families-occurred at the base of the Insecta, Animalia, and Protostomia, respectively. Comparison of receptor family sizes across arthropods reveals a generally positive correlation with their widely disparate complexity of chemical ecology. Closely related species reveal the ongoing processes of gene family evolution, including gene duplication, divergence, pseudogenization, and loss, that mediate these larger patterns. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-ento-020117-043322DOI Listing
January 2019

Movement Ecology of Pest Helicoverpa: Implications for Ongoing Spread.

Annu Rev Entomol 2019 01 8;64:277-295. Epub 2018 Oct 8.

Centre for Ecology and Conservation, and Environment and Sustainability Institute, University of Exeter, Penryn TR10 9FE, United Kingdom; email:

The recent introduction and spread of Helicoverpa armigera throughout South America highlight the invasiveness and adaptability of moths in the Helicoverpa genus. Long-range movement in three key members, H. armigera, H. Read More

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January 2019
3 Reads

Movement and Demography of At-Risk Butterflies: Building Blocks for Conservation.

Annu Rev Entomol 2019 01 8;64:167-184. Epub 2018 Oct 8.

Tufts University, Medford, Massachusetts 02155, USA.

The number of insect species at risk of population decline and extinction is increasing rapidly. Yet we know almost nothing about the ecology of these species, except for at-risk butterflies. A growing body of literature shows how butterfly vital rates, including demography and movement, are essential for guiding conservation and recovery. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-ento-011118-112204DOI Listing
January 2019
25 Reads

Biology and Control of the Khapra Beetle, Trogoderma granarium, a Major Quarantine Threat to Global Food Security.

Annu Rev Entomol 2019 01 4;64:131-148. Epub 2018 Oct 4.

Department of Entomology, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad 38040, Pakistan; email:

The khapra beetle, Trogoderma granarium, is a voracious feeder of stored products and is considered one of the most important quarantine pests globally. Its ability to survive for long periods under extreme conditions facilitates its spread through international commerce, which has led to invasions of new geographic regions. The khapra beetle is an important quarantine pest for many countries, including the major wheat-producing countries the United States, Canada, Russia, and Australia, and has been classified as one of the 100 worst invasive species worldwide. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-ento-011118-111804DOI Listing
January 2019

Epigenetics in Insects: Genome Regulation and the Generation of Phenotypic Diversity.

Annu Rev Entomol 2019 01 4;64:185-203. Epub 2018 Oct 4.

School of Biological Sciences, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332, USA; email:

Epigenetic inheritance is fundamentally important to cellular differentiation and developmental plasticity. In this review, we provide an introduction to the field of molecular epigenetics in insects. Epigenetic information is passed across cell divisions through the methylation of DNA, the modification of histone proteins, and the activity of noncoding RNAs. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-ento-011118-111914DOI Listing
January 2019

Vectors of Babesiosis.

Annu Rev Entomol 2019 01 1;64:149-165. Epub 2018 Oct 1.

UCD School of Veterinary Medicine, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4, Ireland; email:

Babesiosis, caused by piroplasmid protozoans in the genus Babesia, is arguably the most important vector-borne disease of livestock and companion animals and is growing in importance as a zoonosis. Ixodid ticks were identified as vectors more than a hundred years ago, but the particular tick species transmitting some significant pathogens are still unknown. Moreover, it is only recently that the complexity of the pathogen-tick relationship has been revealed as a result of studies enabled by gene expression and RNA interference methodology. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-ento-011118-111932DOI Listing
January 2019
9 Reads

Invasion Success and Management Strategies for Social Vespula Wasps.

Annu Rev Entomol 2019 01 26;64:51-71. Epub 2018 Sep 26.

Centre for Biodiversity and Biosecurity, School of Biological Sciences, University of Auckland, Auckland 1072, New Zealand; email:

Three species of Vespula have become invasive in Australia, Hawai'i, New Zealand, and North and South America and continue to spread. These social wasp species can achieve high nest densities, and their behavioral plasticity has led to substantial impacts on recipient communities. Ecologically, they affect all trophic levels, restructuring communities and altering resource flows. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-ento-011118-111812DOI Listing
January 2019
4 Reads

The Ecology of Collective Behavior in Ants.

Authors:
Deborah M Gordon

Annu Rev Entomol 2019 01 26;64:35-50. Epub 2018 Sep 26.

Department of Biology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305-5020, USA; email:

Nest choice in Temnothorax spp.; task allocation and the regulation of activity in Pheidole dentata, Pogonomyrmex barbatus, and Atta spp.; and trail networks in Monomorium pharaonis and Cephalotes goniodontus all provide examples of correspondences between the dynamics of the environment and the dynamics of collective behavior. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-ento-011118-111923DOI Listing
January 2019

Development of Baits for Population Management of Subterranean Termites.

Authors:
Nan-Yao Su

Annu Rev Entomol 2019 01 26;64:115-130. Epub 2018 Sep 26.

Department of Entomology and Nematology, Fort Lauderdale Research and Education Center, University of Florida, Davie, Florida 33314, USA; email:

The objective of bait application envisioned by early researchers was to eliminate the source of infestation, the colony, but because of the lack of adequate evaluation tools, results of field trials with mirex baits in the 1960s were mostly inconclusive. On-the-ground monitoring stations and mark-recapture protocol developed in the 1970s marked the turning point in the field studies of termite baits. Results of field studies with metabolic inhibitors and chitin synthesis inhibitors (CSIs) in the 1990s indicated that a bait toxicant has to be slow-acting and nonrepellent, and its lethal time has to be dose independent. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-ento-011118-112429DOI Listing
January 2019

Locust and Grasshopper Management.

Annu Rev Entomol 2019 01 26;64:15-34. Epub 2018 Sep 26.

Orthopterists' Society, McKellar, ACT 2617, Australia; email:

Locusts and grasshoppers (Orthoptera: Acridoidea) are among the most dangerous agricultural pests. Their control is critical to food security worldwide and often requires governmental or international involvement. Although locust and grasshopper outbreaks are now better controlled and often shorter in duration and reduced in extent, large outbreaks, often promoted by climate change, continue to occur in many parts of the world. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-ento-011118-112500DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

The Discovery of Arthropod-Specific Viruses in Hematophagous Arthropods: An Open Door to Understanding the Mechanisms of Arbovirus and Arthropod Evolution?

Annu Rev Entomol 2018 01;63:87-103

Kansas State University, Manhattan, Kansas 66506-7600; email:

The discovery of an odd virus from hematophagous arthropods 40 years ago by Stollar and Thomas described cell fusing agent virus in cells derived from Aedes aegypti mosquitoes. Then came the report of Kamiti River virus from Ae. macintoshi in 1999, followed by worldwide reports of the discovery of other viruses of mosquitoes, ticks, and midges that replicate only in arthropods and not in vertebrates or in vertebrate cells. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-ento-020117-043033DOI Listing
January 2018
12 Reads

Gustatory Processing in Drosophila melanogaster.

Authors:
Kristin Scott

Annu Rev Entomol 2018 01;63:15-30

Department of Molecular and Cell Biology and Helen Wills Neuroscience Institute, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720; email:

The ability to identify nutrient-rich food and avoid toxic substances is essential for an animal's survival. Although olfaction and vision contribute to food detection, the gustatory system acts as a final checkpoint control for food acceptance or rejection. The vinegar fly Drosophila melanogaster tastes many of the same stimuli as mammals and provides an excellent model system for comparative studies of taste detection. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-ento-020117-043331DOI Listing
January 2018

Neuroparasitology of Parasite-Insect Associations.

Annu Rev Entomol 2018 01;63:471-487

Department of Life Sciences, Ben Gurion University, Beer Sheva 8410501, Israel; email:

Insect behavior can be manipulated by parasites, and in many cases, such manipulation involves the central and peripheral nervous system. Neuroparasitology is an emerging branch of biology that deals with parasites that can control the nervous system of their host. The diversity of parasites that can manipulate insect behavior ranges from viruses to macroscopic worms and also includes other insects that have evolved to become parasites (notably, parasitic wasps). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-ento-020117-043234DOI Listing
January 2018
5 Reads

The Management of Insect Pests in Australian Cotton: An Evolving Story.

Annu Rev Entomol 2018 01;63:215-237

New South Wales Department of Primary Industries, Narellan, New South Wales 2567, Australia; email:

The Australian cotton industry progressively embraced integrated pest management (IPM) to alleviate escalating insecticide resistance issues. A systems IPM approach was used with core principles that were built around pest ecology/biology and insecticide resistance management; together, these were integrated into a flexible, year-round approach that facilitated easy incorporation of new science, strategies, and pests. The approach emphasized both strategic and tactical elements to reduce pest abundance and rationalize decisions about pest control, with insecticides as a last resort. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-ento-020117-043432DOI Listing
January 2018
2 Reads

Tritrophic Interactions Mediated by Herbivore-Induced Plant Volatiles: Mechanisms, Ecological Relevance, and Application Potential.

Annu Rev Entomol 2018 01;63:433-452

Institute of Plant Sciences, University of Bern, 3013 Bern, Switzerland; email:

Tritrophic interactions between plants, herbivores, and their natural enemies are an integral part of all terrestrial ecosystems. Herbivore-induced plant volatiles (HIPVs) play a key role in these interactions, as they can attract predators and parasitoids to herbivore-attacked plants. Thirty years after this discovery, the ecological importance of the phenomena is widely recognized. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-ento-020117-043507DOI Listing
January 2018

Mosquito Immunobiology: The Intersection of Vector Health and Vector Competence.

Annu Rev Entomol 2018 01;63:145-167

Division of Biology, Kansas State University, Manhattan, Kansas 66506; email:

As holometabolous insects that occupy distinct aquatic and terrestrial environments in larval and adult stages and utilize hematophagy for nutrient acquisition, mosquitoes are subjected to a wide variety of symbiotic interactions. Indeed, mosquitoes play host to endosymbiotic, entomopathogenic, and mosquito-borne organisms, including protozoa, viruses, bacteria, fungi, fungal-like organisms, and metazoans, all of which trigger and shape innate infection-response capacity. Depending on the infection or interaction, the mosquito may employ, for example, cellular and humoral immune effectors for septic infections in the hemocoel, humoral infection responses in the midgut lumen, and RNA interference and programmed cell death for intracellular pathogens. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-ento-010715-023530DOI Listing
January 2018
2 Reads

Preface: Valedictory from a Gadfly Grammarian.

Authors:
May R Berenbaum

Annu Rev Entomol 2018 01;63:v-ix

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-en-63-121917-100001DOI Listing
January 2018

Neonicotinoids and Other Insect Nicotinic Receptor Competitive Modulators: Progress and Prospects.

Authors:
John E Casida

Annu Rev Entomol 2018 01;63:125-144

Environmental Chemistry and Toxicology Laboratory, Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720; email:

Neonicotinoids (neonics) are remarkably effective as plant systemics to control sucking insects and for flea control on dogs and cats. The nitroimines imidacloprid, clothianidin, thiamethoxam, and dinotefuran are the leaders among the seven commercial neonics that also include the nitromethylene nitenpyram, the nitromethylene-derived cycloxaprid, and the cyanoimines acetamiprid and thiacloprid. Honey bees are highly sensitive to the nitroimines and nitromethylenes, but the cyanoimines are less toxic. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-ento-020117-043042DOI Listing
January 2018

Phylogeny and Evolution of Neuropterida: Where Have Wings of Lace Taken Us?

Annu Rev Entomol 2018 01;63:531-551

Division of Entomology, Natural History Museum, Lawrence, Kansas 66045-4415, USA; email: ,

The last 25 years of phylogenetic investigation into the three orders constituting the superorder Neuropterida-Raphidioptera, Megaloptera, and Neuroptera-have brought about a dramatic revision in our understanding of the evolution of lacewings, snakeflies, dobsonflies, and their diverse relatives. Phylogenetic estimations based on combined analyses of diverse data sources, ranging from adult and larval morphology to full mitochondrial genomic DNA, have begun to converge on similar patterns, many times in accordance with hypotheses put forth by Cyril Withycombe nearly a century ago. These data, in combination with information from the fossil record, have given a revised perspective on the historical evolution and classification of Neuropterida, necessitating an overhaul of their organization and providing focus and insight on fruitful future efforts for neuropterology. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-ento-020117-043127DOI Listing
January 2018
1 Read

The Evolution and Metamorphosis of Arthropod Proteomics and Genomics.

Authors:
Judith H Willis

Annu Rev Entomol 2018 01;63:1-13

Department of Cellular Biology, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602; email:

This article presents an overview of the development of techniques for analyzing cuticular proteins (CPs), their transcripts, and their genes over the past 50 years based primarily on experience in the laboratory of J.H. Willis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-ento-020117-043447DOI Listing
January 2018

Health Hazards Associated with Arthropod Infestation of Stored Products.

Annu Rev Entomol 2018 01;63:553-573

San Joaquin Valley Agricultural Sciences Center, Agricultural Research Service, US Department of Agriculture, Parlier, California 93648-9757, USA; email:

Insects and mites are common inhabitants and accidental invaders of food, including durable commodities, and their presence can have both direct and indirect effects on human health. The most common direct effect is contamination of food with arthropod fragments and related contaminants, which may be allergenic or even carcinogenic. The most important indirect effect is that their presence can change the storage microenvironment, making durable products suitable for the rapid development of fungi and other microorganisms. Read More

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http://www.annualreviews.org/doi/10.1146/annurev-ento-020117
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-ento-020117-043218DOI Listing
January 2018
9 Reads

Entomological Opportunities and Challenges for Sustainable Viticulture in a Global Market.

Annu Rev Entomol 2018 01;63:193-214

Technological Transfer Center, Fondazione Edmund Mach, San Michele all'Adige, Trento 38010, Italy; email:

Viticulture has experienced dramatic global growth in acreage and value. As the international exchange of goods has increased, so too has the market demand for sustainably produced products. Both elements redefine the entomological challenges posed to viticulture and have stimulated significant advances in arthropod pest control programs. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-ento-010715-023547DOI Listing
January 2018

Impact of the Invasive Brown Marmorated Stink Bug in North America and Europe: History, Biology, Ecology, and Management.

Annu Rev Entomol 2018 01 25;63:599-618. Epub 2017 Oct 25.

Department of Entomology, Rutgers University, Bridgeton, New Jersey 08302, USA; email:

The brown marmorated stink bug (BMSB), Halyomorpha halys (Stål), is an invasive pentatomid introduced from Asia into the United States, Canada, multiple European countries, and Chile. In 2010, BMSB populations in the mid-Atlantic United States reached outbreak levels and subsequent feeding severely damaged tree fruit as well as other crops. Significant nuisance issues from adults overwintering inside homes were common. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-ento-020117-043226DOI Listing
January 2018

Correlates and Consequences of Worker Polymorphism in Ants.

Annu Rev Entomol 2018 01 25;63:575-598. Epub 2017 Oct 25.

Program in Ecology, Evolution and Conservation Biology, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801, USA; email:

Body size is a key life-history trait influencing all aspects of an organism's biology. Ants provide an interesting model for examining body-size variation because of the high degree of worker polymorphism seen in many taxa. We review worker-size variation in ants from the perspective of factors internal and external to the colony that may influence body-size distributions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-ento-020117-043357DOI Listing
January 2018
1 Read

Entomological Collections in the Age of Big Data.

Annu Rev Entomol 2018 01 20;63:513-530. Epub 2017 Oct 20.

Department of Science and Education, Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago, Illinois 60605, USA; email:

With a million described species and more than half a billion preserved specimens, the large scale of insect collections is unequaled by those of any other group. Advances in genomics, collection digitization, and imaging have begun to more fully harness the power that such large data stores can provide. These new approaches and technologies have transformed how entomological collections are managed and utilized. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-ento-031616-035536DOI Listing
January 2018
4 Reads

Regulatory Pathways Controlling Female Insect Reproduction.

Annu Rev Entomol 2018 01 20;63:489-511. Epub 2017 Oct 20.

Department of Entomology, Institute for Integrative Genome Biology, and Center for Disease Vector Research, University of California, Riverside, California 92521, USA; email: , ,

The synthesis of vitellogenin and its uptake by maturing oocytes during egg maturation are essential for successful female reproduction. These events are regulated by the juvenile hormones and ecdysteroids and by the nutritional signaling pathway regulated by neuropeptides. Juvenile hormones act as gonadotropins, regulating vitellogenesis in most insects, but ecdysteroids control this process in Diptera and some Hymenoptera and Lepidoptera. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-ento-020117-043258DOI Listing
January 2018
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Systematics, Biology, and Evolution of Microgastrine Parasitoid Wasps.

Annu Rev Entomol 2018 01 20;63:389-406. Epub 2017 Oct 20.

Canadian National Collection of Insects, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0C6, Canada; email:

The braconid parasitoid wasp subfamily Microgastrinae is perhaps the most species-rich subfamily of animals on Earth. Despite their small size, they are familiar to agriculturalists and field ecologists alike as one of the principal groups of natural enemies of caterpillars feeding on plants. Their abundance and nearly ubiquitous terrestrial distribution, their intricate interactions with host insects, and their historical association with mutualistic polydnaviruses have all contributed to Microgastrinae becoming a key group of organisms for studying parasitism, parasitoid genomics, and mating biology. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-ento-020117-043405DOI Listing
January 2018
2 Reads

Advances in Attract-and-Kill for Agricultural Pests: Beyond Pheromones.

Annu Rev Entomol 2018 01 20;63:453-470. Epub 2017 Oct 20.

Fruit and Vegetable Insect Research Unit, Agricultural Research Service, US Department of Agriculture, Wapato, Washington 98951, USA; email:

Attract-and-kill has considerable potential as a tactic in integrated management of pests of agricultural crops, but the use of sex pheromones as attractants is limited by male multiple mating and immigration of mated females into treated areas. Attractants for both sexes, and particularly females, would minimize these difficulties. Volatile compounds derived from plants or fermentation of plant products can attract females and have been used in traps for monitoring and control, and in sprayable attract-and-kill formulations or bait stations. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-ento-031616-035040DOI Listing
January 2018
2 Reads

Management of Western North American Bark Beetles with Semiochemicals.

Annu Rev Entomol 2018 01 20;63:407-432. Epub 2017 Oct 20.

USDA Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station, Davis, California, 95618, USA; email: , ,

We summarize the status of semiochemical-based management of the major bark beetle species in western North America. The conifer forests of this region have a long history of profound impacts by phloem-feeding bark beetles, and species such as the mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae) and the spruce beetle (D. rufipennis) have recently undergone epic outbreaks linked to changing climate. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-ento-020117-043339DOI Listing
January 2018
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Alien Invasion: Biology of Philornis Flies Highlighting Philornis downsi, an Introduced Parasite of Galápagos Birds.

Annu Rev Entomol 2018 01 20;63:369-387. Epub 2017 Oct 20.

Department of Biology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112-0840, USA; email:

The muscid genus Philornis comprises approximately 50 described species of flies, nearly all of which are obligate parasites of nestling birds. Philornis species are native to the Neotropics and widely distributed from Florida to Argentina. Most research on this group has focused on P. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-ento-020117-043103DOI Listing
January 2018
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Nutritional Physiology and Ecology of Honey Bees.

Annu Rev Entomol 2018 01 13;63:327-344. Epub 2017 Oct 13.

Department of Entomology, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Rehovot 76100, Israel; email:

Honey bees feed on floral nectar and pollen that they store in their colonies as honey and bee bread. Social division of labor enables the collection of stores of food that are consumed by within-hive bees that convert stored pollen and honey into royal jelly. Royal jelly and other glandular secretions are the primary food of growing larvae and of the queen but are also fed to other colony members. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-ento-020117-043423DOI Listing
January 2018
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Environmental Adaptations, Ecological Filtering, and Dispersal Central to Insect Invasions.

Annu Rev Entomol 2018 01 13;63:345-368. Epub 2017 Oct 13.

Terrestrial Ecology Unit, Department of Biology, Ghent University, B-9090 Ghent, Belgium; email:

Insect invasions, the establishment and spread of nonnative insects in new regions, can have extensive economic and environmental consequences. Increased global connectivity accelerates rates of introductions, while climate change may decrease the barriers to invader species' spread. We follow an individual-level insect- and arachnid-centered perspective to assess how the process of invasion is influenced by phenotypic heterogeneity associated with dispersal and stress resistance, and their coupling, across the multiple steps of the invasion process. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-ento-020117-043315DOI Listing
January 2018

Functional Hypoxia in Insects: Definition, Assessment, and Consequences for Physiology, Ecology, and Evolution.

Annu Rev Entomol 2018 01 6;63:303-325. Epub 2017 Oct 6.

Department of Animal Ecology and Ecophysiology, Radboud University, Nijmegen, Netherlands; email:

Insects can experience functional hypoxia, a situation in which O supply is inadequate to meet oxygen demand. Assessing when functional hypoxia occurs is complex, because responses are graded, age and tissue dependent, and compensatory. Here, we compare information gained from metabolomics and transcriptional approaches and by manipulation of the partial pressure of oxygen. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-ento-020117-043145DOI Listing
January 2018
8 Reads

Anthropogenic Impacts on Mortality and Population Viability of the Monarch Butterfly.

Annu Rev Entomol 2018 01 4;63:277-302. Epub 2017 Oct 4.

Department of Biological Sciences, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, Michigan 49008; email:

Monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) are familiar herbivores of milkweeds of the genus Asclepias, and most monarchs migrate each year to locate these host plants across North American ecosystems now dominated by agriculture. Eastern migrants overwinter in high-elevation forests in Mexico, and western monarchs overwinter in trees on the coast of California. Both populations face three primary threats to their viability: (a) loss of milkweed resources for larvae due to genetically modified crops, pesticides, and fertilizers; (b) loss of nectar resources from flowering plants; and (c) degraded overwintering forest habitats due to commercially motivated deforestation and other economic activities. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-ento-020117-043241DOI Listing
January 2018
3 Reads

The Psychology of Superorganisms: Collective Decision Making by Insect Societies.

Annu Rev Entomol 2018 01 4;63:259-275. Epub 2017 Oct 4.

School of Life Sciences, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287, USA; email:

Under the superorganism concept, insect societies are so tightly integrated that they possess features analogous to those of single organisms, including collective cognition. If so, colony function might fruitfully be studied using methods developed to understand individual animals. Here, we review research that uses psychological approaches to understand decision making by colonies. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-ento-020117-043249DOI Listing
January 2018
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Ecology, Worldwide Spread, and Management of the Invasive South American Tomato Pinworm, Tuta absoluta: Past, Present, and Future.

Annu Rev Entomol 2018 01 4;63:239-258. Epub 2017 Oct 4.

INRA (French National Institute for Agricultural Research), University of Côte d'Azur, CNRS, UMR 1355-7254, 06903 Sophia Antipolis, France; email:

The South American tomato pinworm, Tuta absoluta (Meyrick), is native to the western Neotropics. After invading Spain in 2006, it spread rapidly throughout Afro-Eurasia and has become a major threat to world tomato production. Integrated pest management (IPM) strategies have been developed, but widespread insecticide use has caused selection for insecticide resistance as well as undesirable effects on key beneficial arthropods. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-ento-031616-034933DOI Listing
January 2018
32 Reads

Insect-Borne Plant Pathogens and Their Vectors: Ecology, Evolution, and Complex Interactions.

Annu Rev Entomol 2018 01 2;63:169-191. Epub 2017 Oct 2.

Department of Forest and Rangeland Stewardship, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado 80523-1472; email:

The transmission of insect-borne plant pathogens, including viruses, bacteria, phytoplasmas, and fungi depends upon the abundance and behavior of their vectors. These pathogens should therefore be selected to influence their vectors to enhance their transmission, either indirectly, through the infected host plant, or directly, after acquisition of the pathogen by the vector. Accumulating evidence provides partial support for the occurrence of vector manipulation by plant pathogens, especially for plant viruses, for which a theoretical framework can explain patterns in the specific effects on vector behavior and performance depending on their modes of transmission. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-ento-020117-043119DOI Listing
January 2018
64 Reads

Social Immunity: Emergence and Evolution of Colony-Level Disease Protection.

Annu Rev Entomol 2018 01 25;63:105-123. Epub 2017 Sep 25.

IST Austria (Institute of Science and Technology Austria), Klosterneuburg 3400, Austria; email: ,

Social insect colonies have evolved many collectively performed adaptations that reduce the impact of infectious disease and that are expected to maximize their fitness. This colony-level protection is termed social immunity, and it enhances the health and survival of the colony. In this review, we address how social immunity emerges from its mechanistic components to produce colony-level disease avoidance, resistance, and tolerance. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-ento-020117-043110DOI Listing
January 2018
24 Reads