831 results match your criteria Annual Review Of Entomology[Journal]


Preface.

Authors:
John Trumble

Annu Rev Entomol 2020 01;65:v-vi

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-en-65-110219-100001DOI Listing
January 2020

Balancing Disturbance and Conservation in Agroecosystems to Improve Biological Control.

Annu Rev Entomol 2020 01;65:81-100

Department of Entomology, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey 08901, USA; email:

Disturbances associated with agricultural intensification reduce our ability to achieve sustainable crop production. These disturbances stem from crop-management tactics and can leave crop fields more vulnerable to insect outbreaks, in part because natural-enemy communities often tend to be more susceptible to disturbance than herbivorous pests. Recent research has explored practices that conserve natural-enemy communities and reduce pest outbreaks, revealing that different components of agroecosystems can influence natural-enemy populations. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-ento-011019-025143DOI Listing
January 2020

Influence of Nesting Characteristics on Health of Wild Bee Communities.

Annu Rev Entomol 2020 01;65:39-56

Department of Entomology, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801, USA; email:

Nest site availability and quality are important for maintaining robust populations and communities of wild bees. However, for most species, nesting traits and nest site conditions are poorly known, limiting both our understanding of basic ecology for bee species and conservation efforts. Additionally, many of the threats commonly associated with reducing bee populations have effects that can extend into nests but are largely unstudied. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-ento-011019-024955DOI Listing
January 2020

Insect Declines in the Anthropocene.

Authors:
David L Wagner

Annu Rev Entomol 2020 01 14;65:457-480. Epub 2019 Oct 14.

Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut 06269, USA; email:

Insect declines are being reported worldwide for flying, ground, and aquatic lineages. Most reports come from western and northern Europe, where the insect fauna is well-studied and there are considerable demographic data for many taxonomically disparate lineages. Additional cases of faunal losses have been noted from Asia, North America, the Arctic, the Neotropics, and elsewhere. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-ento-011019-025151DOI Listing
January 2020

Global Trends in Bumble Bee Health.

Annu Rev Entomol 2020 01 14;65:209-232. Epub 2019 Oct 14.

School of Biological Sciences, Illinois State University, Normal, Illinois 61790, USA; email:

Bumble bees () are unusually important pollinators, with approximately 260 wild species native to all biogeographic regions except sub-Saharan Africa, Australia, and New Zealand. As they are vitally important in natural ecosystems and to agricultural food production globally, the increase in reports of declining distribution and abundance over the past decade has led to an explosion of interest in bumble bee population decline. We summarize data on the threat status of wild bumble bee species across biogeographic regions, underscoring regions lacking assessment data. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-ento-011118-111847DOI Listing
January 2020

Non-Bee Insects as Visitors and Pollinators of Crops: Biology, Ecology, and Management.

Annu Rev Entomol 2020 01 14;65:391-407. Epub 2019 Oct 14.

Department of Biology, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742, USA.

Insects other than bees (i.e., non-bees) have been acknowledged as important crop pollinators, but our understanding of which crop plants they visit and how effective they are as crop pollinators is limited. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-ento-011019-025055DOI Listing
January 2020

Pesticide-Induced Planthopper Population Resurgence in Rice Cropping Systems.

Annu Rev Entomol 2020 01 14;65:409-429. Epub 2019 Oct 14.

Biological Control of Insects Research Laboratory, US Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Columbia, Missouri 65203, USA.

Planthoppers are serious rice pests in Asia. Their population resurgence was first reported in the early 1960s, caused mainly by insecticides that indiscriminately killed beneficial arthropods and target pests. The subsequent resurgence involved two mechanisms, the loss of beneficial insects and insecticide-enhanced planthopper reproduction. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-ento-011019-025215DOI Listing
January 2020
13.731 Impact Factor

Mechanisms, Applications, and Challenges of Insect RNA Interference.

Annu Rev Entomol 2020 01 14;65:293-311. Epub 2019 Oct 14.

Department of Entomology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40546, USA; email:

The RNA interference (RNAi) triggered by short/small interfering RNA (siRNA) was discovered in nematodes and found to function in most living organisms. RNAi has been widely used as a research tool to study gene functions and has shown great potential for the development of novel pest management strategies. RNAi is highly efficient and systemic in coleopterans but highly variable or inefficient in many other insects. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-ento-011019-025224DOI Listing
January 2020

Ecology and Evolution of Insect-Fungus Mutualisms.

Annu Rev Entomol 2020 01 14;65:431-455. Epub 2019 Oct 14.

Sustainable Perennial Crops Laboratory, United States Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Beltsville, Maryland 20705, USA; email:

The evolution of a mutualism requires reciprocal interactions whereby one species provides a service that the other species cannot perform or performs less efficiently. Services exchanged in insect-fungus mutualisms include nutrition, protection, and dispersal. In ectosymbioses, which are the focus of this review, fungi can be consumed by insects or can degrade plant polymers or defensive compounds, thereby making a substrate available to insects. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-ento-011019-024910DOI Listing
January 2020

Resistance to the Fumigant Phosphine and Its Management in Insect Pests of Stored Products: A Global Perspective.

Annu Rev Entomol 2020 01 14;65:333-350. Epub 2019 Oct 14.

School of Biological Sciences, University of Queensland, St Lucia, Brisbane, Queensland 4072, Australia; email:

Development of resistance in major grain insect pest species to the key fumigant phosphine (hydrogen phosphide) across the globe has put the viability and sustainability of phosphine in jeopardy. The resistance problem has been aggravated over the past two decades, due mostly to the lack of suitable alternatives matching the major attributes of phosphine, including its low price, ease of application, proven effectiveness against a broad pest spectrum, compatibility with most storage conditions, and international acceptance as a residue-free treatment. In this review, we critically analyze the published literature in the area of phosphine resistance with special emphasis on the methods available for detection of resistance, the genetic basis of resistance development, key management strategies, and research gaps that need to be addressed. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-ento-011019-025047DOI Listing
January 2020

Ecology of .

Annu Rev Entomol 2020 01 10;65:351-372. Epub 2019 Oct 10.

Department of Infectious Disease and Global Health and New England Regional Biosafety Laboratory, Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine, Tufts University, North Grafton, Massachusetts 01536, USA; email:

Tularemia is a Holarctic zoonosis caused by the gamma proteobacterium and is considered to be a vector-borne disease. In many regions, human risk is associated with the bites of flies, mosquitoes, or ticks. But the biology of the agent is such that risk may be fomite related, and large outbreaks can occur due to inhalation or ingestion of contaminated materials. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-ento-011019-025134DOI Listing
January 2020
1 Read

Insect Sterol Nutrition: Physiological Mechanisms, Ecology, and Applications.

Annu Rev Entomol 2020 01 10;65:251-271. Epub 2019 Oct 10.

Department of Entomology, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas 77843, USA; email:

Insects, like all eukaryotes, require sterols for structural and metabolic purposes. However, insects, like all arthropods, cannot make sterols. Cholesterol is the dominant tissue sterol for most insects; insect herbivores produce cholesterol by metabolizing phytosterols, but not always with high efficiency. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-ento-011019-025017DOI Listing
January 2020

A Life's Journey Through Insect Metamorphosis.

Authors:
Lynn M Riddiford

Annu Rev Entomol 2020 01 10;65:1-16. Epub 2019 Oct 10.

Friday Harbor Laboratories, University of Washington, Friday Harbor, Washington 98250, USA; email:

This autobiographical article describes the research career of Lynn M. Riddiford from its early beginnings in a summer program for high school students at Jackson Laboratory to the present "retirement" at the Friday Harbor Laboratories. The emphasis is on her forays into many areas of insect endocrinology, supported by her graduate students and postdoctoral associates. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-ento-011019-025103DOI Listing
January 2020

The Global Expansion of Dengue: How Mosquitoes Enabled the First Pandemic Arbovirus.

Annu Rev Entomol 2020 01 8;65:191-208. Epub 2019 Oct 8.

Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98121, USA; email:

Dengue is an emerging viral disease principally transmitted by the () mosquito. It is one of the fastest-growing global infectious diseases, with 100-400 million new infections a year, and is now entrenched in a growing number of tropical megacities. Behind this rapid rise is the simple adaptation of to a new entomological niche carved out by human habitation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-ento-011019-024918DOI Listing
January 2020

Botanical Insecticides in the Twenty-First Century-Fulfilling Their Promise?

Authors:
Murray B Isman

Annu Rev Entomol 2020 01 8;65:233-249. Epub 2019 Oct 8.

Faculty of Land and Food Systems, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 1Z4, Canada; email:

Academic interest in plant natural products with insecticidal properties has continued to grow in the past 20 years, while commercialization of new botanical insecticides and market expansion of existing botanicals has lagged considerably behind. Insecticides based on pyrethrum and neem (azadirachtin) continue to be standard bearers in this class of pesticides, but globally, their increased presence is largely a consequence of introduction into new jurisdictions. Insecticides based on plant essential oils are just beginning to emerge as useful plant protectants. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-ento-011019-025010DOI Listing
January 2020

Dormancy, Diapause, and the Role of the Circadian System in Insect Photoperiodism.

Authors:
David S Saunders

Annu Rev Entomol 2020 01 8;65:373-389. Epub 2019 Oct 8.

University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH8 9YL, United Kingdom; email:

Whole-animal experiments devised to investigate possible association between photoperiodic time measurement and the circadian system (Bünning's hypothesis) are compared with more recent molecular investigations of circadian clock genes. In and some other species, experimental cycles of light and darkness revealed a photoperiodic oscillator, set to constant phase at dusk and measuring night length repeatedly during extended periods of darkness. In some species, however, extreme dampening revealed an unrepetitive (i. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-ento-011019-025116DOI Listing
January 2020

Insect-Resistant Genetically Engineered Crops in China: Development, Application, and Prospects for Use.

Annu Rev Entomol 2020 01 8;65:273-292. Epub 2019 Oct 8.

State Key Laboratory for Biology of Plant Diseases and Insect Pests, Institute for Plant Protection, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Beijing 100193, China; email:

With 20% of the world's population but just 7% of the arable land, China has invested heavily in crop biotechnology to increase agricultural productivity. We examine research on insect-resistant genetically engineered (IRGE) crops in China, including strategies to promote their sustainable use. IRGE cotton, rice, and corn lines have been developed and proven efficacious for controlling lepidopteran crop pests. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-ento-011019-025039DOI Listing
January 2020

Versatile and Dynamic Symbioses Between Insects and Bacteria.

Annu Rev Entomol 2020 01 8;65:145-170. Epub 2019 Oct 8.

Institute of Organismic and Molecular Evolution, Evolutionary Ecology, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, 55128 Mainz, Germany; email:

Symbiotic associations with microorganisms represent major sources of ecological and evolutionary innovations in insects. Multiple insect taxa engage in symbioses with bacteria of the genus a diverse group that is widespread across different environments and whose members can be mutualistic or pathogenic to plants, fungi, and animals. symbionts provide nutritional benefits and resistance against insecticides to stinkbugs, defend beetle eggs against pathogenic fungi, and may be involved in nitrogen metabolism in ants. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-ento-011019-025025DOI Listing
January 2020

Chikungunya Virus: Role of Vectors in Emergence from Enzootic Cycles.

Annu Rev Entomol 2020 01 8;65:313-332. Epub 2019 Oct 8.

Medical Entomology Unit, Institut Pasteur Dakar, B.P. 220 Dakar, Senegal.

Chikungunya virus (CHIKV), a re-emerging mosquito-borne arbovirus, has caused millions of cases of severe, often chronic arthralgia during recent outbreaks. In Africa, circulation in sylvatic, enzootic cycles involves several species of arboreal mosquito vectors that transmit among diverse nonhuman primates and possibly other amplifying hosts. Most disease occurs when CHIKV emerges into a human-amplified cycle involving and sometimes transmission and extensive spread via travelers. Read More

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https://www.annualreviews.org/doi/10.1146/annurev-ento-01101
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-ento-011019-025207DOI Listing
January 2020
2 Reads

Microbial Symbionts of Parasitoids.

Annu Rev Entomol 2020 01 7;65:171-190. Epub 2019 Oct 7.

Laboratory of Entomology, Wageningen University, 6700 AA Wageningen, The Netherlands; email:

Parasitoids depend on other insects for the development of their offspring. Their eggs are laid in or on a host insect that is consumed during juvenile development. Parasitoids harbor a diversity of microbial symbionts including viruses, bacteria, and fungi. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-ento-011019-024939DOI Listing
January 2020

The Insect Circulatory System: Structure, Function, and Evolution.

Annu Rev Entomol 2020 01 4;65:121-143. Epub 2019 Oct 4.

Department of Integrative Zoology, University of Vienna, 1090 Vienna, Austria; email:

Although the insect circulatory system is involved in a multitude of vital physiological processes, it has gone grossly understudied. This review highlights this critical physiological system by detailing the structure and function of the circulatory organs, including the dorsal heart and the accessory pulsatile organs that supply hemolymph to the appendages. It also emphasizes how the circulatory system develops and ages and how, by means of reflex bleeding and functional integration with the immune system, it supports mechanisms for defense against predators and microbial invaders, respectively. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-ento-011019-025003DOI Listing
January 2020

Sexual Size Dimorphism: Evolution and Perils of Extreme Phenotypes in Spiders.

Annu Rev Entomol 2020 01 1;65:57-80. Epub 2019 Oct 1.

Department of Entomology, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC 20560-0105, USA; email:

Sexual size dimorphism is one of the most striking animal traits, and among terrestrial animals, it is most extreme in certain spider lineages. The most extreme sexual size dimorphism (eSSD) is female biased. eSSD itself is probably an epiphenomenon of gendered evolutionary drivers whose strengths and directions are diverse. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-ento-011019-025032DOI Listing
January 2020

Ecology of Terrestrial Arthropods in Freshwater Wetlands.

Annu Rev Entomol 2020 01 23;65:101-119. Epub 2019 Sep 23.

Northeast Institute of Geography and Agroecology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun, Jillin Province, 130102, P.R. China; email:

The terrestrial arthropod fauna of wetlands has been largely ignored by scientists compared to other ecological elements, yet these organisms are among the most important influences on the ecology of these systems, with the vast majority of the biodiversity in wetlands found among the terrestrial arthropods. Wetlands present a range of habitat for terrestrial arthropods, with unique faunas being associated with soils and ground litter, living-plant substrates, and peatlands. Myriapoda, Araneae, Collembola, Carabidae, Formicidae, and assorted herbivorous Coleoptera and Lepidoptera are the terrestrial arthropod groups that most influence the ecology of wetlands. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-ento-011019-024902DOI Listing
January 2020

Invasion Biology, Ecology, and Management of Western Flower Thrips.

Annu Rev Entomol 2020 01 19;65:17-37. Epub 2019 Sep 19.

North Florida Research and Education Center, University of Florida, Quincy, Florida 32351, USA; email:

Western flower thrips, , first arose as an important invasive pest of many crops during the 1970s-1980s. The tremendous growth in international agricultural trade that developed then fostered the invasiveness of western flower thrips. We examine current knowledge regarding the biology of western flower thrips, with an emphasis on characteristics that contribute to its invasiveness and pest status. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-ento-011019-024947DOI Listing
January 2020
2 Reads

Bee Viruses: Ecology, Pathogenicity, and Impacts.

Annu Rev Entomol 2019 01;64:205-226

Department of Plant Sciences and Plant Pathology and Pollinator Health Center, Montana State University, Bozeman, Montana 59717, USA; email:

Bees-including solitary, social, wild, and managed species-are key pollinators of flowering plant species, including nearly three-quarters of global food crops. Their ecological importance, coupled with increased annual losses of managed honey bees and declines in populations of key wild species, has focused attention on the factors that adversely affect bee health, including viral pathogens. Genomic approaches have dramatically expanded understanding of the diversity of viruses that infect bees, the complexity of their transmission routes-including intergenus transmission-and the diversity of strategies bees have evolved to combat virus infections, with RNA-mediated responses playing a prominent role. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-ento-011118-111942DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

An Unlikely Beginning: A Fortunate Life.

Annu Rev Entomol 2019 01;64:1-13

Department of Entomology, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721, USA; email:

Elizabeth A. Bernays grew up in Australia and studied at the University of Queensland before traveling in Europe and teaching high school in London. She later obtained a PhD in entomology at London University. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-ento-011118-111820DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Blueberry IPM: Past Successes and Future Challenges.

Annu Rev Entomol 2019 01;64:95-114

Department of Entomology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824, USA; email:

Blueberry is a crop native to North America with expanding production and consumption worldwide. In the historical regions of production, integrated pest management (IPM) programs have been developed and provided effective control of key insect pests. These have integrated monitoring programs with physical, cultural, biological, behavioral, and chemical controls to meet the intense demands of consumers and modern food systems. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-ento-011118-112147DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Life and Death at the Voltage-Sensitive Sodium Channel: Evolution in Response to Insecticide Use.

Authors:
Jeffrey G Scott

Annu Rev Entomol 2019 01;64:243-257

Department of Entomology, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853, USA; email:

The voltage-sensitive sodium channel (VSSC) is a critical component of the insect nervous system. Pyrethroids and DDT are insecticides that have been widely used, and they kill insects by perturbations of the VSSC. Decades of insecticide use selected for mutations in Vssc that give rise to resistance in almost all pest insects. Read More

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https://www.annualreviews.org/doi/10.1146/annurev-ento-01111
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-ento-011118-112420DOI Listing
January 2019
24 Reads

Water Beetles as Models in Ecology and Evolution.

Annu Rev Entomol 2019 01;64:359-377

Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology; and Division of Entomology, Biodiversity Institute, University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas 66045, USA; email:

Beetles have colonized water many times during their history, with some of these events involving extensive evolutionary radiations and multiple transitions between land and water. With over 13,000 described species, they are one of the most diverse macroinvertebrate groups in most nonmarine aquatic habitats and occur on all continents except Antarctica. A combination of wide geographical and ecological range and relatively accessible taxonomy makes these insects an excellent model system for addressing a variety of questions in ecology and evolution. Read More

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https://www.annualreviews.org/doi/10.1146/annurev-ento-01111
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-ento-011118-111829DOI Listing
January 2019
36 Reads

Preface.

Authors:
Angela E Douglas

Annu Rev Entomol 2019 01;64:v-vii

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https://www.annualreviews.org/doi/10.1146/annurev-en-64-1030
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-en-64-103018-100001DOI Listing
January 2019
10 Reads

Invasive Cereal Aphids of North America: Ecology and Pest Management.

Annu Rev Entomol 2019 01 29;64:73-93. Epub 2018 Oct 29.

Wheat, Peanut, and Other Field Crops Research Unit, USDA-ARS, Stillwater, Oklahoma 74075, USA; email:

Aphid invasions of North American cereal crops generally have started with colonization of a new region or crop, followed by range expansion and outbreaks that vary in frequency and scale owing to geographically variable influences. To improve understanding of this process and management, we compare the invasion ecology of and management response to three cereal aphids: sugarcane aphid, Russian wheat aphid, and greenbug. The region exploited is determined primarily by climate and host plant availability. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-ento-011118-111838DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Phylogeography of Ticks (Acari: Ixodida).

Annu Rev Entomol 2019 01 24;64:379-397. Epub 2018 Oct 24.

Department of Evolution, Ecology, and Organismal Biology and Museum of Biological Diversity, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43212, USA.

Improved understanding of tick phylogeny has allowed testing of some biogeographical patterns. On the basis of both literature data and a meta-analysis of available sequence data, there is strong support for a Gondwanan origin of Ixodidae, and probably Ixodida. A particularly strong pattern is observed for the genus Amblyomma, which appears to have originated in Antarctica/southern South America, with subsequent dispersal to Australia. Read More

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https://www.annualreviews.org/doi/10.1146/annurev-ento-02011
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-ento-020117-043027DOI Listing
January 2019
24 Reads

Systematics, Phylogeny, and Evolution of Braconid Wasps: 30 Years of Progress.

Annu Rev Entomol 2019 01 17;64:335-358. Epub 2018 Oct 17.

Department of Terrestrial Zoology, Naturalis Biodiversity Center, 2300 RA Leiden, The Netherlands; email:

The parasitoid wasp family Braconidae is likely the second-most species-rich family in the animal kingdom. Braconid wasps are widely distributed and often encountered. They constitute one of the principal groups of natural enemies of phytophagous insects, of which many are serious pest species. Read More

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https://www.annualreviews.org/doi/10.1146/annurev-ento-01111
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-ento-011118-111856DOI Listing
January 2019
4 Reads

Molecular Mechanisms of Wing Polymorphism in Insects.

Annu Rev Entomol 2019 01 12;64:297-314. Epub 2018 Oct 12.

State Key Laboratory of Rice Biology, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058, China.

Many insects are capable of developing into either long-winged or short-winged (or wingless) morphs, which enables them to rapidly match heterogeneous environments. Thus, the wing polymorphism is an adaptation at the root of their ecological success. Wing polymorphism is orchestrated at various levels, starting with the insect's perception of environmental cues, then signal transduction and signal execution, and ultimately the transmitting of signals into physiological adaption in accordance with the particular morph produced. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-ento-011118-112448DOI Listing
January 2019
5 Reads

Nonreproductive Effects of Insect Parasitoids on Their Hosts.

Annu Rev Entomol 2019 01 12;64:259-276. Epub 2018 Oct 12.

Instituto Valenciano de Investigaciones Agrarias, 46113 Valencia, Spain; email: ,

The main modes of action of insect parasitoids are considered to be killing their hosts with egg laying followed by offspring development (reproductive mortality), and adults feeding on hosts directly (host feeding). However, parasitoids can also negatively affect their hosts in ways that do not contribute to current or future parasitoid reproduction (nonreproductive effects). Outcomes of nonreproductive effects for hosts can include death, altered behavior, altered reproduction, and altered development. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-ento-011118-111753DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Fat Body Biology in the Last Decade.

Annu Rev Entomol 2019 01 12;64:315-333. Epub 2018 Oct 12.

Guangzhou Key Laboratory of Insect Development Regulation and Application Research, Institute of Insect Science and Technology, School of Life Sciences, South China Normal University, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510631, China; email: , ,

The insect fat body is analogous to vertebrate adipose tissue and liver. In this review, the new and exciting advancements made in fat body biology in the last decade are summarized. Controlled by hormonal and nutritional signals, insect fat body cells undergo mitosis during embryogenesis, endoreplication during the larval stages, and remodeling during metamorphosis and regulate reproduction in adults. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-ento-011118-112007DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Molecular Evolution of the Major Arthropod Chemoreceptor Gene Families.

Authors:
Hugh M Robertson

Annu Rev Entomol 2019 01 12;64:227-242. Epub 2018 Oct 12.

Department of Entomology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801, USA; email:

The evolutionary origins of the three major families of chemoreceptors in arthropods-the odorant receptor (OR), gustatory receptor (GR), and ionotropic receptor (IR) families-occurred at the base of the Insecta, Animalia, and Protostomia, respectively. Comparison of receptor family sizes across arthropods reveals a generally positive correlation with their widely disparate complexity of chemical ecology. Closely related species reveal the ongoing processes of gene family evolution, including gene duplication, divergence, pseudogenization, and loss, that mediate these larger patterns. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-ento-020117-043322DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Movement Ecology of Pest Helicoverpa: Implications for Ongoing Spread.

Annu Rev Entomol 2019 01 8;64:277-295. Epub 2018 Oct 8.

Centre for Ecology and Conservation, and Environment and Sustainability Institute, University of Exeter, Penryn TR10 9FE, United Kingdom; email:

The recent introduction and spread of Helicoverpa armigera throughout South America highlight the invasiveness and adaptability of moths in the Helicoverpa genus. Long-range movement in three key members, H. armigera, H. Read More

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https://www.annualreviews.org/doi/10.1146/annurev-ento-01111
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-ento-011118-111959DOI Listing
January 2019
6 Reads

Movement and Demography of At-Risk Butterflies: Building Blocks for Conservation.

Annu Rev Entomol 2019 01 8;64:167-184. Epub 2018 Oct 8.

Tufts University, Medford, Massachusetts 02155, USA.

The number of insect species at risk of population decline and extinction is increasing rapidly. Yet we know almost nothing about the ecology of these species, except for at-risk butterflies. A growing body of literature shows how butterfly vital rates, including demography and movement, are essential for guiding conservation and recovery. Read More

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https://www.annualreviews.org/doi/10.1146/annurev-ento-01111
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-ento-011118-112204DOI Listing
January 2019
74 Reads

Biology and Control of the Khapra Beetle, Trogoderma granarium, a Major Quarantine Threat to Global Food Security.

Annu Rev Entomol 2019 01 4;64:131-148. Epub 2018 Oct 4.

Department of Entomology, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad 38040, Pakistan; email:

The khapra beetle, Trogoderma granarium, is a voracious feeder of stored products and is considered one of the most important quarantine pests globally. Its ability to survive for long periods under extreme conditions facilitates its spread through international commerce, which has led to invasions of new geographic regions. The khapra beetle is an important quarantine pest for many countries, including the major wheat-producing countries the United States, Canada, Russia, and Australia, and has been classified as one of the 100 worst invasive species worldwide. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-ento-011118-111804DOI Listing
January 2019
2 Reads

Epigenetics in Insects: Genome Regulation and the Generation of Phenotypic Diversity.

Annu Rev Entomol 2019 01 4;64:185-203. Epub 2018 Oct 4.

School of Biological Sciences, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332, USA; email:

Epigenetic inheritance is fundamentally important to cellular differentiation and developmental plasticity. In this review, we provide an introduction to the field of molecular epigenetics in insects. Epigenetic information is passed across cell divisions through the methylation of DNA, the modification of histone proteins, and the activity of noncoding RNAs. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-ento-011118-111914DOI Listing
January 2019
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Vectors of Babesiosis.

Annu Rev Entomol 2019 01 1;64:149-165. Epub 2018 Oct 1.

UCD School of Veterinary Medicine, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4, Ireland; email:

Babesiosis, caused by piroplasmid protozoans in the genus Babesia, is arguably the most important vector-borne disease of livestock and companion animals and is growing in importance as a zoonosis. Ixodid ticks were identified as vectors more than a hundred years ago, but the particular tick species transmitting some significant pathogens are still unknown. Moreover, it is only recently that the complexity of the pathogen-tick relationship has been revealed as a result of studies enabled by gene expression and RNA interference methodology. Read More

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https://www.annualreviews.org/doi/10.1146/annurev-ento-01111
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-ento-011118-111932DOI Listing
January 2019
12 Reads

Invasion Success and Management Strategies for Social Vespula Wasps.

Annu Rev Entomol 2019 01 26;64:51-71. Epub 2018 Sep 26.

Centre for Biodiversity and Biosecurity, School of Biological Sciences, University of Auckland, Auckland 1072, New Zealand; email:

Three species of Vespula have become invasive in Australia, Hawai'i, New Zealand, and North and South America and continue to spread. These social wasp species can achieve high nest densities, and their behavioral plasticity has led to substantial impacts on recipient communities. Ecologically, they affect all trophic levels, restructuring communities and altering resource flows. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-ento-011118-111812DOI Listing
January 2019
5 Reads

The Ecology of Collective Behavior in Ants.

Authors:
Deborah M Gordon

Annu Rev Entomol 2019 01 26;64:35-50. Epub 2018 Sep 26.

Department of Biology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305-5020, USA; email:

Nest choice in Temnothorax spp.; task allocation and the regulation of activity in Pheidole dentata, Pogonomyrmex barbatus, and Atta spp.; and trail networks in Monomorium pharaonis and Cephalotes goniodontus all provide examples of correspondences between the dynamics of the environment and the dynamics of collective behavior. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-ento-011118-111923DOI Listing
January 2019
2 Reads

Development of Baits for Population Management of Subterranean Termites.

Authors:
Nan-Yao Su

Annu Rev Entomol 2019 01 26;64:115-130. Epub 2018 Sep 26.

Department of Entomology and Nematology, Fort Lauderdale Research and Education Center, University of Florida, Davie, Florida 33314, USA; email:

The objective of bait application envisioned by early researchers was to eliminate the source of infestation, the colony, but because of the lack of adequate evaluation tools, results of field trials with mirex baits in the 1960s were mostly inconclusive. On-the-ground monitoring stations and mark-recapture protocol developed in the 1970s marked the turning point in the field studies of termite baits. Results of field studies with metabolic inhibitors and chitin synthesis inhibitors (CSIs) in the 1990s indicated that a bait toxicant has to be slow-acting and nonrepellent, and its lethal time has to be dose independent. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-ento-011118-112429DOI Listing
January 2019
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Locust and Grasshopper Management.

Annu Rev Entomol 2019 01 26;64:15-34. Epub 2018 Sep 26.

Orthopterists' Society, McKellar, ACT 2617, Australia; email:

Locusts and grasshoppers (Orthoptera: Acridoidea) are among the most dangerous agricultural pests. Their control is critical to food security worldwide and often requires governmental or international involvement. Although locust and grasshopper outbreaks are now better controlled and often shorter in duration and reduced in extent, large outbreaks, often promoted by climate change, continue to occur in many parts of the world. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-ento-011118-112500DOI Listing
January 2019
3 Reads

The Discovery of Arthropod-Specific Viruses in Hematophagous Arthropods: An Open Door to Understanding the Mechanisms of Arbovirus and Arthropod Evolution?

Annu Rev Entomol 2018 01;63:87-103

Kansas State University, Manhattan, Kansas 66506-7600; email:

The discovery of an odd virus from hematophagous arthropods 40 years ago by Stollar and Thomas described cell fusing agent virus in cells derived from Aedes aegypti mosquitoes. Then came the report of Kamiti River virus from Ae. macintoshi in 1999, followed by worldwide reports of the discovery of other viruses of mosquitoes, ticks, and midges that replicate only in arthropods and not in vertebrates or in vertebrate cells. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-ento-020117-043033DOI Listing
January 2018
17 Reads

Gustatory Processing in Drosophila melanogaster.

Authors:
Kristin Scott

Annu Rev Entomol 2018 01;63:15-30

Department of Molecular and Cell Biology and Helen Wills Neuroscience Institute, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720; email:

The ability to identify nutrient-rich food and avoid toxic substances is essential for an animal's survival. Although olfaction and vision contribute to food detection, the gustatory system acts as a final checkpoint control for food acceptance or rejection. The vinegar fly Drosophila melanogaster tastes many of the same stimuli as mammals and provides an excellent model system for comparative studies of taste detection. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-ento-020117-043331DOI Listing
January 2018
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Neuroparasitology of Parasite-Insect Associations.

Annu Rev Entomol 2018 01;63:471-487

Department of Life Sciences, Ben Gurion University, Beer Sheva 8410501, Israel; email:

Insect behavior can be manipulated by parasites, and in many cases, such manipulation involves the central and peripheral nervous system. Neuroparasitology is an emerging branch of biology that deals with parasites that can control the nervous system of their host. The diversity of parasites that can manipulate insect behavior ranges from viruses to macroscopic worms and also includes other insects that have evolved to become parasites (notably, parasitic wasps). Read More

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http://www.annualreviews.org/doi/10.1146/annurev-ento-020117
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-ento-020117-043234DOI Listing
January 2018
7 Reads

The Management of Insect Pests in Australian Cotton: An Evolving Story.

Annu Rev Entomol 2018 01;63:215-237

New South Wales Department of Primary Industries, Narellan, New South Wales 2567, Australia; email:

The Australian cotton industry progressively embraced integrated pest management (IPM) to alleviate escalating insecticide resistance issues. A systems IPM approach was used with core principles that were built around pest ecology/biology and insecticide resistance management; together, these were integrated into a flexible, year-round approach that facilitated easy incorporation of new science, strategies, and pests. The approach emphasized both strategic and tactical elements to reduce pest abundance and rationalize decisions about pest control, with insecticides as a last resort. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-ento-020117-043432DOI Listing
January 2018
4 Reads